Sample records for invasive nonnative species

  1. Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, S.J.

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of this research can be used to prioritize management and research activities related to these invasive taxa on the Research Park as a whole and for specific Natural or Reference Areas. Additional research on the autecology and synecology of each species surveyed is suggested. In particular, research should focus on assessing the impacts of these species on the invaded plant and animal communities and ecosystems. Finally, this ranking system could be used to similarly rank the many other nonnative, invasive species present on the Research Park not included in this study.

  2. Invasive Species Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    monograph The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants [1] helped inspire two generations of scientists species on its environment. Invasibility The vulnerability of a habitat, community, or ecosystem of Species, Darwin (1859) warned "Let it be remembered how powerful the influence of a single introduced tree

  3. Invasive, Nonnative Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open EnergyIGPIntevac Jump

  4. Born of Fire--Restoring Sagebrush Steppe reversing the presence of invasive species,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    displace native species, but can fuel fires that favor invasion and yet more fires. Restoring a healthy and present use of native and nonnative plants in revegetation projects. Invasive Species Influenced by Fire between 1988 and 1999 indicated that there was a doubling of fires in the last 12 years, mostly between

  5. Invasive Species Conservation Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    and decline of birds, mammals, and other species · Result in electrical outages ­ 1600+ between `78-'97 #12;

  6. Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    ····· Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest extinction species a major cause of animal extinctions, or has the extinction threat of invasive species been exaggerated? By what mechanisms have invasive species driven animal species to extinction? Are certain animal

  7. Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) ­ By smothering (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu) ­ By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree loosestrife (competition) Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU Kudzu (mat

  8. Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    honeysuckle, kudzu) By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree, privet, bamboo) #12;2 Photo Photo by Randy Westbrooks, USGS Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU #12 / Cultural Uses Environmental Remediation (e.g. Kudzu!) Food for wild game (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - australian native species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration... of the river. The distribution of flows and non-native species prior...

  10. Final Report Parris Island Depot Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Species Occurrence and Management Page 6 a. Invasive Species Survey Conducted in 2001 Page 7 b. Management Plant Control Inc. (IPC) was contracted to survey and prescribe a management plan to control invasive and Control Efforts Page 9 c. Herbicides Page 10 IV. 2010 Survey of Invasive Species Page 16 a. Survey Methods

  11. Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Jessica Gurevitch and Dianna K. Padilla species invasions and the extinction of natives is widely accepted by scientists as well species on extinctions. Greater clarity in our under- standing of these patterns will help us to focus

  12. Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions Miguel Clavero and Emili Garci and extinctions of species is unproven. They analyzed the IUCN Red List database [2] and stated that only 6% of the taxa are threatened with extinction as a result of invasion by alien species and !2% (ten terrestrial

  13. Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

  14. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  15. PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

  16. 1A Appendix A--Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon APPENDIX A. OREGON STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT OF INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY OISC Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive will not be shared. Rather, survey responses will be compiled as part of this statewide management assessment Species Survey and Management Question 2 If you conducted invasive species work in your fiscal year 2008

  17. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  18. Making the best of a pest: the potential for using invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) biomass as a supplement to commercial chicken feed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlan, Claire; Rose, Paul; Aldridge, David C.

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasive non-native species frequently occur in very high densities. Where such invaders present an economic or ecological nuisance this biomass is typically removed and landfill is the most common destination, which is undesirable from both...

  19. Application of Branching Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    and their empirical growth rates. We then characterize the estimated spatial-temporal rate of spread of red banana services. Pimentel et al. (2005, 2007) estimates the financial impact of invasive species in the United States at over 120 billion dollars per year, and Colautti et al. (2006) estimates the cost of eleven

  20. Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessment Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    , such as an insect stowed away in a cargo box or a lar- val fish brought on board a ship in the bal- last water. When is not just an eco- nomic issue--the health of our unique coastal and marine ecosystems is a source of pride into new areas--such as the unintentional transport of species in the ballast water of freight ships

  1. Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sax, Dov

    Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

  2. 3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic concepts: · In most plant communities at most times, most of the resources that are available makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic

  3. Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    declines and extinctions of native species worldwide.and even extinctions, of native species through variousG (2004) How species respond to multiple extinction threats.

  4. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  5. Tradeable risk permits to prevent future introductions of invasive alien species into the Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    or control of IAS populations (e.g., integrated pest management [IPM]), or adaptation. Historically, efforts; Risk management; Permit trading 1. Introduction Invasive alien species (IAS)--species that establish, damage, or degrade assets (e.g., power plants, boats, piers, and reservoirs) and result in significant

  6. Marine Invaders in the Northeast: Rapid Assessment Survey of Non-native and Native Marine Species of Floating Dock Communities, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his seminal book on The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Elton (1958) laid the foundation for the science of biological invasions. He identified the importance of human-mediated vectors as means of transporting ...

  7. aquatic invasive species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species:321-333 DOI 10.1007s11258-009-9645-9 12;biogeographical isolation (Office of Technology Assessment 1993 (Robinia pseudoaca- cia) introduced to Europe in the...

  8. Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Danny 1983-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically...

  9. BUTYRIC ACID INCREASES INVASIVENESS OF HL-60 LEUKEMIA CELLS: ROLE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Microbiol Lett 518, 1-3 (2002) 159-63" #12;2 Abbreviations: AML-2, acute myeloid leukemia type 2; ATRA, all leukemia cell line HL-60 represent a widely used model of acute myeloid leukemia type 2 (AML-2) [8], which1 BUTYRIC ACID INCREASES INVASIVENESS OF HL-60 LEUKEMIA CELLS: ROLE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

  10. Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species-quarantined pathogen of potatoes that has been previously confirmed in the eastern United States. The detection from the Andean region of South America, the pathogen now has worldwide distribution where potatoes

  11. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  12. nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public, and land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 I nvasive nonnative plants are a serious subject for gardeners, farmers, the general public and spread. For example, invasive plants may be introduced to an ecosystem through unintentional escape from to a country where the dis- ease was not previously present. An invasive plant can also be referred

  13. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

  14. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF AN UNPRECEDENTED OUTBREAK Allan L. Carroll University of British Columbia, Department of Forest carbon dynamics. The loss of carbon uptake and the increased emissions from decaying trees have converted

  15. Introduction to the Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    actions that it believes are likely to cause or promote the introduction or spread of invasive species positive role that bioenergy crops can play in offsetting the global rise in atmospheric CO2Tomaso et al. 2007). It was with this in mind that the WSSA Sustainable Agriculture Committee organized

  16. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , NC 27606 ABSTRACT Our geospatial analysis estimated that LBAM could establish throughout most on LBAM. Our economic analysis had two components: (1) a geospatial analysis that identified areas at risk2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE

  17. 106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND ()--PINENE FOR DETECTING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND (­)--PINENE FOR DETECTING traps baited with ethanol or ethanol and (-)--pinene for bark and ambrosia beetles in pine stands control; (2) ethanol; (3) (-)--pinene; and (4) ethanol + (-)--pinene. The release rates for ethanol

  18. Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

  19. BROMUS TECTORUM INVASION AND GLOBAL CHANGE: LIKELIHOOD OF SPREAD AND FEASIBILITY OF CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concilio, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and T. Taylor. 2011. Composting one invasive species toproject, chipping and composting one invasive species was

  20. IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive of a tree can mean to different social groups. The organizers see this "citizen science" (one definition

  1. Water Quality at Caddo Lake, Center for Invasive Species Eradication: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Knutson, A.; Ederton, E.; Mukherjee, A.; Baumann, P.; Masser, M.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Giant salvinia, a highly invasive aquatic fern native to South America, poses a serious threat to Texas’ waters and has done so since its discovery in the state in the 1990s. If left unmanaged, giant salvinia can cause a multitude of impacts...

  2. Planting History and Propagule Pressure as Predictors of Invasion by Woody Species in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Region MARTIN KRIV´ANEK, § PETR PYSEK, AND VOJTECH JAROS´IK Institute of Botany, Academy of Sciences Invasi´on de Especies Le~nosas en una Regi´on Templada Resumen: Estudiamos 28 especies de ´arboles no nativos que actualmente est´an sembrados con fines fore- stales en la Rep´ublica Checa para determinar la

  3. Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-121 Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1 Jeffrey E. Hill2 1 of a wide variety of warm-water and tropical species of ornamental, food, bait, and sport fish. In 2012, the farm-gate value of Florida aquaculture was US$69 million, with 40% of that value in ornamental fish

  4. Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native to identify the Botryosphaeriaceae species present as endophytes or associated with cankers in both introduced is a very diverse group of fungi that includes endophytes and plant pathogens of trees and plants (Alves et

  5. Invasive Species: Major Laws and the Role of Selected Federal Agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    the globe can pose a significant threat to native animal and plant communities, and may result and nuclear power plants in the Great Lakes and the Mississippi basin. The light brown apple moth, a native species) refers to an animal or plant that is introduced into an environment where it is not native

  6. Invasive Bluegills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    " policy and offering recipes for blue gill fried, marinated and in chili sauce. Hmmm. Maybe we can adopt that approach to deal with our own invasive Japanese species... so would you like that kudzu with a balsamic vinaigrette or the house dressing? #ceas...

  7. EO 13112: Invasive Species

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR CertifiedRed LionDepartment183

  8. Coexistence of congeneric native and invasive species: The case of the green algae Codium spp. in northwestern Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provan, Jim

    Biological invasions have increased in number in coastal eco- systems in recent decades, although until are carried with the sand and rock ballast of ships, such as seaweeds, molluscs and arthro- pods (Carlton

  9. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-?B signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-?B and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-?B, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ? Endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed enhanced invasiveness. ? Nicotine induces uPAR expression and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness. ? MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signals are involved in nicotine-induced uPAR.

  10. 122 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 COMPARISON OF FECUNDITY AND SURVIVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID (HEMIPTERA: ADELGIDAE) IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN POPULATIONS Artemis Roehrig), Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an introduced species first reported in the eastern

  11. Climate change and ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Region Catriona E. Rogers1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    decline, while problems with non-native invasive species, such as kudzu and gypsy moths, might increase

  12. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 111 FORESTRY-RELATED PATHWAYS FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), non-wood forest products, and trees for planting. Pests may infest these commodities prior to harvest or transport, or may attach themselves as hitchhikers at any time during the extraction, transport, or trading fauna, and lower the water table. Some invade undisturbed forests, changing species composition

  13. INVASION NOTE Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revell, Liam

    INVASION NOTE Genetic analysis of a novel invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake R 2012 Abstract The tropical island Puerto Rico is poten- tially vulnerable to invasion by some species and genetically characterize the nascent invasion of Puerto Rico by an exotic constricting snake of the family

  14. Nonnative Plant Response to Silvicultural Treatments: A Model Based on Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Cara

    can have on nonnative vegetation, alter their harvesting techniques to minimize negative nonnative result in substantial adverse effects on the functions of native forest ecosystems, including nutrient in the scientific literature. Of a total of 42 studies that addressed the effects of silvicultural treatments

  15. Conference on Invasive Species in Natural Areas, October 2529, 2010, Coeur D'Alene, ID. Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ Vehicles as a vector of plant seed dispersal: quantifying seed loss by vehicles is an important but relatively unmeasured component of the invasion story, and few data exist quantifying how far propagules are dispersed once present on a vehicle and under different driving conditions

  16. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  17. An online system for entering and annotating non-native Mandarin Chinese speech for language teaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawksley, Andrea Johanna

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of an intuitive online system for the annotation of non-native Mandarin Chinese speech by native Chinese speakers. This system will allow speech recognition researchers ...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    loaders, etc.) before entering the action area and working on the project to prevent transport of non-native invasive species within the transmission line corridor. 2...

  19. www.biosciencemag.org October 2011 / Vol. 61 No. 10 Invasive Plant Atlas of New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    : The Role of Citizens in the Science of Invasive Alien Species Detection SARAH T. BOIS, JOHN A. SILANDER JR allows citizen science data to be used by the general public and as a data source for researchers efforts in invasion ecology. Keywords: citizen science, species distribution database, invasive species

  20. aphid species aphis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABS1003775P NEW INVASIVE SPECIES OF APHIDS (HEMIPTERA, APHIDIDAE) IN SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO CiteSeer Summary: Abstract-. Three new invasive species of aphids have been found in...

  1. alien species introductions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of the introduced species...

  2. What is an Invasive Species? Invasion Ecology's terminology problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Plants in Forests Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Golden bamboo

  3. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States Received 19 April 2006; accepted 23 August 2006 Abstract Over key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how

  4. Effects of Local Adaptation of Invasion Success: A Case Study of Rhithropanopeus harrisii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Terrence Michael

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider the potential for differential success among different source populations. This study looked at the inland invasion of Rhithropanopeus harrisii in the context of a current invasion model. This species has been introduced worldwide, but has only...

  5. Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion; accepted in revised form 10 October 2005 Key words: eutrophication, food web, invasive species) run- off, which causes eutrophication. Eutrophication has a myriad of negative consequences, including

  6. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = 0.138). The energy production values may be underestimatedin the median 24 h energy production of M. polymorpha (TableNocturnal and diurnal energy production of M. polymorpha We

  7. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune 20,in the NextPopulations |

  8. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM STAR CertifiedRed LionDepartment183EO

  9. Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes to invasion by the non-native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Kenneth

    Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes grass, Poa alsodes, and a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium sp.) improved the grass's ability to compete naturally endophyte-symbiotic and experi- mentally endophyte-free P. alsodes plants with the invader

  10. angiography nimiscad-non invasive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark A. Davis Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , and ecological impacts of invasive species as well as the variety of management strategies developed to...

