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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Electric Transmission Right-of-Way Invasive Non-Native Woody Plant Species Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Invasive non-native woody plant species are a significant issue in the United States. Invasive woody plants are a particular concern for electric transmission right-of-way (ROW) managers. While invasive non-native woody plants have beneficial usesincluding erosion control, wildlife food and cover, and use as ornamentalsthey also have a notably negative impact on electric transmission ROWs. Negative impacts include reducing line clearance, reliability, and accessibility, and increasing vegetation manageme...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Final Report Parris Island Depot Invasive Plant Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Recommendations for Control Page 37 a. Chinese tallow tree (Triadicasebifera) Page 37 b. Chinaberry non-native invasive species that have been prioritized for control are Chinese tallow

Bolding, M. Chad

3

EO 13112: Invasive Species  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

183 183 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 25 / Monday, February 8, 1999 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13112 of February 3, 1999 Invasive Species By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990, as amended (16 U.S.C. 4701 et seq.), Lacey Act, as amended (18 U.S.C. 42), Federal Plant Pest Act (7 U.S.C. 150aa et seq.), Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended (7 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.), Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other pertinent statutes, to prevent the introduc- tion of invasive species and provide for their control and to minimize

4

Invasive Species -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Wildlife What's New Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Some of the links on this page are to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) that can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. Non-native plants and animals cause problems for many native species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Protected and relatively undisturbed for the past 60 years, the ORR has changed considerably since 1942 when it was acquired as part of the Manhattan project. At that time about half of the land was cleared and cultivated. Those cleared areas have gradually returned to forest through plantings and natural succession. Now about 70% of the reservation is in mature or maturing native habitats. However, invasive, non-native plants and animals often impact these areas.

5

Invasive Plant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USDANISIC Rosa multiflora Multiflora rose Severe Invasive.org, USDANISIC Sorghum halepense Johnsongrass Severe Invasive.org, USDANISIC Vinca minor Common periwinkle...

6

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

honeysuckle, kudzu) By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree, privet, bamboo) #12;2 Photo

Gray, Matthew

7

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ­ By smothering (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu) ­ By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree

Gray, Matthew

8

For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbaceous crops for bioenergy. Biomass Bioenerg 14:31724.Non-native species and bioenergy: Are we cultivating theniche estimates for bioenergy crops and invasive species of

DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of Non-Native Invasive Plant Species on the United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S.M. Almeida is a notorious invader of roadsides and power transmission line rights-of-way in the southeastern United States, but it is seldom found...

10

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China, Nanjing, China 2 Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China 3 ISPRA ­ Institute for Environmental and Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, China 5 The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic

Kratochvíl, Lukas

11

INITIAL RESPONSE OF INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANT SPECIES TO TIMBER HARVESTING IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY FORESTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The responses of invasive exotic plant species (IES) to silvicultural treatments one growing season after timber harvesting were examined in the Cumberland Plateau region of (more)

Devine, Kevin Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Teller, Brittany Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels in Communities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teller, Brittany 374099 Do Invasive Species Change the Biomass of Dependant Trophic Levels the trophic structure of their invaded territories in terms of biomass. If invasive plant species reduce native plant biomass it is expected that the higher trophic levels that depend on native plants

Knight, Tiffany

13

Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Patterns of Plant Invasions: A Case Example in Native Species Hotspots and Rare Habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land managers require landscape-scale information on where exotic plant species have successfully established, to better guide research, control, and restoration efforts. We evaluated the vulnerability of various habitats to invasion by exotic plant species in a 100,000 ha area in the southeast corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. For the 97 0.1-ha plots in 11 vegetation types, exotic species richness (log 10 ) was strongly negatively correlated to the cover of cryptobiotic soil crusts (r =-0.47, P<0.001), and positively correlated to native species richness (r = 0.22, P<0.03), native species cover (r = 0.23, P<0.05), and total nitrogen in the soil (r = 0.40, P<0.001). Exotic species cover was strongly positively correlated to exotic species richness (r = 0.68, P<0.001). Only 6 of 97 plots did not contain at least one exotic species. Exotic species richness was particularly high in locally rare, mesic vegetation types and nitrogen rich soils. Dry, upland plots (n = 51) had less than half of the exotic species richness and cover compared to plots (n = 45) in washes and lowland depressions that collect water intermittently. Plots dominated by trees had significantly greater native and exotic species richness compared to plots dominated by shrubs. For the 97 plots combined, 33% of the variance in exotic species richness could be explained by a positive relationship with total plant cover, and negative relationships with the cover of cryptobiotic crusts and bare ground. There are several reasons for concern: (1) Exotic plant species are invading hot spots of native plant diversity and rare/unique habitats. (2) The foliar cover of exotic species was greatest in habitats that had been invaded by several exotic species. (3) Continued distu...

Thomas J. Stohlgren; Yuka Otsuki; Cynthia A. Villa; Michelle Lee; Jayne Belnap

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

17

A geographic footprint of boaters entering & departing Lake Powell| Aquatic nuisance species management| Potential distribution of the invasive zebra/quagga mussel into south western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Currently, transoceanic and intercontinental dispersal of the Zebra/Quagga mussel (and many other Aquatic Invasive Species) has already occurred. While there may be countless vectors (more)

Wenzel, Jamie M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake Vander Zanden , Gretchen J.A. Hansen, Scott N. Higgins 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with natural disasters, where disaster preparedness and emergency response plans are the norm, even in casesCommentary Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake. In a response to our article, Horns (2011-this issue) highlights difficulties associated with invasive species

Vander Zanden, Jake

19

Non-native speech perception in adverse conditions: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If listening in adverse conditions is hard, then listening in a foreign language is doubly so: non-native listeners have to cope with both imperfect signals and imperfect knowledge. Comparison of native and non-native listener performance in speech-in-noise ... Keywords: Noise, Non-native, Review, Speech perception

Maria Luisa Garcia Lecumberri; Martin Cooke; Anne Cutler

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE OR NERP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available eledronically from the following source. Available eledronically from the following source. Web s/te: www.doe.gov/bridge Reports are available in paper to the public from the following source. US. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 T-e: 1-800-553-6847 EM//: orders@ ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm 7DD: 703-487-4639 Fa: 703-605-6900 Reports are available in paper to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) representatives, and International Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source. Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: 865-576-8401 €-ma//; reports0 adonis.osti .gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANT CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torpedo Grass CogonGrass Chinese Tallow Japanese Climbing Fern #12;Wide Range of Habitats /Dispersal Mechanisms Barrier Island Sand Dune Flatwood Swamp CHINESE TALLOW CHINESE TALLOW #12;Application Equipment treatments Urban Interface Plantation Cut Stump #12;More Treatments COGON GRASS TALLOW TREES CLIMBING FERN

Watson, Craig A.

22

Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically dominant and economically important invasive species in the United States. This dissertation addresses aspects of the biology, behavior, management, and collection techniques for N. fulva. Specifically, topics investigated include a modified drip technique for extracting ants from their substrate, the effectiveness of a broadcast ant bait as a stand-alone treatment, the foraging preference and peak activity of workers, the reproductive potential of queens, and the ability of this species to translocate pathogenic microorganisms. The primary goal of these works was to better understand the biological idiosyncrasies of this species that may ultimately lead to the mitigation N. fulva populations. A modified drip technique was developed to quickly and efficiently extract N. fulva from their nesting substrates. Ants and their associated substrates were collected in 18.9 L buckets lined with talcum powder and transported to the laboratory. Substrates were weighted down and a cardboard tower was provided for the immigration of ants as they were forced out of substrates with a slow influx of water. Three applications of Advance Carpenter Ant Bait (ACAB) were applied to a N. fulva population in East Columbia, TX. A series of GIS interpolated maps depict achieved management and subsequent rebound of N. fulva populations. As great as 77% population reduction was achieved by 1 week post treatment, but N. fulva populations rebounded within 3-4 weeks. As a stand-alone treatment, this bait did not provide adequate ant management in treatment plots. Diet preference experiments were performed using artificial diets and food lures. These results of these trials indicated that N. fulva preferred the most carbohydrate rich diet offered through all seasons and that mint apple jelly or hot dog slices were the favored food lures. Diel foraging behavior was observed when temperatures were between 9.95 and 37.26 degrees C. Peak foraging activity occurred at 28.24 +/- 3.12 degrees C. A laboratory investigation of N. fulva suggested that as the number of queens increased, individual queen fecundity increased. This phenomenon is a novel observation among ants and suggests an alternative mechanism for intracolony dominance. Hexagyne colony fecundity of 0.25 +/- 0.12 eggs/queen/hr was the maximum fecundity observed. Results of laboratory experiments showed that N. fulva were capable of transferring E. coli up to 4.5 m in 6 hrs after acquisition from a contaminated source. Pyrosequencing of ectomicrobial assemblages revealed a suite of 518 bacteria and 135 fungi species associated with N. fulva, many of which are known pathogens of plants and animals, including humans. These results suggested that N. fulva should be regarded as both a medically and agriculturally important species.

McDonald, Danny 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

24

Comparison of Upper Thermal Tolerances of Native and Nonnative Fish Species in Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a combination of brine shrimp Artemia spp., daphnia Daphnia spp., bloodworms Chironomus spp., spirulina Natural- ist 15:459­464. Morgan, I. J., D. G. McDonald, and C. M. Wood. 2001. The cost of living

Bonar, Scott A.

25

Fertilization with nitrogen and phosphorus increases abundance of non-native species in Hawaiian montane forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the understory plant commu- nity of two montane wet forests in Hawaii. One site occupies a young substrate, where montane forests Rebecca Ostertag1,3,* and Julia H. Verville2,4 1 Department of Botany, University address: Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA; *Author

Ostertag, Rebecca

26

Fly Invasion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasion Invasion Name: Mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Over the past week, out house has been infested with big houseflys! I am killing 10-15 in one swipe! It only tends to be during the day with the light coming through the windows, but it been going on for 3 days now and they just keep coming! Where are they coming from and why are they so huge? I feel like maybe I've been keeping a fithly house, but I know it's clean. Please help me to understand what is going on. This is the first time I have ever seen so many in my house. Replies: Mary Jo, The way to deal with any insect infestation is first to get rid of the adults and then remove the children and the place they will/can develop. Seeing that you are swatting 10-15 per swipe of the adults, you have step one in progress. Continue removing the adults as you find them and you lessen their opportunity for reproduction.

27

Cement invasion  

SciTech Connect

Damage from cement and cement filtrate has been a much discussed subject since set-through-and-perforate completions were first used. Historically, much of the discussion was similar to that for rotary drilling and drilling mud - it would be nice to prevent all damage, but in the real world, some damage must be tolerated to allow the operator to reap the benefits of cementing. The principal perceived formation damage due to cement invasion is seen by the operator as reducing production. The pure idealist requires full potential production under all alternatives, and would to complete all oil and gas wells free of any formation damage. The more practical idealist holds that damage would result in lower production with the completion method he prefers should be prevented. The pragmatic operator compares the cost of preventing damage to the cost of correcting the damage. Even an extremely high damage ratio is academic if the planned stimulation treatment eliminates the influence the cement invasion might have on production. Formations with permeability high enough to yield economical production without some sort of stimulation or cleanup treatment are unlikely to be subject to significant cement filtrate damage.

Sutton, D.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Dynamic Invasive Species Research Vision: Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President Curry Seed and Chile Co. Robert Flynn Soil Scientist NMSU's Extension Plant Sciences Lupe Garcia in Chile Peppers Report 20: Using a Color Sorter to Remove Sticks from Mechanically Harvested Red Chile

USDA, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station

29

Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

Wirmer, Julia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

October 2, 2008: NETL and Zebra mussels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

October 2, 2008The Department announces that DOE-funded researchers have developed an environmentally safe bacterial toxin to control zebra and quagga mussels, two non-native, invasive species that...

31

Impact of disturbance on arthropod community structure: Nutrient enrichment, fire and the invasive Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Invasive species, fire suppression and nutrient deposition, as distinct disturbance factors, have altered Texas prairie communities. Arthropod diversity, abundance, and community composition may be modified (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The politics of invasion : defining and defending the natural, native and legal in the Galpagos Islands of Ecuador.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation analyzes contemporary politics and practices designed to manage species invasions and human population impacts in the Galpagos Islands of Ecuador. Due to the (more)

Brewington, Laura.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo ?.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

34

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The war of the roses: demilitarizing invasion biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demilitarizing invasion biology BMH Larson new socialdemilitarizing invasion biology Brendon MH Larson Biologistsmetaphors within invasion biology. I argue that these

Larson, BMH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Sensitive Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitive Species Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the impact of Laboratory activities on sensitive species, LANL can potentially reduce the possibility of these species being upgraded to federal protection. April 12, 2012 sensitive species The bald eagle is one of our sensitive species. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Sensitive species are plants and animals that are protected at the state or local level. Keeping sensitive species safe We strive to minimize the impact of Laboratory operations on sensitive species, which are plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels.

37

The little fire ant Wasmannia auropunctata: a new invasive species ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

effect also on other ground arthropods, judging from the observed decline ... It is an agricultural pest in ...... tural importance as they reduce agricultural crop pest.

38

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Reservation Invasive Plant Treatment Update All 33,000 acres of the ORR All 33,000 acres of the ORR ORR Invasive Plant Management Plan Surveys and Monitoring ...

39

Exotic Species What's the Problem?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are estimated to cost about $138 billion in environmental damage and losses each year. Non-native plants $100 million annually in damage to water pipes and filtration systems, and in control costs. · Brown-300 power outages/yr, numerous bites of children, etc. #12;What's the Problem? · Melaleuca tree --destroyed

Callender, Craig

40

Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology. Battelle Number(s): ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Non-Invasive Attack Testing Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Invasive Attack Testing Workshop. Purpose: To encourage development of test methods, metrics and tools for evaluating the effectiveness of ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

43

Evolutionary and Ecological Drivers of Invasion in the Annual Thistle, Centaurea melitensis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) populations intrait among invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia populations intrait among invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia populations in

Moroney, Jolene Rene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Ecological and Socio-Economic Impacts of Invasive Alien Species on Island Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 10,000 kg were harvested annually from the black coral beds off Maui and Kauai. During the late 70's from the Philippines and Tonga (Harper, 1988). These sources have filled the demand for low quality in the FMP (Grigg, 1988).For black coral, the combined MSY for beds off Maui and Kauai is 6,250 kg/yr (Grigg

Meyerson, Laura A.

45

Burmese Pythons in South Florida: Scientific Support for Invasive Species Management1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- such as the common boa (Boa constrictor), green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), yellow anaconda (Eunectes notaeus

Mazzotti, Frank

46

INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

´n Biolo´gica de Don~ana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cienti´ficas, Avda Americo Vespucio, 41092, where M. floricola have fighting abilities superior to Anoplolepis gracilipes (which sprays formic acid

Courchamp, Franck

47

Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects  

SciTech Connect

Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Biological invasion-inspired migration in distributed evolutionary algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration strategy plays an important role in designing effective distributed evolutionary algorithms. In this work, a novel migration model inspired to the phenomenon known as biological invasion is devised. The migration strategy is implemented through ... Keywords: Biological invasion, Distributed evolutionary algorithm, Massive migration

I. De Falco; A. Della Cioppa; D. Maisto; U. Scafuri; E. Tarantino

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Identification, Distribution and Control of an Invasive Pest Ant, Paratrechina sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invasive species are capable of causing considerable damage to natural ecosystems, agricultures and economies throughout the world. These invasive species must be identified and adequate control measures should be investigated to prevent and reduce the negative effects associated with exotic species. A recent introduction of an exotic ant, Paratrechina sp. nr. pubens, has caused tremendous economic and ecological damage to southern Texas. Morphometric and phylogenetic procedures were used to identify this pest ant, P. sp. nr. pubens, to Southern Texas. The populations in Texas were found to be slightly different but not discriminating from P. pubens populations described in previous literature. Analysis of the distribution and expansion of P. sp. nr. pubens found numerous geographically discrete populations and moderately expanding territories. These expansion rates were determined to be ~20 and ~30 m per mo for a neighborhood and industrial area, respectively. Several laboratory and field control strategies were implemented for control of this intensely pestiferous species. Dinotefuran exhibited high laboratory efficacy against P. sp. nr. pubens, while treatments using novaluron were inconclusive. The use of expanded-use Termidor? demonstrated trends in these data that suggest it as the treatment of choice. Other field treatments, such as Termidor and Top Choice?, Termidor and Advance Carpenter Ant BaitTM, and Transport? and Talstar? G, did not attain the success found in the expanded-use Termidor treatment. Most treatments examined were determined ineffective against high populations of P. sp. nr. pubens. Additional and more intensive population management regimes should be investigated. Abating further P. sp. nr. pubens population proliferation to other regions will only be realized from additional control research supplemented with state and federal interdiction policies.

Meyers, Jason

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Endangered Species Listing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an Endangered Species Advisory Committee to guide a new research effort to address electric power sector technical issues connected to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listing decisions on hundreds of species over the next several years. EPRI has conducted initial research into the listing process and has reached out to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other stakeholder groups in an effort to establish collegial and cooperative ties and to better understand the research gaps ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species A document listing the tree species included in the 2011 Production Forecast Tom Jenkins Justin Gilbert Ewan Mackie Robert Matthews #12;PF2011 ­ List of tree species The following is the list of species used within the Forecast System. Species are ordered alphabetically

52

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

53

Negative plantsoil feedbacks may limit persistence of an invasive tree due to rapid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: biological invasions; Chinese tallow tree; pathogen accumulation; persistence; plant­soil feedbacks 1

Siemann, Evan

54

Winter Bird Use of the Chinese Tallow Tree in Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) is a non-native invasive tree that is of particular concern in the Southeastern United States. It has become naturalized in a (more)

Baldwin, Michael John

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Scarboro Creek Wetland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Management: Scarboro Creek Wetland * Purple loosestrife was treated with foliar spray of Accord (glyphosphate) by ESD in 2007. Photos by Harry Quarles Invasive Non-native...

56

Why Sequence Methylotenera species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methylotenera species? Methylotenera species? electron micrograph Scanning electron micrograph of cells of Methylotenera mobilis strain JLW8 grown on methylamine. Photo: Dennis Kunkel, Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc. Metabolism of organic C1 compounds (compounds containing no carbon-carbon bonds) is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Methane has been recognized as one of the major C1 compounds in the environment and a major contributor to the greenhouse effect. While global emissions of other C1 compounds (methanol, methylated amines) have historically attracted less attention, recent models put their emissions on a scale similar to the scale of methane emissions. JGI plans to sequence three methylotrophs (degraders of C1 compounds) of the genus Methylotenera. Methylotrophic bacteria play a major role in maintaining the balance of C1

57

Why sequence psychrotolerant Acidithiobacillus species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

techniques for such sites. Principal Investigators: Dopson, Mark Ume University Program: CSP 2010 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence psychrotolerant Acidithiobacillus species...

58

JGI - Why Sequence Polynucleobacter Species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free-Living and Endosymbiotic Polynucleobacter Species? The Polynucleobacter group (Betaproteobacteria, Burkholderiaceae) is of enormous environmental relevance in freshwater...

59

Category:NEPA Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources Resources Jump to: navigation, search Category of resources that could be impacted by activities related to geothermal development. Pages in category "NEPA Resources" The following 39 pages are in this category, out of 39 total. A Access and Transportation Air Quality Areas of Critical Environmental Concern B BLM Sensitive Species C Candidate and Special Status Species Cultural Resources E Economic Values Environmental Justice F Fire Resources Fisheries Resources Floodplains G Geology and Minerals I Induced Seismicity Impact I cont. Intentional Destructive Acts Invasive, Nonnative Species L Lands and Realty Lands with Wilderness Characteristics M Migratory Birds N Native American Concerns Noise P Paleontological Resources Prime or Unique Farmlands Public Health and Safety

60

Microsoft Word - Aquatic_Invasive_Mussels_Monitoring_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovations - ST-3 Innovations - ST-3 Matt DeLong Contract Specialist for Technology Innovation Projects - NSSP-4 Proposed Action: Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Columbia River Basin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to partially fund the expansion of ongoing research and monitoring efforts on the potential spread and impact of aquatic invasive mussels in the Columbia River Basin through BPA's Fiscal Year 2013 Technology Innovation Portfolio. Washington State University Vancouver would conduct the enhanced research and monitoring efforts with co-sponsorship from the U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Abstract Invasive species, where successful, can devas-tate native communities. We studied the dynamics of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of ant communities in regenerating temperate conifer forests Jennifer D. Palladini a of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA. Tel.: +1 406 2434356; fax: +1 406 2434184. E-mail address: jennifer Formica lasiodes 4 (1) 17 (9) 10 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 (1) 0 Myrmica discontinua 6 (4) 33 (9) 4 (3) 0 1 (1) 0

Gordon, Deborah

62

Why Sequence Three Acidovorax Species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three Acidovorax Species? Three Acidovorax Species? Intimate interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes have influenced the course of organismal evolution and ecological distribution. While ubiquitous, there is generally little understanding of the physiological basis of such associations, particularly when they are nonpathogenic in nature (symbiotic). Earthworms of the family Lumbricidae harbor novel symbiotic betaproteobacteria within their nephridia (excretory organ). Few symbiotic betaprotebacteria have been reported, and no other beneficial bacteria are described that specifically colonize the excretory organs of animals. To better understand the physiological and evolutionary dimensions of this symbiosis, JGI will sequence the genome of the isolated Acidovorax symbiont, and the genomes of two additional species within the genus: the

63

Why sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? sequence four Labyrinthulomycete species? These common marine microorganisms with the tongue-twisting name behave like fungi in the ocean ecosystem but are actually protists. Their abundance in the ocean varies with the changing seasons. They feed on non-living organic matter such as decaying algae, plants such as mangrove leaves and salt marsh grass or even animal tissues. Species that belong to the Labyrinthulomycete category all fall under a larger category of protists that also includes diatoms and brown algae. Labyrinthulomycetes help break down organic matter in the waters, and some species can also break down crude oil and tarballs. Researchers believe they also "upgrade" the quality of the debris that feed other marine organisms by adding nutrients. Long chain fatty acids produced by

64

Rapid ontogenetic niche expansions in invasive Chinese tallow tree permit establishment in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid ontogenetic niche expansions in invasive Chinese tallow tree permit establishment and poorly understood. Chinese tallow tree Triadica sebifera is a major invader demonstrating broad variation

Siemann, Evan

65

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

66

Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Species Information System (SIS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Data Species Information System (SIS) Dataset Summary Description The Species Information System (SIS) consists of a web-enabled database (login required) and a public...

68

Exploring similarities among many species distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. ... Keywords: HPC, parallel processing, species distribution modeling

Scott Simmerman; Jingyuan Wang; James Osborne; Kimberly Shook; Jian Huang; William Godsoe; Theodore Simons

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage  

SciTech Connect

Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dynamics of water use and responses to herbivory in the invasive reed, Arundo donax (L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first objective of this study was to investigate the role of an invasive grass species, Arundo donax (L.), on the hydrologic cycle. At a site on the Rio Grande in South Texas, we measured the gas exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor at the leaf scale and structural characteristics, such as leaf area and shoot density, at the stand scale. In order to assess the effect of water availability, this study was conducted along transects perpendicular to the edge of the river along a potential moisture gradient. The second objective was to quantify the effect of two herbivores, an armored scale, Rhizaspidiotus donacis (Leonardi), and a stem-galling wasp, Tetramesa romana (Walker),on the photosynthetic and transpiration rates of A. donax. Leaf gas exchange measurements were made to determine the direction and magnitude of the effect on physiological processes and by what mechanisms any effects arose. Stands of A. donax used approximately 9.1 ? 1.1 mm of water per day. This rate of water use was at the high end of the spectrum for plants. The major controls on stand scale transpiration were evaporative demand, leaf area index, and water availability. During two summer seasons, stand scale transpiration varied greatly, following the pattern of variability in precipitation, suggesting that recent rainfall constituted a significant proportion of the water taken up by this species. Herbivory by a stem-galling wasp and a sap-feeding scale, both separately and together, reduced the rates of leaf scale physiological processes in A. donax. The efficacy of the wasp was density dependent, and this herbivore reduced the carboxylation rate of Rubisco. The effect of the scale took approximately five months to manifest, which coincided with generation time. Scale reduced photosynthesis by decreasing the maximum rate of electron transport. When the two insects were both present, the effect of their herbivory seemed to be additive. These results will assist the responsible management agencies in evaluating the propriety of using one or both of the insect herbivores as biological control agents.

Watts, David A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Trace species emissions for IGFC  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this investigation are to study both the fate and distribution of at least five significant, coal-derived trace elements commonly present in coal-gas, in terms of their vaporization during gasification, their condensation and sorption during hot-gas cleanup, as well as their effects on fuel cells, gas turbines, and ultimately the environment. The definition here of trace does not include the major contaminants of sulfur and chlorine, etc., although the simultaneous presence of such major species is always considered in our thermochemical calculations. Of course, many other elements can vaporize in trace quantities from raw coal as either volatile, molecular compounds or as metallic vapors which, besides their deleterious action on the energy conversion systems, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when emitted into the atmosphere. Hence, an understanding is sought of how the type and quantity of significant trace species in coal-gas changes from the coal pile through cleanup subsystems and the electric generators to the exhaust stack of an integrated system.

Pigeaud, A.E.; Helble, J.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Narrowing the estimates of species migration rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of species migration rates How fast can species migrate?estimate population growth rates for each population sinceon their data 1 show that the rate of population spread is

Blois, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effects of nutrient loading and extreme rainfall events on coastal tallgrass prairies: invasion intensity, vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbivory on the ability of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) to invade coastal prairie to determine of extreme rainfall events. Keywords: biological invasions, carbon, Chinese tallow tree, climate change

Siemann, Evan

74

Genetic differences in growth of an invasive tree Evan Siemann and William E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum) from its native range (Asia), place of introduction to North of increased competitive ability, Sapium sebiferum, Chinese Tallow Tree, trade- off, invasion, plant growth

Siemann, Evan

75

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist native  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist prairie vegetation and a seedling of either introduced Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) or native

Siemann, Evan

76

Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

McGee, Sasha Alanda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Experiences and challenges in deploying potentially invasive sensor systems for dynamic media applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a series of projects that explore a set of dynamic media applications built upon a potentially invasive sensor system - the Ubiquitous Media Portal, featuring high-resolution video and audio capture ...

