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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Invasive Species Conservation Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependent on such waters" ­ Non-indigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 · ­ Alien · Major impacts · Examples (Global, Great Lakes) · Invasion Success · Control #12;Terminology of Invasive species · What is the difference between exotic, non-indigenous, non-native, alien, nuisance, and invasive

Gottgens, Hans

2

Spatial distribution of non-native invasive plants following large-scale wind damage at LaRue Pine Hills - Otter Pond Research Natural Area, Union County, Illinois.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to determine if a large-scale wind disturbance facilitated the invasion of forest interiors by non-native invasive plant species. The (more)

Romano, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of this research can be used to prioritize management and research activities related to these invasive taxa on the Research Park as a whole and for specific Natural or Reference Areas. Additional research on the autecology and synecology of each species surveyed is suggested. In particular, research should focus on assessing the impacts of these species on the invaded plant and animal communities and ecosystems. Finally, this ranking system could be used to similarly rank the many other nonnative, invasive species present on the Research Park not included in this study.

Drake, S.J.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

4

Invasive, Nonnative Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Of TheIntevac Jump

5

Exotic, Invasive, Alien, Nonindigenous, or Nuisance Species: No Matter What You Call Them, They're a Growing Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exotic, Invasive, Alien, Nonindigenous, or Nuisance Species: No Matter What You Call Them, They nonindigenous species. What is the Difference between Exotic, Nonindigenous, Non-Native, Alien, Nuisance of February 3, 1999, defined "alien" species as "any species, including its seeds, eggs, spores, or other

6

Plants & Animals Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Climate Exotic Species Ecology Environmental Policy Reference Fire ant Ant Seed predation Computational, guaranteed results! SwissFrenchSchool.ch AFM Tips by NanoAndMore AFM Tips For Any Application. Fast Delivery. Free Samples! NanoAndMore.com/Tips Related Stories Ants Are Experienced Fungus

Alvarez, Nadir

7

Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive species Invasive species have been described as the second-greatest extinction species a major cause of animal extinctions, or has the extinction threat of invasive species been exaggerated? By what mechanisms have invasive species driven animal species to extinction? Are certain animal

Davis, Mark A.

8

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ­ By smothering (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle, kudzu) ­ By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree loosestrife (competition) Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU Kudzu (mat

Gray, Matthew

9

Nonnative Invasive Species Impacts and Control in Southern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

honeysuckle, kudzu) By shading regeneration (e.g. Melaleuca, Chinese tallow tree, privet, bamboo) #12;2 Photo Photo by Randy Westbrooks, USGS Kudzu infestation in Mississippi Photo by John D. Byrd, MSU #12 / Cultural Uses Environmental Remediation (e.g. Kudzu!) Food for wild game (e.g. Japanese honeysuckle

Gray, Matthew

10

THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL PURPOSES IN NORTH: The Introduction of Potentially Invasive Alien Plant Species for Horticultural Purposes in North America: Assessing/Approved: ________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Invasive alien plant species are known to cause significant economic and ecological

11

Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are invasive species a major cause of extinctions? Jessica Gurevitch and Dianna K. Padilla species invasions and the extinction of natives is widely accepted by scientists as well species on extinctions. Greater clarity in our under- standing of these patterns will help us to focus

Padilla, Dianna

12

Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive species are a leading cause of animal extinctions Miguel Clavero and Emili Garci and extinctions of species is unproven. They analyzed the IUCN Red List database [2] and stated that only 6% of the taxa are threatened with extinction as a result of invasion by alien species and !2% (ten terrestrial

Garca-Berthou, Emili

13

Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

Ricciardi, Anthony

14

Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien invasive species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: alien invasive species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Invasive Species Conservation Biology Summary: species What is the difference between exotic, non-indigenous,...

16

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China, Nanjing, China 2 Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China 3 ISPRA ­ Institute for Environmental and Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, China 5 The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic

Kratochvíl, Lukas

17

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aquatic Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3 1. Abstract Ten North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project impoundments were surveyed for aquatic invasive Energy's North Umpqua Hydroelectric Project includes 11 impoundments within the North Umpqua River

18

Why do Invasive Species Successfully Establish & Invade?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coming from? #12;At Risk: Ecosystems with scarce resources · If resources are limited, native species survive #12;Empty niche hypothesis #12;Empty niche hypothesis RESOURCES #12;What resources do species need? #12;Plant Resources #12;Resource supply Resourceusage Resource supply & demand Few extra resources

Schweik, Charles M.