  11. Alex Lester Invasive Plants: Just A Nuisance?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Terence

    by altering the type of disturbance, the frequency of the disturbance, its intensity, and its duration (Gordon, and an altered disturbance regime (Gordon 1998). Geomorphologically, invasive plant species can affect processes to the soil. The final ecosystem level impact is seen in changed disturbance regimes. This can take place

  12. aquatic species program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invasive species (AIS) is an aquatic parasite 5 Aquatic Pesticide Monitoring Program Review of Alternative Aquatic Pest Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    species form mutual- isms with honeydew-producing Hemiptera and their aggressive presence deters the natural enemies of the Hemiptera. Invasive ant species like the Argentine ant have often been associated decades (Bronstein 1994; Bruno et al. 2003). Mutualisms involving ants and Hemiptera have been described

  14. vol. 162, no. 4 the american naturalist october 2003 Toward a Mechanistic Understanding and Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    of native species with cos- mopolitan, nonnative species is homogenizing the global fauna and flora. While of the global biota. Keywords: invasion, extinction, biodiversity, native, nonnative, hab- itat loss. * E by The University of Chicago. 0003-0147/2003/16204-020366$15.00. All rights reserved. Human-assisted dispersal

  15. CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) IN THE SAN JUAN RIVER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES native fishes. Introduced largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in the San Juan River, New Mexico. The disproportional abundance of native fishes in the diet of juvenile largemouth bass suggests greater susceptibility

  16. Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirmer, Julia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

  17. .\\m. Midi. Nat. 159:55-66 Do Non-native Plant Species Affect the Shape of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Kurt Kotrschal c Rui F. Oliveira a, b a Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA ­ Instituto Universitário is the relation- ship between spatial ability requirements and the relative Key Words Blennies Spatial behavior Published online: February 16, 2011 Silvia Costa Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34 PT

  18. INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo Æ.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

  19. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  20. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Inter-species interactions and ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    (increased propagule load). Model simulations of hypothetical interactions of Dendroctonus rufipennis and I species of Ips and Dendroctonus in North America and Eurasia have failed to establish outside communities, and loss of biodiversity. Keywords Species introduction Á Invasive species Á Ips Á Dendroctonus Á

  2. Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F. Schaefer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F 66506, USA b Department of Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 in Oklahoma and Kansas to examine spatial patterns of species invasions in the Great Plains region of the US

  3. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

  4. Stationary Policies in the Control of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant. A CHP plant uses hotter steam and higher pressure boilers. It, too

  5. Cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or bias against those not mentioned. Larva and frass. (Photo: Coutin R. OPIE) Cabbage damaged by cabbage. / OPIE) Larvae feeding on the plants at night. Management notes Sex pheromones for the cabbage moth have

  6. Letters Response Response to Ricciardi. Assessing species invasions as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla, Dianna

    , pollution and toxic sediments [4­7]), har- vest for the cultured pearl industry, and loss of native fishes, the primary extinction threats are habitat loss and degradation (including construction of dams, development of the legacy of toxic sediments left from decades of pollution [6]. We feel that it is essential to determine

  7. European cabbageworm Pieris brassicae Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rusticana), radish (Raphanus sativus), watercress (Nasturtium microphyllum) and garlic mustard (Alliaria

  8. Combating Invasive Species Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioenergetics model that indicates Asian carp cannot survive in Lake Michigan given the available food types and bioenergetics modeling are providing information for the first two projects. Bioenergetics is the study

  9. Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of honeydew-producing Hemiptera (Holway et al. 2002). Weof Nysius seed bugs (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) occurred in aColeoptera Diptera Hemiptera Lepidoptera Psocoptera

  10. 2009 AARES Annual Symposium Invasive Species and Biosecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    analysis, optimal border quarantine and surveillance, environmental valuation methods, search and spread

  11. Mechanisms controlling the distribution of two invasive Bromus species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bykova, Olga

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and altitudinal gradients (Beatley 1966). While B. tectorumand inspiration. References Beatley, J.C. (1966) Ecologicalmid elevations below 1500m (Beatley 1966). More- over, while

  12. alien invasive species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vegetables, fooder, live fancing etc. Harmful effects were identified on native plants, crop production, livestock grazing human health,water drainage etc. Kalyan Das; Pallwabee...

  13. Golden nematode Globodera rostochiensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Venezuela. Oceania

  14. ancient biological invasion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who has published in the areas of invasion Davis, Mark A. 4 1 Invasion Ecology syllabus, spring 2012 Description: Mechanisms and hypotheses to explain biological invasions....

  15. Research Symposium January 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    in New York is to remove the offending coyote using lethal control. Non-lethal methods to prevent? Non-native invasive species are considered a serious ecological and economic threat. Because of this. However, little is known about the impact these organizations have on invasive plant populations

  16. Social aspects include following applicable laws and international treaties; using open and transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the potential of bioenergy crops spreading genetically modified organisms, invasive species, or nonnative Biodiversity and habitat Genetically modified organisms and invasives Soil health Environ -mental mic for animal feed, food, and processed-food ingredients. Economic factors are influenced by government policies

  17. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  18. Title: Stepping stones for biological invasion: A bioeconomic model of transferable risk Authors: Travis Warziniacka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    equilibrium estimates. If ecosystem services and market goods are substitutes the partial equilibrium bias #12;2 1. Introduction We investigate three sources of bias in valuation methods for invasive species), failure to consider nonseparability of ecosystem services with market goods (general equilibrium

  19. PERSPECTIVE Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions Antoine Guisan,1,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    for analysis and learning. Furthermore, the decision framework within which SDMs are used is rarely made explicit. Using case studies from biological invasions, identification of critical habitats, reserve planning, critical habitats, environmental suitability, reserve selection, species distribution model

  20. Predicting invasive plants in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brusati, Elizabeth D; Johnson, Douglas W; DiTomaso, Joseph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pueraria montana (Lour. ) Merr. Kudzu Bignoniaceae Spathodeaan animal forage species, kudzu (Pueraria montana) escapedthe southern United States. Kudzu is neither naturalized nor

  1. Spatial Interactions among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial Interactions among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project title: Spatial Interactions Among Fuels, Wildfire, and Invasive Plants Project location: Colorado State University, Western Forest, wildfire severity, exotic plant invasions, and post-fire fuel flammability in grasslands, shrub lands

  2. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice LovatoEndangered Species

  3. Invasion of a Sphagnum-peatland by Betula spp and Molinia caerulea impacts on organic matter biochemistry. Implications for carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the extent of the influence of this invasion on the biochemical characteristics of the peat. Elemental substrate injection as invading plants have a lower ratio than Sphagnum spp and Sphagnum peat. Total the availability of resources to other species (Jones et al, 1994). Sphagnum species, by regulating

  4. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  5. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  6. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  7. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

  8. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    the environmental and economic impact of invasive non-native species in Canada and United States. The North American for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tracks information regarding disease prevalence/incidence, NAISN activities on public conservation lands and waterways in terms of prevention and early detection efforts

  9. Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of Plant Invasions LLEWELLYN C. FOXCROFT of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Abstract: Human land uses surrounding protected areas provide propagules for colonization of these areas by non-native species, and corridors between protected-area

  10. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  11. Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion Dana Blumenthala,1, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor levels of available resources in their native range are particularly susceptible to enemies

  12. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Sarah J.

    Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements Tony Birch Chris Breward Sarah Campbell Igor, September 2007 Tony Birch et. al. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements #12;Overview: Finapres. al. Continuous Non-Invasive Blood-Pressure Measurements #12;The Problem Under normal resting

  13. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

  14. Full story from the April 2010 issue CENTER FOR INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT | Montana State University | PO Box 173120 Bozeman, MT 59717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    .weedcenter.org | email: weedcenter@montana.edu Seed Dispersal by Vehicles By Dr. Lisa Rew and Fredric Pollnac1 If you have ever driven your vehicle off-road or on an unpaved road surface, chances are that you have played vehicle only moved a few seeds of this invasive species a short distance, natural events such as wind

  15. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    include thermal expansion of the warming oceans along with melting of glaciers and ice caps (Church et al considerably this century, potentially affecting species that rely on coastal habitat. The Northwestern

  16. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  17. R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Jane

    . Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration on stream restoration in the United States in the last decade, yet fewer than 10% of projects monitorR E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species Removal on Recovery

  18. 88 2008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species AN ASSESSMENT OF SIREX NOCTILIO SPREAD AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -FBM biophysical component simulates the spread of invading organism, forest biomass growth, timber yields AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON PINE WOOD SUPPLY AND HARVESTS IN EASTERN CANADA Denys Yemshanov1 , Daniel W. McKenney1 Forest Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre 1219 Queen St. East, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, P6A 2E5 Canada 2 U

  19. European cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . (Photo: Coutin R. / OPIE) Larva exiting the cherry fruit. (Photo: Coutin R. / OPIE) #12;European cherry

  20. Plum fruit moth Cydia funebrana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's entry hole, premature ripening and fruit drop. Adult resting on a plum leaf. (Photo: R. Coutin / OPIE) Larva in a plum. (Photo: R. Coutin / OPIE) #12;Plum fruit moth 2 MSU is an affirmative-action, equal

  1. Occupation, Dispersal, and Economic Impact of Major Invasive Plant Species in Southern U.S. Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thunb.), 2. air yam (Dioscorea bulbifera L.), 3. winter creeper (Euonymus fortunei (Turcz.) Hand.-Maz.), 4. English ivy (Hedera helix L.), 5. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.), 6. kudzu (Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata...

  2. 132008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species DISPERSALAND DYNAMICS OF THE WOODWASP SIREX NOCTILIO IN ARGENTINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    population outbreaks. In Patagonia (Southern Argentina), pine trees (mainly Pinus ponderosa) are increasingly ecological and behavioral studies of this forest pest carried out in Patagonia. Our aim is to help increase). Number of attacked trees was estimated through a census of a 70-ha pine plantation in Northwest Patagonia

  3. European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    common names European grape moth, European vine moth, grape berry moth, vine moth Systematic position on nectar. Identification Adult : 5-7 mm wingspan; forewings have cream-white color with gray, black State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color

  4. Golden twin spot Chrysodeixis chalcites Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper) Global distribution any time of year. Flights occur at dusk and moths are attracted to lights. Identification Adult State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color

  5. Silver Y moth Autographa gamma Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Other common name gamma moth Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Autographa gamma per year in Asia and Europe, and adults are seen from May through October. Identification Adult moth programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender

  6. Dynamics of invasion and native species recovery following fire in coastal sage scrub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gressard, Scott Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology. 16: 909-23. O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal sageSpringer-Verlag, New York O'Leary, J. F. 1990. Post-fireof Vegetation Science 1:173-180 O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal

  7. Pale cyst nematode Globodera pallida Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , United Kingdom; Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Venezuela

  8. Chrysanthemum white rust Puccinia horiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Uruguay, Venezuela. Quarantine status Localized introductions

  9. ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girondot, Marc

    Metropolitan University, Department of Zoology, Port Elizabeth 6031, South Africa 2 Laboratoire Écologie 183 Amber Valley, Private Bag X 30, Howick 3290, South Africa ABSTRACT: Average age and size at first of a species/ population are highly modified by energy availability (Berner & Blanckenhorn 2007). Therefore

  10. Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E.; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive all other species to extinction. However, empiricalA will always drive species B to extinction (unless f A = fductivity species (species B) to extinction (Fig. 2a). In

  11. ENDANGERED SPECIES PETITION MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 a. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species

  12. Src, PKCalpha, and PKCdelta are required for alphavbeta integrin-mediated metastatic melanoma invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Andrew J; Schulz, Veronique V; Freiter, Eric M; Bill, Heather M; Miranti, Cindy K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mediated metastatic melanoma invasion Andrew J Putnam †1,2 ,capacity of malignant melanomas, yet it remains unclear howof this integrin triggers melanoma invasion and metastasis.

  13. Preservation of a species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

  14. Remote sensing has been used to determine the occurrence of many non-indigenous plant species. GIS are used to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    requires an objective-based approach using integrated techniques and technology for geospatial analysis are used to manage data acquired with remote sensing and field surveys. Geospatial models are designed." Invasive Plant Species Management with Geospatial Information Technologies and Computational Science

  15. Effects of Simvastatin and Fluvastatin on Endothelial Invasion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Evan

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    (bFGF), as well as the lysosphingolipid Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P). Invasion is distinguishable by dramatic EC morphological changes from simple squamous cells to sprouting structures that ultimately form new lumens. Cholesterol synthesis...

  16. Brassica tournefortii: Phenology, Interactions and Management of an Invasive Mustard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marushia, Robin Gene

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasions 11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1966). "EcologicalEcology 47(4): 548-&. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological events

  17. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  18. D I G E S T Public Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , Sustainability, Energy and Water ____________________________________________ 30 Fort Benning saves energy prioritization of nonnative invasive plant management, by Matthew Hohmann 37 Experimental grease trap waste

  19. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993. The recovery of an endangered plant. I. Creating a newEffects of invasive alien plants on fire regimes. Bioscience2008. Effects of an invasive plant on a desert sand dune

  20. Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract What's Invasive and Project Budburst are citizen science projects mobile-based citizen science deployment, as well as issues surrounding system development

  1. University of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    , diversions, and inter-basin water transfers alter disturbance regimes (flood frequency, magnitude, timingUniversity of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance GRACE MORTENSON entitled Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance

  2. Economic Incentives for Controlling Trade-Related Biological Invasions in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    efforts focused on post-invasion control or eradication (Lupi, Hoehn, and Christie 2003). But there is now

  3. Exotic Species What's the Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    of introduced species as "the stealth destroyers of the American environment" (McDonald 1999: A15). Another seeds, eggs, spores, or other biological material capable of propagating that species

  4. STRUCTURED AND FLEXIBLE GRAY-BOX COMPOSITION USING INVASIVE DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    problems for SAP AG's SOA infrastructure are considered, e.g., in the CESSA research project). Fig. 1.sudholt@mines-nantes.fr ABSTRACT The evolution of complex distributed software systems often requires intricate composition of complex software systems that require invasive modifications. Concretely, we provide three contributions

  5. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation Algorithm (IDEA) is an ex­ ample of one such algorithm. However, little is known about the practical benefits of these algorithms even though AI--techniques are often favored in practice because

  6. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    in practice because of their general applicability and good performance on com- plicated real­world problemsBringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation university technical report UU-CS-2004-049 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization

  7. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Packer, Samuel (Floral Park, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  8. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  9. Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production in British Columbia by Rupananda Widanage Ph.D. (Economics), University of Ruhuna, 2007 M.Sc., Asian: Master of Resource Management Report Number: 529 Title of Research Project: Economics of Biological

  10. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  11. Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments Christopher Niederauer exploded views of 3D architectural environments such as multi-story buildings. These exploded views allow viewers to simultaneously see the internal and external structures of such environments. To create

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Invasion dynamics of the glassy-winged sharpshooter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in French Polynesia Je´ro^me N. Petit Æ Mark S. Hoddle Æ Julie Grandgirard Æ George Homalodisca coagulata (Say)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), has recently emerged as a serious invasive pest. From Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Takiya et al. 2006)] (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) is native to the southeast USA

  13. Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

  14. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terakawa, Yuzo [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Croul, Sidney E. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neuropathology, University Health Network, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (Canada); Rutka, James T., E-mail: james.rutka@sickkids.ca [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ? Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ? Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ? We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ? Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  15. Loopless non-trapping invasion percolation model for fracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless non-trapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium, and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a 2D square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. W...

  16. From invasion percolation to flow in rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettstein, Salomon J; Araujo, Nuno A M; Lanyon, Bill; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this work is to simulate two-phase flow in the form of immiscible displacement through anisotropic, three-dimensional (3D) discrete fracture networks (DFN). The considered DFNs are artificially generated, based on a general distribution function or are conditioned on measured data from deep geological investigations. We introduce several modifications to the invasion percolation (MIP) to incorporate fracture inclinations, intersection lines, as well as the hydraulic path length inside the fractures. Additionally a trapping algorithm is implemented that forbids any advance of the invading fluid into a region, where the defending fluid is completely encircled by the invader and has no escape route. We study invasion, saturation, and flow through artificial fracture networks, with varying anisotropy and size and finally compare our findings to well studied, conditioned fracture networks.

  17. alien invasive slider: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass...

  18. alien invasive centaurea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass...