Gong, Nan-Wei

78

A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

80

Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endangered Species Act Endangered Species Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Endangered Species Act Year 1973 Url Puerto-rican-parrott-TomMacKenzieUSFWS.jpg Description References The Endangered Species Act[1] Fish and Wildlife Service - ESA Overview[2] ESA Fact Sheet[3] When Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, it recognized that our rich natural heritage is of "esthetic, ecological, educational, recreational, and scientific value to our Nation and its people." It further expressed concern that many of our nation's native plants and animals were in danger of becoming extinct. The purpose of the ESA is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. It is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Blair Road Kudzu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Management: Blair Road and Hwy 58 Intersection * Kudzu treated with foliar spray of Garlon 3a and Tordon by CSC in 2004. Photo by Harry Quarles Invasive Non-native...

82

Bear Creek and Hwy 95 Intersection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plantation and presented aesthetic impact. * Kudzu treated with high-volume foliar spray of Tordon 101 by CSC in 2004 through 2006. Invasive Non-native Plant Management: Bear...

83

SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Abstract--Design aspects of a minimally invasive high-throughput automation system for radiation biodosimetry are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for radiation exposure. Only those showing both internal and external contamination were examined usingAbstract--Design aspects of a minimally invasive high- throughput automation system for radiation was supported by grant number U19 AI067773, the Center for High-Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation

85

Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Fish and Game

86

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ground surface as snow- drift and the ice sheet during a growing phase, with a mixing ratio of the localGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

87

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart H. S. Soroff, MD and J. Rastegar The primary function of the ventricular chambers of the heart is to provide the proper volume, in the first part of the cardiac cycle, when the heart is relaxed, cardiac diastole, the device exerts

Webster III, Robert James

88

Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Comparative analysis of Aspergilli species? Aspergillus is not only one of the most important fungi for use in biotechnology it is also one of the most commonly found groups of fungi worldwide. This project seeks to sequence and annotate a series of additional Aspergillus species and Penicillium roqueforti to complement and strengthen the genomic data currently available for comparative studies. The data resulting from these species comparisonswill be of direct relevance to the DOE mission, particularly to howspecies have become adapted for utilization of specific carbon sources enabling efficientbiomass degradation. Principal Investigators: Ronald de Vries, CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence Comparative analysis of Aspergilli

89

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

Jarvis, E. E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES  

SciTech Connect

While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or â??clearing houseâ? for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Aquatic Nuisance Species: A multi-stage approach to understanding the invasion ecology of exotic crayfish in Northern and Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population (American River & Crystal Lake), along with a noRiver (Sacramento Co. , CA) and from the outflow of Crystal

Kats, Lee; Pintor, Lauren; Sih, Andrew; Kerby, Jake

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

93

Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. In Global bio- diversity assessment, Section 6.complexity controls species diversity and nutrient effectsC. S. Thornber. 2006. Predator diversity strengthens trophic

Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

95

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

96

Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasive Early Detection & Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects Invasive Early Detection & Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens Lee Goldstein Boston University School of Medicine Abstract Purpose: The lens is a highly-ordered tissue with unique optical properties and exquisite radiosensitivity. The focus of this project is to evaluate radiation cataract dose response and mechanisms associated with low-linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays. We aim to investigate the natural history of Rayleigh light scattering changes in pre-cataractous lenses of mice exposed to radiations using a fully-validated, performance-tested quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) instrument developed by Dr. Goldstein and colleagues at Boston University. This innovative laser-based technology quantitatively assays pre-cataractous molecular pathology in the lenses of living mice

97

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Quantitative, non-invasive imaging of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in vivo Wenrong Li 1, , Fang Li 1 , Qian Huang 1 , Jingping Shen 1 , Frank Wolf 1 , Yujun He 1 , Xinjian Liu 1 , Y. Angela Hu 1 , Joel. S. Bedford 5 , and Chuan-Yuan Li 1,2,* Departments of 1 Radiation Oncology, 2 Pharmacology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA; 3 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA DNA double strand breaks are a major form of DNA damage and a key mechanism through which radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents kill cancer cells. Despite its importance, measuring DNA double strand breaks is still a tedious task that is normally carried out by gel electrophoresis or immunofluorescence staining. Here we report a novel approach to image and

98

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Enables Energy Efficiency Strategies, Ongoing Commissioning and Improved Operational Control Harry Sim CEO Cypress Envirosystems harry.sim@cypressenvirosystems.com www.cypressenvirosystems.com NASA Ames Reduced Project Cost by Over 80% with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies * Legacy Pneumatic Thermostats  Waste energy  High maintenance costs  Uncomfortable occupants  No visibility * Project Scope  14 buildings  1,370 pneumatic thermostats  Integration with campus BAS  Diagnostics for ongoing commissioning * Traditional DDC Retrofit  Cost over $4.1 million  Asbestos exposure/abatement  Occupants significantly disrupted

99

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recombinant stromelysin-1 (SL-1) on invasion and migration?2, ?6, or ?1 integrin subunits with (+ SL-1, black bars)or without (- SL-1, white bars) the addition of recombinant

Lochter, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

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101

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion cycles. They are also useful benchmark systems for the comparison to current theoretical methods where they provide insight into the dynamics occurring beyond the Franck-Condon region. These systems are studied using velocity map ion imaging, a technique that measures velocity and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic and photolytic methods. The current work involves the measurement of fundamental physical constants of the XO species. The bond dissociation energy of IO is measured. Vibrational level dependent correlated final state branching ratios of the predissociation of the A(^2 II_3/2) state of ClO and BrO are reported, and comparison to theoretical methods is discussed.

Dooley, Kristin S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spraying over the top of Ambrosia pumila, a federally listedtypical of the Larrea-Ambrosia microphyllous scrub that isthe highest of all species. Ambrosia dumosa, E. farinosa, K.

Steers, Robert Jeremy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aquatic Species Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned AFOSR Workshop Washington, D.C. February 19-21, 2008 Sponsored by Air Force Office of Science Eric E. Jarvis, Ph.D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Bioenergy Center eric_jarvis@nrel.gov NREL/PR-510-43232 The ASP Didn't Invent the Concept of Fuels from Algae...  Algae for methane (via anaerobic digestion) * Meier (1955); UC Berkeley 1957-59 (Oswald and Golueke) * Wastewater use, recycling of CO 2 and nutrients  Revival during Energy Crisis of 1970's * Uziel et al. (1975); Benemann et al. (1976-80) * Still focused on methane and hydrogen * Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) * Later DOE (SERI founded in 1977) ...But the ASP Took the Concept to the Next Level  Supported work at SERI/NREL and through

105

endangered species | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

429 Throttled (bot load) 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234558 Varnish cache server endangered species Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting #2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today in Boise. Though the intent of the meeting was to focus on identifying permitting concerns, agencies and developers alike had few concerns with the current process. There were agency personnel in attendance who had not attended the first Idaho meeting, so the workshop was a great opportunity to work through the flowcharts relevant to those agencies. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

106

Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

109

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

110

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

111

A REVIEW OF NON-INVASIVE IMAGING METHODS AND APPLICATIONS IN CONTAMINANT HYDROGEOLOGY RESEARCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminant hydrogeological processes occurring in porous media are typically not amenable to direct observation. As a result, indirect measurements (e.g., contaminant breakthrough at a fixed location) are often used to infer processes occurring at different scales, locations, or times. To overcome this limitation, non-invasive imaging methods are increasingly being used in contaminant hydrogeology research. The most common methods, and the subjects of this review, are optical imaging using UV or visible light, dual-energy gamma-radiation, X-ray microtomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Non-invasive imaging techniques have provided valuable insights into a variety of complex systems and processes, including porous media characterization, multiphase fluid distribution, fluid flow, solute transport and mixing, colloidal transport and deposition, and reactions. In this paper we review the theory underlying these methods, applications of these methods to contaminant hydrogeology research, and methods advantages and disadvantages. As expected, there is no perfect method or tool for non-invasive imaging. However, optical methods generally present the least expensive and easiest options for imaging fluid distribution, solute and fluid flow, colloid transport, and reactions in artificial two-dimensional (2D) porous media. Gamma radiation methods present the best opportunity for characterization of fluid distributions in 2D at the Darcy scale. X-ray methods present the highest resolution and flexibility for three-dimensional (3D) natural porous media characterization, and 3D characterization of fluid distributions in natural porous media. And MRI presents the best option for 3D characterization of fluid distribution, fluid flow, colloid transport, and reaction in artificial porous media. Obvious deficiencies ripe for method development are the ability to image transient processes such as fluid flow and colloid transport in natural porous media in three-dimensions, the ability to image many reactions of environmental interest in artificial and natural porous media, and the ability to image selected processes over a range of scales in artificial and natural porous media.

Werth, Charles J.; Zhang, Changyong; Brusseau, M. L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Baumann, T.

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: > PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. > Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. > Black Sea data were used for parameterization. > North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). > PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

Weijs, Liesbeth, E-mail: liesbeth.weijs@ua.ac.be [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Yang, Raymond S.H. [Quantitative and Computational Toxicology Group, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1680 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Das, Krishna [Laboratory for Oceanology-MARE Center, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Validation that a 1-year fellowship in minimally invasive and bariatric surgery can eliminate the learning curve for laparoscopic gastric bypass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a six-week focused training program for minimally invasivesurgery fellowship training program in?uence operativeof a fellowship training program in minimally invasive and

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aquatic species project report: FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties  

SciTech Connect

Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite increasing knowledge about its enzymatic properties and the regulation of its expression, little is known about its function. We have generated transgenic animals that express an autoactivating mutant of rat SL1 targeted to the epithelial compartment of the mammary gland. Phenotypically, SL1 transgenic mice display increased branching morphogenesis and lactogenic differentiation at prepubertal stages and premature involution during late pregnancy. Branching morphogenesis requires the invasion of epithelial cells into the adipose tissue, a process reminiscent of invasion of stromal compartments by tumor cells. Strikingly, a large number of SL1 transgenic animals also develop mammary tumors of various histotypes, including invasive adenocarcinomas. Because tumor development is a late response of SL1 transgenic mice to overexpression of the transgene, it remains unclear whether SL1 plays a direct role in tumor growth and/or invasion or whether the observed tumors are a consequence of other molecular alterations in the microenvironment of the mammary gland before the onset of tumor growth. Studies performed with synthetic inhibitors of MMP activity and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) have shown that suppression of MMP activity also suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. In many cases, the level of SL1 expression in tumors of the mammary gland and other tissues is positively correlated with the degree of malignancy. However, the only direct evidence for the nature of the MMPs involved was provided by the demonstration that function-blocking antibodies against gelatinase A and antisense inhibition of matrilysin expression decreased the invasiveness of tumor cells in a reconstituted basement membrane assay. These studies encouraged us to investigate whether SL1 plays a direct role in invasion of ECM. We used two carcinoma cell lines, TCL1 and SCg6 that formed rapidly growing, invasive tumors in vivo and migrated through Matrigel and collagen gels in culture. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against SL1 inhibited Matrigel invasion by TCL1 and SCg

Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Linking fisheries management and conservation in bioengineering species: the case of South American mussels (Mytilidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the cultured in Venezuela. Farmed invasive bivalvefor exploitation (Venezuela). Extraction from natural banksin the Gulf of Paria (Venezuela) in 1993, causing large

Carranza, Alvar; Defeo, Omar; Beck, Mike; Castilla, Juan Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM A Global Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standardized linear contrasts to show that this positive relationship persists when all bird species for which distribution maps published in standard ornithological handbooks (e.g., Cramp, 1977­1994; Marchant and Higgins standardized, may be entered into conventional statistical analyses. Standardization of contrasts is dependent

Reynolds, John D.

120

In Silico Modeling of Geobacter Species.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project employed a combination of in silico modeling and physiological studies to begin the construction of models that could predict the activity of Geobacter species under different environmental conditions. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of the first genome-based models of organisms known environmental relevance. This included the modeling of two Geobacter species and two species of Pelobacter. Construction of these models required increased sophistication in the annotation of the original draft genomes as well as collection of physiological data on growth yields, cell composition, and metabolic reactions. Biochemical studies were conducted to determine whether proposed enzymatic reactions were in fact expressed. During this process we developed an Automodel Pipeline process to accelerate future model development of other environmentally relevant organisms by using bioinformatics techniques to leverage predicted protein sequences and the Genomatica database containing a collection of well-curated metabolic models. The Automodel Pipeline was also used for iterative updating of the primary Geobacter model of G. sulfurreducens to expand metabolic functions or to add alternative pathways. Although each iteration of the model does not lead to another publication, it is an invaluable resource for hypothesis development and evaluation of experimental data. In order to develop a more accurate G. sulfurreducens model, a series of physiological studies that could be analyzed in the context of the model were carried out. For example, previous field trials of in situ uranium bioremediation demonstrated that Geobacter species face an excess of electron donor and a limitation of electron acceptor near the point of acetate injection into the groundwater. Therefore, a model-based analysis of electron acceptor limitation physiology was conducted and model predictions were compared with growth observed in chemostats. Iterative studies resulted in the model accurately predicting acetate oxidation and electron acceptor reduction. The model also predicted that G. sulfurreducens must release hydrogen under electron-accepting conditions in order to maintain charge and electron balance. This prediction was borne out by subsequent hydrogen measurements. Furthermore, changes in gene expression were consistent with model predictions of flux changes around central metabolism. The model revealed multiple redundant pathways in central metabolism suggesting an apparent versatility unusual in microbial metabolism. The computational analysis led to the identification of 32 reactions that participated in eight sets of redundant pathways. The computational results guided the design of strains with mutations in key reactions to elucidate the role of the alternate pathways and obtain information on their physiological function. A total of seven strains with mutations in genes encoding five metabolic reactions were constructed and their phenotypes analyzed in 12 different environments. This analysis revealed several interesting insights on the role of the apparent redundant pathways. 13C labeling approaches were developed for further elucidation of metabolic pathways with model-driven interpretation. For example, the model was used to calculate the optimal acetate 13C labeling ratio for distinguishing flux through various pathways based on amino acid isotopomer distributions. With this method it was possible to elucidate the pathways for amino acid biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the labeling pattern of isoleucine deviated significantly from what was predicted by the metabolic reconstruction. Detailed analysis of the labeling patterns with the model led to the discovery that there are two pathways for leucine biosynthesis, including a novel citramalate pathway that was subsequently confirmed with biochemical analysis. In summary, the combined computational and experimental studies have been instrumental in further characterizing the central metabolism of members of the Geobacteraceae. Furthermore, the methods developed in these

Lovley, Derek, R.

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Factors Affecting the Feasibility of a Warsaw Pact Invasion of Western Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War and the opening of selected archives in both Eastern and Western Europe provides scholars the opportunity to study this period with greater accuracy and detail than was previously possible. This study seeks to determine the feasibility of a Warsaw Pact invasion of Western Europe in 1987 through the examination of the factors that would have affected such an operation. After each of these factors have been analyzed then conclusions will be drawn about the probable course and termination of such a conflict in Central Europe. The argument will be made that NATO would have been able to hold onto most of West Germany in the event of such an attack.

Williamson, Corbin

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fuzzy inference systems for efficient non-invasive on-line two-phase flow regime identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification of two-phase flow regimes that occur in heated pipes is of paramount importance for monitoring nuclear installations such as boiling water reactors. A Sugeno-type fuzzy inference system is put forward for non-invasive, on-line flow ...

Tatiana Tambouratzis; Imre Pzsit

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Journal of Tropical Ecology (2002) 18:687705. Copyright 2002 Cambridge University Press The invasibility of tropical forests by exotic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forest location: the Hawaiian Islands. But the combination of Hawaii's extreme isolation and heavy human The invasibility of tropical forests by exotic plants PAUL V. A. FINE1 Department of Biology, University of Utah, 257S. 1400 East Rm. 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA (Accepted 20th September 2001) ABSTRACT

Fine, Paul V.A.

124

NMR relaxometry as a potential non-invasive routine sensor for1 characterization of phenotype in Crassostrea gigas2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NMR relaxometry as a potential non-invasive routine sensor for1 characterization of phenotype parameters that can be used to monitor the physiological state of oysters. NMR measurements18 were carried cavity volume and dry flesh weight and to determine sex and gonad21 development. The NMR results showed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Species conservation in Idahogoing beyond the ESA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

made to utilize Candidate Conservation Agreements (CCAs)and Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances (state Office of Species Conservation was made aware that FWS

Inghram, Brent J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Intermediate Species Profiles in LowPressure Premixed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kinetics are relatively sparse in comparison to the analogous hydro- carbon reactions ... the H/C/O chemistry for one-carbon and two-car- bon species ...

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermodynamics Resource for Gas-Phase and Condensed Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... They include thermodynamic data (heats of formation, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities) for gas and condensed-phase species,...

130

Wolbachia diversity in the Porcellionides pruinosus complex of species (Crustacea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a cosmopolitan woodlouse. It is known to exhibit patterns of geographical variation between populations, and has, sibling species. Introduction The cosmopolitan terrestrial isopod Porcellionides ( Metoponorthus

Cordaux, Richard

131

The black widow spider genus Latrodectus (Araneae: Theridiidae): phylogeny, biogeography, and invasion history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

movement. In particular, the nearly cosmopolitan range of the brown widow, Latrodectus geometricus, and its is sister species, the cosmopolitan L. geometricus, and (2) the mactans clade containing all other hasselti Thorell, 1870) and the cosmopolitan brown wi- dow (L. geometricus C.L. Koch, 1841). Members

Gillespie, Rosemary

132

ORIGINAL PAPER Comparisons of arthropod assemblages on an invasive and native  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) and three native tree species: silver maple (Acer saccharinum), sycamore and abundance of arthropods on tallow tree were similar to the natives. But, ordination (NMS) showed community composition differed on tallow tree compared to all three native trees. It supported an arthropod community

Siemann, Evan

133

Pests Affecting the Ecosystems on the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nest preda- tion on forest species such as the wood thrush increase. The nonnative fish on the ORR with the greatest negative ecosystem impacts are grass and common carp and...

134

0~.0'~;~~5-1:5-;-~'&5-~ ..,~"'Q.n"..e:..-~~"no.5-cn5-...-...Q.~-.03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be typed as SNM, SNG, SCM, SCG, LNM, LNG, LCM, or LCG. On this scheme, only the SNG type and the LNG allegedly non-native colonizers. If one meant species with characteristic SNG, then one should say

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

135

Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ((IHI) and (FH{sub 2})). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

Weaver, A.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Spectroscopy of transient neutral species via negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study two types of transient neutral species: bound free radicals (NO{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}) and unstable neutral species ([IHI] and [FH{sub 2}]). The negative ion time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometer used for these experiments is described in detail.

Weaver, A.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

142

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

143

Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

144

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

145

Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

147

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Species richness, distribution and genetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

richness for Caenorhabditis encountered to date, including both tropically cosmopolitan and geographically for different local species, although global distributions include both cosmopolitan and geographically restricted groups. Local samples for the cosmopolitan C. briggsae mirror its pan-tropical patterns

148

Researchers Map Where Tree Species Survive and Thrive under Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Map Where Tree Species Survive and Thrive under Climate Change A topology map shows the range of tree productivity from low to high biomass production (blue to red,...

149

Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2-T4, N-) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3-6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node-negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

Tunio, Mutahir A., E-mail: drmutahirtonio@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Hashmi, Altaf [Department of Urology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Qayyum, Abdul [Department of Medical Oncology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Mohsin, Rehan [Department of Urology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Zaeem, Ahmed [Department of Medical Physics, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued research into bladder preservation strategies and suggest that definitive radiotherapy represents a viable initial treatment strategy for those who wish to attempt to preserve their native bladder.

Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Manning, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States); Moody, John S., E-mail: john.moody@mosescone.com [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nanostructured sorbents for capture of cadmium species in combustion environments  

SciTech Connect

The pathways of cadmium species to form a sub-micrometer-sized aerosol in a combustion system exhaust were established. Cadmium oxide was the predominant species formed in the experiments and resulted in particles of a mean size of 26-63 nm with number concentrations in the range of 2-8 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. Two different nanostructured sorbents, a solid montmorillonite (MMT) and an in situ generated agglomerated silica, were used for capture of the cadmium species. The MMT sorbent was not stable at 1000{sup o}C, and structural changes resulted. MMT did not suppress nucleation of cadmium species and partially captured it by weak physisorption as established by the leachability tests. In contrast, the in situ generated silica nanostructured agglomerates had a high surface area, suppressed nucleation of cadmium species vapors, and chemisorbed them effectively resulting in a firm binding, as compared to the MMT sorbent. There is an optimal temperature-time relationship at which the capture process is expected to be most effective. The leaching efficiency under these conditions was less than 3.2%. The nanostructured silica agglomerate size can be tuned for effective capture in existing particle control devices. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Myong-Hwa Lee; Kuk Cho; Apoorva P. Shah; Pratim Biswas [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory, Environmental Engineering Science Program

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

153

Minimally-invasive Wearable Sensors and Data Processing Methods for Mental Stress Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronic stress is endemic to modern society. If we could monitor our mental state, we may be able to develop insights about how we respond to stress. However, it is unfeasible to continuously annotate stress levels all the time. In the studies conducted for this dissertation, a minimally-invasive wearable sensor platform and physiological data processing methods were developed to analyze a number of physiological correlates of mental stress. We present a minimally obtrusive wearable sensor system that incorporates embedded and wireless communication technologies. The system is designed such that it provides a balance between data collection and user comfort. The system records the following stress related physiological and contextual variables: heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory activity, electrodermal activity (EDA), electromyography (EMG), body acceleration, and geographical location. We assume that if the respiratory influences on HRV can be removed, the residual HRV will be more salient to stress in comparison with raw HRV. We develop three signal processing methods to separate HRV into a respiration influenced and residual HRV. The first method consists of estimating respiration-induced portion of HRV using a linear system identification method (autoregressive moving average model with exogenous inputs). The second method consists of decomposing HRV into respiration-induced principal dynamic mode and residual using nonlinear dynamics decomposition method (principal dynamic mode analysis). The third method consists of splitting HRV into respiration-induced power spectrum and residual in frequency domain using spectral weighting method. These methods were validated on a binary discrimination problem of two psychophysiological conditions: mental stress and relaxation. The linear system identification method, nonlinear dynamics decomposition method, and spectral weighting method classified stress and relaxation conditions at 85.2 %, 89.2 %, and 81.5 % respectively. When tonic and phasic EDA features were combined with the linear system identification method, the nonlinear dynamics decomposition method, and the spectral weighting method, the average classification rates were increased to 90.4 %, 93.2 %, and 88.1 % respectively. To evaluate the developed wearable sensors and signal processing methods on multiple subjects, we performed case studies. In the first study, we performed experiments in a laboratory setting. We used the wearable sensors and signal processing methods to discriminate between stress and relaxation conditions. We achieved 81 % average classification rate in the first case study. In the second study, we performed experiments to detect stress in ambulatory settings. We collected data from the subjects who wore the sensors during regular daily activities. Relaxation and stress conditions were allocated during daily activities. We achieved a 72 % average classification rate in ambulatory settings. Together, the results show achievements in recognizing stress from wearable sensors in constrained and ambulatory conditions. The best results for stress detection were achieved by removing respiratory influence from HRV and combining features from EDA.

Choi, Jongyoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Identification of Unknown Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. In a wet FGD system, circulating water must be periodically blown down and treated to remove solids and dissolved chemicals. Along with SO2, other substances in flue gas may dissolve in water, including selenium (Se). In addition to the common selenium species selenite and selenate, past research has identified selenium-containing species that...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2013 23, 2013 EM Office of External Affairs Acting Communications Director Dave Borak talks with EM intern Valerie Edwards. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Internships Help Future Energy Leaders Gain Hands-On Experience What's it like interning at the Energy Department? We interviewed one intern to find out. August 21, 2013 Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California's Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

158

Optimal Conservation of Migratory Species Tara G. Martin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Conservation of Migratory Species Tara G. Martin1 *, Iadine Chade`s2 , Peter Arcese1 , Peter P. Marra3 , Hugh P. Possingham4 , D. Ryan Norris1,5 1 Centre for Applied Conservation Research of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars

Queensland, University of

159

Automatic fish classification for underwater species behavior understanding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to propose an automatic fish classification system that operates in the natural underwater environment to assist marine biologists in understanding subehavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types of features: ... Keywords: fish species description and classification

Concetto Spampinato; Daniela Giordano; Roberto Di Salvo; Yun-Heh Jessica Chen-Burger; Robert Bob Fisher; Gayathri Nadarajan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

Cengarle, María Victoria

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996 the growth, survivorship, and reproduction of nondomesticated plants (Friess and Maillet 1996, 1997; FunayamaChapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power

Flecker, Alex

162

A New Reduction Scheme for MultiSpecies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · chemical species in the ground water · (bio-)chemical reactions (kinetic and equilibrium) · (de = L1c1... Lncn with L1 = L2 = ... = Ln, Lici = - · (D ci - qci) , q: fluid (=water) content and flow¨at Erlangen #12;2. Available solution/reduction methods State-of-the-Art: Available reduction methods · Yeh

Kraeutle, Serge

163

Review: Plant species identification using digital morphometrics: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants are of fundamental importance to life on Earth. The shapes of leaves, petals and whole plants are of great significance to plant science, as they can help to distinguish between different species, to measure plant health, and even to model climate ... Keywords: Flower, Image processing, Leaf, Morphometrics, Plant science, Shape analysis, Taxonomy

James S. Cope; David Corney; Jonathan Y. Clark; Paolo Remagnino; Paul Wilkin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

John Harte's Publications: 2000-2011 J. Harte, Maximum Entropy and Ecology: A Theory of Abundance, Distribution, and Energetics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and J. Harte, "Invasion of non-native grasses causes a drop in soil carbon storage in California. Harte, "Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation: heterogeneity over space. Torn, and J. Harte, "Linking soil organic matter dynamics and erosion- induced terrestrial carbon

Kammen, Daniel M.