19

Spatial-Temporal Branching Point Process Models in the Study of Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of models of alien plant spread, EcologicalThe establishment of alien (invasive) plant and animaleconomic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the

Balderama, Earvin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Aquatic Invasive Species Vector Risk Assessment Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as an insect stowed away in a cargo box or a lar- val fish brought on board a ship in the bal- last water. When is not just an eco- nomic issue--the health of our unique coastal and marine ecosystems is a source of pride into new areas--such as the unintentional transport of species in the ballast water of freight ships

Zavaleta, Erika

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Population stability, cooperation, and the invasibility of the human species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a mechanism for these outcomes by modifying a simple density-dependent population model to allow varying populations expanded out of Africa and spread rapidly across the majority of the earth's land surfacePopulation stability, cooperation, and the invasibility of the human species Marcus J. Hamiltona

Brown, James H.

22

3) What makes a species invasive? Is it characteristics of the species or characteristics of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible Life History Traits (Chapter 3 of NRC 2002) 1. Reproductive system · Dioecious vs. Monoecious · Self-incompatible pollen vs. Self-compatible pollen #12;3) What makes a species invasive? Species characteristics: Plant

Nowak, Robert S.

23

Contrasting nutrient stocks and litter decomposition in stands of native and invasive species in a sub-tropical estuarine marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora Phragmites australis Cyperus malaccensis Alien invasive species Native aggressive species Biomass invasive species (Spartina alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass

Gauci, Vincent

24

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

Sax, Dov

25

Correlates of vulnerability among arthropod species threatened by invasive ants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

declines and extinctions of native species worldwide.and even extinctions, of native species through variousG (2004) How species respond to multiple extinction threats.

Krushelnycky, Paul D.; Gillespie, Rosemary G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Tradeable risk permits to prevent future introductions of invasive alien species into the Great Lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or control of IAS populations (e.g., integrated pest management [IPM]), or adaptation. Historically, efforts; Risk management; Permit trading 1. Introduction Invasive alien species (IAS)--species that establish, damage, or degrade assets (e.g., power plants, boats, piers, and reservoirs) and result in significant

Lupi, Frank

27

aquatic invasive species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species:321-333 DOI 10.1007s11258-009-9645-9 12;biogeographical isolation (Office of Technology Assessment 1993 (Robinia pseudoaca- cia) introduced to Europe in the...

28

Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive species often threaten biodiversity and environmental processes in their introduced range by extirpating native species due to competition for resources. Nylanderia fulva (formerly N. (=Paratrechina) sp. nr. pubens) is an ecologically...

McDonald, Danny 1983-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hierarchical models facilitate spatial analysis of large data sets: a case study on invasive plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Hierarchical models facilitate spatial analysis of large data sets: a case study on invasive issues require the analysis of large spatial point data sets ­ for example, modelling species distributions, abundance and spread from survey data. But modelling spatial relationships, especially in large

Silander Jr., John A.

30

Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction. Hypoxia has occurred frequently in the summer in western Lake Erie. HABs have been responsible The Laurentian Great Lakes are a major resource to North America, containing 18% of the world's surface

31

Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species-quarantined pathogen of potatoes that has been previously confirmed in the eastern United States. The detection from the Andean region of South America, the pathogen now has worldwide distribution where potatoes

32

Controlling Invasive Species in Woodlots It is often difficult for landowners to cultivate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controlling Invasive Species in Woodlots It is often difficult for landowners to cultivate introductions are done so intentionally - either as ornamentals, crops, or because they are thought to improve saving you energy and water. Native plants also provide food and shelter for birds, butterflies

New Hampshire, University of

33

Invasion by alien species and size and location of nature reserves Petr PYSEK\\ Toms KUCERA1 and Vojtech JAROSK2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion by alien species and size and location of nature reserves Petr PYSEK\\ Tomás KUCERA1 in the landscape arfect the probability that it will be exposed to invasion by alien species? ODe of the most large Dnes;we found a weak significant relationship between the occurrence of aliens and reserve area

Kratochvíl, Lukas

34

Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Nebraska)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United University, Ithaca, NY 14850-0901, United States Available online 29 December 2004 Abstract Invading alien% of the species on the Threatened or Endangered species lists are at risk primarily because of alien

Schweik, Charles M.