  19. 82 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 MULTITROPHIC EFFECTS OF CALCIUM AVAILABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Delaware, Departments of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, Newark, DE 19716 ABSTRACT Acid rain adsorbed to soil surfaces, and (2) aluminum is released to soil water by acid rain and displaces adsorbed, causing calcium to be more readily leached from the soil. The effects of acid rain on soil calcium

  20. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 69 DISTRIBUTION AND BIOLOGY OF NATIVE SIRICIDAE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    placed in each of the three states. Traps were baited with Sirex lure alone, Sirex lure + ethanol. There was no significant difference in catches between Sirex lure alone and Sirex lure + UHR ethanol. More siricids were as including ethanol. Future studies will focus on re-sampling these study sites using similar trapping methods

  1. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 107 ATTRACTANTS FOR LONGHORN BEETLES IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pheromones, ipsenol and ipsdienol, to the binary combination of pine volatiles, ethanol and (-)--pinene). The following treatments were randomly assigned to one of the three traps within each replicate: ethanol + (-)--pinene (EA) ; ipsenol and ipsdienol (SD); and ethanol, (-)--pinene, ipsenol and ipsdienol (EA + SD

  2. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 141 MANAGING SIREX NOCTILIO POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN PATAGONIA (ARGENTINA): SILVICULTURE AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL José Villacide, Deborah Fischbein, Nélida Jofré (Corley and Villacide 2005). In Patagonia (Argentina), as in other Sirex-affected regions, remarkable contribution to woodwasp mortality in Patagonia (Corley and Bruzzone 2009). We note that, among an array

  3. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 93 IMPACT OF ENHANCIN GENES ON POTENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lacking E1 (E1cat), E2 (E1del) or both (E1delE2del) in larvae fed on artificial diet in the presence enhancin genes (E1 and E2) encoding proteases that degrade key peritrophic matrix (PM) proteins, thereby

  4. Evaluation of oocyte competency in bovine and canine species via non-invasive assessment of oocyte quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willingham-Rocky, Lauri A.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ), and intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) using rhodamine 123, JC-1 and Fluo-4, AM, respectively in bovine and canine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. Comparison of morphological grading with fluorescence intensity yielded similar trends between all grades...

  5. 96 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 THE COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL PEST SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY PROGRAM (CAPS): SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT TO OPTIMIZE A NATIONAL PROGRAM Lisa D. Jackson and Daniel A Survey (CAPS) program is to provide a survey profile of exotic plant pests in the United States deemed decisions and operations through methods development work, scientific investigation, analyses

  6. Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

  7. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Michael P. (Albquuerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  8. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  9. Insect Conservation under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lugo, Ezequiel

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 'protection for species on the verge of extinction. 43. Id.about the extinction of any species 3 1 and, unlike earlier

  10. Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Tamás

    Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction? Yimin Du Penny Langhammer Yijun Lou John population declines, species extinctions ­ Biodiversity loss · Theoretical ­ Host extinction generally to amphibian species Stuart et al. 2004. Science 306: 17831786 #12;Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd

  11. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

  12. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer Matthew J Burfeindt1 , Earl Zastrow1 adjuvant to other treatment modalities for a variety of cancers (e.g., Overgaard et al 1995, Kapp 1996, VanMicrowave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain

  13. R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon sequestration D . A . P E LT Z E R on the effects of some of the major drivers of global change on carbon (C) sequestration, particularly carbon that drive C sequestration. Keywords: biological invasion, carbon sequestration, community structure, forest

  14. Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs Serena whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type

  15. Biological Invasions 4: 333338, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Netherlands. Invasion note First report of the Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida in the northeastern Pacific in revised form 28 May 2002 Key words: California, invasions, kelp, nonindigenous, Undaria, wakame Abstract The Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida was discovered in southern California in the spring of 2000

  16. Role of the scaffolding protein p62Dok in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkington, Ryan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy to determine the subcellular distribution of p62Dok and to determine if p62Dok is required for tumor cell invasion. We have successfully induced invasive structures in fibroblasts and have made a fluorescent Dok1 fusion protein. Preliminary data...

  17. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar,1 Vinod. Culturing melanomas of different meta- static capacities within the system showed that each cell type (i.e., matrix components, interstitial cell presence) on planar and vertical melanoma invasion. We

  18. Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

  19. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  20. Phosphotyrosine Profiling of NSCLC Cells in Response to EGF and HGF Reveals Network Specific Mediators of Invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Hannah

    Growth factor signaling is deregulated in cancer and often leads to invasion, yet receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways driving invasion under different growth factor conditions are not well understood. To identify ...

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  2. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bayesian Analysis (2006) 1, Number 1, pp. 41–92 Explaining Species Distribution Patterns through Hierarchical Modeling Alan E. Gelfand?, John A. Silander Jr†., Shanshan Wu‡, Andrew Latimer§, Paul O. Lewis¶, Anthony G. Rebelo? and Mark Holder..., spatial logistic re- gression, species range, species richness. 1 Introduction Ecologists increasingly use species distribution models to address theoretical and practi- cal issues including predicting the response of species to climate change (Midgley et...

  3. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-García, Virginia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  4. Factoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across the ecoregions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    population density, and the extinction risk of species. This threat index is positively correlated with allFactoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across Biodiversity Species Non-species biological values Threat A B S T R A C T Biodiversity in Africa, Madagascar

  5. The Behavior of Invasive Batillaria attramentaria Compared to the Native Horn Snail and the Impacts of the Invader on Bodega Harbor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to Batillaria's effects on the mudflat environment ·This invasive snail is capable of withstanding stressful

  6. A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

  7. Simulation methods and tissue property models for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Christopher W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many brain tumors are localized deeply and are currently surgically inaccessible without causing severe damage to the overlying structures of the brain. The current spectrum of non-invasive methods for treating such tumors ...

  8. Non-invasive assessment of ventilation maldistribution in lung disease using multiple breath inert gas washouts. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horsley, Alex

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinical research in cystic fibrosis (CF) requires study endpoints that are sensitive to airways disease, repeatable and non-invasive. Despite significant advances in the treatment of CF, lung function assessments continue ...

  9. Ultra-low-power electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    New electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring promise low-cost, maintenance-free, and lightweight devices. These devices are critical in long-term medical measurements and in home-based tele-monitoring services, which ...

  10. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  11. Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishiguchi, Michele

    Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the Southwestern United and decision products will be based on geospatial modeling coupled with field experiments and draw on a wealth

  12. Effects of Local Adaptation of Invasion Success: A Case Study of Rhithropanopeus harrisii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Terrence Michael

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    for shelter at high densities and therefore warrant management in order to reduce their effect. This study indicates a need for the invasion models to take the source population into account in order to ensure effective and prudent management strategies....

  13. Minimally-invasive Wearable Sensors and Data Processing Methods for Mental Stress Detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jongyoon

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    conducted for this dissertation, a minimally-invasive wearable sensor platform and physiological data processing methods were developed to analyze a number of physiological correlates of mental stress. We present a minimally obtrusive wearable sensor...

  14. Invasive potential of cattle fever ticks in the southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Busch, Joseph D.; Olafson, Pia U.; Scoles, Glen A.; Davey, Ronald B.; Pound, J. Mathews; Kammlah, Diane M.; Lohmeyer, Kimberly H.; Wagner, David M.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Background For >100 years cattle production in the southern United States has been threatened by cattle fever. It is caused by an invasive parasite-vector complex that includes the protozoan hemoparasites Babesia bovis ...

  15. Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Sasha Alanda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

  16. A novel three-dimensional model to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to quantify metastatic melanoma invasion Cyrus M. Ghajar, 1Miller AJ, Mihm MC, Jr. Melanoma. N Engl J Med 2006;355:51 –the microenvironment on melanoma cell fate determination and

  17. Continuous and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using ultrasonic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Joohyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a continuous and non-invasive arterial blood pressure (CNAP) monitoring technique using ultrasound. An arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform provides valuable information in treating cardiovascular ...

  18. From Seed Banks to Communities: Effects of Plant Invasions and Nitrogen Deposition on Desert Annual Forbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Heather

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invasions 11:673-686. Beatley, J. C. 1967. Survival ofPress, San Diego, CA. Beatley, J. C. 1966. Ecological statuswater pulses (Went 1948, Beatley 1967, Noy-Meir 1973).

  19. Quantitative assessment of invasive mena isoforms (Menacalc) as an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Seema

    Introduction: Mena, an Ena/VASP protein family member, is a key actin regulatory protein. Mena is up-regulated in breast cancers and promotes invasion and motility of tumor cells. Mena has multiple splice variants, including ...

  20. Strength in Numbers: Setting Quantitative Criteria for Listing Species under the Endangered Species Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Kalyani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 9 'to any species at a "measurable risk" of extinction. H.R.dan- ger of extinction while those species that are listed

  1. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  2. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  3. Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

  4. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Yoon, Y. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  5. Structure and Biochemical Properties of PRL-1, a Phosphatase Implicated in Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Tumor Invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun,J.; Wang, W.; Yang, H.; Liu, S.; Liang, F.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) phosphatases constitute a novel class of small, prenylated phosphatases that are implicated in promoting cell growth, differentiation, and tumor invasion, and represent attractive targets for anticancer therapy. Here we describe the crystal structures of native PRL-1 as well as the catalytically inactive mutant PRL-1/C104S in complex with sulfate. PRL-1 exists as a trimer in the crystalline state, burying 1140 Angstroms{sup 2} of accessible surface area at each dimer interface. Trimerization creates a large, bipartite membrane-binding surface in which the exposed C-terminal basic residues could cooperate with the adjacent prenylation group to anchor PRL-1 on the acidic inner membrane. Structural and kinetic analyses place PRL-1 in the family of dual specificity phosphatases with closest structural similarity to the Cdc14 phosphatase and provide a molecular basis for catalytic activation of the PRL phosphatases. Finally, native PRL-1 is crystallized in an oxidized form in which a disulfide is formed between the active site Cys104 and a neighboring residue Cys49, which blocks both substrate binding and catalysis. Biochemical studies in solution and in the cell support a potential regulatory role of this intramolecular disulfide bond formation in response to reactive oxygen species such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  6. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  7. Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123­127 © 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

  8. The Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950: an analysis of the American response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murry, Ellen Theresa

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CHINESE "INVASION" OF TIBET IN 1950: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN RESPONSE A Thesis by ELLEN THERESA MURRY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF ARTS May 1982 Major Subject; History THE CHINESE "INVASION" OF TIBET IN 1950: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AMERICAN RESPONSE A Thesis by ELLEN THERESA HURRY Approved as to style and content by: a rman o omm1t e) (Member) (Member) em er ea epartme May...

  9. 3D computational study of non-invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    -invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer Earl Zastrow, Susan C Hagness and Barry Non-invasive microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer is investigated using three)). The goal of hyperthermia cancer treatment is to achieve a temperature of approximately 40­45 C in a region

  10. COOPERATION WITH THE STATES THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT SECTION 6 PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    endangered and threatened species, candidate species, and recently de-listed species. Under section 6, NMFS

  11. PET imaging to non-invasively study immune activation leading to antitumor responses with a 4-1BB agonistic antibody

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AS, Radu CG, Ribas A: PET imaging of the immune system:as: Escuin-Ordinas et al. : PET imaging to non-invasivelyRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access PET imaging to non-invasively

  12. Distributed Controller Synthesis for Local Speci cations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Madhusudan

    | and a speci#12;cation, say, a temporal logic formula. The plant is viewed as an existing program which speci Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA (On leave from Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India) thiagu as a temporal logic formula, whether there exists a program for the system such that no matter how

  13. SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

  14. LEAH GERBER The U.S.Endangered Species Act establishes categories for endangered and threatened species but provides no crite-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    and threatened species but provides no crite- ria for deciding when a species should be listed, delisted

  15. IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    i IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES.2.2 Multiple Neuropharmacological Measures from a single PET scan ................. 4 1.2.2.1 Dual ...................................................................................... 5 1.2.3 Reduction of inter-scanner PET image variability

  16. Differential radioactivity monitor for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  17. Control and User Interface Design for Compact Manipulators in Minimally-Invasive Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Control and User Interface Design for Compact Manipulators in Minimally-Invasive Surgery Peter, and robust controllers. The endoscope manipulator is controlled by a single-board computer and individual Berkelman, Eric Boidard, Philippe Cinquin, Jocelyne Troccaz Abstract-- This paper describes the control

  18. ACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE OF HYDRAULICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    to validate the concept and the numerical models. NOMENCLATURE A0 The orifice area of the control valve inletACHIEVING DEXTEROUS MANIPULATION FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE SURGICAL ROBOTS THROUGH THE USE and controllability. As a proof-of-concept for this ap- proach, we are pursuing the design of a novel, dexterous

  19. Annual Logging Symposium, June 16-20, 2012 SATURATION-HEIGHT AND INVASION CONSISTENT HYDRAULIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    clastic and carbonate reservoirs in multi-well contexts. It overcomes the limitation of the bulk volume on pore geometry, which relates to saturation-height modeling at a later stage in reservoir characterization. Additionally, pore geometry affects mud-filtrate invasion under over-balanced drilling conditions

  20. Fluorescent probes for non-invasive bioenergetic studies of whole cyanobacterial cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roegner, Matthias

    Fluorescent probes for non-invasive bioenergetic studies of whole cyanobacterial cells Markus of bioenergetic processes in whole cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Acridine yellow to be created. In sum- mary, bioenergetic £uorescence measurement com- bines the advantages of an easy

  1. Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

  2. Invited Paper Ultra-low-power Electronics for Non-invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    Invited Paper Ultra-low-power Electronics for Non-invasive Medical Monitoring L. Turicchia1 , S on the monitoring of the heart--because of its importance--and we describe a micropower electrocardiograph, an ultra-low-power pulse oximeter, an ultra-low-power phonocardiograph, an integrated- circuit switched-capacitor model

  3. How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine invasion success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    149 How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine for limited resources is considered a key factor controlling invasion success. Resource availability can be viewed in either the long or short-term. Long-term availability depends on the baseline nutrient

  4. Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster III, Robert James

    Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart H. S. Soroff, MD and J. Rastegar The primary function of the ventricular chambers of the heart is to provide the proper volume, in the first part of the cardiac cycle, when the heart is relaxed, cardiac diastole, the device exerts

  5. Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor Progress, Challenges}@mail.missouri.edu, SkubicM@missouri.edu Abstract--A hydraulic bed sensor has been developed to non and development of the system. Keywords--hydraulic bed sensor; eldercare monitoring; ballistocardiography I

  6. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(1):112117, Spring 2010 An effective chemical deterrent for invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on ecosystems and economies, and many cause problems for humans. One such problem is the loss of electrical (Osteopilus septentrionalis) are known to cause power outages and are a nuisance to humans when they invade-related power outages and reduce conflicts with residents in the urbanized areas preferred by these invasive

  7. The effect of fibrillar matrix architecture on tumor cell invasion of physically challenging environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Laura

    environments Asja Guzman, Michelle J. Ziperstein, Laura J. Kaufman* Department of Chemistry, Columbia) extracellular matrix culture systems was studied. This work showed that in 3D fibrillar environments composed architecture is a crucial factor that allows for efficient 3D invasion. In a 3D non-fibrillar environment

  8. Predicting worldwide invasiveness for four major problematic decapods: an evaluation of using different calibration sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Brian

    different calibration sets Ce´sar Capinha, Brian Leung and Pedro Anasta´cio C. Capinha (capinha of occurrence data to use for model calibration. Additionally, pseudo-absences are also known to cause different calibration sets for building worldwide invasiveness models for four major problematic decapods

  9. Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen David E since the 19th century Irish famine, potato late blight has exemplified this threat. The causal oomycete lineage are among the most aggressive on cultivated potatoes, outcompete other aggressive lineages

  10. CHESAPEAKE BAY NUTRIA ERADICATION PROJECT: STRATEGIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accretion. BACKGROUND Nutria are invasive, nonnative South American rodents first released into Dorchester the ecological integrity of wetland systems on the Delmarva Peninsula. The initial act of controlling nutria

  11. Defining viral species: making taxonomy useful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Virus taxonomy at present is best characterized as a categorization of convenience, without a firm basis in the principles of evolutionary biology. Specifically, virus species definitions appear to depend more on tradition and popular opinion among...