165

Molecular Ecology Notes (2006) 6, 505507 doi: 10.1111/j.1471-8286.2006.01296.x 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) S. J. DEWALT, E. SIEMANN and W. E. ROGERS Department of Ecology microsatellite loci for Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera, Euphorbiaceae), which is native to East Asia Molecularmarkerscanaidinreconstructingtheintroduction history of non-native invasive plants. Chinese tallow tree [Triadica sebifera (L.) Small

Siemann, Evan

166

Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain  

SciTech Connect

A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

167

Vegetation Dynamics Along Utility Rights-of-Way Factors Affecting the Ability of Shrub and Herbaceous Communities to Resist Invasion by Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional vegetation management programs along utility rights-of-way (ROW) have been designed to prevent tree growth into transmission wire security zones. This study of vegetation dynamics describes factors affecting the ability of shrub and herbaceous communities to resist tree invasion. Such information will allow ecologists to identify the critical pressure points where intervention in natural ecological processes will prove most effective.

1999-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

Kinetic Study of the Combustion of Phosphorus Containing Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combustion of organophosphorus compounds is of great interest for the incineration of chemical warfare agent and their use in flame inhibition as halon replacement. The thermochemical data of these species and the reactions involved at high temperature are not well known, despite some recent experimental studies. With BAC-MP4 ab initio estimations as a basis and semi-empirical estimations for many new compounds, the thermochemistry of organophosphorus compounds is studied. New group additivity values are proposed for enthalpies of formation at 298K, entropies and heat capacities of species involving pentavalent phosphorus bonded to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, nitrogen and sulfur atoms. The kinetic of unimolecular elimination is investigated by modeling pyrolysis experiments of DEMP, TEP and DIMP. A new combustion mechanism is described and applied to the modeling of DMMP reaction in a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flame.

Glaude, P.A.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. The trace element selenium is found in coal and can become concentrated in the wastewater from the FGD process. Some chemical forms, or species, of selenium are more resistant to removal by water treatment processes than others; thus, understanding the speciation of selenium is important to designing effective wastewater treatment systems. In additi...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

High-Temperature Thermodynamic Data for Species in Aqueous Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of experimental and theoretical research on the high-temperature thermodynamic properties of aqueous species important to nuclear reactor water chemistry. Methods of predicting thermodynamic functions are presented for electrolytes up to 300 degrees Celsius for use in supplementing experimental data. The report includes tables (up to 300 degrees Celsius) of (1) important equilibrium constants for 78 reactions encountered in corrosion and precipitation in nuclear reactor...

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Identification of Arsenic Species in Coal Ash Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of the chemical species and compounds of arsenic in individual coal fly ash particles will help provide a scientifically sound basis for assessing health risks from inhalation of these particles. This report presents the results of an analytical chemistry study of coal-combustion ash, with some work also completed on oil-combustion ash and copper smelter dust collected from several sources in the United States and Europe. Results showed that most arsenic is present on the surface of coal a...

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

On the dispersion of two coexisting nongyrotropic ion species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Space observations in the solar wind and simulations of high Mach number bow-shocks have detected particle populations with two coexisting nongyrotropic ion species. We investigate the inuence of these two sources of free energy on the stability of parallel (with respect to the ambient magnetic eld) and perpendicular propagation. For parallel modes, we derive their dispersion equation in a magnetoplasma with protons and alpha particles that may exhibit stationary nongyrotropy (SNG) and discuss the characteristics of its solutions. Kinetic simulations study the behaviour of perpendicular electrostatic (Bernstein-like) waves in a plasma whose ion populations (positrons and ctitious singly-charged particles with twice the electron mass, for the sake of simulation feasability) can be timevarying nongyrotropic (TNG). The results show that the coexistence of two gyrophase bunched species does not signicantly enhance the parallel SNG instability already found for media with only one nongyrotropic species, whereas it strongly intensies the growth of Bernstein-like modes in TNG plasmas. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities) Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies; waves and instabilities) 1

A. L. Brinca; U. Motschmann; F. J. Romeiras

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Niche-based modelling as a tool for predicting the risk of alien plant invasions at a global scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) succulent karoo, (3) Nama-karoo, (4) fynbos, (5) Albany thicket, (6) grassland and (7) savanna. Because, fynbos and succulent karoo. Temperate Europe and the south-eastern part of the USA now appear suitable (succulent karoo, Nama-karoo and dwarf savanna). Species' distribution models Native distribution of South

Schweik, Charles M.

176

Cargo transportation by two species of motor protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cargo motion in living cells transported by two species of motor protein with different intrinsic directionality is discussed in this study. Similar to single motor movement, cargo steps forward and backward along microtubule stochastically. Recent experiments found that, cargo transportation by two motor species has a memory, it does not change its direction as frequently as expected, which means that its forward and backward step rates depends on its previous motion trajectory. By assuming cargo has only the least memory, i.e. its step direction depends only on the direction of its last step, two cases of cargo motion are detailed analyzed in this study: {\\bf (I)} cargo motion under constant external load; and {\\bf (II)} cargo motion in one fixed optical trap. Due to the existence of memory, for the first case, cargo can keep moving in the same direction for a long distance. For the second case, the cargo will oscillate in the trap. The oscillation period decreases and the oscillation amplitude increases with the motor forward step rates, but both of them decrease with the trap stiffness. The most likely location of cargo, where the probability of finding the oscillated cargo is maximum, may be the same as or may be different with the trap center, which depends on the step rates of the two motor species. Meanwhile, if motors are robust, i.e. their forward to backward step rate ratios are high, there may be two such most likely locations, located on the two sides of the trap center respectively. The probability of finding cargo in given location, the probability of cargo in forward/backward motion state, and various mean first passage times of cargo to give location or given state are also analyzed.

Yunxin Zhang

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear reactions and synthesis of new transuranium species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this short review, I shall describe the special aspects of heavy ion nuclear reaction mechanisms operative in the transuranium region, the role of new techniques, possible nuclear reactions for the production of additional transuranium elements and nuclear species and the importance of work in this region for the development of nuclear models and theoretical concepts. This discussion should make it clear that a continuing supply of leements and isotopes, some fo them relatively short-lived, produced by the HFIR-TRU facilities, will be a requirement for future synthesis of new elements and isotopes.

Seaborg, G.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Microbial Characteristics of Native Aquatic Species of Savannah River Wetlands  

SciTech Connect

In 1974 the Savannah River Site (SRS) was established as a National Environmental Research Park (NERP) in the United States. NERP provided locations for long-term ecological research investigation. Many of the ecological studies that have been conducted in the past mainly focused on the macroscopic view. The Savannah River Site contains wetlands that are home to many diverse organisms. We conducted a preliminary survey of microbial habitats in order to explore the biodiversity of species-specific symbionts. Bacterial surveys included viable counts, direct counts, isolation, identification, and metabolic profiles.

McKinsey, P.C.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Species interactions research and monitoring was initiated in 1989 to investigate ecological interactions among fish in response to proposed supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This is the seventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and pre-supplementation monitoring of fishes in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the ecology and demographics of non-target taxa (NTT) and target taxon, and develop methods to monitor interactions and supplementation success. Major topics of this report are associated with monitoring potential impacts to support adaptive management of NTT and baseline monitoring of fish predation indices on spring chinook salmon smolts. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter. This annual report summarizes data collected primarily by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 1998 in the Yakima basin, however these data were compared to data from previous years to identify preliminary trends and patterns.

Pearsons, Todd N.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

34 The Aquatic Gardener Volume 22 Number 4 35 leaved and emergent species all being  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of temporary wetland (such as peat-lands and sump-lands) in Western Austra- lia, along with many cosmopolitan species. Examples of the cosmopolitan flora include species from Aponogeton, Isoëtes, Marsilea

Andersen, Frede ?.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Standard scales used in the measurement of AGAGE species at Cape...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scales used in archived species from the measurement of AGAGE GC-MS Medua instrument species formula scale units comments CFCs CFC-113 CCl 2 FCClF 2 SIO-2005 ppt HCFCs HCFC-22...

182

Comparative analysis of tandem repeats from hundreds of species reveals unique insights into centromere evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

41 MYA. In contrast, sorghum-maize (9 MYA) and Hor- deum-similar. The closely related Sorghum and Miscanthus speciesrelated Zea species and Sorghum species or between Oryza

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Diet Overlap of Top-Level Predators in Recent Sympatry: Bull Trout and Nonnative Lake Trout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley:1160­1171. Jeppson PW, Platts WS. 1959. Ecology and control of the Columbia River squawfish in northern Idaho lakes

McMahon, Thomas E.

184

Prior Experience Alters the Behavioral Response of Prey to a Nonnative Predator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2002; A´ lvarez and Nicieza, 2006) despite their energetic or developmental costs (Lawler, 1989; Skelly (spirulina) and 25% Tetramin flakes five times weekly. We began our experiment when all tadpoles reached., AND L. A. HATCHETT. 1994. Predator avoidance costs and habituation to fish chemicals by a stream isopod

Ryan, Michael J.

185

Defining skill variables between U16 national team and non-national team ice hockey players.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of the research is to determine does sport specific technical skill tests separate U16 national team players from those who are not selected (more)

Haapea, Ilkka

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public, and land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.invasivespeciesinfo. gov/. United States Department of Agriculture. 2011. PLANTS Database. Washington, DC: United States of the Cascades (EC 1577). #12;6 Yellow archangel (Lamiastrum galeobdolon) is commonly used in window boxes and hanging baskets and as a groundcover. It has been designated as a noxious weed in Washington

187

Automatic correction of grammatical errors in non-native English text  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning a foreign language requires much practice outside of the classroom. Computer-assisted language learning systems can help fill this need, and one desirable capability of such systems is the automatic correction of ...

Lee, John Sie Yuen, 1977-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission L ine Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first 3 months of a project to define the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques on electric transmission rights of way aimed at controlling the spread of invasive exotic (IE) vegetation. It includes the results of a brief literature search of cleaning techniques.BackgroundA science basis for process and procedure to cost effectively clean personnel and equipment so as to reduce the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cost Effectiveness of Cleaning Techniques for Controlling Human-based Transport of Invasive Exotic Plants on Electric Transmission Line Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a broad overview of accomplishments over the first full year of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project to investigate the cost effectiveness of cleaning techniques to control human-based transport of invasive exotic plants on electric transmission line rights-of-way. One-half of the intended field work for the whole project (2012-2015) was completed, with attendant greenhouse and office work ongoing. EPRI expects the project to be completed in ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

190

Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full Coalescent Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full the likelihood of a species tree directly from the markers under a finite-sites model of mutation effectively in an algorithm that allows us to bypass the gene trees and compute species tree likelihoods directly from

Rosenberg, Noah

191

Vertical niche partitioning between cryptic sibling species of a cosmopolitan marine planktonic protist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertical niche partitioning between cryptic sibling species of a cosmopolitan marine planktonic the cryptic genetic diversity within morphological species, many genetic types are cosmopolitan, lending. By depth-stratified sampling, we present evidence that sibling genetic types in a cosmopolitan species

Miller, Thomas E.

192

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

Börger, Egon

193

The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci cation and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci#12;cation and Development Methods the design of a steam boiler control, which realizes the informal speci#12;cation handed out. The steam boiler-control speci#12;cation problem was sent out to the partici- pants nine months before

Börger, Egon

194

An omegatron mass spectrometer for plasma ion species analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An omegatron mass spectrometer which can be used to measure the ion species and charge state distribution in a magnetized plasma is described. In the conventional omegatron, ions are formed as the result of gas ionization by a fine electron beam passing through the center of the analyzer along the magnetic field. In the plasma omegatron, the plasma ions are entering the analyzer through a small floating aperture. We employ a biasing technique to reduce the ion velocity along the magnetic field and, thus, achieve improved ion collection and sensitivity. Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the instrument's operation in the PISCES-A linear plasma device, at a magnetic field {ital B}=1.3 kG. Mass spectra have been obtained in hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen plasmas, and typical results are presented.

Wang, E.Y.; Schmitz, L.; Ra, Y.; LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W. (Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research, (USA) Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (USA) University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Filtered cathodic arc deposition with ion-species-selectivebias  

SciTech Connect

A dual-cathode arc plasma source was combined with acomputer-controlled bias amplifier such as to synchronize substrate biaswith the pulsed production of plasma. In this way, bias can be applied ina material-selective way. The principle has been applied to the synthesismetal-doped diamond-like carbon films, where the bias was applied andadjusted when the carbon plasma was condensing, and the substrate was atground when the metal was incorporated. In doing so, excessive sputteringby too-energetic metal ions can be avoided while the sp3/sp2 ratio can beadjusted. It is shown that the resistivity of the film can be tuned bythis species-selective bias. The principle can be extended tomultiple-material plasma sources and complex materials

Anders, Andre; Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Lim, SunnieH.N.

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Kinetics of Invasive Breast Cancer: A Potential Prognostic Marker for Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Our goal was to determine the correlations between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) kinetics of breast cancers and axillary nodal status (ANS) which may have prognostic value in designing radiation therapy recommendations. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review identified 167 consecutive patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for invasive breast cancer from Jan 1, 2006 to Nov 1, 2007. Patients with DCE-MRI kinetic data from our institution who underwent axillary surgical staging prior to chemotherapy were included. ANS was assessed as positive or negative by pathology record review. For each primary cancer, maximum tumor diameter and kinetic values for initial peak enhancement (PE), percent initial rapid enhancement (RE), and percent delayed washout enhancement (WE) were measured with a computer-aided evaluation program. Univariate, multivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were performed according to the ANS. Results: Forty-six patients met study criteria, with 32 (70%) node-negative and 14 (30%) node-positive patients. Median PE was significantly greater in node-positive patients (209%) than in node-negative patients (138%, p = 0.0027). Similarly, median RE was significantly greater in node-positive patients (57%) than in node-negative patients (27%, p = 0.0436). WE was not different between groups (p = 0.9524). Median maximum tumor diameter was greater in node-positive patients (26 mm) than in node-negative patients (15 mm, p = 0.015). Multivariate analysis showed that only PE trended toward significance (p = 0.18). Conclusions: DCE-MRI kinetics of primary breast cancers correlate with ANS. Multivariate analysis demonstrates the correlation is not due simply to underlying lesion size. If validated prospectively, DCE-MRI kinetics may aid as a tool in selecting patients or designing fields for radiation therapy.

Loiselle, Christopher R., E-mail: Loiselle@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Eby, Peter R.; DeMartini, Wendy B.; Peacock, Sue M.S. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States); Bittner, Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Lehman, Constance D. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States); Kim, Janice N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, Seattle, Washington 98109 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Species differences in metabolism of 1,3-butadiene  

SciTech Connect

1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a 4-carbon gaseous compound with two double bonds. Used in high tonnage to make styrene-butadiene polymers in the rubber industry. Because of large amounts in use, BD was tested for toxicity in 2-year inhalation exposures of both Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F{sub 1} mice. The results of the two-species studies were dramatically different. In the initial study in mice, BD was shown to be a potent multiple-site carcinogen at exposure levels of 625 and 1250 ppM. There were increased incidences of neoplasia in the heart, lung, mammary gland, and ovary; malignant lymphomas resulted in early deaths of the mice so that the planned 2-year study was stopped after only 61 weeks of exposure. The second study in mice was conducted at much lower exposure concentrations (6.25, 20, 62.5, 200, and 625 ppM) and lasted 104 weeks. Increased incidences of hemangiosarcomas of the heart and lung neoplasia were observed in males exposed to 62.5 ppM BD, while females had increased lung neoplasia even at the 6.25 ppM exposure level. Early deaths from lymphomas were again observed at the high exposure concentration (625 ppm). A noncancer toxicity observed in mice was a macrocytic, megaloblastic anemia.

Henderson, R.F.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Differential response to green algal species to solvents  

SciTech Connect

Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents toward test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, limited data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Algae have been considered to be good indicators of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to freshwater unicellular green algae. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on unicellular green algae species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 14 refs., 1 fig.

Tadros, M.G.; Philips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V. (Alabama A M Univ., Huntsville, AL (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for growing microalgae as a renewable biomass feedstock for the production of a diesel fuel substitute (biodiesel), thereby reducing the need for imported petroleum. Microalgae are of interest as a feedstock because of their high growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions, and because the oils (lipids) they produce can be extracted and converted to substitute petroleum fuels such as biodiesel. Microalgae can be grown in arid and semi-arid regions with poor soil quality, and saline water from aquifers or the ocean can be used for growing microalgae. Biodiesel is an extremely attractive candidate to fulfill the need for a diesel fuel substitute. Biodiesel is a cleaner fuel than petroleum diesel; it is virtually free of sulfur, and emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulates during combustion are significantly reduced in comparison to emissions from petroleum diesel. Biodiesel provides essentially the same energy content and power output as petroleum-based diesel fuel.

Brown, L.; Jarvis, E.; Dunahay, T.; Roessler, P.; Zeiler, K. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NON INVASIVE ENERGY METER  

POTENTIAL APPLI ATIONS flow systems Fixed and variable liquid flow systems (e.g., solar systems) Energy Measurement TE HNOLOGI AL ENEFITS

203

Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Predicting Sensitivity to Chemoradiotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In chemoradiation (CRT)-based bladder-sparing approaches for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), patients who respond favorably to induction CRT enjoy the benefits of bladder preservation, whereas nonresponders do not. Thus, accurate prediction of CRT sensitivity would optimize patient selection for bladder-sparing protocols. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is a functional imaging technique that quantifies the diffusion of water molecules in a noninvasive manner. We investigated whether DW-MRI predicts CRT sensitivity of MIBC. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 23 MIBC patients (cT2/T3 = 7/16) who underwent induction CRT consisting of radiotherapy to the small pelvis (40 Gy) with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/day for 5 days), followed by partial or radical cystectomy. All patients underwent DW-MRI before the initiation of treatment. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with CRT sensitivity were analyzed. The proliferative potential of MIBC was also assessed by analyzing the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in pretherapeutic biopsy specimens. Results: Thirteen patients (57%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) to CRT. These CRT-sensitive MIBCs showed significantly lower ADC values (median, 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.43-0.77) than CRT-resistant (no pCR) MIBCs (median, 0.84 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.69-1.09; p = 0.0003). Multivariate analysis identified ADC value as the only significant and independent predictor of CRT sensitivity (p < 0.0001; odds ratio per 0.001 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s increase, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). With a cutoff ADC value at 0.74 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, sensitivity/specificity/accuracy in predicting CRT sensitivity was 92/90/91%. Ki-67 LI was significantly higher in CRT-sensitive MIBCs (p = 0.0005) and significantly and inversely correlated with ADC values ({rho} = -0.67, p = 0.0007). Conclusions: DW-MRI is a potential biomarker for predicting CRT sensitivity in MIBC. DW-MRI may be useful to optimize patient selection for CRT-based bladder-sparing approaches.

Yoshida, Soichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Koga, Fumitaka, E-mail: f-koga.uro@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Shuichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Chikako; Tanaka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ochanomizu Surugadai Clinic, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Hajime; Komai, Yoshinobu; Saito, Kazutaka; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.  

SciTech Connect

Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These findings suggest that for new structurally similar organic acids, a limited comparative species (rat vs. dog) pharmacokinetic analysis early in the toxicology evaluation process may provide important insight into the relevance of the dog. In summary, the substantial difference between the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids in dogs relative to other species, including humans, questions the relevance of using dog toxicity data for the extrapolation of human health risk.

Timchalk, Chuck

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecological and social impact. The carrying capacity for wild dogs of the Predator-Prey Dynamics: The Role of Predators in the Control of Problem Species 85 community...

Wangchuk, Tashi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Proportional counter device for detecting electronegative species in an air sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting an electronegative species comprises an analysis chamber, an inlet communicating with the analysis chamber for admitting a sample containing the electronegative species and an ionizable component, a radioactive source within the analysis chamber for emitting radioactive energy for ionizing a component of the sample, a proportional electron detector within the analysis chamber for detecting electrons emitted from the ionized component, and a circuit for measuring the electrons and determining the presence of the electronegative species by detecting a reduction in the number of available electrons due to capture of electrons by the electronegative species. 2 figures.

Allman, S.L.; Chen, F.C.; Chen, C.H.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modelling the global distribution of fungal species: new insights into microbial cosmopolitanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling the global distribution of fungal species: new insights into microbial cosmopolitanism cosmopolitan distributions. However, for estimating the global distributions of microorganisms, discriminating

Bruns, Tom

209

Species-specific features affect the ability of census-derived models ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

species living in large groups, precluding the attainment of good predictions. ..... Model building and prediction of regional distribution. The original deviance...

210

Individual tree species identification using LIDAR-derived crown structures and intensity data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tree species identification is important for a variety of natural resource management and monitoring activities including riparian buffer characterization, wildfire risk assessment, biodiversity monitoring, and (more)

Kim, Sooyoung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measuring and Modelling Biodiversity from Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

invasive species, Chinese tallow. International Journal ofStates, such as Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera), to

Gillespie, Thomas; Foody, Giles M.; Rocchini, Duccio; Giorgi, Ana Paula; Saatchi, Sassan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-147a IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE GREAT LAKES ECOSYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordinator, USGS Invasive Species Program Sandra Kosek-Sills, Planner, Ohio Department of Natural Resources

213

Advanced shape context for plant species identification using leaf image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel method for leaf species identification combining local and shape-based features. Our approach extends the shape context model in two ways. First of all, two different sets of points are distinguished when computing the shape ... Keywords: image retrieval, plant species identification, shape context

Sofiene Mouine; Itheri Yahiaoui; Anne Verroust-Blondet

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

End-Triassic calcification crisis and blooms of organic-walled `disaster species'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

End-Triassic calcification crisis and blooms of organic-walled `disaster species' B. van de the response of marine photosynthetic phytoplankton to the proposed perturbation in the carbon cycle. Our high) contemporaneous blooms of organic-walled, green algal `disaster' species which comprise in one case N70

215

Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program  

SciTech Connect

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Cryptic species within the cosmopolitan desiccation-tolerant moss Grimmia laevigata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryptic species within the cosmopolitan desiccation-tolerant moss Grimmia laevigata Catherine C cosmopolitan range. This presents an evolutionary puz- zle, the solution to which lies in understanding phylogeography The broad and, in some cases, cosmopolitan distribution of many moss species suggests

Thompson, John N.

217

Summary of data and analyses indicating that exotic species have impaired the beneficial uses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to constitute the #12;majority of the species, the number of individuals, or the biomass present in the water of the biological diversity in many habitats, whether counted as number of species, number of individuals or biomass organisms in the Delta, and can account for most of the benthic biomass in many areas. Juvenile Corbicula

218

Solovyev and Saldaitis A new species of the genus Parasa Moore (Lepidoptera:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new species Parasa dusii Solovyev and Saldaitis from northern Yemen is described (holotype in Museum Witt, Munich; Germany). The species has tendency to lose the green pigment typical for other congeners. It is provisionally placed into the genus Parasa Moore, 1859 where it is closely related to P. divisa West, 1940, P. catori Bethune-Baker, 1911, P. marginata West, 1940,

Limacodidae From Yemen; Alexey V. Solovyev A; Aidas Saldaitis B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

781 New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa P.W. Crous and M.J. Wingfield Ahstract:Although Africa and Indonesia have not been particularly well surveyed Eucalyptus leaves from Indonesia. The former species is of particular interest, because its anamorph

220

Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mycoscience 41: 595--606, 2000 595 New Leptographium species from Indonesia and Eastern North from pine infested with an Ips sp. in Indonesia. In addition, two unknown species have been collected that the isolates from Indonesia and those from Eastern North America represent three previously un described taxa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from to specify the detection of the steam-boiler fail- ures. Finally we discuss validation and veri#12;cation

Bidoit, Michel

222

Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Elevated CO2 and plant species diversity interact to slow root decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in plant species diversity can result in synergistic increases in decomposition rates, while elevated atmospheric CO2 can slow the decomposition rates; yet it remains unclear how diversity and changes in atmospheric CO2 may interact to alter root decomposition. To investigate how elevated CO2 interacts with changes in root-litter diversity to alter decomposition rates, we conducted a 120-day laboratory incubation. Roots from three species (Trifolium repens, Lespedeza cuneata, and Festuca pratense) grown under ambient or elevated CO2 were incubated individually or in combination in soils that were exposed to ambient or elevated CO2 for five years. Our experiment resulted in two main findings: (1) Roots from T. repens and L. cuneata, both nitrogen (N) fixers, grown under elevated CO2 treatments had significantly slower decomposition rates than similar roots grown under ambient CO2 treatments; but the decomposition rate of F. pratense roots (a non-N-fixing species) was similar regardless of CO2 treatment. (2) Roots of the three species grown under ambient CO2 and decomposed in combination with each other had faster decomposition rates than when they were decomposed as single species. However, roots of the three species grown under elevated CO2 had similar decomposition rates when they were incubated alone or in combination with other species. These data suggest that if elevated CO2 reduces the root decomposition rate of even a few species in the community, it may slow root decomposition of the entire plant community.