36

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects on species, communities and ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects-analysis of 199 articles reporting 1041 field studies that in total describe the impacts of 135 alien plant taxa on resident species, communities and ecosystems. Across studies, alien plants had a significant effect in 11

Kratochvíl, Lukas

38

106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND ()--PINENE FOR DETECTING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

106 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 ETHANOL AND (­)--PINENE FOR DETECTING traps baited with ethanol or ethanol and (-)--pinene for bark and ambrosia beetles in pine stands control; (2) ethanol; (3) (-)--pinene; and (4) ethanol + (-)--pinene. The release rates for ethanol

39

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE MOTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 87 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LIGHT BROWN APPLE. Our analyses indicated that LBAM could cause substantial economic losses to U.S. apple, grape, orange an economic analysis of the light brown apple moth (LBAM), (Epiphyas postvittana (Walker)), whose presence

40

EnvironmEntal monitoring and dEtEction of invasivE spEciEs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, landscape architecture and forest sciences), environmental sciences and/ or the life sciences. The AllianceEnvironmEntal monitoring and dEtEction of invasivE spEciEs ­ current challenges 4­6 September 2013 International W orkshop #12;3rd international global challenges University alliance Workshop Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive Species andWater Levels, Invasive Species and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adapting to Climate ChangeAdapting to Climate Change ­­ ExtremeExtreme Water Levels, Invasive." IPCC Risk management is the framework to discuss adaptation to climate change impacts. Risk The Water Resources Working Group will assess and synthesize climate change impacts to Wisconsin's water

Sheridan, Jennifer

42

Population genetics of the invasive plant species Impatiens glandulifera in Southern Finland.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biological invasions affect biodiversity worldwide, and, consequently, the invaded ecosystems may suffer from significant losses in economic and cultural values. Impatiens glandulifera Royle (Balsaminaceae) is (more)

Marton, Ana-Maria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6­35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over

Cronin, James T.

44

Occupation, Dispersal, and Economic Impact of Major Invasive Plant Species in Southern U.S. Forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive alien plants have impacted southern U.S. forests. This study focuses on quantifying current distribution, rate of dispersals, and economic losses caused by four major invaders Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera (L.) Small), Chinese Privet...

Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

BROMUS TECTORUM INVASION AND GLOBAL CHANGE: LIKELIHOOD OF SPREAD AND FEASIBILITY OF CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and T. Taylor. 2011. Composting one invasive species toproject, chipping and composting one invasive species was

Concilio, Amy Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil nitrogen on the dominance of alien annual plants in theNaturalization and invasion of alien plants: Concepts andBerlin. Rundel, P. W. 2000. Alien species in the flora and

Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Water Quality at Caddo Lake, Center for Invasive Species Eradication: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Giant salvinia, a highly invasive aquatic fern native to South America, poses a serious threat to Texas waters and has done so since its discovery in the state in the 1990s. If left unmanaged, giant salvinia can cause a multitude of impacts...

Gregory, L.; Knutson, A.; Ederton, E.; Mukherjee, A.; Baumann, P.; Masser, M.; Wagner, K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native to identify the Botryosphaeriaceae species present as endophytes or associated with cankers in both introduced is a very diverse group of fungi that includes endophytes and plant pathogens of trees and plants (Alves et

49

Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA-121 Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1 Jeffrey E. Hill2 1 of a wide variety of warm-water and tropical species of ornamental, food, bait, and sport fish. In 2012, the farm-gate value of Florida aquaculture was US$69 million, with 40% of that value in ornamental fish

Watson, Craig A.