  12. Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, E. E.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

  13. Languages and Species: Threats and Global Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, William

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Both languages and species are threatened with extinction. This talk will compare patterns of cultural and biological diversity. The aims will be to compare the extinction risk of languages with other groups and then compare the patterns...

  14. Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . By sensing the electric signals generated by other 3368 Reactive Gliosis #12;individuals, mormyrids are alsoReactive Gliosis Glial Scar Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide Anions Neuroinflammation motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication

  15. Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-Caballero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

  16. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic...

  17. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  18. MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

  19. Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

  20. Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species interactions in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species Facilitation Foundation species Kelp Negative effects Species diversity The effect of foundation species scales. Egregia menziesii (Turner) J.E. Areschoug is a large and robust perennial kelp that creates

  1. Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur We propose a solution to the steam boiler control speci cation problem AS] by means of a formal speci

  2. Two-phase flow in porous media: Crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferer, M.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by a wide ranage of applications, from enhanced oil recovery to carbon cioxide sequestions, we have developed a pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous, capillary, and gravitational effects. We have validated this model quantitatively, in the very different limits of zero viscosity ratio and zero capillary number. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (u injected/ u displaced >=1), we have increased the capillary number, Nc, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from capillary fingering (the fractal flow of invasion percolation) and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. Results exhibiting this crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion are presented for the saturation profile and the average position of the injected fluid. The modeling reuslts agree with earlier predictions.

  3. Multi-scale approach to invasion percolation of rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali N. Ebrahimi; Falk K. Wittel; Nuno A. M. Araújo; Hans J. Herrmann

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-scale scheme for the invasion percolation of rock fracture networks with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields is proposed. Inside fractures, fluid transport is calculated on the finest scale and found to be localized in channels as a consequence of the aperture field. The channel network is characterized and reduced to a vectorized artificial channel network (ACN). Different realizations of ACNs are used to systematically calculate efficient apertures for fluid transport inside differently sized fractures as well as fracture intersection and entry properties. Typical situations in fracture networks are parameterized by fracture inclination, flow path length along the fracture and intersection lengths in the entrance and outlet zones of fractures. Using these scaling relations obtained from the finer scales, we simulate the invasion process of immiscible fluids into saturated discrete fracture networks, which were studied in previous works.

  4. Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Mona

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information than their disclosure...

  5. Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Mona

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information than their disclosure...

  6. Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation and isotopic enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, Sean B.; Suarez, Andy V.; Tillberg, Chadwick V.; Chou, Cheng T.; Holway, David A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOI 10.1007/s00442-010-1694-1 COMMUNITY ECOLOGY - ORIGINALPAPER Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-variation in the trophic ecology of prominent members of

  7. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using a Nitrogen Gas Analyzer combustion method (LECO FP-was determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Methodwas determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Method

  8. Post-Project Evaluation of Channel Morphology, Invasive Plant Species, and Native Fish Habitat in Putah Creek in Winters, CA Six Years After Channel Relocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Gina; Boisrame, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources Association 46(2):211-226. Putah Creek Council.2007. Putah Creek Explorer Book. Accessed November 2011. creek- watershed>. StreamWise.

  9. Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through Invasive Species Control and by Providing Technical and Financial Assistance to Reduce Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Porter, A.; Knutson, A.; Muegge, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    landowners. It included the development and establishment of water quality management plans (WQMPs) on riparian and upland grazing lands, extending chemical treatment of saltcedar to previously unsprayed stands along the river and its tributaries, expanding...

  10. Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael Thomas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerous benefits that wetlands provide make them essential to ecosystem services and ecological functions. Historically, wetland losses have been caused by natural and anthropogenic changes. In Texas, nearly 50% of coastal wetland habitat has...

  11. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watersheds of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. D'Antonio,53. Rugen, F. J. 1987. Fires in Ventura County: 1871-1879.Ventura County Historical Museum (docent class). Rundel, P.

  12. Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

  13. Radiation Increases Invasion of Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zielske, Steven P., E-mail: szielske@med.umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Livant, Donna L.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow that have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of tumor radiotherapy on the localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. Methods and Materials: MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate their migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, the MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark the infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing radiation doses to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. Results: MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not the absence, of hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing radiation doses, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with the basal levels of MSC infiltration; however, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. Conclusion: These findings suggest that radiation-induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which might increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. The production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion.

  14. A study of the effects of mud filtrate invasion on the response of standard resistivity logging tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semmelbeck, Mark Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not accurately rep- resent the water saturation profile in the reservoir resulting from invasion. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author wishes to express his sincere appreciation to the following individuals. Dr. S. A. Holditch, professor of Petroleum Engineering... Relative Permeability Data Capillary Pressure Data Base Case Water Saturation Profile Idealized Invasion Process Page 13 21 26 27 29 Water Saturation Profile Base Case 35 Water Salinity Profile Base Case 36 Water Resistivity Profile Base...

  15. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S.more »enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.« less

  16. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M. [Univ. of Missouri - St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Granger, Brian R. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Harcombe, William R. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S. enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.

  17. Crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion for two-phase drainage with stable viscosity ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferer, M.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by a wide range of applications from enhanced oil recovery to carbon dioxide sequestration, we have developed a two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous, capillary, and gravitational effects. This model has been validated quantitatively, in the very different limits of zero viscosity ratio and zero capillary number; flow patterns from modeling agree well with experiment. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (?injected/?displaced 1), we have increased the capillary number, Nc, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from capillary fingering (the fractal flow of invasion percolation) and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. Results exhibiting this crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion are presented for the average position of the injected fluid, the fluid–fluid interface, the saturation and fractional flow profiles, and the relative permeabilities. The agreement between our results and earlier theoretical predictions [Blunt M, King MJ, Scher H. Simulation and theory of two-phase flow in porous media. Phys Rev A 1992;46:7680–99; Lenormand R. Flow through porous media: limits of fractal patterns. Proc Roy Soc A 1989;423:159–68; Wilkinson D. Percolation effects in immiscible displacement. Phys Rev A 1986;34:1380–90; Xu B, Yortsos YC, Salin D. Invasion Percolation with viscous forces. Phys Rev E 1998;57:739–51] supports the validity of these general theoretical arguments, which were independent of the details of the porous media in both two and three dimensions.

  18. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallin, Asa R. [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Svanvik, Joar [Department of Surgery, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Adell, Gunnar [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Sun Xiaofeng [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  19. affecting species diversity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA Geosciences Websites Summary: in a New York stream system as a result of species...

  20. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Abstract: Atomistic...

  1. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

  2. aquatic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 243 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  3. accumulator plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 135 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  4. anthocyanic plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 109 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  5. altered plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 129 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  6. arecaceae species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    73 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  7. avian species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  8. animal species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  9. affects species richness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  10. alien plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger 224 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  11. amazonian plant species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species. In 1999, the National Key Protected Wild Plants identified about 1700 rare and endangered plant species (Chinese State Report on Biodiversity Editorial...

  12. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Kourakis, Ioannis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  13. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  14. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

  15. Inferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    (LASSO), Sparse Bayesian Regression (SBR), Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs) and Bayesian Networks (BNs to thank Marco Grzegorczyk for the answering my question about Bayesian networks and the MCMC methodsInferring Ecological Networks From Species Abundance Data Frank Dondelinger Master of Science

  16. Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

  17. Objectives for Multiple-Species Conservation EMILY NICHOLSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    of extinction for multiple species. Although the assessment of extinction risk for single species is common, few researchers have formu- lated an objective function that combines the extinction risks of multiple species. We functions based on extinction risk across many species and illustrated the differences between

  18. How Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and for two species to coexist, driving the others to extinction. In case n = 3, it is shown that every extinct. Every solution approaches a single­species or two­species steady state. However, as already notedHow Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li # Department of Mathematics

  19. THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

  20. TAXON 43 -FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    ). The converse pro- cess, the winnowing of lineages or extinction, acts through disappearance of species, since genera and families go extinct when their last species disappears. Species also represent the basic unitTAXON 43 - FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic? Loren H. ~ i e s e b e r ~ '& Luc

  1. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  2. Appendix S1 -A greener Greenland? Normand et al. Appendix S1: Study species and species occurrence data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Appendix S1 - A greener Greenland? Normand et al. 1 Appendix S1: Study species and species as in one or several of the floristic provinces bordering Greenland (Fig. S1.1). The selection were based subspecies) was considered. The selected species were assigned maximum heights and Greenlandic species

  3. An independently evolved mutualism among ants (Myrmicinae Pheidole terramorium and Paratrechina longicornis), sea hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and Hemiptera: an invader-invader mutualism and invasion meltdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thayer, Lesley K

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIBISCUS TILIACEUS) AND HEMIPTERA: AN INVADER-INVADERand invasive ants and Hemiptera that colonized the island ofand behaviors of ants and Hemiptera in response to different

  4. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Liu, Jinsong [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chadee, Deborah N., E-mail: deborah.chadee@utoledo.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  5. Species differences in courtship acoustic signals among five Lake Malawi cichlid species (Pseudotropheus spp.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~ao em Eco-Etologia, ISPA, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal, Departamento de Biologia of the sounds produced in the early stage of court- ship by males of three closely related species from Lake

  6. HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, George

    . Vidra What are exotic plant species? Perhaps you have noticed huge thickets of kudzu vine along, it grows _ inch per hour! Kudzu is one example of an exotic plant species. In North Carolina, exotics change the structure of the forest, as kudzu does when it covers every surface. Exotics may also

  7. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  8. Clinical Outcomes Using Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We compared clinical outcomes of women diagnosed with either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with ILC received APBI as part of their breast-conservation therapy (BCT) and were compared with 410 patients with IDC that received APBI as part of their BCT. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment related variables were analyzed including age, tumor size, hormone receptor status, surgical margins, lymph node status, adjuvant hormonal therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and APBI modality. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 3.8 years for the ILC patients and 6.0 years for the IDC patients. ILC patients were more likely to have positive margins (20.0% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.006), larger tumors (14.1 mm vs. 10.9 mm, p = 0.03) and less likely to be node positive (0% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001) when compared with patients diagnosed with IDC. The 5-year rate of LR was 0% for the ILC cohort and 2.5% for the IDC cohort (p = 0.59). No differences were seen in the rates of RR (0% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.80), distant metastases (0% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.54), DFS (100% vs. 94%, p = 0.43), CSS (100% vs. 97%, p = 0.59), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.88) between the ILC and IDC patients, respectively. Additionally, when node-positive patients were excluded from the IDC cohort, no differences in the rates of LR (0% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.62), RR (0% vs. 0%), DFS (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.46), CSS (100% vs. 98%, p = 0.63), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.91) were noted between the ILC and IDC patients. Conclusion: Women with ILC had excellent clinical outcomes after APBI. No difference in local control was seen between patients with invasive lobular versus invasive ductal histology.

  9. Juniper invasion and community development in the Post Oak Savanna of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Terry Lee

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with and without a live post oak center tree. 32 Table 8: Correlat1ons between redcedar variables and live center tree va ri ah 1 ss 33 Table 9: Data used to construct regress1on model to estimate redcedar ages 35 Table 10: Regression analys1s results...J UNIPER INVASION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNA OF TEXAS A Thesis by TERRY LEE COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  10. Two Component Signal Transduction in Desulfovibrio Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luning, Eric; Rajeev, Lara; Ray, Jayashree; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmentally relevant Desulfovibrio species are sulfate-reducing bacteria that are of interest in the bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated water. Among these, the genome of D. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a large number of two component systems consisting of 72 putative response regulators (RR) and 64 putative histidinekinases (HK), the majority of which are uncharacterized. We classified the D. vulgaris Hildenborough RRs based on their output domains and compared the distribution of RRs in other sequenced Desulfovibrio species. We have successfully purified most RRs and several HKs as His-tagged proteins. We performed phospho-transfer experiments to verify relationships between cognate pairs of HK and RR, and we have also mapped a few non-cognate HK-RR pairs. Presented here are our discoveries from the Desulfovibrio RR categorization and results from the in vitro studies using purified His tagged D. vulgaris HKs and RRs.

  11. Introduction Many tropical plant species house scale insects (Ho-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    al. 2001) and honeydew is known to provide a large percentage of the energy budget for some ant off small coccinellid larvae, but sometimes also regulating the aphid population (El-Ziady and Kennedy and invasive in Western Europe, is frequently observed with myrmecophilic aphids, ants, and non

  12. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  13. Minimally Invasive Radiologically Guided Intervention for the Treatment of Salivary Calculi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jackie E.; Drage, Nicholas A. [Department of Dental Radiology, Guy's Dental Hospital, Guy's and St. Thomas' Dental Hospital Trust, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Escudier, Michael P. [Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, LondonSE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Wilson, Ron F. [Dental Clinical Research, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); McGurk, Mark [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, LondonSE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe the technique and examine the value of salivary stone extraction using a minimally invasive, radiologically guided approach as an alternative to salivary gland surgery for the treatment of benign salivary gland obstruction. Methods: Eighty-six cases of sialolithiasis (83 patients) were treated by stone removal using a Dormia basket under local anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperative assessment was made clinically at review, by sialogram and by questionnaire. Results: Of 86 cases of sialolithiasis treated, in 55 (64%)it was possible to remove all stones. In 12 cases (14%) part of a stone or some of a number of calculi were removed and in 19 cases (22%) the procedure failed. The commonest reason for failure was fixation of the stone within the duct. Symptoms at review (range 1-49 months, mean 17 months) were relieved in 55 of 67 (82%) of cases where a stone or portion of stone was removed. Conclusions:Stone removal from the salivary duct system by radiologically guided,minimally invasive approach is a simple procedure with low morbidity and high patient acceptance when appropriate selection criteria are applied. These criteria are considered and recommendations made.

  14. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States) [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)] [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  15. publication 420-323 Several species of Asian honeysuckle have been intro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    rather than hollow stems and typically do not form extensive invasions. Control Herbicide control. 2005. Herbicides and forest vegeta- tion management: Controlling unwanted trees, brush, and other

  16. Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyers Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Siddavatam, Prasad; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E.; Gull, Tamara; Khare, Sangeeta; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyer’s Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome Carlos A. Rossetti1¤a, Kenneth L. Drake2, Prasad Siddavatam2, Sara D. Lawhon1, Jairo E. S. Nunes1... mechanisms. Citation: Rossetti CA, Drake KL, Siddavatam P, Lawhon SD, Nunes JES, et al. (2013) Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyer’s Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome. PLoS ONE 8(12): e...