De Graaff, Marie-Anne [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Rula, Kelly L [ORNL; Six, Johan W U A [University of California, Davis; Schweitzer, Jennifer A [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A New Species of Parodia (Cactaceae, Notocacteae) from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Species of Parodia (Cactaceae, Notocacteae) from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Marlon C. Machado Grande do Sul, Brazil. jlarocca@unisinos.br ABSTRACT . A new species, Parodia gaucha M. Machado & Larocca (Cactaceae, Notocacteae), from Encruzilhada do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, is described and illustrated

Zürich, Universität

225

A Low Cost Immobilization Agent From an Invasive Marine Alga: Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea Biomass In Bovine Serum Albumin Immobilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives: Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea is a marine green alga which has been widely invading sublittoral ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea since 1991. Inasmuch as there is no eradication method related to this species so far, use of the dried biomass of C.racemosa for immobilization of bovine serum albumin was studied in the present study. Materials and Methods: Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea was collected from Seferihisar ?zmir by SCUBA diving. Immobilization studies were done by using batch technique under different conditions concerning the determination of optimum temperature, ionic strength, pH and adsorbent dosage. Results: Optimum pH, ionic strength, temperature and amount of adsorbent dosage was found as 7 (pH), 50 mM, 25 0 C and 10 mg, respectively. Conclusion: According to results of this paper, dried and powdered form of Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea might be used in some biomolecule immobilization studies as a low cost immobilization agent. This paper proposes an alternative application of biomass of Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea after a possible eradication method which will be carried out in future.

Serum Albuminine; Ynelik D?k; Maliyetli Immobilizasyon Ajan?; Sevilay Cengiz; Levent Cavas; M. Kadir Yurdakoc; Levent Cavas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Williams Abstract Williams Abstract Direct and indirect effects of warming, elevated CO2 and non-native plant invasion on carbon and water cycling in semiarid grassland Principle Investigator: David G. Williams, University of Wyoming Co-Investigators: Elise Pendall, University of Wyoming Abstract:: Our proposed work builds on the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment underway in semiarid grassland of Wyoming. We will evaluate relative sensitivities of carbon and water cycles to elevated CO2 and temperature, and non-native plant invasion, separately and in combination, and distinguish direct from indirect effects of these factors on ecosystem physiology. Location: The PHACE experiment is being conducted at the USDA-ARS High Plains Grasslands Research Station, located near Cheyenne, WY. The ecosystem is a northern mixed-grass prairie consisting of C3 and C4 grasses, C3 forbs and C3 sub-shrubs. Laboratory analyses will be conducted at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

227

Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants  

SciTech Connect

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

Sackschewsky, M.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Malaria in Africa: Vector Species' Niche Models and Relative Risk Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shackelford, Sahotra Sarkar* Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, Shackelford N, Sarkar S (2007) Malaria in Africa: Vector Species' Niche Models and Relative Risk Maps. PLo

Sarkar, Sahotra

229

Phototriggered production of reactive oxygen species by TIO2 nanospheres and rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the study of reactive oxygen species production under the light irradiation of two different types of TiO2 nanocrystals. Both TiO2 spheric NPs and anisotropic nanorods were investigated using activation of the horseradish ...

Bianca Geiseler, Marko Miljevic, Philipp Mller, Ljiljana Fruk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Phylogenetic Relationships among Agamid Lizards of the Laudakia caucasia Species Group: Testing Hypotheses of Biogeographic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-413 90, Go¨ teborg, Sweden; §Institute of Zoology, Turkmenistan Academy of Sciences, Azadi Street 6 the Laudakia cau- casia species group on the Iranian Plateau were inves- tigated using 1708 aligned bases

Schulte, Jim

231

A multidimensional platform for the purification of non-coding RNA species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed interest in non-coding RNA (ncRNA) has led to the discovery of novel RNA species and post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications, and an emerging appreciation for the role of ncRNA in RNA epigenetics. ...

McBee, Megan E.

232

Study of Mercury Transformation with Chlorinated Species under Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mercury (Hg) transformation under homogeneous (gas-phase oxidation reactions primarily involving chlorine species in flue gases) and heterogeneous (gas-surface oxidation reactions involving surface enhanced Hg oxidation (more)

Busireddy, Bhargavi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, where anthropogenic 129 I from

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

234

Assemblathon 2: evaluating de novo methods of genome assembly in three vertebrate species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly. Genome BiolJ: Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indianambitious multi-species genome sequencing projects such as

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Gradient Genesis of Stratospheric Trace Species in the Subtropics and around the Polar Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms that control the formation and decay of meridional gradients in stratospheric trace species in the subtropics and around the polar vortex are investigated using a gradient genesis equation that uses mass-weighted isentropic zonal ...

Kazuyuki Miyazaki; Toshiki Iwasaki

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Species-specific patterns in bivalve larval supply to a coastal embayment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Larval supply is an important process linking reproductive output to recruitment of benthic marine invertebrates. Few species-specific studies of bivalve larvae have been performed due to the lack of suitable methods for ...

Thompson, Christine Mingione

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method of molecular specie alteration by nonresonant laser induced dielectric breakdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Irradiation of a molecular specie by itself or in the presence of a secondary material at a pressure above a threshold value for the particular system by a laser of predetermined minimum power and having a frequency displaced from an absorption line of the specie causes severance of the weakest bond and a yield of products containing at least one dissociative fragment from said specie. A Rogowski type TEA CO.sub.2 --N.sub.2 --He laser has been used successfully on a wide variety of molecular species. Solid, liquid and gaseous end products have been obtained depending upon the starting materials. When solids have been produced they are in the form of microfine particles or microfine aggregates. A neodymium glass laser has also been used successfully.

Ronn, Avigdor M. (Great Neck, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Numerical Simulation of the Transport of Chemically Reactive Species under Land- and Sea-Breeze Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of the transport of chemically reactive species under land- and sea-breeze (LSB) circulations are investigated using a detailed transport/chemistry model, which includes 84 gas-phase and 10 heterogeneous chemical reactions. ...

Toshihiro Kitada; Gregory R. Carmichael; Leonard K. Peters

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

An Empirical Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation for Multiple Chemical Species of Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, flexible framework is proposed for parameterizing the heterogeneous nucleation of ice within clouds. It has empirically derived dependencies on the chemistry and surface area of multiple species of ice nucleus (IN) aerosols. Effects from ...

Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Paul J. DeMott; Constantin Andronache

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Worldwide Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 and Other Trace Gas Species Using Commercial Airlines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New automated observation systems for use in passenger aircraft to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and other trace species have been developed and are described in this paper. The Continuous CO2 Measuring Equipment (CME) is composed ...

T. Machida; H. Matsueda; Y. Sawa; Y. Nakagawa; K. Hirotani; N. Kondo; K. Goto; T. Nakazawa; K. Ishikawa; T. Ogawa

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (completed May 31, 2011)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control Project (Completed May 31, 2010) Description NeuCo, Inc. (which acquired original participant Pegasus Technologies), a developer of power plant control and optimization technologies, demonstrated the capability to optimize mercury speciation and control of emissions from an existing power plant. This demonstration took place at an 890 megawatt (MW) utility boiler in Jewett,

243

Distribution and conservation significance of endemic species of flowering plants in Peru  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Using the data published in the Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Gymnosperms of Peru, we analyzed the elevational distributions of 5323 species reported as endemics from that country as a whole, for 10 families with the highest number of endemic taxa in Peru, and the distribution patterns of these species according to life form. We calculated the density of endemism (number of endemic species divided by area 1000) and absolute number of endemic species among life forms and families, along an elevational gradient. Overall densities of endemics were 1015 times higher at mid-elevation (2000 3500 m) than in the Amazonian lowlands (0500 m). Absolute numbers of endemics peaked at 1500 3000 m for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes, while trees, vines, and lianas showed maxima in the lowlands (0500 m); yet densities of endemics for all life forms peaked at 15003000 m. Among the 10 families with the highest number of endemics, densities of endemics peaked at mid- to high elevation (1500 4500 m), but showed much disparity in the elevational distribution of absolute numbers of endemic species. Finally, the percentage of endemic species to total species is highest for herbs, shrubs, and epiphytes. Given that less than 10 % of the land area for each of the montane zones (20004500 m) is protected compared to 13.529.9 % in the lower elevations (01000 m), we recommend that priority be given to increasing the size of protected areas at mid- to high altitude in the Andean slopes to grant further protection in zones with the highest density of endemics. We also recommend that more emphasis be given to collecting and studying non-trees, since most endemic species belong to that class.

Henk Van; Der Werff; Trisha Consiglio

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The green manure value of seven clover species grown as annual crops on low and high fertility temperate soils.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Annual and perennial clover species may differ in green manure value. Seven clover (Trifolium) species were grown as annual crops on low fertility (Breton) and high fertility 15 (Edmonton) soils in Alberta

Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; O'Donovan, John T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ten-year growth of woody species planted in reclaimed mined banks with different slopes  

SciTech Connect

In landscape reconstruction in an opencast coal mine, a gradient of slopes can be obtained. The slope gradient can affect different processes, such as plant growth, especially in semi-arid conditions. On the other hand, to favor the heterogeneity of habitats and ensure long-term restoration, late successional woody species have been planted but with heterogeneous results. In this study, the effect of a slope gradient (from 11.4 to 15.5 degrees) on the growth and survival of five Mediterranean woody species 10 years after the reconstruction of mining banks was evaluated. Slope gradient reduced height growth significantly from 10 cm degree{sup -1} (lentish) to 25 cm degree{sup -1} (pine) in 10-year- old woody species. This gradient also reduced basal diameter growth from 0.22 mm degree{sup -1} (juniper) to 0.58 mm degree{sup -1} (pine). Survival and slope were not significantly correlated. Growth and survival of the 10-year- old woody species were equal to or higher than those of the same species in other afforestations in semi-arid conditions. This outcome demonstrates the adequacy of species and applied techniques of restoration that allow a long-term reliability of reclaimed mine slopes.

Badia, D.; Valero, R.; Gracia, A.; Marti, C.; Molina, F. [Escuela Politecnica Superior, Huesca (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Lessons Learned from Nonproliferation Successes and Failures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fishes; the effects of non-native species on food supply; and the proliferation of contaminants River to support naturally produced native fishes." Added to this is the proliferation of non columbia river Treaty with Stephen R. Oliver, Vice President of Generation Asset Management

Katz, Jonathan I.

248

Aspects of the comparison of stratospheric trace species measurements with photochemical models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation and measurement of reservoir species, including H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, ClONO/sub 2/, HNO/sub 4/, HOCl, N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and others, can potentially test some portions of photochemical models of the stratosphere, leading to improvements and increased confidence in model predictions. But abundance measurements of a single reservoir species without accompanying values for other species do not serve, in most cases, to constrain the related model mechanism and parameters within the recognized uncertainties. This follows from the sensitivity of abundance of a species to fluctuations in its long-lived precursors from transport processes. A better test of theory would be provided by correlation studies in which precursor concentrations and photolytic fluxes are measured simultaneously and in the same air volume as the reservoir species. Three recent reported differing observations or upper limits for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ give an example of the difficulties. All three reported values could be nearly consistent with the current LLNL one-dimensional stratospheric photochemical model, depending on the values of O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/ and H/sub 2/O appropriate to each measurement. The important precursors in each case can be identified by consideration of the appropriate kinetics and observed precursor variability. 10 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

250

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

System and method for generating current by selective minority species heating  

SciTech Connect

A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of low-frequency waves into the plasma by means of phased antenna arrays or phased waveguide arrays. The plasma is prepared with a minority ion species of different charge state and different gyrofrequency from the majority ion species. The wave frequency and wave phasing are chosen such that the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by minority species ions traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Valid flow combinations for stable sheath in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical study is done of the entry criterion for the plasma flow into the electrostatic boundary layer, or sheath, forming in a magnetized multiple ion species plasma. Finding valid entry velocity combinations in a magnetized set up requires a magnetized equivalent of the generalized Bohm criterion. A magnetized generalized entry criterion is obtained with the scale length distribution in a region of validity for the stable solutions. The analysis finds that the valid entry flow velocity combinations with distinct values of individual ion species can correspond to a unique system phase velocity. Magnetization effects govern the region of validity whose boundaries collapse to the unmagnetized sheath criterion in the limit of normal incidence, independent of the strength of the magnetic field. Considerably smaller entry velocities, in comparison to the unmagnetized system sound velocity, are recovered for the species in appropriate regime of magnetization in the cases of oblique incidences.

Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Species List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The list is in tab-delimited format can contains the following information ... Redistribution rights for CAS registry numbers are reserved by the American ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Exact Solution for the Generalized Bohm Criterion in a Two-Ion-Species Plasma  

SciTech Connect

For a weakly collisional two-ion species plasma, it is shown that the minimum phase velocity of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) at the sheath-presheath boundary is equal to twice the phase velocity in the bulk plasma. This condition provides a theoretical basis for the experimental results that each ion species leaves the plasma with a drift velocity equal to the IAW phase velocity in the bulk plasma [D. Lee et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 041505 (2007)]. It is shown that this result is a consequence of the generalized Bohm criterion and fluid expressions for the IAW phase velocities.

Lee, Dongsoo; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Oksuz, Lutfi [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, Suleyman Demirel Universitesi, Isparta 32260 (Turkey)

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

Improved method for the production of atomic ion species from plasma ion sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique to enhance the yield of neutral atomic and ionic species (H{sup +}, D{sup +}, O{sup +}, N{sup +}, etc.) from plasmas. The technique involves the addition of catalyzing agents to the ion discharge. Effective catalysts include H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}, among others, with the most effective being water (H{sub 2}O). This technique has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory, where microwave produced beams consisting essentially of 100% atomic neutral species (H) have been generated, and ion beams of close to 100% purity have been generated.

Spence, D.; Lykke, K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Signatures of selection in loci governing major colour patterns in Heliconius butterflies and related species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

original format HM000... . 2Total bps: total length, in basepairs, of the annotated gene. 3Lineage-based: Heliconius lineage-based background ? estimates (branch model = 0 in COD EML) using BAC sequences of three species ( H. melpomene , H . erato , H... original format HM000... . 2Total bps: total length, in basepairs, of the annotated gene. 3Lineage-based: Heliconius lineage-based background ? estimates (branch model = 0 in COD EML) using BAC sequences of three species ( H. melpomene , H . erato , H...

Wu, Grace C; Joron, Mathieu; Jiggins, Chris D

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

Multiple rearrangements in cryptic species of electric knifefish, Gymnotus carapo (Gymnotidae, Gymnotiformes) revealed by chromosome painting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Erythrinidae). Brazilian Journal of Genetics 1978, 1(2):103-120. 34. Dover GA: Molecular drive: a cohesive mode of species evolution. Nature 1982, 299:111-117. 35. Grenier E, Castagnone-Sereno P, Abad P: Satellite DNA sequences as taxonomic markers... in nematodes of agronomic interest. Parasitology Today 1997, 13(10):398-401. 36. Abadon M, Grenier E, Laumond C, Abad P: A species-specific satellite DNA from the entomopathogenic nmatode Heterorhabditis indicus. Genome 1998, 41:148-153. doi: 10...

Nagamachi, Cleusa Y; Pieczarka, Julio C; Milhomem, Susana S R; O'Brien, Patricia C M; de Souza, Augusto C P; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

Drift mode in a bounded plasma having two-ion species  

SciTech Connect

The drift wave is investigated in a two-ion species plasma in several different cases. The global drift mode is studied in a plasma bounded in a cylinder having Gaussian density profile corresponding to different poloidal wavenumbers. The frequency of the mode becomes a little larger when it is investigated without including the ion cyclotron wave dynamics. The effect of magnetic shear on the wave propagation along the density gradient is studied in a Cartesian geometry assuming absorbing boundary. It is found that the wave amplitude is reduced when two-ion species are present (with the same concentration) compared to pure electron-ion plasma.

Ahmad, Ali; Sajid, M.; Saleem, H. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad, Pakistan and Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad, Pakistan and Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multiple prey traits, multiple predators: keys to understanding complex species interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Species interactions generate both natural selection and ecological community structure. Among the more interesting species interactions are those that create adaptive tradeoffs-where phenotypes conferring improved performance in interactions with one species decrease performance with another. Such tradeoffs create divergent natural selection and favor the evolution of strategies such as phenotypic plasticity. Functional tradeoffs may also provide little "enemy-free space" for a focal species in complex communities, resulting in emergent ecological impacts. Emergent community properties arise when community patterns are not predicted based on additive knowledge of pairwise interactions. These emergent impacts typically result from indirect effects, where interactions between two species depend on intermediary species. In this thesis, I examined constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and addressed its potential significance in community dynamics. I further reviewed concepts and issues related to linking functional and community studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying community structure. I proposed an integrative approach to the subject, emphasizing four major areas of promise, by combining perspectives of ecology and evolution. Freshwater physid snails induce defensive phenotypes in the presence of specialized molluscivorous sunfish. While predator-induced shells reduce predation from shell-crushing fish, I examined whether non-predatory fish induced unnecessary responses. I raised freshwater snails, Physella virgata, with either molluscivorous or non-molluscivorous sunfish species. Regardless of the predator class with which they were raised, snails exhibited two induced responses: reduced growth, and development of rotund shells. Although induced responses are adaptive in the presence of molluscivorous species, responding unnecessarily to non-molluscivores is maladaptive. Both growth reduction and rotund shells entail substantial costs without compensatory benefits in the absence of predatory fish. A pluralistic approach to studying ecological interactions shaping community dynamics should prove profitable in revealing details of complex interactions. I primarily illustrate these principles with case studies involving predation ecology in the freshwater snail-fish-crayfish model system. The system illustrates how predator impacts on prey are mediated by multiple prey traits, correlations between traits, functional tradeoffs in predator defense, interactions between predators, and interactions with other community members. These case studies demonstrate the importance of a multiple-trait and multiple-environment perspective in functional ecological studies.

Langerhans, Randall Brian

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Similar Treatment Outcomes for Radical Cystectomy and Radical Radiotherapy in Invasive Bladder Cancer Treated at a United Kingdom Specialist Treatment Center  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To conduct a retrospective analysis within a large university teaching hospital, comparing outcomes between patients receiving either radical surgery or radiotherapy as curative treatment for bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: Between March 1996 and December 2000, 169 patients were treated radically for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Data were collected from patient notes. Statistical analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to compare radiotherapy and surgical outcome data. Results: There was no difference in overall, cause-specific, and distant recurrence-free survival at 5 years between the two groups, despite the radiotherapy group being older (median age, 75.3 years vs. 68.2 years). There were 31 local bladder recurrences in the radiotherapy group (24 solitary), but there was no significant difference in distant recurrence-free survival. In a more recent (2002-2006) cohort, the median age of radiotherapy patients but not the cystectomy patients was higher than in the 1996-2000 cohort (78.4 years vs. 75.3 years for radiotherapy and 67.9 years vs. 68.2 years for surgery). Conclusions: Although the patients undergoing radical cystectomy were significantly younger than the radiotherapy patients, treatment modality did not influence survival. Bladder cancer patients are an increasingly elderly group. Radical radiotherapy is a viable treatment option for these patients, with the advantage of organ preservation.

Kotwal, Sanjeev [Pyrah Department of Urology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Choudhury, Ananya [Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre, Section of Oncology, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Johnston, Colin [Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre, Section of Oncology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Paul, Alan B.; Whelan, Peter [Pyrah Department of Urology, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Kiltie, Anne E. [Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre, Section of Oncology, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.e.kiltie@leeds.ac.uk

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Viruses in laboratory-reared cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae), is a non-native species threatening a variety of native cacti, particularly endangered species of Opuntia (Zimmerman et al. 2001), on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Cactoblastis cactorum populations have expanded from Florida northward along the Atlantic coast as far as Charleston, SC, and westward along the Gulf of Mexico to Dauphin Island, south of Mobile, AL. It is feared that further movement to the west will allow C. cactorum to enter the US desert Southwest and Mexico, particularly the latter. Numerous cactus species, especially those of the genera Opuntia and Nopalea, are native to the U.S. and Mexico. Local economies based on agricultural and horticultural uses of cacti could be devastated by C. cactorum (Vigueras and Portillo 2001). A bi-national control program between the US and Mexico is being developed, utilizing the sterile insect technique (SIT). In the SIT program, newly emerged moths are irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source and released to mate with wild individuals. The radiation dose completely sterilizes the females and partially sterilizes the males. When irradiated males mate with wild females, the F1 progeny of these matings are sterile. In order for the SIT program to succeed, large numbers of moths must be reared from egg to adult on artificial diet in a quarantined rearing facility (Carpenter et al. 2001). Irradiated insects must then be released in large numbers at the leading edge of the invasive population and at times which coincide with the presence of wild individuals available for mating. Mortality from disease in the rearing colony disrupts the SIT program by reducing the numbers of insects available for release.

Marti, O.G.; Myers, R.E.; Carpenter, J.E. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Crop Protection and Management Research Laboratory, PO Box 748, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States); Styer, E.L. [University of Georgia, Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory, PO Box 1389, Tifton, GA 31794 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Establishment Success of native Versus Non-Native Herbaceous Seed Mixes on a Revegetated Roadside in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a B.A. in Philosophy from Texas A&M as well as a Masters inCurly mesquitegrass in Texas and northern Mexico. WrightiaFlora of North Central Texas. BRIT, Fort Worth, Texas.

Tinsley, M. Jeannine; Simmons, Mark T.; Windhager, Steve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Exclusion of Non-Native Voters from a Final Plebiscite in Puerto Rico: Law and Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??U.S. Puerto Rico relations have always been mystifying to countless U.S. citizens, due to inconsistent policies and judicial decisions from the United States. Puerto Ricans (more)

Rodriguez, Ramon Antonio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cherenkov radiation of shear Alfven waves in plasmas with two ion species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A calculation is presented of the radiation pattern of shear Alfven waves generated by a burst of charged particles in a charge-neutral plasma with two-ions of differing charge-to-mass ratios. The wake pattern is obtained for the inertial and kinetic regimes of wave propagation. Due to the presence of two ion-species, the Alfven waves propagate within two different frequency bands separated by a gap. One band is restricted to frequencies below the cyclotron frequency of the heavier species and the other to frequencies between the ion-ion hybrid frequency and the cyclotron frequency of the lighter species. The radiation pattern in the lower frequency band is found to exhibit essentially the same properties reported in a previous study [Van Compernolle et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 082101 (2008)] of a single species plasma. However, the upper frequency band differs from the lower one in that it always allows for the Cherenkov radiation condition to be met. The methodology is extended to examine the Alfvenic wake of point-charges in the inertial and adiabatic regimes. The adiabatic regime is illustrated for conditions applicable to fusion-born alpha particles in ITER.

Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

(208) 334-2189 Fax (208) 334-2172 OFFICE OF SPECIES CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(208) 334-2189 Fax (208) 334-2172 OFFICE OF SPECIES CONSERVATION C.L. "BUTCH" OTTER P.O. Box Boise, Idaho 83702 May 18, 2009 Nancy Leonard Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 SW Sixth on the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (Council) draft list of High Level Indicators (HLIs

270

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

271

Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'[Phys. Plasmas 20, 012701 (2013)  

SciTech Connect

A recent paper presents numerical simulations of shock waves in a two-ion-component plasma, investigating how species separation occurring in the latter can affect the nuclear fusion yield of inertial confinement fusion targets. Here, it is shown that an important physical mechanism has obviously been omitted in those calculations, which thus lead to significantly overestimated results.

Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Abstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

52820). Sequence analysis of ScNLE protein A BLAST search of the GenBank protein database revealed transcription factors, we searched the ScNLE promoter for different sequence motifs recog- nizedAbstract We have isolated a plant NOTCHLESS (NLE) homolog from the wild potato species Solanum

273

Abstracts of Presentation: Aquatic Species Program Annual Review Meeting, Golden, Colorado, 24-25 September 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the aquatic species program is to produce gasoline and diesel fuels from microalgae grown in saline waters of the desert southwest. Microalgae are known to accumulate lipids in large quantities and can thrive in high salinity water which currently has no other use.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Catches of Monk, Hake and other species in western  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FISHERIES SCIENCE PARTNERSHIP Catches of Monk, Hake and other species in western waters by FV;2 Introduction The DEFRA-funded Fisheries Science Partnership was established between DEFRA1 , CEFAS2 and NFFO3 fished with two 9-metre beam trawls fitted with chain mats and 3-bar flip-up ropes. Codends were

275

Search biases, frequency-dependent predation and species co-existence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search biases, frequency-dependent predation and species co-existence Christopher J. Whelan, 1, Palos Heights, IL 60463, USA ABSTRACT Search biases ­ behaviours that intentionally or unintentionally (hyperpredation) that incorporated a search bias influenced by the frequency of prey. We extend their model

Brown, Joel S.

276

ALR-015V2 1 Productivity and susceptibility analysis for species caught in Atlantic tuna fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALR-015V2 1 1 Productivity and susceptibility analysis for species caught in Atlantic tuna for assisting the management of fisheries from an ecosystem perspective. Atlantic tuna fisheries, managed by the20 International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), are economically

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Whole-genome comparative annotation and regulatory motif discovery in multiple yeast species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In [13] we reported the genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. mikatae and S. bayanus and compared these three yeast species to their close relative, S. cerevisiae. Genome-wide comparative analysis allowed the identification of functionally ... Keywords: comparative genomics, computational biology, genome annotation, regulatory motif discovery

Manolis Kamvysselis; Nick Patterso; Bruce Birren; Bonnie Berger; Eric Lander

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Appendix C: Species Accounts C-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and stream in northern Japan demonstrating the exchange of reciprocal energy subsidies describe pathways by which energy, nutrients and other materials make their way to species of cultural, they are of immense practical and theoretical importance. They characterize, in a relatively simple way, how energy

280

Underwater temporary threshold shift induced by octave-band noise in three species of pinniped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater temporary threshold shift induced by octave-band noise in three species of pinniped at center frequency . Each subject was trained to dive into a noise field and remain stationed underwater airborne. When human divers were tested underwater, for instance, the resultant levels of TTS were much

Reichmuth, Colleen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mimicry and foraging behaviour of two tropical sand-flat octopus species off North Sulawesi, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Indonesia ROGER T. HANLON1 *, LOU-ANNE CONROY1 and JOHN W. FORSYTHE2 1 Marine Resources Center, Marine-called `mimic octopuses' of tropical Indonesia are reputed to mimic up to 13 species of other local marine in the `mimic octopus' of the Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia (Steene, 1998; Tackett & Tackett, 1997

Hanlon, Roger T.