50

Environment and Coastal Management Marine Invasive Species in North America: Impacts,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of world shipping and the number of species that can be and are being transported via ballast water, tank aquaculture, canals, aquarium trade, recreational boating, hydrocarbon exploration and trans- portation. Beach, Coastal Sprawl: The Effects of Urban Design on Aquatic Ecosystems in the United States (Arlington

Taggart, Christopher

51

36 2008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species STATUS OF MICROWAVES AND RADIOFREQUENCY AS ALTERNATIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., University Park, PA 16802 ABSTRACT Microwave (MW) and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation are forms of dielectric of MW exposure of red pine logs (Pinus resinosa Ait.), temperatures measured in the log with fiber optic through short irradiation treatment times. To date, we have shown that microwaves kill several species

52

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(1):3040, Spring 2009 The eradication of invasive mammal species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cause of species extinction on offshore islands. Management of IAS requires data on the ecology, Atkinson 1996, Vitousek et al. 1997a). This is particularly true on offshore islands, where floras, island biotas form most of the biodiversity hot spots, accounting for 45% of all bird, plant, and reptile

53

Invasive Species: Major Laws and the Role of Selected Federal Agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the globe can pose a significant threat to native animal and plant communities, and may result and nuclear power plants in the Great Lakes and the Mississippi basin. The light brown apple moth, a native species) refers to an animal or plant that is introduced into an environment where it is not native

Jawitz, James W.

54

Biological Invasions ISSN 1387-3547  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10.1007/s10530-013-0491-2 Evidence for multiple introductions of Phragmites australis to North.springer.com". #12;INVASION NOTE Evidence for multiple introductions of Phragmites australis to North America Abstract We found a new non-native haplotype of Phragmites australis in North America that provides

Cronin, James T.

55

66 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 EMERALD ASH BORER IN RUSSIA: 2009 SITUATION UPDATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

66 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 EMERALD ASH BORER IN RUSSIA: 2009, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Science, Krasnoyarsk, Russia 2 Institute of Forest Management and Mechanization, Pushkino, Moscow Region, Russia 3 Far Eastern Institute of Forest Management, Khabarovsk, Russia

56

CORRESPONDENCE Non-natives: 141  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example through their effect on soils. Pronouncing a newly introduced species as harmless can lead to bad and mechanical means. The public must be vigilant of introductions and continue to support the many successful

Vermont, University of

57

Invasive Bluegills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" policy and offering recipes for blue gill fried, marinated and in chili sauce. Hmmm. Maybe we can adopt that approach to deal with our own invasive Japanese species... so would you like that kudzu with a balsamic vinaigrette or the house dressing? #ceas...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

EO 13112: Invasive Species  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement ||MoreThis documentWHITE HOUSE183 Federal

59

Coexistence of congeneric native and invasive species: The case of the green algae Codium spp. in northwestern Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological invasions have increased in number in coastal eco- systems in recent decades, although until are carried with the sand and rock ballast of ships, such as seaweeds, molluscs and arthro- pods (Carlton

Provan, Jim

60

"Invasive potential of common carp (*Cyprinus carpio*) and Nile tilapia (*Oreochromis niloticus*) in American freshwater systems"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Nonnative fish introductions disrupt ecosystem processes and can drive native species to local extinction. Two of the most widespread, introduced species are the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) from Eurasia and ...

Zambrano, Luis; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Menezes, Naercio; Peterson, A. Townsend

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RESEARCH ARTICLE Rural housing is related to plant invasions in forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of invasive non-native plants in temperate forests of the Midwestern US. In the Baraboo Hills, Wisconsin, we be discouraged. Keywords Baraboo Hills Á Forest fragmentation Á Landscaping Á Midwestern forests Á NonRESEARCH ARTICLE Rural housing is related to plant invasions in forests of southern Wisconsin, USA

Radeloff, Volker C.

62

Climate change and ecosystems of the Mid-Atlantic Region Catriona E. Rogers1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

decline, while problems with non-native invasive species, such as kudzu and gypsy moths, might increase

McCarty, John P.