  17. Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    resistivity from the simulated radial distri- butions of water saturation and salt concentration and compare of OBM invasion compared with those of WBM invasion. INTRODUCTION During the process of drilling wells for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formation

  18. Invasion Correction of Acoustic Logs in a Gas Reservoir Shihong Chi*, Jianghui Wu, and Carlos Torres-Verdin, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Torres-Verdin, The University of Texas at Austin Summary Mud-filtrate invasion modifies the connate fluid saturation distribution of mud filtrate and connate formation fluids is first obtained by simulating the mud, the near-wellbore formation is often altered by stress, mud-filtrate invasion, chemical reactions, and many

  19. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER A novel, combined approach to assessing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morphological species of freshwater microalgae often have broad geographic distribution. However, traditional distribu- tional stability among microalgal species groups such as the desmids. Keywords Microalgae microalgae have recently been undergoing major conceptual changes in the light of increasing evidence

  20. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites Formed in NO Adsorption. Characterization of NOx Species in Dehydrated and Hydrated Na- and Ba-Y, FAU Zeolites...

  1. A new species of Chiasmognathus from Kazakhstan (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.; Packer, Laurence

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the ammobatine bee genus Chiasmognathus Engel (Nomadinae: Ammobatini) is described and figured from near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Chiasmognathus scythicus Engel & Packer, new species, is superficially similar to C. gussakovskii (Popov...

  2. Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

  3. Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document lists endangered, threatened, and species of special concern in Connecticut, along with procedures for petitioning to add or remove a species from these lists and to add or remove an...

  4. Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species on U.S. Army-05 #12;#12;Disturbance Dependent T&E Species Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened

  5. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  6. Threatened and Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoulOaks, California:Species

  7. Performance of species richness estimators across assemblage types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remains a topic of much debate (Brose et al., 2003). Attempts to quantify species diversity often include

  8. An Urban Estuary in a Changing World: Diversity, Invasions, and Climate Change in San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    33: 1–67. ????. 2006. Water Quality of San Francisco Bay.within and among shallow- water Ciona species (Ascidiacea).induced changes in estuarine water quality. Marine Ecology

  9. Identification, Distribution and Control of an Invasive Pest Ant, Paratrechina sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Jason

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the negative effects associated with exotic species. A recent introduction of an exotic ant, Paratrechina sp. nr. pubens, has caused tremendous economic and ecological damage to southern Texas. Morphometric and phylogenetic procedures were used to identify...

  10. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species ITeleostei, Oreosomatidae species was examined.Allozyme variation at 26 loci was examined in seven species: six from Australasia. helgae). Two phenetic trees were constructed: an unweighted pair- group method with arithmetic averag

  11. Epidemics in Two Competing Species Litao Han 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugliese, Andrea

    infection and competition are revealed: (1) a species that would get extinct without the infection, may the infection, is driven to extinction by the infection; (3) an infection that would die out in either species: Epidemic model, Multi-host infection, Species extinction, Uniform persistence, Hopf bifurcation, Periodic

  12. Species Loss and Aboveground Carbon Storage in a Tropical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Daniel E.

    of tropical tree species on carbon storage by simulating 18 possible extinction scenarios within a well-studied 50-hectare tropical forest plot in Panama, which contains 227 tree species. Among extinction as well as the size and longevity of tropical trees. Instead, we simulated species extinctions

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE Modelling multi-species response to landscape dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    and to the spatio-temporal configuration of urban brownfield habitats in a multi-species approach (37 plant and 43- sion time of brownfield habitats required to support all and especially regionally rare species Dynamic landscape Á Species distribution model Á Habitat model Á Urban brownfields Á Model averaging Á

  14. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  15. Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological from H will be a function of the soils' water-content. To the best of our knowledge

  16. 4,398 words Src family tyrosine kinases-driven colon cancer cell invasion is induced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . (a), ASN2324598 inhibits Csk activity in vitro (upper panel) and in MCF7 cells (lower panel). (b), ASN2324598 potentiates growth in soft-agar (left) and invasion (right) of MCF7 cells. (c), Csk 160 Colo205 cellinvasion MCF7 a b MCF7 0 100 200 300 400 500 Colo205 #colonies 5 10 - 5- 10

  17. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  18. Aquatic Invasions (2008) Volume 3, Issue 1: 61-76 DOI 10.3391/ai.2008.3.1.10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -water exchange (BWE) is currently the most common treatment used to reduce the ballast transfer of organisms and the subsequent risk of invasions among coastal ecosystems. Freshwater or estuarine organisms remaining after BWE-refill (E-R) BWE methods. We focused especially on larval and adult crustaceans from freshwater

  19. New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis of Other Iranian Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hrbek, Tomas - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

    New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis isfahanensis, is described from the Isfahan basin of Iran. It is distinguished from the other Iranian species in Iran. THE extant and extinct species of the killifish genus Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodon- tiformes

  20. Species Discovery versus Species Identification in DNA Barcoding Efforts: Response to Rubinoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    in the discus- sion. I start with Rubinoff's second point that there are "problems with DNA barcodes and species needs to be tested in a scientific context (Goldstein et al. 2000; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Sites of taxonomy (Dunn 2003; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Seberg et al. 2003). On the other hand DNA sequences can be used

  1. NON-NATIVE TREES Why and how to choose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    when planning the establishment of woodland on brownfield land. But for any particular set of site the revegetation of brownfield land, especially if woodland habitat creation and enhancement of biodiversity is one of the imagination can brownfield land, however well reclaimed, be compared with natural ecosystem conditions

  2. In Silico Modeling of Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek, R.

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project employed a combination of in silico modeling and physiological studies to begin the construction of models that could predict the activity of Geobacter species under different environmental conditions. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of the first genome-based models of organisms known environmental relevance. This included the modeling of two Geobacter species and two species of Pelobacter. Construction of these models required increased sophistication in the annotation of the original draft genomes as well as collection of physiological data on growth yields, cell composition, and metabolic reactions. Biochemical studies were conducted to determine whether proposed enzymatic reactions were in fact expressed. During this process we developed an Automodel Pipeline process to accelerate future model development of other environmentally relevant organisms by using bioinformatics techniques to leverage predicted protein sequences and the Genomatica database containing a collection of well-curated metabolic models. The Automodel Pipeline was also used for iterative updating of the primary Geobacter model of G. sulfurreducens to expand metabolic functions or to add alternative pathways. Although each iteration of the model does not lead to another publication, it is an invaluable resource for hypothesis development and evaluation of experimental data. In order to develop a more accurate G. sulfurreducens model, a series of physiological studies that could be analyzed in the context of the model were carried out. For example, previous field trials of in situ uranium bioremediation demonstrated that Geobacter species face an excess of electron donor and a limitation of electron acceptor near the point of acetate injection into the groundwater. Therefore, a model-based analysis of electron acceptor limitation physiology was conducted and model predictions were compared with growth observed in chemostats. Iterative studies resulted in the model accurately predicting acetate oxidation and electron acceptor reduction. The model also predicted that G. sulfurreducens must release hydrogen under electron-accepting conditions in order to maintain charge and electron balance. This prediction was borne out by subsequent hydrogen measurements. Furthermore, changes in gene expression were consistent with model predictions of flux changes around central metabolism. The model revealed multiple redundant pathways in central metabolism suggesting an apparent versatility unusual in microbial metabolism. The computational analysis led to the identification of 32 reactions that participated in eight sets of redundant pathways. The computational results guided the design of strains with mutations in key reactions to elucidate the role of the alternate pathways and obtain information on their physiological function. A total of seven strains with mutations in genes encoding five metabolic reactions were constructed and their phenotypes analyzed in 12 different environments. This analysis revealed several interesting insights on the role of the apparent redundant pathways. 13C labeling approaches were developed for further elucidation of metabolic pathways with model-driven interpretation. For example, the model was used to calculate the optimal acetate 13C labeling ratio for distinguishing flux through various pathways based on amino acid isotopomer distributions. With this method it was possible to elucidate the pathways for amino acid biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the labeling pattern of isoleucine deviated significantly from what was predicted by the metabolic reconstruction. Detailed analysis of the labeling patterns with the model led to the discovery that there are two pathways for leucine biosynthesis, including a novel citramalate pathway that was subsequently confirmed with biochemical analysis. In summary, the combined computational and experimental studies have been instrumental in further characterizing the central metabolism of members of the Geobacteraceae. Furthermore, the methods developed in these

  3. al4o2cl102 oxide species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the surrounding 5 km. We predicted that species richness would increase with park size and that species richness and evenness would decrease with development. Species...

  4. update: Species–area curves and the estimation of extinction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011)  Extinctions:  consider  all  species.   Nature, 474, Species–area  relationships  always overestimate extinction and the estimation of extinction rates  The  species–area 

  5. A tale of four “carp:” Invasion potential and ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVaney, Shannon C.; McNyset, Kristina M.; Williams, Justin B.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Wiley, Edward O.

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    algorithm. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133: 845–854. 14. McNyset KM (2005) Use of ecological niche modelling to predict distributions of freshwater fish species in Kansas. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 14: 243–255. 15. Zambrano L, Mart?´nez-Meyer.... Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 107: 105–112. 54. Bain MB (1993) Assessing impacts of introduced aquatic species — Grass carp in large systems. Environmental Management 107: 221–224. 55. Stanley JG, Miley WW, Sutton DL (1978) Reproductive...

  6. Recent Swiss records of rare bee species (Hymenoptera, Apidae) with two species new to Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    in the cities of Zürich and Lucerne did not yield any new or very rare bee species. The known distribution was conducted on 106 sampling sites in the Swiss cities of Zürich (47°22 N, 8°31 E), Lucerne (47°05 N, 8°17 E), and Lugano (46°07 N, 8°56 E) from June 13th to August 3rd 2006. In Lucerne, 34 sampling locations were chosen

  7. A study of selected species of Rosa using isozyme polymorphisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Ju

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : avid H. yrne (Chair of ommittee) S ephan L. Hatch (Member) James R. Manhart (Member) R. Daniel Lineber r (Head of Department) December 1994 Major Subject: Horticulture ABSTRACT A Study of Selected Species of Rosa Using Isozyme Polymorphisms.... Three of the subgenera are monotypic. The species in the subgenus Rosa are classified into 11 sections. Forty seven R o s a species (116 total accessions) from subgenera Rosa and Plaryrhodon were characterized for isozyme phenotypes using starch gel...

  8. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  9. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  10. analysis chemical species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bonds (CACB) to simple organic reaction paths. CACB Goddard III, William A. 15 Using Fractal Analysis To Assess How Species Perceive Landscape Structure CiteSeer Summary: To...

  11. atiii species present: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from neontological Barnosky, Anthony D. 4 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Prevalence of non Helicobacter pylori species in patients presenting with dyspepsia CiteSeer Summary:...

  12. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  13. Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species Act of 1973, as...

  14. active nitrogen species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into groundwater and streams and other alterations of forest nutrient cycling), eutrophication of estuaries and coastal areas (Howarth 1988) and changes in species composition...

  15. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Regulatory Commission. 2001. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission....

  16. TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TREE PLANTING SITE EVALUATION FORM "SITE DICTATES SPECIES" ABOVE GROUND Utilities: Electric issue) Parking proximity: Distance from car doors __________________ Wind: Problem _________ No problem:________________________________________________ Fire hydrant: ________________________________________________ Electric

  17. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

  18. ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID...

  19. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  20. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  1. PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS -ORIGINAL PAPER Utilization of invasive tamarisk by salt marsh consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    dynamics techniques and stable isotope enrichment experi- ments. The observations of a short residence time and labile food source. With an isotopic (15 N) enrichment of tamarisk, we demonstrated that numerous dominance within the invertebrate community to species not widely consumed. Keywords Isotope enrichment Á

  2. Dynamics of water use and responses to herbivory in the invasive reed, Arundo donax (L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, David A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of variability in precipitation, suggesting that recent rainfall constituted a significant proportion of the water taken up by this species. Herbivory by a stem-galling wasp and a sap-feeding scale, both separately and together, reduced the rates of leaf scale...

  3. The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Biological invasions complicate the conservation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    and energy cycles), "provisioning" (ie produc- tion of goods), "regulating" (ie maintenance of ecosystem through the DAISIE project (www.europe-aliens.org) have facilitated the development of the first pan plants. Alien species from all taxonomic groups affect "supporting", "provisioning", "regulating

  4. Hedychium gardnerianum invasion into Hawaiian montane rainforest: interactions among litter quality,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funk, Jennifer

    -canopy forests and, despite inter-specific differences in litter quality and quantity between understory and domi strongly influenced by native species, which contribute the most to overall stand biomass. A negative a combination of litter quality and quantity (e.g., Ehrenfeld 2003), the results from these studies

  5. Minimizing invasive potential of Miscanthus 3 giganteus grown for bioenergy: identifying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    proportion of energy to be derived from biofuels (Robertson et al. 2008). Dedicated bioenergy crops are hence with grain-based biofuels. By cultivating bioenergy crops on marginal lands unfit for food crops, it may, USA Summary 1. Many species prioritized for bioenergy crop development possess traits associated

  6. The establishment, biological success and host impact of Diorhabda elongata, imported biological control agents of invasive Tamarix in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgeons, Jeremy L.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diorhabda elongata elongata leaf beetles were released at two field locations in the upper Colorado River watershed of Texas in 2003 and 2004 for the biological control of invasive Tamarix, exotic trees deteriorating riparian ecosystems of western...

  7. The Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in the Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Venice Calinisan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arf6 activation to the downstream  activation of Rac1.  invasion­associated factor downstream of Akt signaling.  Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in 

  8. Mena invasive (Mena[superscript INV]) and Mena11a isoforms play distinct roles in breast cancer cell cohesion and association with TMEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, Evanthia T.

    Mena, an actin regulatory protein, functions at the convergence of motility pathways that drive breast cancer cell invasion and migration in vivo. The tumor microenvironment spontaneously induces both increased expression ...

  9. Feasibility of Diffraction Radiation for a Non-invasive Diagnostics of the SLAC Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; /Tomsk Polytechnic U.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Hayano, H.; Karataev, P.; Muto, T.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ross, M.; /SLAC; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; /UCLA; Hamatsu, R.; /Tokyo Metropolitan U.

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the non-invasive bunch size diagnostics based on the diffraction radiation is now in progress in frame of TPU-KEK-SLAC collaboration. The experimental test of a transverse beam size measurement was performed successful on the KEK-ATF extracted electron beam. However many difficulties emerge if we going from the one GeV electron energy to the several tenth GeV electron beams. The extremely high Lorenz-factor value gives rise to the some problems, such as large contribution of a radiation from an accelerator construction elements in submillimeter wavelength region, extremely pre-wave zone effect even in the optical range, exceeding of the electron beam divergence over the diffraction radiation cone, and so on. More over, the sensitivity of the method based on the optical diffraction radiation from flat slit target decrease catastrophic when an electron energy increase up to several tenth GeV. We suggest the new method based on the phase shift on the slit target, consisting on the two semi-planes which are turned at a some angle one to other (crossed target technique) and present here the results of experimental test of this technique. Also we discuss the origins of indicated difficulties and suggest the ways of these problems solution.