282

Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

On the Determination of Age of Air Trends from Atmospheric Trace Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace chemical species have been used in numerical models to calculate the age of air (AOA), which is a measure of the strength of the mean meridional circulation. The trend in the AOA has also been computed and found to be negative in ...

Rolando R. Garcia; William J. Randel; Douglas E. Kinnison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the ????rst time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

D.R. Coyle; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels-including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability-are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

How environmental conditions affect canopy leaf-level photosynthesis in four deciduous tree species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Species composition of temperate forests vary with successional age and seems likely to change in response to significant global climate change. Because photosynthesis rates in co-occurring tree species can differ in their sensitivity to environmental conditions, these changes in species composition are likely to alter the carbon dynamics of temperate forests. To help improve their understanding of such atmosphere-biosphere interactions, the authors explored changes in leaf-level photosynthesis in a 60--70 yr old temperate mixed-deciduous forest in Petersham, Massachusetts (USA). Diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions differentially influenced in situ leaf-level photosynthesis rates in the canopies of four mature temperate deciduous tree species: red oak (Quercus rubra), red maple (Acer rubrum), white birch (Betula papyrifera), and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis). The authors measured in situ photosynthesis at two heights within the canopies through a diurnal time course on 7 d over two growing seasons. They simultaneously measured a suite of environmental conditions surrounding the leaf at the time of each measurement. The authors used path analysis to examine the influence of environmental factors on in situ photosynthesis in the tree canopies.

Bassow, S.L.; Bazzaz, F.A. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

COOPERATION WITH THE STATES THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT SECTION 6 PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 of the ESA, a State, through the appropriate State agency or agencies, may apply to enter into one(c)(1) for animals): (A) authority resides in the State agency to conserve resident species of fish or wildlife determined by the State agency or the Secretary to be endangered or threatened; (B) the State

288

Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among

290

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels--including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability--are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Foliar response of ten tree species exposed to SO/sub 2/ air pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the relative susceptibility to SO/sub 2/ damage among 4 birch species - Scotch, Austrian, and eastern white pines, white ash, black cherry, and hybrid poplar - is reported. Controlled exposures were performed and the percentages of plants injured and the percentages of leaf areas damaged were recorded.

Biggs, A.R.; Davis, D.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

BIOLOGY OF FIVE SPECIES OF SEAROBINS (PISCES, TRIGLIDAE) FROM THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOLOGY OF FIVE SPECIES OF SEAROBINS (PISCES, TRIGLIDAE) FROM THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO to be restricted almost exclusively to the eastern portion of the Gulf of Mexico, while Bellator militaris, P in shrimp trawls along the coast ofthe Gulf of Mexico where they comprise an important ele- ment

293

Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 3 Genetic Engineering Approaches for Trait Development in Brassica Oilseed Species Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

295

The Influence of Woodlot Size and Location in Suburban and Rural Matrices on Bird Species Richness and Individual Abundance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study assessed the influence of woodlot area and matrix composition on bird species richness and individual abundance. Bird surveys were conducted in winter 2004 (more)

Chartier, Neil Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

High Resolution Imaging of in situ Root Hair Development to Assess Oilseed Species Responses to Water Stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3: Root hair geometry for canola, camelina, flax, and lentilof four crop species, canola (Brassica napus), camelina (RSA (Pcanola and camelina had the

Hammac, Warren Ashley; Pan, William; Bolton, Ronald; Koenig, Richard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in the same photobioreactor system should be similar at light limited growth conditions based on photon flux. It is how the algae 'allocate' this energy captured that will vary: Data will be presented that shows that Botryococcus invests greater energy in oil production than Chlorella under these growth conditions. In essence, the Chlorella can grow 'fast and lean' or can be slowed to grow 'slow and fat'. The overall energy potential between the Chlorella and Botryococcus, then, becomes much more equivalent on a per-photon basis. This work will indicate an interesting relationship between two very different algae species, in terms of growth rate, lipid content and composition, and energy efficiency of the overall process. The presentation will indicate that in light-limited growth, it cannot be assumed that either rapid growth rate or lipid production rate can be used as stand-alone indicators of which species-lipid relationships will truly be more effective in algae-to-fuels scenarios.

Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Species specific identification of spore-producing microbes using the gene sequence of small acid-soluble spore coat proteins for amplification based diagnostics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers for the detection of certain Bacillus species, such as Bacillus anthracis. The primers specifically amplify only DNA found in the target species and can distinguish closely related species. Species-specific PCR primers for Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus globigii and Clostridium perfringens are disclosed. The primers are directed to unique sequences within sasp (small acid soluble protein) genes.

McKinney, Nancy (Decatur, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Gas species, their evolution and segregation through the ITER vacuum systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper takes the ITER fueling requirements and current knowledge of gas balance and exhaust from operating tokamaks to predict all likely gas inputs into the ITER Vacuum systems. Areas where gas dynamics modeling is relevant to the ITER design are highlighted. The design and operation of the ITER vacuum system gives an element of segregation of different gas flows and species. This paper analyses the time dependent gas segregation in the vacuum system resulting from different temperature dependences of cryogenic sorption and condensation processes of different gas species. As a specific example, the optimal transfer of Ar-41 through the vacuum system is studied with respect to its decay and the resulting effects on the design of system components.

Pearce, R.J.H. [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Antipenkov, Alexander [ITER Joint Work Site, Cadarache; Bersier, Jean-Louis [ITER Joint Work Site, Cadarache; Boussier, Bastien [ITER Joint Work Site, Cadarache; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Gardner, Walter L [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode. The study shows that two types of hydroxyl intermediates (non-hydrated OH and hydrated OH) with distinct activities coexist on a fuel-cell cathode. The performance of polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) fuel cells is limited by the reduction at the cathode of various oxygenated intermediates in the four-electron pathway of the oxygen reduction reaction. A research team led by SLAC scientists performed x-ray spectroscopy identification and DFT simulations of oxygenated intermediates on a platinum fuel-cell cathode

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SELECTING SPECIES FOR MARINE ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES AROUND AMCHITKA: PLANNING FOR DIVERSE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring and Assessment (2006) 123: 371-391 Monitoring and Assessment (2006) 123: 371-391 DOI: 10.1007/~10661-006-9203-2 @ Springer 2006 SELECTING SPECIES FOR MARINE ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES AROUND AMCHITKA: PLANNING FOR DIVERSE GOALS AND INTERESTS JOANNA BURGER*, MICHAEL GOCHFELD and STEPHEN JEWETT Rutgers University ('author for correspondence, e-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu) (Received 27 October 2005; accepted 16 January 2006) Abstract. Considerable attention has been devoted to selecting bioindicator species as part of moni- toring programs for exposure and effects from contaminants in the environment. Yet the rationale for selection of bioindicators is often literature-based, rather than developed with a firm site-specific base of data on contaminant levels in a diverse range of organisms at different trophic levels in the same

302

A comparison of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year-round sampling. This study compares the environmental {sup 137}Cs concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage {sup 137}Cs concentrations. The study`s objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation {sup 137}Cs concentrations are statistically the same.

Rangel, R.C.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Tissue distribution as a factor in species susceptibility to toxicity and hazard assessment. Example: methylmercury  

SciTech Connect

Data on the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of methylmercury(MeHg) in cats and humans were utilized as an example of how such data can assist in extrapolating toxicity data between animal species. These data demonstrate that the whole-body half-time for clearance of MeHg was the same for cats and humans and that the concentration of MeHg in the brain at comparable signs of toxicity were the same (10 ppM) in the two species. However, the blood:brain ratio of MeHg concentration was 10 times as high in cats (1:1) as humans (1:10). From these data it was hypothesized that the no-effect level of methylmercury intake in cats should be 10 times that for humans. This hypothesis was verified from toxia data on MeHg toxicity in cats and humans.

Willes, R.F.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

Hinojosa, H. [comp.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Removal and Transformation of Sulfur Species During Regeneration of Poisoned Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur K-edge XANES was used to monitor sulfur species transforming from sulfides to sulfates during steam + air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. The catalyst was tested for multiple reaction/regeneration cycles. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H{sub 2}S-poisoned nickel catalyst. Although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H{sub 2} reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Identification of Non-Pertechnetate Species in Hanford Tank Waste, Their Synthesis, Characterization, and Fundamental Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technetium, as pertechnetate (TcO4 -), is a mobile species in the environment. This characteristic, along with its long half-life, (99Tc, t1/2 = 213,000 a) makes technetium a major contributor to the long-term hazard associated with low level waste (LLW) disposal. Technetium partitioning from the nuclear waste at DOE sites may be required so that the LLW forms meet DOE performance assessment criteria. Technetium separations assume that technetium exists as TcO4 - in the waste. However, years of thermal, chemical, and radiolytic digestion in the presence of organic material, has transformed much of the TcO4 - into unidentified, stable, reduced, technetium complexes. To successfully partition technetium from tank wastes, it will be necessary to either remove these technetium species with a new process, or reoxidize them to TcO4 - so that conventional pertechnetate separation schemes will be successful.

Schroeder, Norman C.; Ashley, Kenneth R.; Olivares, Jose A.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Firewood crops: shrub and tree species for energy production. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one-third of the world's population depends on wood for cooking and heating. Eighty-six percent of all the wood consumed annually in the developing countries is used for fuel, and of this total at least half is used for cooking. In the face of global concern over the dwindling supply of firewood, the rate of forest decimation to provide basic human necessities in developing countries is alarming. This report suggests potentially significant fuelwood candidates for introduction to suitable environments. Primary emphasis is on species suitable for growing firewood for individual family needs. However, species suited to plantation cultivation for fueling small industrial factors, electric generators, and crop driers are also considered.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine  

SciTech Connect

Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

Hamaguchi, Satoshi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz Kuntner1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz, is grossly underestimated. Most species build large webs at forest edges, clearings, and gardens niche: casting its web across streams, rivers and lakes, so that the orb is suspended above water

Agnarsson, Ingi

310

Speci cation and Veri cation of a Steam-Boiler with Signal-Coq Micka l Kerb uf1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speci cation and Veri cation of a Steam-Boiler with Signal-Coq Micka l Kerb uf1 , David Nowak2 assistant, Coq, for the speci cation and the veri cation of co-inductive properties of the well-known steam-boiler cation tools. Keywords: synchronous programming, theorem proving, the steam- boiler problem. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

Quantification, Localization, and Speciation of Selenium in Seeds of Canola and Two Mustard Species Compared to Seed-Meals Produced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantification, Localization, and Speciation of Selenium in Seeds of Canola and Two Mustard Species with Se. We report a chemical analysis of Se in Brassica seeds (canola, Indian mustard, and white mustard shoots of several Brassica species, canola (Brassica napus), Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), and white

312

Global tropospheric chemistry models for radiatively important trace species: Design and research recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Changes in the Earth`s climate could significantly affect regional and global concentrations of trace species that are criteria pollutants regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The policy community also needs to know how changes in global natural and anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, particulate aerosols, and aerosol precursors will affect the distribution and concentration of these pollutants. This report maps out one path for obtaining this information.

Barchet, W.R.; Brothers, A.J.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.; Ghan, S.J.; Saylor, R.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pelleted and resuspended three times in fresh ice cold fixative (3:1 methanol:acetic acid), then kept at ?20C until use. The chromosomes of other Anostomidae species (L. friderici, L. striatus, L. lacustris, Schizodon borelii and S. isognathus) were... . latipes. Genetics 2007, 175:13351340. 29. Henning F, Moyss CB, Calcagnotto D, Meyer A, Almeida-Toledo LF: Independent fusions and recent origins of sex chromosomes in the evolution and diversification of glass knife fishes (Eigenmannia). Heredity 2011...

Parise-Maltempi, Patrcia P; da Silva, Edson L; Rens, Willem; Dearden, Frances; OBrien, Patricia CM; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Behavior of radioactive species during water injection into alloy breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion safety experiment was conducted to determine the consequences of water injection into lead-lithium alloy under postulated reactor accident conditions. The fraction of water reacted, quantity of hydrogen produced, and behavior of radioactive species associated with the use of this alloy as a breeder material were determined. The reaction products were identified, and the aerosol was characterized for particle size, chemical composition, and deposition rate. 2 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Jeppson, D.W.; Serinni, G. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA); Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Optimal nitrogen application rates for three intensively-managed hardwood tree species in the southeastern USA.  

SciTech Connect

Forest production can be limited by nutrient and water availability, and tree species are expected to respond differently to fertilization and irrigation. Despite these common expectations, multi-species comparisons are rare, especially ones implementing a range of fertilization rates crossed with irrigation. This study compares the response of three forest hardwood species to numerous nitrogen (N) fertilization levels and water availability using a novel non-replicated technique. A range of N levels was included to determine how N affected the growth response curve, and statistical procedures for comparing these non-linear response functions are presented. We used growth and yield data to calculate the Land Expectation Value (LEV) for these intensive management treatments, and to determine the optimal growing conditions (accounting for tree productivity and grower expenses). To accomplish these objectives, we used a series of cottonwood, sycamore, and sweetgum plots that received a range of N fertilization with or without irrigation. Regression is an economical approach to define treatment responses in large-scale experiments, and we recommend >3 treatment levels so the response of any single plot does not disproportionally influence the line. The non-replicated plots showed a strong positive N response below 150 kg N ha -1 yr -1, beyond which little response was observed. However, different amounts of fertilization were required for the greatest biomass accumulation rate in each tree species. Cottonwood and sycamore growth was optimized with less than 150 kg N ha -1 yr -1 while sweetgum growth was optimized with less than 100 kg N ha -1 yr -1. Results from this experiment should be representative of many of the nutrient-poor soils in the Coastal Plain in the southeastern USA. The LEVs were not positive for any treatment x genotype combination tested when using irrigation or liquid fertilizer, but our analysis showed that several non-irrigated treatments in sycamore and sweetgum did result in positive LEVs when fertilized with granular urea.

Coyle, David; Aubrey, Doug P.; Siry, Jacek P.; Volfovicz-Leon, Roberto R.; Coleman, Mark D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Assessment of FTIR and Tunable Diode Laser Monitoring of Combustion-Based Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy (TDLAS) make continuous in-situ combustion measurements of boiler gases possible and have already demonstrated an ability to make temperature measurements as well as conventional species concentration and density measurements in many applications. The two spectroscopic techniques permit a new generation and type of combustion sensors based on infrared absorption spectroscopy. This report reviews the basic theory behind th...

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Role of Temperature and Nutritional Status in Impingement of Clupeid Fish Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Episodic impingement of high numbers of juvenile and adult clupeid fish species such as gizzard and threadfin shad, menhaden, and herring is a common occurrence, particularly during winter at many power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). In fact, annual impingement estimates are frequently dominated by the large numbers of clupeids associated with these episodes. Minimizing the number of fish impinged at CWIS is important for both environmental protection and operational reasons. This report p...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Screening and characterizing oleaginous microalgal species from the southeastern United States. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to select and characterize promising algal species which tolerate high light intensities, temperature variations and accumulate lipids. Samples have been collected from freshwater and saltwater locations in the State of Alabama and intertidal regions of the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were screened through a multi-step process. Selected species: Cyclotella, Nitzschia, Chlorella, Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus, have been examined for growth requirements. Approximate cellular composition of these species was determined. This report describes accomplishments from February 1984 to January 1985. During this period, collection trips were made to Dauphin Island near the Alabama coast in the summer of 1984. Over sixty strains were isolated, and of these six were ranked as good growers. Two diatoms were isolated that are of particular interest because of their ability to accumulate high lipids. Cyclotella tolerates high temperatures (30/sup 0/-35/sup 0/C), grows at moderate salinities (15-25 parts per thousand), and with nitrogen stress accumulates 42% of its dry weight as lipid. Hantzschia is a large diatom that also grows well at elevated temperatures and full strength seawater. Hantzschia can accumulate as much as 66% of its dry weight as lipid. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Tadros, M.G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Experimental Test of Instability-Enhanced Collisional Friction for Determining Ion Loss in Two Ion Species Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments have shown that ions in weakly collisional plasmas containing two ion species of comparable densities nearly reach a common velocity at the sheath edge. A new theory suggests that collisional friction between the two ion species enhanced by two stream instability reduces the drift velocity of each ion species relative to each other near the sheath edge and finds that the difference in velocities at the sheath edge depends on the relative concentrations of the species. It is small when the concentrations are comparable and is large, with each species reaching its own Bohm velocity, when the relative concentration differences are large. To test these findings, ion drift velocities were measured with laser-induced fluorescence in argon-xenon plasmas. We show that the predictions are in excellent agreement with the first experimental tests of the new model.

Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, University of San Diego, San Diego, California 92110 (United States)

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods involve bubbling carbon dioxide (CO_(2)) gas into the media to provide a carbon source for photosynthesis, but this can be very inefficient releasing most CO_(2) back into the atmosphere. This research began by investigating the effect of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO_(3)) in the growth media as an alternative carbon source to bubbling CO_(2) into the cultures. The second part examined if NaHCO_(3) could act as a lipid trigger in higher (10.0 g/L) concentrations. The microalgae species Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta), Mayamaea spp. (Baciallariophyta) and Synechoccocus sp. (Cyanophyta) were grown with 0.0 g/L, 0.5g/L, 1.0 g/L, 2.0 g/L and 5.0 g/L dissolved NaHCO_(3) in modified seawater (f/2) media. To investigate effects of NaHCO_(3) on lipid accumulation, growth media cultures were divided into two ?lipid phase? medias containing either 0.0g/L (non-boosted) or 10.0 g/L (boosted) NaHCO_(3) treatments. Culture densities were determined using spectrophotometry, which showed both all three species are able to successfully grow in media ameliorated with these high NaHCO_(3) concentrations. Highest growth phase culture densities occurred in NaHCO_(3) concentrations of 2.0 g/L for D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp., and the 5.0 g/L treatment for Synechoccocus sp. Highest growth rates occurred in the 5.0 g/L NaHCO_(3) concentration treatments for D. tertiolecta, Mayamaea spp., and Synechoccocus sp. (0.205 d-1 0.010, 0.119 d-1 0.004, and 0.372 d-1 0.003 respectively). As a lipid accumulation trigger two of the three species (D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp) had their highest end day oil indices in a 10.0 g/L treatment. Highest oil indices occurred in boosted 5.0 g/L Dunaliella tertiolecta and 2.0 g/L Mayamaea spp. (13136 895 and 62844 8080 respectively (relative units)). The results obtained indicate NaHCO3 could be used as a photosynthetic carbon source for growth in all three species and a lipid trigger for D. tertiolecta and Mayamaea spp.

Gore, Matthew

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Non-Invasive Energy Meter  

Sandia has developed an energy monitoring device that measures energy from liquid flow systems (e.g., solar systems) using a simple technique that ...

325

Twelve-Month Prostate-Specific Antigen Values and Perineural Invasion as Strong Independent Prognostic Variables of Long-Term Biochemical Outcome After Prostate Seed Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (ptPSA) values at 12 months and other clinical parameters predict long-term PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) following prostate seed brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Records of 204 hormone-naieve patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated at St. Mary's Regional Medical Center in Reno, NV, and at Carson Tahoe Regional Medical Center in Carson City, NV, between 1998 and 2003, using I-125 or Pd-103 seed brachytherapy, were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment planning was done using a preplanned, modified peripheral loading technique. A total of 185 of 204 patients had PSA records at 12 months after implant. Variables included were age, initial pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group (RG), perineural invasion (PNI), external beam boost, dose, and ptPSA levels at 12 months with cutpoints at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml. Results: Median follow-up was 80 months, and median age was 69 years. The numbers of patients stratified by NCCN low, intermediate, and high RG were 110:65:10, respectively. Monotherapy and boost prescription doses were 145 Gy and 110 Gy for I-125, and 125 Gy and 100 Gy for Pd-103 seeds, respectively. The median dose (D90) was 95.4% of the prescribed dose. The 5-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml were 98.5%, 85.7%, 61.5%, and 22.2%, respectively. The 10-year PRFS at the 12-months ptPSA levels of {<=}1 and 1.01 to 2.00 ng/ml were 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, both ptPSA and PNI were significant independent predictors of PRFS. Hazard ratios (HR) for ptPSA levels at {<=}1, 1.01 to 2.00, 2.01 to 3.00, and >3.00 ng/ml at 12 months were 1, 4.96, 27.57, and 65.10, respectively. PNI had an HR of 6.1 (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Presence of PNI and ptPSA values at 12 months are strong prognostic variables for long-term PRFS after definitive prostate brachytherapy seed implantation.

Ding, William, E-mail: billyding888@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Chamberlain, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States); Cunningham, James [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States)] [Carson Urology, Carson City, Nevada (United States); Yang Lixi [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Tay, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits  

SciTech Connect

The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.

HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assessing Potential Acidification of Marine Archaeological Wood Based on Concentration of Sulfur Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of sulfur in marine archaeological wood presents a challenge to conservation. Upon exposure to oxygen, sulfur compounds in waterlogged wooden artifacts are being oxidized, producing sulfuric acid. This speeds the degradation of the wood, potentially damaging specimens beyond repair. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to identify the species of sulfur present in samples from the timbers of the Mary Rose, a preserved 16th century warship known to undergo degradation through acidification. The results presented here show that sulfur content varied significantly on a local scale. Only certain species of sulfur have the potential to produce sulfuric acid by contact with oxygen and seawater in situ, such as iron sulfides and elemental sulfur. Organic sulfurs, such as the amino acids cysteine and methionine, may produce acid but are integral parts of the wood's structure and may not be released from the organic matrix. The sulfur species contained in the sample reflect the exposure to oxygen while submerged, and this exposure can differ greatly over time and position. A better understanding of the species pathway to acidifications required, along with its location, in order to suggest a more customized and effective preservation strategy. Waterlogged archaeological wood, frequently in the form of shipwrecks, is being excavated for historical purposes in many countries around the world. Even after extensive efforts towards preservation, scientists are discovering that accumulation of sulfate salts results in acidic conditions on the surfaces of the artifacts. Sulfuric acid degrades structural fibers in the wood by acid hydrolysis of cellulose, accelerating the decomposition of the ship timbers. Determining the sulfur content of waterlogged wood is now of great importance in maritime archaeology. Artifact preservation is often more time consuming and expensive than the original excavation; but it is key to the availability of objects for future study as well as maintaining the integrity of historical data and preserving the value of museum pieces. Sulfur occurs in a wide number of oxidation states from -2 to +6, and appears in numerous organic and inorganic compounds in nature. However, it is a very minor component of wood. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a valuable technique because it has the ability to detect very low concentrations of sulfur in the specimen. XAS is also sensitive to differences in oxidation states, as well as long and short range order in molecules.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

Size of nanoobjects in oil and gas species and materials with positron annihilation spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical method to determine geometry and size of nano-scale defects in oil and gas species and materials is proposed. The modeling is carried out with the parameters of the positron spectra in the angular distribution method of positron annihilation spectroscopy, and is based on the 'free electron' approximation. From the annihilation decay kinetics, it is possible to express the trapping velocity of parapositronium in pores via intensities of the positronium components and to define the concentration and radii of pores in a porous layer. As the result, size and the concentration of micro-porous cylindrical nano-objects in the silicon samples are estimated.

Grafutin, V I; Elnikova, L V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze into biologically active compounds. Jatropha curcas SM does not contain glucosinolates but contains curcin, a known phytotoxin (toxalbumin). A 14-d greenhouse study was conducted to determine how Sinapis alba (white mustard, WM), Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, IM), Camelina sativa (camelina) and Jatropha curcas (jatropha) applied to soil at varying application rates and incubation times affected seed germination and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Seed meals were analyzed for the presence of glucosinolates, and were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 percent (w/w) to Darco fine sand soil and incubated for 1, 7 or 14 d prior to planting. With the weed species, germination and survival was most reduced by 2.5 percent WM SM incubated 1d for Johnsongrass and 14 d for redroot pigweed. Cotton and sorghum seedlings showed strong negative responses to WM SM applications of 2.5 percent at any incubation time. All crops and weed species were most inhibited by 2.5 percent application with any SM, but incubation days varied. Seed meals of each species showed negative results dependent on the incubation day, but overall, WM and camelina SMs were most detrimental compared to IM and jatropha. A second greenhouse study was conducted to determine the availability of nutrients in SMs (WM and IM) to cotton and sorghum compared to inorganic fertilization. Seed meals were applied at 1.0 and 2.5 percent (w/w) and initially incubated for 35 days prior to planting. Emergence of both species was so poor that treatments were incubated for an additional 21 d and replanted. Application rates of 2.5 percent WM and IM SMs reduced sorghum heights and biomass, but only WM had a negative effect on cotton yield. However, the higher of the SM application rates provided greater levels of nutrients compared to the fertilized treatment and control. Results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM applications should be considered before land-applying SMs in organic cropping systems in order to successfully manage weeds while producing a profitable crop.

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

TSNo s02-peak104427-P Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TSNo s02-peak104427-P Title Direct Determination of Phosphate Species in Alum-Amended Poultry been fully addressed. We used XANES spectroscopy at the P k edge to directly determine the speciation

Sparks, Donald L.

332

Measurement of Expected Nucleation Precursor Species and 3500-nm Diameter Particles at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric measurements of expected homogeneous nucleation precursors and aerosols were made at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, from 28 June to 27 July 1992. Large molecular clusters and gas phase species including sulfuric acid (H2SO4), ...

R. J. Weber; P. H. McMurry; F. L. Eisele; D. J. Tanner

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Knapp, Steve

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Characterization of Root-Knot Nematode Resistance in Cowpea and Utilization of Cross-Species Platforms in Legume Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Platforms in Legume Genomics A Dissertation submitted inSpecies Platforms in Legume Genomics by Sayan Das Doctor ofrich space of cowpea. BMC Genomics 9:107. Trudgill DL, Bala

Das, Sayan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Colloidal products and actinide species in leachate from spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were subjected to unsaturated leach tests with simulated groundwater at 90{degrees}C. The actinides present in the leachate were determined at the end of two successive periods of {approximately}60 days and after an acid strip done at the end of the second period. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. In addition, the actinide release behavior of the two fuels appeared to be different for both the total amount of material released and the relative amount of each isotope released. This paper will focus on the detection and identification of the colloidal species observed in the leachate that was collected after each of the first two successive testing periods of approximately 60 days each. In addition, preliminary values for the total actinide release for these two periods are reported.

Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Separation of gonadotropic fractions with different species specificities from tuna pituitaries  

SciTech Connect

Eight different gonadotropic glycoprotein fractions were separated from the acetone-dried powder of yellow fin tuna pituitary glands by successive chromatographies on Superose 12 for gel filtration and Mono Q for anion exchange using the Pharmacia fast protein liquid chromatography system. This was preceded by preliminary separations using an ammonium sulfate precipitation method and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose. For biological characterization, we employed two radioreceptor assay systems, one using goby testis plasma membranes and silver carp GTH as the receptor and radioligand, respectively, and the other using testis plasma membranes of the yellow fin tuna and gonadotropin of the same species, respectively. We also employed two testicular cyclic AMP accumulation bioassay methods in vitro, one with the goby testis and the other with the mackerel testis. The least acidic fraction after Mono Q was further separated into four subfractions by rechromatography with Mono Q. They were strongly active in the tuna and mackerel assays but almost inactive in the goby assays. They were referred to as tuna-type tuna gonadotropin. In contrast, the most acidic fraction obtained after the first Mono Q was active in the goby assays but almost inactive in the tuna and mackerel assays. It was referred to as goby-type tuna gonadotropin. The intermediate fractions were active on both assays and are considered to be mixtures of tuna-type and goby-type gonadotropins. The reason for the presence of gonadotropin inactive to homologous species is discussed from the evolutionary viewpoint.

Ando, H.; Ishii, S.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Species profiles are literature summaries of the life history, distribution and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates. Profiles are prepared to assist with environmental impact assessment. The Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) is an important commercial fish along the Atlantic coast. In the South Atlantic Region, Atlantic menhaden spawn during winter in continental shelf waters. Adults then move inshore and northward in spring; some move into estuaries as far as the brackish-freshwater boundary. Atlantic menhaden larvae in the South Atlantic Region enter estuaries after 1 to 3 months at sea. Young fish move into the shallow regions of estuaries and seem to prefer vegetated marsh habitats. Atlantic menhaden are size-selective plankton feeders as larvae, and filter feeders as juveniles and adults. Due to their large population size, individual growth rates, and seasonal movements, Atlantic menhaden annually consume and redistribute large amounts of energy and materials. They are also important prey for large game fishes such as bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), and bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus). The Atlantic menhaden is associated with estuarine and nearshore systems during all phases of its life cycle. Young menhaden require these food-rich habitats to survive and grown. Destruction of estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine wetlands has decreased nursery habitat available to Atlantic menhaden and other estuarine-dependent species. 115 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Rogers, S.G.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effect of species and wood to bark ratio on pelleting of southern woods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six common southern hardwoods and loblolly pine were pelleted in a laboratory pellet mill. The pellet furnishes were blended to test the effect of different wood to bark ratios on pellet durability and production rate. Included was a ratio chosen to simulate the wood to bark ratio found in whole-tree chips. This furnish produced good quality pellets for all species tested. Pelleting of the pure wood of hardwoods was not successful; furnish routinely blocked the pellet mill dies. Pure pine wood, however, did produce acceptable pellets. It was noted that, as lignin and extractive content increased above a threshold level, the precentage of fines produced in a pellet durability test increased. Thus, all pine and tupelo wood/bark mixes produces high fines. This reduces the desirability of the pellets in the marketplace. Further research is necessary to confirm this relationship. This study suggests that both tree species and wood/bark ratio affect the durability of pellets and the rate with which they can be produced in a laboratory pellet mill. 9 references.

Bradfield, J.; Levi, M.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dworshak Reservoir Investigations: Trout, Bass and Forage Species, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Dworshak Dam and Reservoir is a Corps of Engineers facility located on the North Fork Clearwater River 3.2 km upstream from the Mainstem Clearwater confluence. Since initial filling in 1971, conversion of 87 km of river habitat to a 6644 hectare impoundment has had a profound influence on resident fisheries. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) entered into separate intergovernmental agreements with the Bonneville Power Administration in a cooperative effort to study these impacts. The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka assessment is included in the IDFG agreement, and is not addressed in this report. This project pertains primarily to rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui), and forage species. For the period November 1987 through February 1988, an estimated 4339 angler-hours were expended to catch 430 rainbow trout. An estimated 20 bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, 4 smallmouth bass, and 4 suckers Catostomus spp. were also caught. Catch rates were generally poor through the period, at .091 fish per hour for all species combined (excluding kokanee). Shasta strain hatchery rainbow trout were dominant in the creel, comprising 53.9 percent of the catch, although this strain was last planted in the reservoir in June 1986. Bank anglers caught a higher percentage (93.5 percent) of the total catch of Shasta strain rainbows than Kamloops strain rainbows (33.3 percent). 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Statler, David P.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

French, R.J.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development

342

Phylogeny of the genus Gossypium and genome origin of its polyploid species inferred from variation in nuclear repetitive DNA sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of phylogenetic relationships among taxa is essential for comparative and evolutionary genomic research. Here, we report reconstruction of the phylogenetic tree of the genus Gossypium containing cultivated cottons of importance in agriculture by using variation of nuclear repetitive DNA sequences. Genomic DNA was isolated from 87 available accessions of 35 species representing all eight basic genome groups of the genus Gossypium and analyzed to infer phylogeny of the genus and genome origin of its polyploid species. Twenty-two interspersed repeated sequence clones derived from G. hirsutum, each representing a repeated sequence family, were hybridized to the genomic DNA of the 35 species, respectively. Southern hybridization showed that 15 of the repetitive DNA sequences could be detected in all of the eight diploid genome groups, five were A genome-specific, and two were detected in some of the non D-genome groups. A total of 642 major restriction bands of repeated sequences were used for phylogenetic analysis of the species. A phylogenetic tree of the species was constructed, based on the parsimony method and evaluated by the bootstrap approach. The tree was consistent with those previously constructed with different methods in major clades in which the genealogical lineages of species are largely congruent with genome designations and geographical distribution; but significantly different branching among some of the species was observed. These results not only further confirm the previously phylogenetic analysis of the species and the utility of repetitive DNA sequences for phylogenetic analysis of the genus Gossypium, but also provide new insights into the phylogeny of the genus.

Rong, Ying

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Journeys within the Leucophoropterini: Revision of the Tribe, Genera and Species, and Description of New Genera and Species from Australia and the Indo-Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tribe Leucophoropterini (Miridae: Phylinae) is a diverse assemblage of primarily Indo-Pacific and Australian bugs which are united by simple, small genitalia and a trend towards ant-mimetic body forms. Previous to this work, the relationship of the Leucophoropterini to the other tribes of Phylinae, as well as the generic relationships within the lineage, was unresolved. Further, the characters initially proposed to unite the tribe are brought into question with the addition of several recently discovered taxa from Australia. The Leucophoropterini is first re-evaluated within a phylogenetic analysis of the subfamily Phylinae, using a combined molecular and morphological dataset to test the monophyly of the lineage, re-test the character synapomorphies supporting it, and to determine the closest relatives to the tribe. The molecular dataset includes 4 genes (COII, 16S, 28S, and 18S), and 123 morphological characters for 104 taxa, which is analyzed in a parsimony analysis using Tree analysis using New Technology [TNT], a model-based analysis in RAxML, and a Bayesian analysis in Mr. Bayes. All three methods resulted in phylogenetic trees with nearly identical generic and tribal groupings, and a lineage containing Pseudophylus Yasunaga, Decomia Poppius and Tuxedo Schuh being sister-group to the Leucophoropterini. With the closest relatives to the Leucophoropterini determined for outgroup selection, a generic revision of the tribe including both Australian and Indo-Pacific taxa is accomplished using 137 morphological characters and is analyzed in an un-weighted and implied weighted parsimony analysis using TNT for 86 leucophoropterine taxa. The Indo-Pacific taxa of Leucophoropterini are found to be related to the Australian Leucophoropterini, and at least two genera within the tribe (Sejanus Distant, Leucophoroptera Poppius) were found to be paraphyletic. Lastly, taxa are revised within the context of the generic-level phylogenetic analysis, with new genera and species from Australia and the Indo-Pacific being described.

Menard, Katrina Louise

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nafus, A., Mcclaran, M. P., Archer, S. R. & Throop, H. L. (2009) Multi-species allometric models predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management (In Press) Abstract Multi-species allometric models to predict grass biomass may increase field study efficiency by eliminating the need-species regression models predicting current years' aboveground biomass for 8 common cespitose grass species. Simple

Archer, Steven R.

346

Species Assemblage Structure and Ecomorphological Convergence in Perciform Fishes (Cichlidae and Centrarchidae) in Tropical and Temperate Floodplain Rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, I used two independent perciform lineages (Neotropical Cichlidae and Nearctic Centrarchidae) to examine patterns of species richness and species coexistence a two spatial scales (e.g., macrohabitat and mesohabitat) and to examine inter-faunal patterns of ecomorphological convergence. The study was conducted during the low-water periods in four lowland rivers: the Cinaruco in Venezuela, the Tambopata in Peru, and the Neches and the Brazos rivers in Texas (USA). These rivers were chosen because of their similar characteristics, in terms of geomorphology, sediments, and water quality. The Cinaruco River and the Neches River have clear slightly-stained waters, whereas the Tambopata and the Brazos River have turbid waters with high loads of suspended sediments. I used morphological approaches as a surrogate to investigate patterns of species distribution in niche space, and predict patterns of species richness at different spatial scales. Despite high variation in the number of species in these two perciform assemblages, morphological analysis based on the means and standard deviations of nearest neighbor distance (NND) and mean distance to centroid (CD) revealed similar trends of morphological similarity in relation to species richness. Comparison of observed versus randomized data mesohabitat scale for all four rivers generally supported the niche expansion model of response to increase in species richness. At the scale of mesohabitats within rivers, most species assemblages appear to be organized by competitive interactions in accordance with the niche expansion model. The tropical species-rich Cinaruco River revealed particularly strong support for the niche expansion model. Intercontinental comparison of functional morphology and diets based on analysis of stomach contents and stable isotope ratios indicated broad morphological and dietary overlap between cichlid and centrarchid assemblages. For the most part, morphological ordinations showed that the two groups have diversified in a parallel manner within the confines of ram-suction modes of prey ingestion. This study concludes that even though differences are observed in historical and stochastic factors structuring fish assemblages in different geographic regions, consistent patterns of convergence at the species and assemblage levels results from natural selection under similar environmental conditions.

Montana, Carmen 1976-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Multi-Species Farley-Buneman Instability in the Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical models of the solar chromosphere show intense electron heating immediately above its temperature minimum. Mechanisms such as resistive dissipation and shock waves appear insufficient to account for the persistence and uniformity of this heating as inferred from both UV lines and continuum measurements. This paper further develops the theory of the Farley-Buneman Instability (FBI) which could contribute substantially to this heating. It expands upon the single ion theory presented by Fontenla (2005) by developing a multiple ion species approach that better models the diverse, metal-dominated ion plasma of the solar chromosphere. This analysis generates a linear dispersion relationship that predicts the critical electron drift velocity needed to trigger the instability. Using careful estimates of collision frequencies and a one-dimensional, semi-empirical model of the chromosphere, this new theory predicts that the instability may be triggered by velocities as low as 4 km s^-1, well below the neutral ...

Madsen, Chad A; Oppenheim, Meers M; Fontenla, Juan M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

DOE Joint Genome Institute: First Wild Grass Species and Model System for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 10, 2010 February 10, 2010 First Wild Grass Species and Model System for Energy Crops Sequenced WALNUT CREEK, CA-As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) works toward developing sustainable sources of clean renewable energy, perennial grasses have emerged as major candidates for the commercial production of cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks. However, little is known about the specific biological traits of the grasses that might contribute to their usefulness for energy production, in part because such grasses typically have long lifecycles and possess large, complex genomes, making them difficult to study. Representative genomes for two of the three major subfamilies of grasses-those that include rice, maize, sorghum and sugar cane-have already been sequenced. Now in the February 11 edition of the journal

349

Spatial distributions of the emitting species in a penning surface-plasma source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using optical spectroscopy we study the spatial and temporal distributions of the H{sub {alpha}}, CsI(4555 {angstrom}), CsII(4604 {angstrom}), and MoI(3903 {angstrom}) emissions lines in a Penning surface-plasma source (SPS). A diagnostic slit exposes the entire SPS discharge gap either parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field. The spatial and temporal distributions of the emitting species are recorded using a 1-m monochromator. The visible light and the H{sub {alpha}} and CsII(4604 {angstrom}) spatial distributions are also recorded with a video camera. The cesium atomic and ionic light, and molybdenum atomic light, is strongly concentrated near the cathodes; the visible light and the H{sub {alpha}} light is almost uniform in both directions. These measurements are presented and discussed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

Smith, H.V. Jr; Allison, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Saadatmand, K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber having a metal coating on at least a portion of a light transmissive core. The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface. 6 figs.

Angel, S.M.; Sharma, S.K.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Beam Ion Instability in ILC Damping Ring with Multi-Gas Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2 pm. The beam ion instability with various beam filling patterns for the latest lattice DTC02 is studied using PIC code. The code has been benchmarked with SPEAR3 experimental data and there is a good agreement between the simulation and observations. It uses the optics from MAD and can handle arbitrary beam filling pattern and vacuum. Different from previous studies, multi-gas species and exact beam filling patterns have been modeled simultaneously in the study. This feature makes the study more realistic. Analyses have been done to compare with the simulations.

Wang, Lanfa; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

In-situ determination of energy species yields of intense particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Objects of the present invention are provided for a particle beam having a full energy component at least as great as 25 keV, which is directed onto a beamstop target, such that Rutherford backscattering, preferably near-surface backscattering occurs. The geometry, material composition and impurity concentration of the beam stop are predetermined, using any suitable conventional technique. The energy-yield characteristic response of backscattered particles is measured over a range of angles using a fast ion electrostatic analyzer having a microchannel plate array at its focal plane. The knee of the resulting yield curve, on a plot of yield versus energy, is analyzed to determine the energy species components of various beam particles having the same mass.

Kugel, H.W.; Kaita, R.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

353

The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

Shaw, A. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India); Goswami, K. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Assam (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Plasma and operational conditions in a high species filter bucket source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental details of operation and plasma flow are presented for bucket ion sources having magnetic flux that bridges the source between the regions of electron injection and ion extraction. The basic goal is to increase the atomic fraction of hydrogen and deuterium by 15% and yet retain an ion-flux-density uniformity over the extraction region to within +- 7%. A rod structure containing permanent magnets produces a known bridging flux filter across a well-defined region. This provides an experimental apparatus useful for the study of the effect of magnetic flux on the source plasma flow. The parameters of filter position, filter strength, filter orientation, arc power, and gas pressure are related to species fractions, profile uniformity, and electrical efficiency. The option of having the bridging flux without a rod structure is presented, and experimental results of sources thought to contain this field configuration are discussed.

Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Lietzke, A.F.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electrochemical energy storage device based on carbon dioxide as electroactive species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical energy storage device comprising a primary positive electrode, a negative electrode, and one or more ionic conductors. The ionic conductors ionically connect the primary positive electrode with the negative electrode. The primary positive electrode comprises carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and a means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2. This means for electrochemically reducing the CO.sub.2 comprises a conductive primary current collector, contacting the CO.sub.2, whereby the CO.sub.2 is reduced upon the primary current collector during discharge. The primary current collector comprises a material to which CO.sub.2 and the ionic conductors are essentially non-corrosive. The electrochemical energy storage device uses CO.sub.2 as an electroactive species in that the CO.sub.2 is electrochemically reduced during discharge to enable the release of electrical energy from the device.

Nemeth, Karoly; van Veenendaal, Michel Antonius; Srajer, George

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Overcoming restriction as a barrier to DNA transformation in Caldicellulosiruptor species results in efficient marker replacement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overcoming Overcoming restriction as a barrier to DNA transformation in Caldicellulosiruptor species results in efficient marker replacement Daehwan Chung 1,2 , Joel Farkas 1,2 and Janet Westpheling 1,2* Abstract Background: Thermophilic microorganisms have special advantages for the conversion of plant biomass to fuels and chemicals. Members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacteria known. They have the ability to grow on a variety of non-pretreated biomass substrates at or near ~80°C and hold promise for converting biomass to bioproducts in a single step. As for all such relatively uncharacterized organisms with desirable traits, the ability to genetically manipulate them is a prerequisite for making them useful. Metabolic engineering of pathways for product synthesis is relatively simple compared to engineering the ability to utilize

357

Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}heating as {integral}{sub r{sub 1}} {sup r{sub 2}} dr=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

Zhao, L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

On the nature and origin of acidic species in petroleum. 1. Detailed acid type distribution in a California crude oil.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acidity in crude oils has long been a problem for refining. Knowledge of the detailed chemical composition of the acids responsible for corrosion can facilitate identification of problem crude oils and potentially lead to improved processing options for corrosive oils. A highly aerobically biodegraded crude from the San Joaquin Valley, which has a long history of causing corrosion problems during refining, was the subject of this study. The oil was first extracted with base, then acidified and extracted with petroleum ether. A portion of the resulting acid fraction was methylated. The unmethylated extract was analyzed by FTIR, NMR, and the methylated sample was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Over 96% of the ions observed in HRMS have been assigned reliable formulas. Considerably greater functionality is seen in this sample than would be presumed from the 'naphthenic acid' title typically assigned to these species. Although over 60% of the compounds contained two or more oxygens, compounds containing only oxygen heteroatoms accounted for less than 10% of the acidic compounds identified. Approximately one-half of the species contained nitrogen and about one-fourth contained sulfur. It is believed that microbial degradation is a major source of these acidic components. It was also observed that acid species with higher degrees of heteroatom substitution generally also had a higher degree of saturation than those species having less heteroatoms, possibly due to impeded migration of highly substituted, less-saturated species.

Tomczyk, N. A.; Winans, R. E.; Shinn, J. H.; Robinson, R. C.; Chemistry; Chevron Research and Technology Co.

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, Jon B. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species is described. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

Cross, J.B.; Cremers, D.A.

1986-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A comparison of 137 Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology, have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year117CS round sampling. This study compares the environmental concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil 117CS concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage 137CS concentrations. The study's objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation 137CS concentrations are statistically the same. If the concentrations are statistically the same, then a recommendation could be made to the CPSES for substitution of leaf type sampled. Broadleaf tree leaf samples were collected on and off CPSES. Evergreen leaf samples were collected in close proximity to broadleaf samples. The leaf and soil samples were dried and homogenized for analysis. Gamma-ray spectrometry was performed to measure 137Cs radioactivity in each leaf and soil sample. The 137CS concentrations for each leaf and soil sample were calculated and statistically compared. The mean values of the 137CS concentrations in broadleaf and evergreen foliage samples were found to be statistically the same and therefore from the same population. The individual soil sample 137CS concentration means were also statistically the same and from its own population. The foliage and soil populations, although, were found to be statistically different. This study's conclusion is that evergreen leaves from juniper trees can be used to supplement and/or substitute for the broadleaf samples-currently collected. This study may be used by CPSES to petition the USNRC for a modification of the current environmental sampling program. A change in foliage collection would allow the CPSES to better satisfy its environmental sampling regulatory requirements.

Rangel, Ruben Canales

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza sativa. However, using DNA markers it was found that most of the red rice with black hulls was sufficiently divergent to be considered a separate species. This includes TX4, a red rice ecotype that has been reported to have considerable natural tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate. TX4 is closely related to samples that have been classified as Oryza rufipogon. However, it was shown that both the TX4-like red rice from commercial fields and most of the Oryza rufipogon accessions in the US National Small Grains Collection are more accurately classified as Oryza nivara. This is significant since Oryza rufipogon is regulated under the Federal Noxious Weed Act, while Oryza nivara is not. Oryza nivara closely related to TX4 was found to be widely distributed across the rice production areas of Texas and was also found in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Of 240 samples from across Texas, 23 samples from six different counties were identical with TX4 with all 18 DNA markers tested. The reported glufosinate tolerance of TX4 is a potential problem since this same herbicide would be used in conjunction with genetically modified (GM) that is being developed as a method of red rice control. Thus, field, greenhouse and tissue culture studies were conducted to evaluate the degree of glufosinate tolerance in TX4. TX4 typically was severely damaged by glufosinate, but not efficiently controlled. Even with the maximum number of herbicide applications at the proposed maximum label rate, TX4 often re-sprouted and produced viable seed. Herbicide tolerance was found to be variable, but appears to be sufficient to present a problem with the use of the GM glufosinate resistant varieties currently under development, particularly when combined with variation in the response of ??sensitive?? varieties.

Vaughan, Laura Kelly

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Structural Analysis of a Ni-Methyl Species in Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.2 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Ni-methyl species that is a proposed catalytic intermediate in methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), the enzyme that catalyzes the biological formation of methane. The methyl group is situated 2.1 {angstrom} proximal of the Ni atom of the MCR coenzyme F{sub 430}. A rearrangement of the substrate channel has been posited to bring together substrate species, but Ni(III)-methyl formation alone does not lead to any observable structural changes in the channel.

Cedervall, Peder E.; Dey, Mishtu; Li, Xianghui; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Hedman, Britt; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Wilmot, Carrie M. (Michigan); (SLAC); (UMM)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gatewaycompatible vectors for highthroughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gateway-compatible Gateway-compatible vectors for high-throughput gene functional analysis in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and other monocot species David G.J. Mann 1,5,†* , Peter R. LaFayette 2,3,5 , Laura L. Abercrombie 1,5 , Zachary R. King 3,5 , Mitra Mazarei 1,5 , Mathew C. Halter 1 , Charleson R. Poovaiah 1,5 , Holly Baxter 1,5 , Hui Shen 4,5 , Richard A. Dixon 4,5 , Wayne A. Parrott 2,3,5 and C. Neal Stewart Jr 1,5 1 Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA 2 Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA 3 Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics & Genomics, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA 4 Plant Biology Division, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, USA 5 The BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA Received 31 May 2011; revised 12 June 2011; accepted 10 August 2011.

368

Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

Radogna, Flavia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Paternoster, Laura [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Istitututo di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ammendola, Sergio [Ambiotec (Italy); Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ghibelli, Lina [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Quenching-independent measurement of species concentrations in flames by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work accomplished in the last two years on measurement of species concentrations in flames via laser-induced fluorescence. During this period, we have published absolute number densities of atomic hydrogen in subatmospheric, premixed C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/Ar flames at equivalence ratios of 1.0 and 1.7 via two-photon excited fluorescence. This work has led to the development of a new single-laser, two-step fluorescence method for the detection of atomic hydrogen in flames. Using photoionization controlled-loss spectroscopy (PICLS), we have verified the T{sup {minus}1/2} dependence of quenching on temperature for atomic hydrogen, in agreement with kinetic theory. Previous work on pyrometry using laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) and the anomalous fluorescence from pyrene has evolved into publication of a major review paper on temperature measurements by light-scattering methods. Finally, we have demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative LSF measurements of NO concentration by obtaining relative saturation curves and NO fluorescence profiles. 25 refs.

Salmon, J.T.; Carter, C.D.; Laurendeau, N.M.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Climate missing links: Aqueous greenhouse species in clouds, fogs and aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been considerable interest regarding possible greenhouse effects due to combustion and energy-related pollution. This concern has been due to the release and secondary production of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, freons, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. These gases can absorb infrared radiation as it comes back from the heated ground and therefore effectively trap the infrared radiation in the troposphere, leading to climatic change. Beyond these gases, clouds, aerosols, and fogs may also play important roles in affecting, the radiation balance by scattering incoming radiation. This work describes the measurement of water soluble infrared absorbers that are known to be derived from pollution. Polluted precipitation is likely to be an important contributor to radiation balance that is currently being neglected. Pollutants characterized include sulfate, nitrate, formate, acetate, oxalate, phenol, p-nitrophenol, ammonium, carbonate, bicarbonate, formaldehyde (dihydroxy methane), methanol, and ethanol. Band positions and band strengths have been determined. These species show measurable infrared absorption bands in the atmospheric window regions (i.e., 900--1600 cm{sup {minus}1}). These data are discussed with regard to the reported discrepancies in the radiatively important water infrared absorption region commonly referred to as the ``foreign broadened continuum.``

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Cunningham, M.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Numerical study of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing two species of charged dust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-fluid model is used to study the dynamics of a dusty plasma sheath consists of electrons, ions, and two species of charged dust particles, i.e., nano-size and micron-size particles. It is found that, when the sheath is dominated by the nano-size dust grains, spatially periodic fluctuations are developed in the profiles of the sheath potential, and the number density and velocity of the plasma and dust particles. Due to inertial effects, the fluctuations in the parameters of the micron-size grains are much lower than those of the other parameters. The competition between the electric and ion drag forces plays the primary role in development of the fluctuations. The spatial period of the fluctuations is approximately a few Debye lengths and their amplitude depends on the plasma and dust parameters. The fluctuations are reduced by the increase in the radius, mass density, and Mach number of the nano-size particles, as well as the density and Mach number of the ions. But, they are enhanced by the increase in the plasma number density and the electron temperature. The sheath thickness demonstrates a non-monotonic behavior against variation of the nanoparticle parameters, i.e., it first decreases quickly, shows a minimum, and then increases. However, the sheath width always decreases with the plasma number density and ion Mach number, while grows linearly with the electron temperature.