  10. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Harris, J. [Colorado State U.; Martinez, J. [Colorado State U.; Milton, S. V. [Colorado State U.; Van Keuren, J. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Steve V. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

  11. Method and apparatus for non-invasive monitoring of blood glucose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Graham H. (Livermore, CA); Watson, Roger M. (Modesto, CA); Noell, J. Oakey (Mishawaka, IN)

    1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and improved method and apparatus are provided for non-invasive monitoring of changes in blood glucose concentration in a tissue specimen and particularly in an individual. The method uses acoustic velocity measurements for monitoring the effect of glucose concentration upon the density and adiabatic compressibility of the serum. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic velocity measurements are made through the earlobe of a subject by means of an acoustic probe or monitor which includes a transducer for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic energy pulses to and from the blood flowing in the subject's earlobe and a reflector for facilitating reflection of the acoustic pulses from the blood. The probe is designed in such a way that when properly affixed to an ear, the transducer is positioned flush against the anterior portion of an earlobe while the reflector is positioned flush against the interior portion of the earlobe. A microthermocouple is provided on the probe for monitoring the internal temperature of the blood being sampled. An electrical system, essentially comprising a frequency generator, a time intervalometer and an oscilloscope, is linked to the glucose monitoring probe. The electrical system analyzes selected ones of the pulses reflected from the blood sample in order to determine therefrom the acoustic velocity of the blood which, in turn, provides a representation of the blood glucose concentration levels at the time of the acoustic velocity measurements.

  12. Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, David

    Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness Richard G. Davies1,*, C data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test, 1988; Currie 1991; Allen et al. 2002). Its role is also argued to extend to the influence of solar

  13. The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding Rob DeSalle*, Mary G. Egan are clarified and resolved, before the use of DNA as a tool for taxonomy and species delimitation can framework for interweaving classical taxonomy with the goals of `DNA barcoding'. Keywords: DNA barcoding

  14. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  15. Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan NPJ Vogtla¨nder1 , WPM Tamboer1 open. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to degrade and depolymerize carbohydrates, and to playDa in skeletal muscle, ranging from 120 kDa in brain to 190 kDa in the Torpedo electric organ.8

  16. A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA Alexander Krings Herbarium_Krings@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT A new species of Matelea is described from Hispaniola, resulting from study of subtribe Hispaniola: Matelea pentactina Krings, sp. nov. (Fig. 1, A­B, E). TYPE: HAITI: Les Roseaux, Massif de la

  17. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  18. When to stop managing or surveying cryptic threatened species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    When to stop managing or surveying cryptic threatened species Iadine Chade`s* , Eve Mc soon, failing to invest in sufficient surveying to be sufficiently sure further management increasingly difficult to detect as their populations decline. Managers of such cryptic threatened species face

  19. SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT HASSAN H. FADL, REDA F. BAKR, RAWDA M. BADAWY AND MOSTAFA R. SHARAF Entomology Dept., Fac. Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. ABSTRACT Six new ant species from Egypt Cerapachys collingwoodi, Cataglyphis agostii, Messor eglalae

  20. Global attractors and extinction dynamics of cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transitions to absorbing states are of fundamental importance in non-equilibrium physics as well as ecology. In ecology, absorbing states correspond to the extinction of species. We here study the spatial population dynamics of three cyclically interacting species. The interaction scheme comprises both direct competition between species as in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, and separated selection and reproduction processes as in the May-Leonard model. We show that the dynamic processes leading to the transient maintenance of biodiversity are closely linked to attractors of the nonlinear dynamics for the overall species' concentrations. The characteristics of these global attractors change qualitatively at certain threshold values of the mobility, and depend on the relative strength of the different types of competition between species. They give information about the scaling of extinction times with the system size and thereby the stability of biodiversity. We define an effective free energy as the negative...

  1. Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Armstrong, Timothy R. [ORNL

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

  2. Species separation and kinetic effects in collisional plasma shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C., E-mail: bellei1@llnl.gov; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of collisional shock waves propagating in uniform plasmas are studied with ion-kinetic calculations, in both slab and spherical geometry and for the case of one and two ion species. Despite the presence of an electric field at the shock front—and in contrast to the case where an interface is initially present [C. Bellei et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 044702 (2013)]—essentially no ion reflection at the shock front is observed due to collisions, with a probability of reflection ?10{sup ?4} for the cases presented. A kinetic two-ion-species spherical convergent shock is studied in detail and compared against an average-species calculation, confirming effects of species separation and differential heating of the ion species at the shock front. The effect of different ion temperatures on the DT and D{sup 3}He fusion reactivity is discussed in the fluid limit and is estimated to be moderately important.

  3. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  4. Application of optical lens of a CD writer for detecting the blood glucose semi-invasively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshram, N. D., E-mail: meshramnileshsd@gmail.com [Mathuradas Mohota College of Sciences, Nagpur-440009 (India); Dahikar, P. B., E-mail: pbdahikar@rediffmail.com [Kamla Nehru Mahavidyalaya, Sakkardara Square, Nagpur-440009 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological advancements in the photonics industry have led to a resurgence of interest in optical glucose sensing and to realistic progress toward the development of an optical glucose sensor. Such a sensor has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life for the estimated 16 million diabetics in this country by making routine glucose measurements more convenient. Currently over 100 small companies and universities are working to develop noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensing technologies, and optical methods play a large role in these efforts. It has become overwhelmingly clear that frequent monitoring and tight control of blood sugar levels are requisite for effective management of Diabetes mellitus and reduction of the complications associated with this disease. The pain and trouble associated with current “finger-stick” methods for blood glucose monitoring result in decreased patient compliance and a failure to control blood sugar levels. Thus, the development of a convenient noninvasive blood glucose monitor holds the potential to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with Diabetes. A method and apparatus for noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration based on transilluminated laser beam via the Index Finger has been reported in this paper. This method depends on photodiode based laser operating at 632.8 nm wavelength. During measurement, the index finger is inserted into the glucose sensing unit, the transilluminated optical signal is converted into an electrical signal, compared with the reference electrical signal, and the obtained difference signal is processed by signal processing unit which presents the results in the form of blood glucose concentration. This method would enable the monitoring blood glucose level of the diabetic patient continuously, safely and noninvasively.

  5. Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

  6. Spatial synchronization and extinction of species under external forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Amritkar; Govindan Rangarajan

    2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interplay between synchronization and extinction of a species. Using a general model we show that under a common external forcing, the species with a quadratic saturation term in the population dynamics first undergoes spatial synchronization and then extinction, thereby avoiding the rescue effect. This is because the saturation term reduces the synchronization time scale but not the extinction time scale. The effect can be observed even when the external forcing acts only on some locations provided there is a synchronizing term in the dynamics. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction.

  7. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

  8. andean wild species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004; Ferrer-Costa et al. 2007; Baresic et Zhang, Jianzhi 27 MOLECULAR MARKERS IN WILD TURKEY Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: and conservation of wildlife species. In the...

  9. affecting ornamental species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: FA182...

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Population Evidence of Cryptic Species and Geographical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    in the Cosmopolitan Ectomycorrhizal Fungus, Tricholoma scalpturatum Fabian Carriconde & Monique Gardes & Patricia, the Fungi constitute a major group of Eukaryota. There are vast numbers of species--a conser- vative

  11. Numerous rockfish species inhabit the waters off California, Oregon, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of the National Marine the southern euphausiid species Nyctiphanes simplex and juveniles of Pacific whiting (Merluccius productus

  12. Clonality as a taxonomic character of Actinian species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Smith, Deborah R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea anemones of some species have been considered to exist both clonally and as solitary individuals. In two temperate taxa, these alternative forms have been demonstrated through molecular techniques actually to belong ...

  13. MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

  14. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  15. Pervasive poleward shifts among North American bird species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is expected to influence species’ geographic distributions in the form of poleward and upward range expansion combined with extirpations from the equatorial and downslope sides of the distribution, but such shifts observed to date...

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major amphibian populations. Keywords Amphibia . Beta chain . Gene walking . Lithobates . Positive selection balancing selection Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251

  17. Using species distribution models to inform IUCN Red List assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syfert, Mindy M.; Joppa, Lucas; Smith, Matthew J.; Coomes, David A.; Bachman, Steven P.; Brummitt, Neil A.

    2014-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    .g. hurricanes) or anthropogenic effects (e.g. deforestation) not included in the model fitting process (Elith and Leathwick 2009). Additionally, the SDM approach we have taken here does not explicitly take into account non-equilibrium species dynamics. While...

  18. Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

  19. Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences, community composition, and trait brownfields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 Habitat models forces for insects in urban brownfields 41 4.1 Introduction

  20. Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

  1. active halogen species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry...

  2. anopheles funestus species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a spatial resolution of 1 arc-minute (9 185 275 cells of approximately 4 sq km). Using a maximum entropy method we construct niche models for 10 malaria vector species based on...

  3. Herpetologica, 70(2), 2014, 135148 2014 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    diseases, environmental pollution, nonnative species, increases in UV-B irradiation, and exploitation for food, medicine, and the pet trade (Blaustein and Kiesecker, 2002; Beebee and Griffiths, 2005). Few

  4. Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Jill Ellen

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    native species "'n the nursery trade because they can be produced more economically. Effi- cient and successful production methods nave been developeo whicn enable a nurseryman to cultivate many exotic plants in suffic' en numbers to profitably meet... native species such as Redbud, Sycamore, Flowering Dogwood, Live Cak, Yucc , Desert Willow, Virginia "reeper present ln the nursery trade. Similar efforts ln cultivation whicn have made these spec'es readily available could be applied to many other...

  5. Chemical, physical, and organoleptic properties of acorns of selected species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofcarcik, Ralph Paul

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis By RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE J'anuary 1969 Major Subject& Food Technology CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Approved as to style and content by: (Chaxrman C ttee) (Head of Department) mber...

  6. Ecological niche modelling and prioritizing areas for species reintroductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Serví n, Jorge I.; Kiff, Lloyd F.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Corresponding author) Natural History Museum, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA. E-mail town@ku.edu Jorge I. Serv?´n Departamento de Desarrollo Sustentable, Instituto de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Jua´rez del Estado de Durango, Apdo.... Introduction One of the aims of biodiversity conservation is to avoid loss of species. The best approach preserves natural systems prior to perturbation or damage by human activities. However, conservation action usually begins after species have been...

  7. Comparison of sampling techniques for Heliothis species in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Michelle Lynn

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 19g& Najor Subject: Entomology COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR HELIOTHIS SPECIES IN COTTON A Thesis by MICHELLE LYNN WALTERS Approved as to style and content by: J. K. Walker, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) J. K. Olson (Member) A. E.... Percival (Member) 2 & F/yg. (Member) F, G. Maxwell (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRACT Comparison of Sampling Techniques for Heliothis Species in Cotton. (December 1986) Nichelle Lynn Walters, B. S. , Arizona State University; Chairman...

  8. Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tunio, Mutahir A., E-mail: drmutahirtonio@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Hashmi, Altaf [Department of Urology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Qayyum, Abdul [Department of Medical Oncology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Mohsin, Rehan [Department of Urology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan); Zaeem, Ahmed [Department of Medical Physics, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2-T4, N-) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3-6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node-negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

  9. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States) [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)] [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  10. Island biogeography Much of our current understanding of how many species occupy a community comes from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    a balance between ongoing immigration of new species to the island and continuous extinction of species') and E is the maximum rate of extinction (the rate of extinction when the number of species on the island there are no species on the island (logically). But extinction rate increases with increasing species on the island

  11. Invasive interactions of Monomorium minimum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) infected with Thelohania solenopsae (Microsporida: Thelohaniidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keck, Molly Elizabeth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .50 ab* 600 1.80 abc 2.00 a 3.20 ab 4.20 abc 7.60 a 800 2.20 ac 2.80 a 4.20 ab 7.00 bc 8.40 a 1000 3.40 b 4.40 a 8.75 c* 8.75 d* 14.33 b* * Means only include four of five colonies in the experiment. In these situations the invasive... OF CONTENTS??????????????????????....... viii LIST OF TABLES ????????????????????????........ ix LIST OF FIGURES???????????????????????.......... x INTRODUCTION?????????????????????????...... 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS????????????????????.. 11...

  12. NO2 Adsorption on BaO/Al2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. NO2 Adsorption on BaOAl2O3: The Nature of Nitrate Species. Abstract: The nature of nitrate species formed in the...

  13. Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci

  14. Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

  15. Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

  16. Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N. perkinsii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N description of species and, having failed to discredit the approach, describe the new species, N. hispaniola

  17. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  18. Implantation, flux and recoil distributions for plasma species impinging on tokamak divertor materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshman, Nathan David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. APlasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. byquantities needed to couple tokamak edge plasma to coolant

  19. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  20. Life cycle studies of the red tide dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnahan, Michael L. (Michael Lewis)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  1. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

  2. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  3. Three-fold way to extinction in cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulands, S; Frey, E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Species extinction occurs regularly and unavoidably in ecological systems. The time scales for extinction can broadly vary and inform on the ecosystem's stability. We study the spatio-temporal extinction dynamics of a paradigmatic population model where three species exhibit cyclic competition. The cyclic dynamics reflects the non-equilibrium nature of the species interactions. We identify three types of dynamics that leave leave their fingerprints in the extinction-time probability distribution: rapid extinction, heteroclinic orbits, and metastable traveling weaves. Based on these three types we develop semi-phenomenological arguments for the functional form and the scaling behavior of the extinction-time probability distribution. These analytical results are supported by extensive numerical simulations.

  4. Quantitative Ecology and the Conservation of Biodiversity: Species Richness, Abundance, and Extinction in Human-Altered Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitzes, Justin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for predicting species extinction by linking populationfor estimates of species extinctions. Ecology 81:3305–estimates of single-species extinction risks and community-

  5. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  6. Silverside Diets and Potential Competition in the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway: The Invasive Menidia audens versus the Native Labidesthes sicculus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strongin, Kyle

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    differences, overlap, and niche shifts. The analysis indicated that diets differed significantly between the two species. However, dietary overlap at sites of co-occurrence was greater than expected under conditions of incipient competitive exclusion; and...

  7. Inhibition and success of prymnesium parvum invasion on plankton communities in Texas, USA and prymnesium parvum pigment dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Errera, Reagan Michelle

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Prymnesium parvum Carter, a haptophyte species capable of forming harmful algal blooms (HABs), has been identified in fresh and brackish water habitats worldwide. In Texas, P. parvum blooms have diminished local community revenues from losses...

  8. Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyers Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Siddavatam, Prasad; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E.; Gull, Tamara; Khare, Sangeeta; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer’s patches ...

  9. africa pretoria 20-23: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND OTHER ALIEN INVASIVE SPECIES IN AFRICA Clement Chilima FISNA Secretariat, Forestry Research to be protected from the impact of alien invasive species for the good of...