Foroutan, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhoundi, A. [Nanostructure Material Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Correlation between some selected trace metal concentrations in six species of fish from the Arabian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of trace metals in marine ecosystems has been keenly investigated during recent years. It is known that abundance of essential trace metals regulates the metal content in the organisms by homeostatic control mechanisms, which when cease to function cause essential trace metals to act in an either acutely or chronically toxic manner. Therefore, a correlation study based on essential and non-essential trace metal concentrations is imperative for extending the existing knowledge of bioaccumulation of trace metals in marine organisms. An attempt has been made in the present investigation to bring out quantitative correlations between the concentrations of iron, copper, lead and zinc in the edible muscle tissue of six species of marine fish: Salmon (salmon sole); tuna (thunnus thynnus); pomfret silver (pampus argenteus); Pomfret black (formioniger); long tail tuna (thynnus tonggel) and Indian oil sardine (sardinella longiceps). These fish are abundantly available in Pakistan along the coastal line of the Arabian Sea and have great commercial value. The computational analysis on the trace metal correlation was conducted using an MSTAT statistical package.

Ashraf, M.; Jaffar, M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Crystal Structure and Characterization of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Methylocystis species Strain M  

SciTech Connect

Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain {approx}2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of Cu{sup I} and Cu{sup II}, of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 Cu{sup II} electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu-O/N and Cu-Cu ligand environments with a Cu-Cu interaction at 2.52-2.64 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 {angstrom} resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models.

Smith, Stephen M.; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mode conversion between Alfven wave eigenmodes in axially inhomogeneous two-ion-species plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uniform cylindrical plasma model of Litwin and Hershkowitz (Phys. Fluids {bold 30}, 1323 (1987)) is shown to predict mode conversion between the lowest radial order {ital m}=+1 fast magnetosonic surface and slow ion-cyclotron global eigenmodes of the Alfven wave at the light-ion species Alfven resonance of a cold two-ion plasma. A hydrogen ({ital h})--deuterium ({ital d}) plasma is examined in experiments. The fast mode is efficiently excited by a rotating field antenna array at {omega}{similar to}{Omega}{sub {ital h}} in the central cell of the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 51}, 1955(1983)). Radially scanned magnetic probes observe the propagating eigenmode wave fields within a shallow central cell magnetic gradient in which the conversion zone is axially localized according to {ital n}{sub {ital d}}/{ital n}{sub {ital h}}. A low radial-order slow ion-cyclotron mode, observed in the vicinity of the conversion zone, gives evidence for the predicted mode conversion.

Roberts, D.R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Tataronis, J.A. (Department of Nuclear Engineering Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbates storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbates storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fiber optic apparatus for detecting molecular species by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optrode apparatus for detecting constituents of a fluid medium includes an optical fiber (13, 13a to 13e) having a metal coating (22, 22a to 22e) on at least a portion of a light transmissive core (17, 17a to 17d). The metal is one, such as silver, gold or copper, which enhances emission of Raman signal frequencies by molecules adsorbed on the surface of the coating when monochromatic probe light of a different frequency is scattered by such molecules and the metal coating is sufficiently thin to transmit light between the absorbed molecules and the core of the fiber. Probe light is directed into one end of the fiber and a detector (16, 16d, 16e) analyzes light emitted from the fiber for Raman frequencies that identify one or more particular molecular species. In one form, the optrode (13e) may function as a working electrode of an electrochemical cell (53) while also serving to detect the products of oxidation or reduction reactions which occur at the electrode surface.

Angel, Stanley M. (Livermore, CA); Sharma, Shiv K. (Honolulu, HI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Spectroscopic and structural characterization of reduced technetium species in acetate media  

SciTech Connect

The reduction of ammonium pertechnetate by sodium borohydride in 0.1 M NaOH/glacial acetic acid has been studied. The reduction products (solids and solutions) have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectra of the solution, after reduction, exhibit bands at 350 and 500 nm that have been attributed to the formation of polymeric Tc(IV) species. SEM/EDS on the solid (X-ray amorphous) indicates the absence of metallic Tc and the presence of oxygen. EXAFS measurements further indicate that the precipitate exhibits a [Tc({mu}-O){sub 2}Tc] core structure. XANES is consistent with the formation of Tc(III) and/or Tc(IV). Results infer that reduction of aqueous Tc(VII) by borohydride in the presence of acetic acid does not produce metallic Tc, but a mixture of various oxidation states of Tc near Tc(III) and Tc(IV).

Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Droessler, Janelle; Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (UNLV)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effect of different crop species and mixtures and storage methods on ethanol production. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn, grain sorghum, wheat and barley were tested for ethanol production as pure species and in mixtures. Some compensatory responses were discovered such as foam reduction in barley feedstocks. Cull potatoes were also tested for ethanol production in their pure state and in combination with grain sorghum. Potato producers could derive additional income if cull potatoes could be profitably used in the production of ethanol. A potato and grain mixture may alleviate the necessity of adding additional grinding equipment to process fleshy high moisture material. It is noteworthy to point out that the hammer mill employed at NMSU Agricultural Science Center at Clovis had no problems in processing potatoes in their pure form. Ensiling storage for high moisture corn and sweet sorghum was tested to determine the effect on ethanol production. High moisture corn proved to be an acceptable feedstock for ethanol production. Because of significant deterioration of the ensiled sweet sorghum samples, further investigation into appropriate techniques to simulate silage on a small-scale is needed. 6 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Houck, W.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Identifying and characterizing the most significant ?-glucosidase of the novel species Aspergillus saccharolyticus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly discovered fungal species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus, was found to produce a culture broth rich in beta-glucosidase activity. In this present work, the main beta-glucosidase of A. saccharolyticus responsible for the efficient hydrolytic activity was identified, isolated, and characterized. Ion exchange chromatography was used to fractionate the culture broth, yielding fractions with high beta-glucosidase activity and only one visible band on an SDS-PAGE gel. Mass spectrometry analysis of this band gave peptide matches to beta-glucosidases from aspergilli. Through a PCR approach using degenerate primers and genome walking, a 2919 base pair sequence encoding the 860 amino acid BGL1 polypeptide was determined. BGL1 of A. saccharolyticus has 91% and 82% identity with BGL1 from Aspergillus aculeatus and BGL1 from Aspergillus niger, respectively, both belonging to Glycoside hydrolase family 3. Homology modeling studies suggested beta-glucosidase activity with preserved retaining mechanism and a wider catalytic pocket compared to other beta-glucosidases. The bgl1 gene was heterologously expressed in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, purified, and characterized by enzyme kinetics studies. The enzyme can hydrolyze cellobiose, pNPG, and cellodextrins. The enzyme showed good thermostability, was stable at 50C, and at 60C it had a half-life of approximately 6 hours.

Sorensen, Anette; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Lubeck, Mette; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Culley, David E.; Lubeck, Peter S.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2Chapter 2 Chemistry and Reactions of Reactive Oxygen Species in Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Chapter 2 Chemistry and Reactions of Reactive Oxygen Species in Lipid Oxidation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AC26ACB856C86AFB9EC8D10FE0DBB342 Press

382

Critical review of the chemistry and thermodynamics of technetium and some of its inorganic compounds and aqueous species  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and thermodynamic data for Technetium (Tc) and some of its inorganic compounds and aqueous species are reviewed here. Major emphasis is given to systems with potential geochemical applications, especially the geochemistry of radioactive waste disposal. Compounds considered include oxides, hydroxides, hydrates oxides, halides, oxyhalides, double halides, and sulfides. The aqueous species considered include those in both noncomplexing media (pertechnetates, technetates, aquo-ions, and hydrolyzed cations) and complexing media (halides, sulfates, and phosphates). Thermodynamic values are recommended for specific compounds and aqueous ions when reliable experimental data are available. Where thermodynamic data are inadequate or unavailable, the chemistry is still discussed to provide information about what needs to be measured, and which chemistry needs to be clarified. A major application of these thermodynamic data will be for chemical equilibrium modeling and for construction of potential-pH diagrams for aqueous solutions. Unfortunately, the present lack of data precludes such calculations for complexing aqueous media. The situation is much better for noncomplexing aqueous media, but the chemistry and thermodynamics of cationic Tc(V) species and hydrolyzed Tc(III) species are poorly understood. 240 references, 6 tables.

Rard, J.A.

1983-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Auditory system comparisons between sand cats and other felid species : acoustic input admittance of ears and auditory brainstem responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sand cat, one species of the cat family, is found only in deserts and has unusually large ear canals and middle-ear air cavities. Recent work has shown that sand cat ears absorb acoustic power at low frequencies (<1 ...

Chan, Howard F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Scaling Isoprene Fluxes from Leaves to Canopies: Test Cases over a Boreal Aspen and a Mixed Species Temperate Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate at which isoprene is emitted by a forest depends on an array of environmental variables, the forests biomass, and its species composition. At present it is unclear whether errors in canopy-scale and process-level isoprene emission ...

Dennis D. Baldocchi; Jose D. Fuentes; David R. Bowling; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Russell K. Monson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Twenty new species of Metrichia (Trichoptera: Hydroptili-dae) from Costa Rica are described: M. acicula, M. alajuela,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species occurring in Costa Rica are provided: M. avon (Bueno- Soria), M. biungulata (Flint), M. lemniscata (Flint), M. penicillata (Flint), M. quadrata (Flint), and M. riva (Bueno- Soria). An illustrated key as a distinct genus (Wiggins 1996, Flint & Bueno-Soria 1998). Metrichia is highly diverse in the Neotropical

Holzenthal, Ralph W.

386

Dynamic-radius species-conserving genetic algorithm for the financial forecasting of dow jones index stocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research uses a Niche Genetic Algorithm (NGA) called Dynamic-radius Species-conserving Genetic Algorithm (DSGA) to select stocks to purchase from the Dow Jones Index. DSGA uses a set of training data to produce a set of rules. These rules are then ... Keywords: Niche genetic algorithm, black-box investing, classification, financial forecasting, genetic algorithm, stock forecasting

Michael Scott Brown, Michael J. Pelosi, Henry Dirska

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books D9362F8F06B7CB16FD59D7C2F2FBABF2 AOCS Press Downloa

388

Perennial species for optimum production of herbaceous biomass in the Piedmont (Management study, 1987--1991)  

SciTech Connect

The authors have investigated cutting and N management strategies for two biofuel feedstock candidate species -- switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and weeping lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula). Each was no-till planted in 1987 at three sites underlain by Davidson or Cecil soils. Three N levels (0, 50, or 100 kg/ha) were applied, and the plots fertilized at each level were harvested either twice (early-September and early-November) or only in early-November. The results with lovegrass suggest 50 kg N/ha is nearly optimal and that two cuttings provide more biomass than one. For switchgrass, when averaged across sites and years, 50 kg N/ha produced a slight yield advantage over no added N, but 50 kg was not different from 100 kg. In 1989 and 1990, more biomass was available in early-September harvests (9.6 Mg/ha) than in early-November (8.3 Mg/ha). Apparently the plants translocated significant portions of their biomass below ground during the last few weeks of the season. In 1991, we harvested only in early-November. Plots that had been cut in early-September in the previous three years had lower yields (7.6 Mg/ha) than those that had been cut only in early-November (9.4 Mg/ha). The delayed cutting permitted more growth on a sustained basis -- presumably because of conservation of translocatable materials. This poses an interesting dilemma for the producer of biomass. In additional studies, the authors found no advantage in double-cropping rye (Secale cereale) with switchgrass; at low input levels, rye yields were low, and rye lowered switchgrass yields. Other studies showed double-cropping with winter-annual legumes such as crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum) may have potential. The timing of herbicide treatment of the legume is critical.

Parrish, D.J.; Wolf, D.D.; Daniels, W.L. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Characterization of Dried and Torrefied Arundo Donax Biomass for Inorganic Species Prior to Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Portland General Electric (PGE) potentially plans to replace the coal with torrefied Arundo donax for their Boardman coal-fired power plant by 2020. Since there is only a limited amount of experience with this high yield energy crop, PGE would like to characterize raw and torrefied Arundo before a test burn and therefore avoid possible ash related operational problems such as slagging, deposit formation and corrosion. This report describes the results from characterization of ground and cross-sectioned samples of Arundo with a high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, and also includes analytical results from a short water-leaching test for concentrations of Ca, Mg, K, Na, S, and Cl in the non-leached and leached Arundo and leachates. SEM-EDS analysis of torrefied Arundo revealed that condensation of volatile components during torrefaction can result in their undesirable re-deposition on the outside surfaces in the form of amorphous or crystallized clusters with a size from a few ms to as large as 100 m. A short exposure of Arundo to water resulted in an efficient removal of volatile species from the raw and torrefied Arundo, e.g., ~ 98 wt% of total K and Cl, and ~75 wt% of total S were removed from raw Arundo, and more than 90 wt% of total K and Cl, and 70 wt% of S from torrefied Arundo, suggesting that water-leaching of Arundo before combustion can be an effective pre-treatment method because high concentrations of Cl increase emissions of HCl, and in combination with K can form large amounts of KCl deposits on boiler surfaces and in combination with H2O or SO3 cause corrosion.

Matyas, Josef; Johnson, Bradley R.; Cabe, James E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

Wan, Joanne [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Winn, Louise M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada) and School of Environmental Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Larval ecology and synchronous reproduction of two crustacean species : Semibalanus balanoides in New England, USA and Gecarcinus quadratus in Veraguas, Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental cues for synchronous reproduction were investigated for two highly abundant, ecologically important crustacean species: the temperate acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and the tropical terrestrial ...

Gyory, Joanna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease.

J Bunikis; B Olsn; G Westman; S Bergstrom; J. Clin Microbiol; Jonas Bunikis; Bjrn Olsn; Gran Westman; Sven Bergstrm

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Assessing the imprint of space, geography, land cover, and host species on the local abundance of a generalist nest parasite, the Brown-headed Cowbird.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Brown-headed Cowbird is an obligate nest parasite suspected of causing local population declines in several threatened and endangered passerine species. Much attention has been (more)

Cummings, Katherine Elizabeth Rainey 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Micro/nano-patterning of supported lipid bilayers: biophysical studies and membrane-associated species separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro/nano-patterning of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) has shown considerable potential for addressing fundamental biophysical questions about cell membrane behavior and the creation of a new generation of biosensors. Herein are presented several novel lithographic methods for the size-controlled patterning of SLBs from the microscale to the nanoscale. Using these methods, chemically distinct types of phospholipid bilayers and/or Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) membranes can be spatially addressed on a single microchip. These arrays can, in turn, be employed in the studies of multivalent ligand-receptor interactions, enzyme kinetics, SLBs size limitation, and membrane-associated species separation. The investigations performed in the Laboratory for Biological Surface Science include the following projects. Chapters II and III describe the creation of lab-on-a-chip based platforms by patterning SLBs in microfluidic devices, which were employed in high throughput binding assays for multivalent ligand-receptor interactions between cholera toxin B subunits (CTB) and ganglioside GM1. The studies on the effect of ligand density for multivalent CTB-GM1 interactions revealed that the CTB-GM1 binding weakened with increasing GM1 density. Such a result can be explained by the clustering of GM1 on the supported phospholipid membranes, which in turn inhibits the binding of CTB. Chapter IV characterizes the enzymatic activity of phosphatase tethered to SLBs in a microfluidic device. Higher turnover rate and catalytic efficiency were observed at low enzyme surface densities, ascribing to the low steric crowding hindrance and high enzyme fluidity, as well as the resulting improvement of substrate accessibility and affinity of enzyme catalytic sites. Chapter V presents sub-100 nm patterning of supported biomembranes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoshaving lithography. Stable SLBs formed by this method have a lower size limit of ~ 55 nm in width. This size limit stems from a balance between a favorable bilayer adhesion energy and an unfavorable bilayer edge energy. Finally, chapter VI demonstrates the electrophoretic separation of membrane-associated fluorophores in polymer-cushioned lipid bilayers. This electrophoretic method was applied to the separation of membrane proteins in E. Coli ghost membranes.

Shi, Jinjun

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of a microfluidic device for patterning multiple species by scanning probe lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning Probe Lithography (SPL) is a versatile nanofabrication platform that leverages microfluidic ink delivery systems with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) for generating surface-patterned chemical functionality on the sub-100 nm length scale. One of the prolific SPL techniques is Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN). High resolution, multiplexed registration and parallel direct-write capabilities make DPN (and other SPL techniques) a power tool for applications that are envisioned in micro/nano-electronics, molecular electronics, catalysis, cryptography (brand protection), combinatorial synthesis (nano-materials discovery and characterization), biological recognition, genomics, and proteomics. One of the greatest challenges for the successful performance of the DPN process is the delivery of multiple inks to the scanning probe tips for nano-patterning. The purpose of the present work is to fabricate a microfluidic ink delivery device (called Centiwell) for DPN (and other SPL) applications. The device described in this study maximizes the number of chemical species (inks) for nanofabrication that can be patterned simultaneously by DPN to conform the industrial standards for fluid handling for biochemical assays (e.g., genomic and proteomic). Alternate applications of Centiwell are also feasible for the various envisioned applications of DPN (and other SPL techniques) that were listed above. The Centiwell consists of a two-dimensional array of 96 microwells that are bulk micromachined on a silicon substrate. A thermoelectric module is attached to the back side of the silicon substrate and is used to cool the silicon substrate to temperatures below the dew point. By reducing the temperature of the substrate to below the dew point, water droplets are condensed in the microwell array. Microbeads of a hygroscopic material (e.g., poly-ethylene glycol) are dispensed into the microwells to prevent evaporation of the condensed water. Furthermore, since poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) is water soluble, it forms a solution inside the microwells which is subsequently used as the ink for the DPN process. The delivery of the ink to the scanning probe tip is performed by dipping the tip (or multiple tips in an array) into the microwells containing the PEG solution. This thesis describes the various development steps for the Centiwell. These steps include the mask design, the bulk micromachining processes explored for the micro-fabrication of the microwell array, the thermal design calculations performed for the selection of the commercially available thermoelectric coolers, the techniques explored for the synthesis of the PEG microbeads, and the assembly of all the components for integration into a functional Centiwell. Finally, the successful implementation of the Centiwell for nanolithography of PEG solutions is also demonstrated.

Rivas Cardona, Juan Alberto

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to model the turbulence in the flow. Conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models were used for the LES simulations. Wall functions were used to resolve the near wall boundary layer. These simulations were run with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The velocity and tracer gas concentration Coefficient of Variations were compared with experimental results. The results from the LES simulations compared better with experimental results than the results from the RANS simulations. The level of mixing downstream of a S-shaped double elbow was higher than either the single elbow or the U-shaped double elbow due to the presence of counter rotating vortices. Penetration of neutralized and non-neutralized aerosol particles through three different types of tubing was studied. The tubing used included standard PVC pipes, aluminum conduit and flexible vacuum hose. Penetration through the aluminum conduit was unaffected by the presence or absence of charge neutralization, whereas particle penetrations through the PVC pipe and the flexible hosing were affected by the amount of particle charge. The electric field in a space enclosed by a solid conductor is zero. Therefore charged particles within the conducting aluminum conduit do not experience any force due to ambient electric fields, whereas the charged particles within the non-conducting PVC pipe and flexible hose experience forces due to the ambient electric fields. This increases the deposition of charged particles compared to neutralized particles within the 1.5� PVC tube and 1.5� flexible hose. Deposition 2001a (McFarland et al. 2001) software was used to predict the penetration through transport lines. The prediction from the software compared well with experiments for all cases except when charged particles were transported through non-conducting materials. A Stairmand cyclone was designed for filtering out large particles at the entrance of the transport section.

Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Look back at the U. S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae Close-Out Report NREL/TP-580-24190 A Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program-Biodiesel from Algae July 1998 By John Sheehan Terri Dunahay John Benemann Paul Roessler Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development Prepared by: the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Operated by Midwest Research Institute Under Contract No. DE-AC36-83CH10093 Executive Summary From 1978 to 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuels Development funded a program to develop renewable transportation fuels from algae. The main focus of the program, know as the Aquatic

399

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

400

Numerical investigation of the ion temperature effect in magnetized plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of ion temperature, magnitude of magnetic field and its orientation on a magnetized plasma sheath consisting of electrons and two species of positive ions are investigated. Using three-fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the dimensionless equations are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that with the increase of the ion temperature and magnetic field strength there is a significant change in ion densities and energies in the sheath. It is also noticed that increase of magnetic field angle enhances the ion density near the sheath edge for a constant ion temperature. With increase in ion temperature and magnetic field angle, the lighter ion density near the sheath edge enhances and reverses for the heavier ion species.

Shaw, A. K.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. J. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Sonapur-782 402, Guwahati, Kamrup (M) (India); Kar, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428, Gujarat (India)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

SCRS/2005/096 Col. Vol. Sci. Pap. ICCAT, (59)2: 546-554 (2006) MULTI-SPECIES ASSESSMENT OF TUNAS CAUGHT IN THE TROPICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF TUNAS CAUGHT IN THE TROPICAL ATLANTIC PURSE SEINE FISHERY: SENSITIVITY OF PRODUCTION MODELS TO BIASES been considered in the estimation of the species composition of the tropical tuna catch as well as in the total catch. Although three species (yellofin, skipjack and bigeye) are involved in the tropical tuna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

403

Distribution of Energy Use and Biomass Among Species of North American Terrestrial Birds Author(s): Brian A. Maurer and James H. Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution of Energy Use and Biomass Among Species of North American Terrestrial Birds Author, 69(6), 1988, pp. 1923-1932 ? 1988 by the Ecological Society of America DISTRIBUTION OF ENERGY USE. The distribution of biomass and energy use among species with different body sizes provides an empirical basis

Brown, James H.

404

An approach using Dempster-Shafer theory to fuse spatial data and satellite image derived crown metrics for estimation of forest stand leading species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leading species at the forest stand level is a required forest inventory attribute. Information regarding leading species enables the calculation of volume and biomass in support of forest monitoring and reporting activities. In this study, approaches ... Keywords: Evidential reasoning, Forest, Landscape, Mapping, Satellite imagery, Tree crown object metrics

Brice Mora, Michael A. Wulder, Joanne C. White

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Proceedings of the SERI Biomass Program Principal Investigators' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program Reports; 23-25 June 1982, Washington, DC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) is concerned with how plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas is utilized. Processes are being developed in this program to make use of those aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as on their extraordinary chemical compositions.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Expression profiling and cross-species RNA interference (RNAi) of desiccation-induced transcripts in the anhydrobiotic nematode Aphelenchus avenae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-36 2.2 1.5 1.4 0.8 GR463918 hypothetical protein ZK228.3 (C. elegans) Z82086.1 4E-04 1.2 2.0 1.4 2.0 Where accession numbers are shown in bold, respective sequences were used in cross-species RNAi experiments with P. superbus. aClosest homologue...

Reardon, Wesley; Chakrabortee, Sohini; Campos Pereira, Tiago; Tyson, Trevor; Banton, Matthew C; Dolan, Katharine M; Culleton, Bridget A; Wise, Michael J; Burnell, Ann M; Tunnacliffe, Alan

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evidence of the production of hot hydrogen atoms in RF plasmas by catalytic reactions between hydrogen and oxygen species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selective H-atom line broadening was found to be present throughout the volume (13.5 cm ID x 38 cm length) of RF generated H2O plasmas in a GEC cell. Notably, at low pressures (ca. hot' with energies greater than 40 eV with a pressure dependence, but only a weak power dependence. The degree of broadening was virtually independent of the position studied within the GEC cell, similar to the recent finding for He/H2 and Ar/H2 plasmas in the same GEC cell. In contrast to the atomic hydrogen lines, no broadening was observed in oxygen species lines at low pressures. Also, in control Xe/H2 plasmas run in the same cell at similar pressures and adsorbed power, no significant broadening of atomic hydrogen, Xe, or any other lines was observed. Stark broadening or acceleration of charged species due to high electric fields can not explain the results since (i) the electron density was insufficient by orders of magnitude, (ii) the RF field was essentially confined to the cathode fall region in contrast to the broadening that was independent of position, and (iii) only the atomic hydrogen lines were broadened. Rather, all of the data is consistent with a model that claims specific, predicted, species can act catalytically through a resonant energy transfer mechanism to create hot hydrogen atoms in plasmas.

Jonathan Phillips; Chun Ku Chen; Randell Mills

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Islands of Martha?¢????s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha?¢????s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha?¢????s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimated the total spring Chinook harvest each year since 1977 (except 1985 and 1986) by conducting,541 2,086 1984 0 0 0 1,290 1,290 1985 131 704 0 1,155 1,990 1986 22d/ 122 0 1,711 1,855 1987 408 501 0 1 from 1986 to 2002 are summarized in Table 4 (Gauvin. 2003). Of 17 spring Chinook carcasses sampled

413

TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grebe Red-breasted Merganser N. Rough-winged Swallow Red-necked Grebe Ruddy Duck Bank Swallow Eared Brown Creeper Red-eyed Vireo Golden-mantled Grnd Squirrel CFLS Brown-headed Cowbird CFLS Red CFLS Williamson's Sapsucker CFLS Red Squirrel CFLS Gyrfalcon FS Willow Flycatcher River Otter Hammond

414

ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level change · Sensitive to renewable energy technologies (wind turbines) · Sensitive to urbanisation (e acoustic deterrents or by increasing the turbine cut-in speed (the wind speed at which electricity enters of water quality, agricultural intensification, loss and fragmentation of forests, fatalities at wind

Willig, Michael

415

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constrictor 6 to 9 ft. Tan oval spots; reddish-brown tail Green Anaconda 13 to 15 ft. Green body; large, round, dark spots; eye stripes Yellow Anaconda 6 to 9 ft. Yellow body; large, dark spots; five dark stripes

Mazzotti, Frank

417

Impact of Environmental Instability on Convective Precipitation Uncertainty Associated with the Nature of the Rimed Ice Species in a Bulk Microphysics Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a number of studies dedicated to the sensitivity of deep convection simulations to the properties of the rimed ice species in microphysics schemes, no consensus has been achieved on the nature of the impact. Considering the need for ...