  10. Evaluating the Interactive Effects of Seasonal Prescribed Fire and Grazing On Invasive Grass Abundance and Woody Brush Encroachment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Michele Diane

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    across rangelands. Increased shrub density can alter fuel loads, decrease herbaceous production (Van Auken 2009), reduce species richness in grasslands (Ratajczak et al. 2012) and diminish ecosystem services (Van Wilgen et al. 1996). In addition... consequently reductions in animal grazing capacity), and diminished critical ecosystem services such as groundwater 5 recharge, carbon sequestration, and pollinator habitat. Knopf (1994) found that grassland bird species have the highest rate of decline...

  11. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Lee [Boston University] [Boston University

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for translational development of molecular biodosimetry instrumentation to assess human exposure to mixed radiation fields.

  12. alien fish species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alien fish species First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Climate Change Vulnerability of...

  13. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  14. Current Time Step: 236 Carbon 14Name of Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenhauer, Greg S.

    of Species: Latitude: 70 N On-line Controller of Atmospheric Modeling 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 200 600 800400 Thread Thread Local monitors and central monitor probe events control steering controller trigger Application Monitoring & User Interaction Controller Trace Data Collector Trace Data Analyzer Filter

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species and conservation listing: insights from nature of biotic taxonomies and how these changes alter perceptions of extinction risk and conservation that the activity of a new, fine-scale taxonomy may have an effect in the taxonomy structure producing a taxonomic

  16. Differential tolerance of UV radiation between Chaoborus species and role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Differential tolerance of UV radiation between Chaoborus species and role of photoprotective that this genus is highly sensitive to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Here, we first tested the UV sensi. obscuripes is associated with the presence of photo- protective compounds. Populations of UV

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are influ- encedORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest carbon release under broadleaved forest floors may explain this difference. Spruce forest floor exhibited

  18. Cytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    . The spotted bass that were intro- duced (most likely by members of a bass- fishing club) are thought to haveCytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an Introduction J. C. Avise Fish and WUdllfe Research Unit (Pierce) and the National Biological Service (Van Den Avyle), Daniel B

  19. Electro-diffusion in a plasma with two ion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Grigory; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field is a thermodynamic force that can drive collisional inter-ion-species transport in a multicomponent plasma. In an inertial confinement fusion capsule, such transport causes fuel ion separation even with a target initially prepared to have equal number densities for the two fuel ion species. Unlike the baro-diffusion driven by ion pressure gradient and the thermo-diffusion driven by ion and electron temperature gradients, electro-diffusion has a critical dependence on the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. Specifically, it is shown here that electro-diffusion vanishes if the ion species have the same charge-to-mass ratio. An explicit expression for the electro-diffusion ratio is obtained and used to investigate the relative importance of electro- and baro-diffusion mechanisms. In particular, it is found that electro-diffusion reinforces baro-diffusion in the deuterium and tritium mix, but tends to cancel it in the deuterium and helium-3 mix.

  20. Plasma equilibria with multiple ion species: Equations and algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galeotti, L.; Ceccherini, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Barnes, D. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Pegoraro, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axisymmetric equilibrium of a magnetically confined plasma with multiple ion species is considered. To describe hot plasmas with isothermal surfaces, we adopt a formulation consistent with zero poloidal ion flow. This formulation includes all magnetic field components and also correctly includes all effects of toroidal ion rotation. There are two free surface functions for each species and a third which is determined by a differential equation relating surface functions per species. We have developed and implemented an algorithm for the solution of the resulting nonlinear equations and found solutions with large charge and mass contrast among the ion species for both compact (r = 0 included) and annular (r = 0 excluded) domains. Our solution method allows for arbitrary domain shapes, includes far-field conditions, and treats any combination of electrically conducting or insulating walls. Appropriate surface functions are used to describe the transition from closed to open field plasma in a reasonable manner. Solutions for advanced fuel cycle fusion systems (both D-{sup 3}He and p-{sup 11}B) are presented to illustrate the power of the method. Finally, we briefly discuss the special issues associated with obtaining very elongated solutions and describe the algorithm for implementing these features.

  1. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  2. How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

  3. Procedure Speci cations in 10.1 Real Time Theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    (MDA) and Touch Down Zone Elevation (TDZE) which are important during the landing phase. Predicates-Time Speci#12;cations module Landing Defs DECLARATIONS constants DH ; MDA;TDZE variables alt DEFINITIONS below DH #1; = (alt MDA #1; = (alt MDA) at MDA #1; = (alt = MDA) landing ) (alt = TDZE

  4. TWO NEW SPECIES OF DICRANOCENTRUS FROM PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari-Mutt, José A.

    TWO NEW SPECIES OF DICRANOCENTRUS FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (COLLEMBOLA: ENTOMOBRYIDAE) JOSE A. MARI M U T T Department of Biology University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00708 National Forest, Puerto Rico and Provincia La Vega, Dominican Republic, and D. zebratus from the latter

  5. Impact of Tree Species on Carbon in Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    species differ in productivity, litter quality and quantity, canopy structure and nitrogen deposition.1.6 Mycelia production (Paper V) 23 4.2 Vegetation 23 4.2.1 Tree biomass and litterfall (Paper II) 23 4.2.2 Understorey vegetation (Paper II) 24 4.2.3 Fine root biomass (Paper V) 25 4.2.4 Fine root production

  6. Developmental plasticity and the origin of species differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    -Eberhard* Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 2511, APO AA 34020-9511 Speciation is the origin of reproductive. Studies of reproductive isolation have dominated research on speciation, leaving the origin of species selection and genetic accommo- dation fueled by standing genetic variation or by subsequent mutation

  7. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrock, John

    Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness Peter B. Adler,1 * Eric W. Seabloom,2 that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found

  8. RARE SPECIES CONSERVATORY FOUNDATION, INC. EIN: 65-0560456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consulting and technical services to conservation teams, and forms educational, political and economic partnerships to expedite specific habitat and species conservation projects. Please also see detailed and stimulate collateral, in situ conservation investment. Lowry Park Zoo is preparing an on-exhibit Red

  9. Monte Carlo Modeling of Nuclear Measurements in Vertical and Horizontal Wells in the Presence of Mud-Filtrate Invasion and Salt Mixing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    of Mud-Filtrate Invasion and Salt Mixing1 Alberto Mendoza2 , William E. Preeg3 , Carlos Torres-Verdín2 the influence of the spatial distributions of fluid saturation and salt concentration on generic compensated-bearing formation. The simulations also consider the mixing of salt between mud-filtrate and connate water. Subse

  10. Differential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION IN A PERIODIC CHEMOSTAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

    , the single-species growth model, has a threshold between global extinction and uniform persistenceDifferential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION is proved and then applied to models of single-species growth and n-species competition in a periodically

  11. Xero-thermophilous and grassland ubiquist species dominate the weevil fauna of Swiss cities (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    (Curculionoidea) was sampled in the three Swiss cities of Lucerne, Lugano and Zurich. In total, 3448 individuals from 129 species were collected (Lucerne: 64 species; Lugano: 69 species; Zurich: 83 species). The most (Soerensen index) was highest be- tween the cities of Lucerne and Zurich, which could be expected since

  12. Extracting Species Trees From Complex Gene Trees: Reconciled Trees And Vertebrate Phylogeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Roderic

    , trypsinogen, tyrosinase, vassopressin, and Wnt-7). The resulting species tree shows much similarity

  13. CONSEQUENCES OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL CLIMATE VARIABILITY FOR SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Miguel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change, habitat loss, protected areas and the climate adaptation potential of species in Mediterranean

  14. Non-invasive, MRI-compatible fibreoptic device for functional near-IR reflectometry of human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorvoja, H.S.S.; Myllylae, T S; Myllylae, Risto A [University of Oulu, Optoelectronics and Measurements Techniques Laboratory (Finland); Kirillin, M Yu; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation); Elseoud, A A; Nikkinen, J; Tervonen, O; Kiviniemi, V [MRI Research Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-invasive device for measuring blood oxygen variations in human brain is designed, implemented, and tested for MRI compatibility. The device is based on principles of near-IR reflectometry; power LEDs serve as sources of probing radiation delivered to patient skin surface through optical fibres. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations of probing radiation propagation in a multilayer brain model are performed to evaluate signal levels at different source - detector separations at three operation wavelengths and an additional wavelength of 915 nm. It is shown that the device can be applied for brain activity studies using power LEDs operating at 830 and 915 nm, while employment of wavelength of 660 nm requires an increased probing power. Employment of the wavelength of 592 nm in the current configuration is unreasonable. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  15. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  16. Clinical Outcomes in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IA Endometrial Cancer With Myometrial Invasion Treated With or Without Postoperative Vaginal Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diavolitsis, V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Rademaker, A. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Lurain, J.; Hoekstra, A. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Strauss, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Small, W., E-mail: wsmall@nmff.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcomes of patients with Stage IA endometrial cancer with myometrial invasion treated with postoperative vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with those who received no adjuvant therapy (NAT). Methods and Materials: All patients treated with hysterectomy for endometrial cancer at Northwestern Memorial Hospital between 1978 and 2005 were identified. Those patients with Stage IA disease with myometrial invasion who were treated with VBT alone or NAT were identified and included in the present analysis. Results: Of 252 patients with Stage IA endometrial cancer with superficial (<50%) myometrial invasion who met the inclusion criteria, 169 underwent VBT and 83 received NAT. The median follow-up in the VBT and NAT groups was 103 and 61 months, respectively. In the VBT group, 56.8% had Grade 1, 37.9% had Grade 2, and 5.3% had Grade 3 tumors. In the NAT group, 75.9%, 20.5%, and 3.6% had Grade 1, 2, and 3 tumors, respectively. Lymphatic or vascular space invasion was noted in 12.4% of the VBT patients and 5.6% of the NAT patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 95.5%. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 92.4% for all patients, 94.4% for the VBT group, and 87.4% for the NAT group (p = NS). Of the 169 VBT patients and 83 NAT patients, 8 (4.7%) and 6 (7.2%) developed recurrent disease. One vaginal recurrence occurred in the VBT group (0.6%) and three in the NAT group (3.8%). Recurrences developed 2-102 months after surgical treatment. Two of the four vaginal recurrences were salvaged. No Grade 3 or higher acute or late radiation toxicity was noted. Conclusions: The use of postoperative VBT in patients with Stage I endometrial cancer with <50% myometrial invasion yielded excellent vaginal disease control and disease-free survival, with minimal toxicity.

  17. Introduced Fish Species: "What do Introduced Fish Species: "What do the locals think?"the locals think?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    bass grass carp Currently 56 species of introduced fish in Tennessee waters 12 exotic to US12 exotic release Bait bucket Game fish introductions Procambarus acutus Two local examples brook troutstriped bass #12;10/19/2009 4 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Anadromous fish native to Atlantic and Gulf coasts

  18. Collection of Digital Imagery in Support of Aquatic Invasive Species Program and CERP Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement W912HZ-10-2-0032. · Development Assessment. Sponsor: Southwest Florida Water Management District. $27,000. 1992. Terminal Interconnected

  19. Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Ashley

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 2004), as well as the San Antonio River Basin (Scharpf 2005). Dionda serena inhabits the Frio, Nueces, and Sabinal rivers in the Nueces River basin (Scharpf 2005). The spring-dwelling nature of Dionda contributes to the relative isolation..., Guadalupe, Nueces and Frio rivers may once have been connected during times of lower sea levels, allowing for fish dispersal between rivers (Mayden 1992). The five species of Dionda in Texas are similar in ecological preferences and life history. All...

  20. Sound pressure and particle acceleration audiograms in three marine fish species from the Adriatic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladich, Friedrich

    umbra using the non-invasive auditory evoked potential-recording technique. Hearing thresholds were and 600 Hz, respectively. The low auditory thresholds and the large hearing bandwidth of S. umbra indicate that sound pressure may play a role in S. umbra's hearing, even though pronounced connections between

  1. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. 2008 61 Introduction ____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Nonnative Invasive Plants in the Northeast Bioregion Alison C. Dibble Kristin Zouhar Jane Kapler Smith occur in scattered areas and on abandoned farm land (old fields) (Garrison and others 1977; Smith and others 2001).Standsofeasternwhitepineoftenoccupyformer agricultural fields. Fire History in the Northeast

  2. Temporal modulation of plasma species in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Dingxin; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Kong, Michael G. [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Virginia 23508 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in helium is a pulsed discharge in nature and the moment of maximum species densities is almost consistent with peak discharge current density. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to investigate the temporal structure of plasma species in an atmospheric He-N{sub 2} dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It is demonstrated that there exist microsecond delays of the moments of the maximum electron and ion densities from the peak of discharge current density. These time delays are caused by a competition between the electron impact and Penning ionizations, modulated by the N{sub 2} level in the plasma-forming gas. Besides, significant electron wall losses lead to the DBD being more positively charged and, with a distinct temporal separation in the peak electron and cation densities, the plasma is characterized with repetitive bursts of net positive charges. The temporal details of ionic and reactive plasma species may provide a new idea for some biological processes.

  3. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  4. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

  5. Properties of Reactive Oxygen Species by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Bernhardt L. Trout; Leonardo Guidoni

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of Chemistry, Biology and Atmospheric Science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab-initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as $N^3-N^4$, where $N$ is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  6. Cargo transportation by two species of motor protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunxin Zhang

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The cargo motion in living cells transported by two species of motor protein with different intrinsic directionality is discussed in this study. Similar to single motor movement, cargo steps forward and backward along microtubule stochastically. Recent experiments found that, cargo transportation by two motor species has a memory, it does not change its direction as frequently as expected, which means that its forward and backward step rates depends on its previous motion trajectory. By assuming cargo has only the least memory, i.e. its step direction depends only on the direction of its last step, two cases of cargo motion are detailed analyzed in this study: {\\bf (I)} cargo motion under constant external load; and {\\bf (II)} cargo motion in one fixed optical trap. Due to the existence of memory, for the first case, cargo can keep moving in the same direction for a long distance. For the second case, the cargo will oscillate in the trap. The oscillation period decreases and the oscillation amplitude increases with the motor forward step rates, but both of them decrease with the trap stiffness. The most likely location of cargo, where the probability of finding the oscillated cargo is maximum, may be the same as or may be different with the trap center, which depends on the step rates of the two motor species. Meanwhile, if motors are robust, i.e. their forward to backward step rate ratios are high, there may be two such most likely locations, located on the two sides of the trap center respectively. The probability of finding cargo in given location, the probability of cargo in forward/backward motion state, and various mean first passage times of cargo to give location or given state are also analyzed.

  7. Treatment of prostate cancer with Ad5/3#24hCG allows non-invasive detection of the magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Treatment of prostate cancer with Ad5/3#24hCG allows non-invasive detection of the magnitudeCGB production. In a s.c. in vivo model of hormone refractory prostate cancer, Ad5/3#24hCG treatment resultedCG is a potent virus for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

  8. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostanci, Zeynep, E-mail: zbostanci@hmc.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Alam, Samina, E-mail: sra116@psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Soybel, David I., E-mail: dsoybel@hmc.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Kelleher, Shannon L., E-mail: slk39@psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER?) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  9. A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis from the Central African Republic (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis Michener (Allodapini: Allodapina) is described and figured from a series of females collected in the Central African Republic. Braunsapis maxschwarzi Engel, new species, ...

  10. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary · Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  11. Reproductive traits of pioneer gastropod species colonizing deep-see hydrothermal vents after an eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayer, Skylar (Skylar Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colonization dynamics and life histories of pioneer species are vital components in understanding the early succession of nascent hydrothermal vents. The reproductive ecology of pioneer species at deep-sea hydrothermal ...

  12. Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater and Conditions #12;MOLECULAR APPROACHES IN FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species: diversity, elevation, DNA barcoding, taxonomy, aquatic insect, EPT, southern Rocky Mountain Elevation

  13. SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putegnat, John

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined snake species richness and relative abundances in a heterogeneous landscape within the post oak savannah of East Central Texas. Snakes were sampled using funnel traps (with drift fences for terrestrial species) and hand capture...

  14. Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    1 Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental: Environmental value transfer and species conservation Key words: environmental value transfer, uncertainty (Department of Environmental Heritage 2005). This results in an underinvestment of conservation dollars

  15. Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    changes in species composition and lessened the negative impact of fertilization on diversity. In non-fertilized plots, sowing increased representation by native species and increased diversity, successional turnover, and biomass production. Our results...

  16. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  17. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  18. Differences in sounds made by courting males of three closely related Lake Malawi cichlid species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . C. P. AMORIM*, M. E. KNIGHT, Y. STRATOUDAKIS§ AND G. F. TURNER{ *Unidade de Investigac¸a~o em Eco species, court- ship calls of three species of Pseudotropheus that co-occur at Nkhata Bay, on the western

  19. Revision of the bee genus Chlerogella (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), Part IV: A new species from southwestern Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Michael S.; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new species of the diverse augochlorine bee genus Chlerogella Michener (Halictinae: Augochlorini) is described and figured from southwestern Colombia. Chlerogella anchicaya Engel, Gonzalez, & Hinojosa-Díaz, new species, ...

  20. Review of the chewing louse genus Tinamotaecola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae), with the description of three new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellenthal, Ronald A.; Price, Roger D.; Timm, Robert M.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic study of the chewing louse genus Tinamotaecola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae) was undertaken, enabling us to recognize four species in the genus. The single previously recognized species, T. andinae Carriker, ...

  1. What matters for predicting spatial distributions of trees: Techniques, data, or species’ characteristics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guisan, A.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Elith, J.; Graham, C. H.; Phillips, S.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data characteristics and species traits are expected to influence the accuracy with which species' distributions can be modeled and predicted. We compare 10 modeling techniques in terms of predictive power and sensitivity ...

  2. Spatial resolution of temperature and chemical species in a flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albahadily, Fakhrildeen Niema

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Winefordner et al. (51). AE . /k A. g. I. B. ln ~ + ln ? + 1n? 1 A. g. i B. (36) where: subscript i = the level excited by the source subscript j = the thermally assisted level flame temperature AE . . ij the difference in energy between i and j.... Schweikert (Member) Abdel-Kad Ayou (Memb ) Vaneica . Y ng (Member) May 1984 ABSTRACT Spatial Resolution of Temperature and Chemical Species in a Flame. (May 1984) Fakhrildeen Niema Albahadily, B. S. , University of Basrah/Iraq Chairman of Advisory...

  3. 31 TAC 65.175 - Threatened Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | Open EnergyEnergyThreatened Species Jump

  4. 31 TAC 65.176 - Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | Open EnergyEnergyThreatened Species

  5. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  6. TWO NEW TRYPANOSOMA SPECIES FROM AFRICAN BIRDS, WITH NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF AVIAN TRYPANOSOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehgal, Ravinder

    TWO NEW TRYPANOSOMA SPECIES FROM AFRICAN BIRDS, WITH NOTES ON THE TAXONOMY OF AVIAN TRYPANOSOMES situation in species taxonomy of avian trypanosomes is discussed. We call for the redescription of valid composition of avian trypanosomes and reconstructing the taxonomy of these organisms. Species of avian

  7. An Algebraic Speci cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bidoit, Michel

    An Algebraic Speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System Michel Bidoit 1 , Claude Chevenier describe how to derive an algebraic speci#12;cation of the Steam-Boiler Control System starting from Introduction Our aim is to explain how one can solve the \\Steam-boiler control speci#12;cation problem

  8. A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Luke

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands James and extinction rates as functions of species richness at dynamic equilibrium. In contrast, the approach results highlight the importance of species abundances as indi- cators of immigration and extinction rates

  9. Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Govindan

    Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar* Physical a synchronizing term. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction. DOI: 10 other examples are documented in Ref. [10]. The second important phenomenon is the extinction of species

  10. Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Liang

    Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling effects. However, time-lagged extinctions due to extinction debt may lead to additional species loss (31 species abundances, at least until future extinction debt is paid. References and Notes 1. M. Gaertner, A

  11. The Value of Endangered Species: the Importance of Conserving Biological Diversity1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    - tion. Since time began, countless species have gone extinct from natural processes. The extinction of dinosaurs is the best known example. Why Save Endangered Species? If extinction is a natural process, why extinction of plants and animals to natural causes. Today most species of plants and animals become extinct

  12. Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global Biodiversity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global subordinate species less intelligent than us, at risk of extinction. In other words, anthropogenic activities have made other species sensitive to changes in climate and habitat vulnerable to extinction [Parry et

  13. SHORT-TERM THERMAL RESISTANCE OF ZOEAE OF 10 SPECIES OF CRABS FROM PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHORT-TERM THERMAL RESISTANCE OF ZOEAE OF 10 SPECIES OF CRABS FROM PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON BENJAMIN to protect the most sensitive species studied is 24OC for the Puget Sound area. Thermal resistance of marine species of Puget INorthwest and Alaska Fisheries Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, 2725

  14. Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species Boundaries in the Lichenized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species-8897 A gene genealogical approach to recognize phylogenetic species boundaries in the lichenized fungus, was investigated as a model system in which to recognize species boundaries. Gene genealogies of 6 and 12 loci were

  15. A NEW SPECIES OF HALICYCLOPS (COPEPODA, CYCLOPOIDA, CYCLOPIDAE) FROM CENOTES OF THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    -4827. Halicyclops cenoticola sp. nov. is described from cenotes of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The new speciesSARSIA A NEW SPECIES OF HALICYCLOPS (COPEPODA, CYCLOPOIDA, CYCLOPIDAE) FROM CENOTES OF THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO, WITH AN IDENTIFICATION KEY FOR THE SPECIES OF THE GENUS FROM THE CARIBBEAN REGION

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji, Kripa Keerthi generate reactive oxygen species under biologically rele- vant conditions via the sequence of reactions by reactive oxygen species generated in this manner may contribute to the cytotoxic properties of leinamycin

  17. vol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    on spatial turnover in the species com- position (beta diversity). Our results suggest that if energy richness, species-energy relationships, potential evapotranspiration, spatial scale, beta diversity, fishesvol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

  18. Vol. 21 No. 3 2004 Endangered Species UPDATE 87 Andrew C. Keller &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    has declined by 33% since delisting (Rugh 2003). In light of this population decline, in this paper we of delisted species, monitoring beyond the 5 years required by the ESA is needed to ensure long-term viability UPDATE Vol. 21 No. 3 200488 Introduction Does delisting species under the En- dangered Species Act (ESA

  19. What Is the Indicator and Why Is It Important? As the number of species considered rare increases,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the likelihood of species extinction increases. This indicator focuses on species that have the greatest chance of species, tracking the number of species at risk of extinction can potentially indicate whether the use? The trend in species extinction since the turn of the 20th century varies by taxonomic group (figure 7

  20. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  1. Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Wright; Carolyn Auchter; Chen-Kuan Chou; Richard D. Graham; Thomas W. Noel; Tomasz Sakrejda; Zichao Zhou; Boris B. Blinov

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

  2. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  3. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  4. Single- and multi-photon ionization studies of organosulfur species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Y.S.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate ionization energies (IE`s) for molecular species are used for prediction of chemical reactivity and are of fundamental importance to chemists. The IE of a gaseous molecule can be determined routinely in a photoionization or a photoelectron experiment. IE determinations made in conventional photoionization and photoelectron studies have uncertainties in the range of 3--100 meV (25--250 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the past decade, the most exciting development in the field of photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy has been the availability of high resolution, tunable ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser sources. The laser pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) scheme is currently the state-of-the-art photoelectron spectroscopic technique and is capable of providing photoelectron energy resolution close to the optical resolution. The author has focused attention on the photoionization processes of some sulfur-containing species. The studies of the photoionization and photodissociation on sulfur-containing compounds [such as CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}SH, CH{sub 3}SSCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}SCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}S (thiophene) and sulfur-containing radicals, such as HS, CS, CH{sub 3}S, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}SS], have been the major subjects in the group because sulfur is an important species contributing to air pollution in the atmosphere. The modeling of the combustion and oxidation of sulfur compounds represents important steps for the control of both the production and the elimination of sulfur-containing pollutants. Chapter 1 is a general introduction of the thesis. Chapters 2 and 6 contain five papers published in, or accepted for publication in, academic periodicals. In Chapter 7, the progress of the construction in the laboratory of a new vacuum ultraviolet laser system equipped with a reflectron mass spectrometer is presented. Chapters 2 through 7 have been removed for separate processing. A general conclusion of these studies are given in Chapter 8 followed by an appendix.

  5. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other potential complexants. The sodium nitrate and sodium phosphate salts that form most of the salt cake layers have little interaction with plutonium in the wastes and contain relatively small plutonium concentrations. For these reasons the authors consider plutonium species in the sludges and supernate solutions only. The low concentrations of plutonium in waste tank supernate solutions and in the solid sludges prevent identification of chemical species of plutonium by ordinary analytical techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements are not sensitive enough to identify plutons oxidation states or complexes in these waste solutions. Identification of solid phases containing plutonium in sludge solids by x-ray diffraction or by microscopic techniques would be extremely difficult. Because of these technical problems, plutonium speciation was extrapolated from known behavior observed in laboratory studies of synthetic waste or of more chemically simple systems.

  6. A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico Sean M de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, AP 70-153, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510

  7. 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manager of the processor. (xii) A signed statement from the applicant and from all persons who are listed for personal injury, death, sickness, damage to property directly or indirectly due to activities conducted§ 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc § 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation

  8. Frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus (Leptodactylidae) in the cordillera occidental in Peru with descriptions of three new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duellman, William E.; Lehr, Edgar

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , and two are members of the Eleutherodactylus unistrigatus Group. We recognize 15 species of Eleutherodactylus in the Cordillera Occidental; 10 of these species are reported for the first time from the Cordillera Occidental. Four of these species are shared...

  9. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

  10. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Verde, Licia, E-mail: stephen.feeney.09@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and ICC, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  11. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, André; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lévèque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

  12. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  13. Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter B. Adler; et al.

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating local diversity. The original view, which is still widely accepted, holds that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity. Although recent meta-analyses questioned the generality of hump-shaped patterns, these syntheses have been criticized for failing to account for methodological differences among studies. We addressed such concerns by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found no clear relationship between productivity and fine-scale (meters-2) richness within sites, within regions, or across the globe. Ecologists should focus on fresh, mechanistic approaches to understanding the multivariate links between productivity and richness.

  14. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  15. Apparatus and method for polarizing polarizable nuclear species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersman, F. William; Leuschner, Mark; Carberry, Jeannette

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a polarizing process involving a number of steps. The first step requires moving a flowing mixture of gas, the gas at least containing a polarizable nuclear species and vapor of at least one alkali metal, with a transport velocity that is not negligible when compared with the natural velocity of diffusive transport. The second step is propagating laser light in a direction, preferably at least partially through a polarizing cell. The next step is directing the flowing gas along a direction generally opposite to the direction of laser light propagating. The next step is containing the flowing gas mixture in the polarizing cell. The final step is immersing the polarizing cell in a magnetic field. These steps can be initiated in any order, although the flowing gas, the propagating laser and the magnetic field immersion must be concurrently active for polarization to occur.

  16. Long-term trends in the avifauna of the Sierra Nevada: community dynamics and species occupancy over a century of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Morgan Winn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitat loss on extinctions at species' low-latitude rangeand local extinction when a species is detected imperfectly.species, with implications for Pleistocene extinctions and

  17. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  18. A novel shogaol analog suppresses cancer cell invasion and inflammation, and displays cytoprotective effects through modulation of NF-?B and Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Fei-Fei; Ling, Hui; Ang, Xiaohui; Reddy, Shridhivya A.; Lee, Stephanie S-H.; Yang, Hong; Tan, Sock-Hoon [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Hayes, John D. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Chui, Wai-Keung [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Chew, Eng-Hui, E-mail: phaceh@nus.edu.sg [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural compounds containing vanilloid and Michael acceptor moieties appear to possess anti-cancer and chemopreventive properties. The ginger constituent shogaol represents one such compound. In this study, the anti-cancer potential of a synthetic novel shogaol analog 3-phenyl-3-shogaol (3-Ph-3-SG) was assessed by evaluating its effects on signaling pathways. At non-toxic concentrations, 3-Ph-3-SG suppressed cancer cell invasion in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells through inhibition of PMA-activated MMP-9 expression. At similar concentrations, 3-Ph-3-SG reduced expression of the inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostanglandin-E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Inhibition of cancer cell invasion and inflammation by 3-Ph-3-SG were mediated through suppression of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) signaling pathway. The 3-Ph-3-SG also demonstrated cytoprotective effects by inducing the antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven genes NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cytoprotection by 3-Ph-3-SG was achieved at least partly through modification of cysteine residues in the E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate adaptor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which resulted in accumulation of transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The activities of 3-Ph-3-SG were comparable to those of 6-shogaol, the most abundant naturally-occurring shogaol, and stronger than those of 4-hydroxyl-null deshydroxy-3-phenyl-3-shogaol, which attested the importance of the 4-hydroxy substituent in the vanilloid moiety for bioactivity. In summary, 3-Ph-3-SG is shown to possess activities that modulate stress-associated pathways relevant to multiple steps in carcinogenesis. Therefore, it warrants further investigation of this compound as a promising candidate for use in chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive strategies. - Highlights: • Novel shogaol 3-phenyl-3-shogaol suppressed cancer cell invasion and inflammation. • Anti-invasive and anti-inflammatory effects were NF-?B-dependent. • 3-Phenyl-3-shogaol induced ARE-driven genes to achieve cytoprotection. • Cytoprotective effects were brought about by modification of cysteines in Keap1. • Chemopreventive activities of 3-phenyl-3-shogaol and 6-shogaol were comparable.

  19. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (304 Cheryl Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. Which generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples.

  20. Species specific blood typing in birds using hemagglutin and precipitin techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cragg, Peter Charles

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to focus on the reactivity across several species in an attempt to relate their taxonomic relationships. The blood from six species; Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Bl khllldl'Dk(hdkdh 11), kghlggdgk (B 1 ~k), d G ld Ph (Ch PP(h B' ) 1- lected... used see Table 3. Taxonomic Grouping Ending Example order family subfamily tribe genus specific epithet species -iformes -idae -inae ? ini Anseriformes Anatidae Anserinae Anserini Branta canadensis Branta canadensis Canada Goose...