Kwinten Van Weverberg

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparison of avian species diversity and densities on non-mined and reclaimed surface-mined land in east-central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface mining often changes the native landscape and vegetation of an area. Reclamation is used to counter this change, with the goal of restoring the land to its original pre-mined state. The process of reclamation creates early successional-stage lands, such as grasslands, shrublands, and wetlands, attracting new plant and animal species to the area. I compared avian species density (number of individuals/ha), diversity (H'), and richness (number of species/ha) on reclaimed and non-mined lands at TXU's Big Brown Mine in Fairfield, Texas. I also compared my results to those of a previous study conducted 25 years earlier. Avian counts were conducted using a fixedradius point-count method on 240 points placed in four different vegetation types and in four land-age groups (time since being reclaimed). Vegetation was measured both locally, and at a landscape level. Overall bird species density did not exhibit a clear relationship on non-mined versus reclaimed land. Overall bird species diversity was greater on non-mined lands, whereas overall species richness was greater on reclaimed lands. My results demonstrated a lower mean/point bird density and higher mean/point bird diversity than were found 25 years earlier. Different nesting guilds occurred on the reclaimed lands than occurred on the non-mined lands. Results suggested different species were attracted to the several successional stages of reclaimed lands over the nonmined lands, which consisted of climax vegetation. The different successional stages of reclaimed lands increased overall diversity and richness of the landscape as a whole. Five bird species of conservation concern were observed in the study, all of which occurred on reclaimed land. Four of the five species primarily occurred on reclaimed lands. Future land management should include conserving different successional-stage lands to increase overall biotic diversity and richness of mined land, preserving reclaimed habitat for species of concern, and educating future private landowners on the importance of maintaining vegetative and bird species diversity.

Wenzel, Dawn Nicole

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evidence of the production of hot hydrogen atoms in RF plasmas by catalytic reactions between hydrogen and oxygen species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selective H atom broadening was found to be present throughout the volume (13.5 cm diameter x 38 cm length) of RF generated H2O plasmas in a GEC cell. Notably, at low pressures (hot' witha energies greater than 40 eV, with a pressure dependence, but only a weak power dependence. The degree of broadening was virtually independent of the position within the GEC cell. In contrast to the atomic hydrogen lines, no broadening was observed in oxygen species lines at low pressure. Also, in 'control' Xe/H2 plasmas run in the saem cell at similar pressures and absorbed power, no significant broadening of atomic hydrogen, Xe or any other lines was observed. Stark broadeing or acceleration of charged species due to high electric fields can not explain the results since (i) the electron density was insufficient by orders or magnitude, (ii) the RF field was essentially confined to the cathode fall region in contrast to the broadening which was fou...

Phillips, J; Mills, R; Phillips, Jonathan; Chen, Chun Ku; Mills, Randell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ab initio Calculation of Thermodynamic Data for Oxygenated Hydrocarbon Fuels and Radial Breakdown Species: R(OMe)n  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has long been interest in the use of oxygenated hydrocarbon additives to conventional fuels. These oxygenates have been shown to reduce soot emissions in diesel engines and CO emissions in spark-ignition engines; and often allow diesel operation with decreased NO{sub x}. The current widely used additive, MTBE is targeted for elimination as a gasoline additive due to its damaging effects on the environment. This creates a need for alternative oxygenated additives; and more importantly, amplifies the importance to fully understand the thermochemical and kinetic properties on these oxyhydrocarbons fuels and for their intermediate and radical breakdown products. We use CBS-Q and density-functional methods with isodesmic reactions (with group balance when possible) to compute thermodynamic quantities for these species. We have studied hydrocarbons with multiple substituted methoxy groups. In several cases, multioxygenated species are evaluated that may have potential use as new oxygenated fuel additives. Thermodynamic quantities (H{sub 298}{sup 0}, S{sub 298}{sup 0}, C{sub p}(T)) as well as group additivity contributions for the new oxygenated groups are reported. We also report trends in bond-energies with increasing methoxy substitution.

Kubota, A; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Bozzelli, J; Glaude, P-A

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Monitoring, assessing and evaluating the pollinator species (Hymenoptera: apoidea) found on a native brush site, a revegetated site and an urban garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research presents the findings of a pollinator diversity study that took place at three study sites. Although variation in pollinator diversity occurred between the three sites, fewer pollinators than expected were recorded from the La Joya Tract (revegetated site). Numerous genera and species were recorded from the Havana Tract (native site) as well as the Valley Nature Center (urban garden). In contrast, the La Joya Tract had a comparatively depauperate pollinator fauna. The numbers of pollinator genera and species recorded from the three study sites were decreased in comparison to the total number of genera and species recorded from Hidalgo County. Hidalgo County has 35 known genera and 75 species of bees documented to date. About 40% of the genera and 23% of the species recorded from Hidalgo County were recorded from the Havana Tract in this study, while a mere 8.5% of the genera and 4% of the species were reported from the La Joya Tract and 34% of the genera and 16% of the species were reported from the Valley Nature Center. Although the vascular plant species identified from these study sites were diverse, the floral rewards they provided yielded an insight as to what was going on in terms of pollinator diversity. Plants may yield nectar or pollen floral rewards or both in some cases to pollinators. The current study provides evidence that revegetation of land with plants that primarily provide nectar rewards will result in fewer observed bee taxa than from land revegetated with plants that provide a mix of nectar and pollen floral rewards.

Cate, Carrie Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ambient Measurements of the NOx Reservoir Species N2O5 using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regulated control of pollutants is essential to maintaining good air quality in urban areas. A major concern is the formation of tropospheric ozone, which can be especially harmful to those with lung conditions and has been linked to the occurrence of asthma. Ozone is formed through reactions of oxidized volatile organic compounds with nitrogen oxides, and the accurate modeling of the process is necessary for smart and effective regulations. Ambient measurements are important to understanding the mechanisms involved in tropospheric chemistry. This dissertation describes the characterization of a novel instrument for the ambient measurement of dinitrogen pentoxide, N2O5, and the results of several field studies. This is an important intermediate in the major nighttime loss pathway of nitrogen oxides. The understanding of this process requires correct modeling formation, as any nitrogen oxides not removed at night will result in increased ozone formation at sunrise. Calibration studies have been performed in order to quantify the loss of reactive species within the instrument, and the sampling flow and N2O5 detection have been well characterized. The results of the laboratory measurements are presented. Results are presented from the SHARP Field Study in Houston, TX in the spring of 2009. N2O5 measurements are compared to measurements of other species, including nitric acid and nitryl chloride, which were performed by other research groups. Mixing ratios exceeding 300 ppt were observed following ozone exceedance days, and a dependence of the concentration on both wind speed and direction was noticed. There was a strong correlation determined between N2O5 with HNO3 and ClNO2 indicating both a fast heterogeneous hydrolysis and N2O5 as the primary source of the species. Observed atmospheric lifetimes for N2O5 were short, ranging from several seconds to several minutes. We have also investigated the presence of N2O5 in College Station, TX. Low mixing ratios peaking at approximately 20 ppt were observed, with longer atmospheric lifetimes of up to several hours. The role of biogenic emissions in the NO3-N2O5 equilibrium is discussed.

Geidosch, Justine Nicole

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Available Technologies: Therapeutics for Invasive and ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology ... as a target for the development of cancer treatment that could be highly effective and more discriminate than those currently available ...

425

Control of Invasive Plants on the ORR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy November 2006 (10) Japanese stilt grass spreads through the ORR (ORNL photo) Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy November 2006 (11)...

426

Ian Duggan: Research Interests Invasion Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.Greaves 9/2011 ( 1 of 8) GPHY250 (2011): Geography of Canada: Fault lines research paper. Research Paper: Library Research Course Guide 1. Background information 2. Books 3. Scholarly journal access 9. Researching, writing, referencing GETTING HELP @ Stauffer Library Monday ­ Friday, 11:00am ­ 5

Waikato, University of

427

Invasive Plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be most problematic in disturbed areas such as clearings and openings along roads, under transmission lines, beside waterfronts, and in areas with dead pines. Some can, however,...

428

High temperature, minimally invasive optical sensing modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote temperature sensing system includes a light source selectively producing light at two different wavelengths and a sensor device having an optical path length that varies as a function of temperature. The sensor receives light emitted by the light source and redirects the light along the optical path length. The system also includes a detector receiving redirected light from the sensor device and generating respective signals indicative of respective intensities of received redirected light corresponding to respective wavelengths of light emitted by the light source. The system also includes a processor processing the signals generated by the detector to calculate a temperature of the device.

Riza, Nabeel Agha (Oviedo, FL); Perez, Frank (Tujunga, CA)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

First accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates documenting contemporaneity of nonanalog species in late Pleistocene mammal communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide late Pleistocene terrestrial mammal faunas are characterized by stratigraphic associations of species that now have exclusive geographic ranges. These have been interpreted as either taphonomically mixed or representative of communities that no longer exist. Accelerator mass spectrometry {sup 14}C dates (n = 60) on single bones of stratigraphically associated fossil micromammals from two American and two Russian sites document for the first time that currently allopatric mammals occurred together between 12,000 and 22,000 yr B.P. on two continents. The existence of mammal communities without modern analogs demonstrates that Northern Hemisphere biological communities are ephemeral and that many modern biomes are younger than 12 ka. Future climate change may result in new nonanalog communities.

Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Semken, H.A. Jr.; Graham, R.W.; Klippel, W.F.; Markova, A.; Smirnov, N.G.; Southon, J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

He+O{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O plasmas as a source of reactive oxygen species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of water in the chemistry of atmospheric-pressure He+O{sub 2} plasmas is studied by means of a comprehensive global model. Water enables the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cocktails that are rich not only in O, O{sub 2}*, and O{sub 3} but also in OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Due to its polar nature, water also leads to cluster formation, possibly affecting the plasma dynamics. Since the lifetime of many of the ROS is short, the plasma chemistry plays two roles: (i) direct interaction with superficial cells and (ii) triggering of a secondary chemistry that propagates the plasma treatment to regions away from the plasma-surface interface.

Liu, D. X.; Wang, X. H.; Rong, M. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, 710049 (China); Iza, F. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kong, M. G. [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, 710049 (China); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage mediate the cytotoxicity of tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloys in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten alloys (WA) have been introduced in an attempt to find safer alternatives to depleted uranium and lead munitions. However, it is known that at least one alloy, 91% tungsten-6% nickel-3% cobalt (WNC-91-6-3), causes rhabdomyosarcomas when fragments are implanted in rat muscle. This raises concerns that shrapnel, if not surgically removable, may result in similar tumours in humans. There is therefore a clear need to develop rapid and robust in vitro methods to characterise the toxicity of different WAs in order to identify those that are most likely to be harmful to human health and to guide development of new materials in the future. In the current study we have developed a rapid visual in vitro assay to detect toxicity mediated by individual WA particles in cultured L6-C11 rat muscle cells. Using a variety of techniques (histology, comet assay, caspase-3 activity, oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin to measure the production of reactive oxygen species and whole-genome microarrays) we show that, in agreement with the in vivo rat carcinogenicity studies, WNC-91-6-3 was the most toxic of the alloys tested. On dissolution, it produces large amounts of reactive oxygen species, causes significant amounts of DNA damage, inhibits caspase-3, triggers a severe hypoxic response and kills the cells in the immediate vicinity of the alloy particles within 24 h. By combining these in vitro data we offer a mechanistic explanation of the effect of this alloy in vivo and show that in vitro tests are a viable alternative for assessing new alloys in the future.

Harris, R.M.; Williams, T.D.; Hodges, N.J.; Waring, R.H., E-mail: R.H.Waring@bham.ac.uk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

C?H Bond Activation by Pd-substituted CeO[subscript 2]: Substituted Ions versus Reduced Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substituted metal oxides containing ionic species have been attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential ability to reduce the usage of precious metals in heterogeneous catalysts. We investigate Pd-substituted CeO{sub 2} for C-H bond activation reactions including the partial oxidation and dry reforming of CH{sub 4}. This catalyst has been previously studied for CO oxidation, NO{sub x} reduction, and the water-gas shift reaction. Pd-substituted CeO{sub 2}, Ce{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}}, was prepared as a powder with high surface area and a hollow sphere morphology using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The catalysts were extensively characterized using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and other techniques, confirming phase pure samples up to 10 mol % Pd substitution. Ce{sub 0.95}Pd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2-{delta}} was found to be active for partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} around 500 C and higher. Our studies, including postcatalytic synchrotron diffraction, suggest that the single-phase Ce{sub 1-x}Pd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} material is not the active species and that catalysis occurs instead over the reduced two-phase Pd{sup 0}/CeO{sub 2}. This observation has been further confirmed by verifying the activity of the reduced Pd{sup 0}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation, a reaction that is known to require Pd{sup 0}.

Misch, Lauren M.; Kurzman, Joshua A.; Derk, Alan R.; Kim, Young-Il; Seshadri, Ram; Metiu, Horia; McFarland, Eric W.; Stucky, Galen D. (Yeungnam); (UCSB)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Large Scale Atmospheric Chemistry Simulations for 2001: An Analysis of Ozone and Other Species in Central Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key atmospheric gas is ozone. Ozone in the stratosphere is beneficial to the biosphere because it absorbs a significant fraction of the sun's shorter wavelength ultraviolet radiation. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant (respiratory irritant in humans and acts to damage crops, vegetation, and many materials). It affects the Earths energy balance by absorbing both incoming solar radiation and outgoing long wave radiation. An important part of the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere involves ozone, through a photolysis pathway that leads to the hydroxyl radical (OH). Since reaction with OH is a major sink of many atmospheric species, its concentration controls the distributions of many radiatively important species. Ozone in the troposphere arises from both in-situ photochemical production and transport from the stratosphere. Within the troposphere, ozone is formed in-situ when carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) react in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NO, = NO + NO2) and sunlight. The photochemistry of the stratosphere differs significantly from that in the troposphere. Within the stratosphere, ozone formation is initiated by the photolysis of 02. Stratospheric ozone may be destroyed via catalytic reactions with NO, H (hydrogen), OH, CI (chlorine) and Br (bromine), or photolysis. In the past, attempts to simulate the observed distributions of ozone (and other important gases) have focused on either the stratosphere or the troposphere. Stratospheric models either employed simplified parameterizations to represent tropospheric chemical and physical processes, or assumed the troposphere behaved as a boundary condition. Likewise, tropospheric models used simplified stratospheric chemistry and transport.

Atherton, C; Bergmann, D; Cameron-Smith, P; Connell, P; Molenkamp, C; Rotman, D; Tannahil, J

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Determing Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution, and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River, Oregon, Subbasin; 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information about lamprey species composition, distribution, life history, abundance, habitat requirements, and exploitation in the lower Deschutes River Subbasin is extremely limited. During 2002, we began a multi-year study to assess the status of lamprey in the Deschutes River subbasin. The objectives of this project are to determine ammocoete (larval lamprey) distribution and associated habitats; Lampretra species composition; numbers of emigrants; adult escapement and harvest rates at Sherars Falls. This report describes the preliminary results of data collected during 2005. We continued documenting ammocoete (larval) habitat selection by surveying four perennial eastside tributaries to the Deschutes River (Warm Springs River, Badger, Beaver and Shitike creeks) within the known ammocoete distribution. The results of 2003-2005 sampling indicate that positive relationships exist between: presence of wood (P = < 0.001), depositional area (P = < 0.001), flow (P = < 0.001), and fine substrate (P = < 0.001). Out-migrants numbers were not estimated during 2005 due to our inability to recapture marked larvae. In Shitike Creek, ammocoete and microphthalmia out-migration peaked during November 2005. In the Warm Spring River, out-migration peaked for ammocoetes in April 2006 and December 2005 for microphthalmia. Samples of ammocoetes from each stream were retained in a permanent collection of future analysis. An escapement estimate was generated for adult Pacific lamprey in the lower Deschutes River using a two event mark-recapture experiment during run year 2005. A modified Peterson model was used to estimate the adult population of Pacific lamprey at 3,895 with an estimated escapement of 2,881 during 2005 (95% CI= 2,847; M = 143; C = 1,027 R = 37). A tribal creel was also conducted from mid-June through August. We estimated tribal harvest to be approximately 1,015 adult lamprey during 2005 (95% CI= +/- 74).

Graham, Jennifer C.; Brun, Christopher V. (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Department of Natural Resources, John Day, OR)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Available Data -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Home Habitat Management Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Available Data Some of the documents on this page are in...

437

Integrating complex ecological information to develop a management plan for Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum L. Roxb.) in south Georgia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Managing pernicious invasive plant species is an essential component of maintaining biodiversity and restoring natural ecosystem structure and function. Chinese tallow (Sapium sebiferum L. Roxb.) (more)

McCormick, Cheryl Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

An investigation of the allelopathic potential of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum [L.] Roxb.) .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Invasive species can cause significant changes to their introduced environments. A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether Sapium sebiferum exhibits allelopathic effects on (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Migratory Birds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risk factors associated with LANL activities, such as: Installation of power poles and transmission lines Construction projects Invasive weed species eradication Waste treatment...

440

Light management for landscape restoration| Suppression of a model weedy light-demanding pioneer shrub, Ulex europaeus on Mauna Kea Hawai`i.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The use of planted forests as a restoration tool has been shown to improve landscape health and may control invasive plant species by canopy (more)

Perry, Cheyenne Hiapo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Available Data Habitat Management Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Some of the documents on this page are in...

442

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1021, Subpart 0 , Appendix B; (5) involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed...

443

U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Admin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1021, Subpart D, Appendix B; (5) involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated noxious weeds, or invasive species, unless the proposed...

444

Why Sequence Desulfotomaculum species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and wastewater. Principal Investigators: Alfons Stams (Wageningen University) Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

445

Why Sequence Desulfurococcus species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Virginia Bioinformatics Inst., Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.) Program: CSP 2009 Home > Sequencing > UC logo DOE logo Contact Us Credits Disclaimer Access...

446

TVDG Ion Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most Commonly Used Ions Most Commonly Used Ions Many other ions can be produced if required. Due to the number of available ions we have to know, in advance, what ions and LETs you plan to use. Please use the Time Request fill-in form to let us know which ions you will be using. In addition to the maximum energies, ranges and corresponding LETs listed below, lower energies are available for each ion. Charts for range and LET values as a function of energy can be seen by clicking on the links in the LET columns. Flux can be in the range of 1 particle/cm2/sec to greater than 1 · 106 particles/cm2/sec. In Silicon High LET Summary Low LET Summary In GaAs High LET Summary Low LET Summary How To Use The Charts Below Mass Max Energy Surface LET Range Surface LET Range Z Symbol AMU MeV MeV

447

Special Status Species Correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and W ild life S e rvice)..................................................................................... C-2

Attachment C; Eric Derleth (u. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; Wildlife To; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; Attn Anthony Tur

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Why Sequence Salinispora Species?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on land, including an obligate requirement of seawater for growth. This will be a small genome program for draft shotgun sequencing of the type strains of the two currently...

449

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

per square inch gage Sb Antimony scfd Standard cubic feet per day Se Selenium SO 2 SOFC Solid oxide fuel cell Sulfur dioxide V Vanadium vol% Volume percent Zn Zinc C Degrees...

450

Interactive Effects of Geography and Host Plant Species on Genetic and Phenotypic Variation of Cotton Fleahopper Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) is a widely distributed insect across the United States. Although, it feeds on several native wild hosts, its agricultural importance lies as an economic pest of cotton in several states in the southern United States. No studies have addressed intraspecific genetic and phenotypic variation of this insect pest at a large geographic scale. I examined genetic variation among cotton fleahopper populations associated with cotton in different geographic locations across the southern United States (Chapter II). Using dominant, neutral, nuclear molecular markers (AFLP, amplified fragment length polymorphism) and mitochondrial DNA sequences, I found that overall genetic differentiation among different geographic populations, collected from cotton in eleven cotton growing states, was low but significant. AFLP revealed the presence of three regional groups representing western (Arizona), central (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama), and eastern (Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina) populations. I examined if there were distinct lineages of cotton fleahoppers associated with three of its host plant species: cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), horsemint (Monarda punctata) and woolly croton (Croton capitatus) in five different locations of Texas by using AFLP markers (Chapter III). I found two distinct host-associated lineages at three locations and local panmixia in the other two locations. I tested if host preference of cotton fleahoppers were affected by geographic variation and prior experience. Conducting choice tests with a Y-tube olfactometer, I found that host preference in cotton fleahoppers for horsemint (one of its native host plants) is conserved and unaffected by individual?s prior experience with cotton (Chapter IV). Finally, I explored the role of host-plant species in morphological differentiation of the cotton fleahopper in two locations that differ in presence of distinct host-associated lineages. Using a geometric-morphometric approach, I detected significant effect of host plant and geography on body morphology and wing shape of cotton fleahopper populations (Chapter V). Length of antenna and rostrum were two important traits associated with morphological divergence of cotton and horsemint associated insect populations. Cotton associated individuals had relatively longer antenna and rostrum compared to individuals associated with horsemint.

Barman, Apurba

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However, these important grazers have been hunted to ecological extinction in some places for their eggs, meat, and skin. The conservation initiative for the survival of sea turtles requires the protection of their primary habitats in conjunction with a decrease in their interaction with humans. One way these objectives can be met is through the creation of species distribution maps (SDMs). For this thesis, a SDM was created from a generalized additive model used to identify major feeding areas for East Pacific green turtles residing in the Galapagos Islands. The input for the model was green turtle sighting locations during a June 2010 marine life observation survey and remotely sensed values of four oceanographic parameters obtained from satellite sensors (Bathymetry, Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll a, and Current Speed). Line transects of intertidal and subtidal shoreline regions of the islands of Isabela, San Cristobal, and Floreana were also completed, to describe similarities and differences in macroalgal abundance between the locations. A generalized additive model (GAM) explained 56% of the data's null deviance and had a true positive rate of 0.83. The corresponding species distribution map indicated that East Pacific green sea turtles prefer to forage in warm, low chlorophyll a, slow moving waters at depths mostly less than 250m throughout the archipelago. ANOVA analyses showed that macroalgal abundance was statistically different (p-value < 0.01) between the islands of San Cristobal and Isabela. The line transects analysis also documented that red algae was the most prominent phyla at the sites and that the macroalgal abundance did not vary much between months June 2010 and April/May 2011. With these results, potential foraging areas for East Pacific green turtles can be identified and protected. Future studies will be focused on the collection of macroalgae from coastal areas outlined in the SDM and the interactions between green turtles and their competitors and/or predators. This information can be used to validate the areas delineated by the model and to further the understanding of the spatial-temporal effects on macroalgal abundance.

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Stimulating the in situ activity of Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 ?M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant,

Robert T. Anderson; Helen A. Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-bernad; Charles T. Resch; Philip E. Long; Richard Dayvault; Ken Karp; Sam Marutzky; Donald R. Metzler; Aaron Peacock; David C. White; Mary Lowe; Derek R. Lovley

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Table l.-Numbers offish cau9ht and retained, by species (in thousands). 'Numbers caught and retained are not considered to be statistically reliable.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table l.-Numbers offish cau9ht and retained, by species (in thousands). 'Numbers caught nonresidents 37.413 37.628 14.664 12.305 7.924 6.366 7.012 6.309 5.638 4.433 4.068 3.353 3.658 3.013 1.967 1

454

Spatial distributions of tree species in a subtropical forest of China Lin Li, Zhongliang Huang, Wanhui Ye, Honglin Cao, Shiguang Wei, Zhigao Wang, Juyu Lian,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatial distributions of tree species in a subtropical forest of China Lin Li, Zhongliang Huang. Li, Z. Huang (huangzl@scib.ac.cn), W. Ye, H. Cao, S. Wei, Z. Wang and J. Lian, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou, PR China. LL and SW also at: Guilin Univ. of Electronic

He, Fangliang

455

J. Bot. Res. Inst.Texas 1(1): 149 170. 2007 TWO NEW SPECIES OF GRATIOLA (PLANTAGINACEAE) FROM EASTERN NORTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Bot. Res. Inst.Texas 1(1): 149 ­ 170. 2007 TWO NEW SPECIES OF GRATIOLA (PLANTAGINACEAE) FROM Research Institute ofTexas 1(1) materials and methods In order to clarify morphological variation within ratio (Fig. 2 C). The seeds #12;152 Journal of the Botanical Research Institute ofTexas 1(1) Table2

Small, Randall

456

ABL J.-R. Abrial, E. Borger, H. Langmaack: The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition of Formal Program Speci cation and Development Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P Preface ABL J.-R. Abrial, E. Borger, H. Langmaack: The Steam Boiler Case Study: Competition synthesis of programs from re#12;ned user requirements (Programming boiler control in NUT). page 13 AL- #12;ning abstract machine speci#12;cations of the steam boiler control to well documented executable

Börger, Egon

457

The Use of Finite-Volume Methods for Atmospheric Advection of Trace Species. Part I: Test of Various Formulations in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of advection of trace species by 3D atmospheric flows, a comparative test of a hierarchy of finite volume transport schemes initially derived by B. Van Leer is presented. Those schemes are conservative by construction and Van Leer ...

Frdric Hourdin; Alexandre Armeng