63

Introduction to the Invasive Plant Species and the New Bioeconomy Symposium The rapid expansion of the plant bioeconomy is creating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the plant bioeconomy is creating strong economic incentives to distribute novel plant material, including). In a measure aimed at reducing U.S. dependence upon foreign petroleum reserves for energy production, President, in ``Evaluating the Credits and Debits of a Proposed Biofuel Species: Giant Reed (Arundo donax),'' clearly

Sims, Gerald K.

64

Please cite this article in press as: Petanidou, T., et al., Self-compatibility and plant invasiveness: Comparing species in native and invasive ranges. Perspect. Plant Ecol. Evol. Syst. (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ppees.2011.08.003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ity rather than self incompatibility. Extending this idea, invasive species whose individuals vary of self compatibility after hand pollination varied dramatically. Both annuals were self incompat- ible derived from ancestrally self-incompatible ones, but that this process may be less important in perennial

Petanidou, Theodora

65

Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed: 3 July 2012 # Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2012 Abstract Nonnative Phragmites is among the most in- vasive plants in the U.S. Atlantic coast tidal wetlands, whereas the native Phragmites has

66

EARN A STIPEND: Develop inquirybased lessons & activities about native, nonnative or invasive plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Doing a demonstration? Asking a series of whole-class questions? Showing a film clip? · Middle school discussion questions in a lesson plan, list specific questions to ask and provide sample acceptable answers://www.spice.centers.ufl.edu/ TITLE: Make it catchy and convey the topic of the lesson. KEY QUESTION(S): Identify key question

Watson, Craig A.

67

SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

What is an Invasive Species? Invasion Ecology's terminology problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plants in Forests Kudzu (Pueraria lobata) Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) Golden bamboo

Schweik, Charles M.

69

Ontogenetic and Seasonal Variation of Young Non-Native Fish Energy Densities in Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific trade-offs between energy allocation to different tissue-types (low energy density, structural tissueOntogenetic and Seasonal Variation of Young Non-Native Fish Energy Densities in Lake Michigan Overview Energy content is a useful metric of physiological status of fishes and may help elucidate spatial

70

Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States Received 19 April 2006; accepted 23 August 2006 Abstract Over key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how

DeLucia, Evan H.

71

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis Thomas J reed (Phragmites australis) has been expanding into previously unoccupied wetland habitats throughout, phragmites, wetlands. Introduction The common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud.) has been

McGlathery, Karen

72

ORIGINAL PAPER Going west--invasion genetics of the alien raccoon dog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Going west--invasion genetics of the alien raccoon dog Nyctereutes procynoides, has long been recognised as a prominent example of an invasive alien species in Europe with a wide . Europe Introduction Invasive alien species are often a significant threat to ecosystems worldwide

Boyer, Edmond

73

Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmnek, Marcel; Pyek, Petr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of eutrophication and snails on Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) invasion; accepted in revised form 10 October 2005 Key words: eutrophication, food web, invasive species) run- off, which causes eutrophication. Eutrophication has a myriad of negative consequences, including

75

Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and diurnal energy production per tree (cal h -1 ), weper tree Flowering trees ha 24 h energy production (cal ha -tree per hectare and the Monte Carlo simulation median 24 h energy

Hanna, Cause

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1:EnergyDecemberof Energy 1514:Populations |112:

77

Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= 0.138). The energy production values may be underestimatedin the median 24 h energy production of M. polymorpha (TableNocturnal and diurnal energy production of M. polymorpha We

Hanna, Cause

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes to invasion by the non-native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes grass, Poa alsodes, and a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium sp.) improved the grass's ability to compete naturally endophyte-symbiotic and experi- mentally endophyte-free P. alsodes plants with the invader

Whitney, Kenneth

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian carps invasive Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 Exotic, Invasive, Alien, Nonindigenous, or Nuisance Species: No Matter What You Call Them, They're a Growing...

80

Aspects of Applied Biology 104, 2010 What makes an alien invasive? Risk and policy responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aspects of Applied Biology 104, 2010 What makes an alien invasive? Risk and policy responses 37 of the `alien' species invasion and their impact on the native ecosystems is therefore a problem of high practical importance. Biological invasion typically has a few distinctly different stages such as (i) alien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reproductive Biology ofReproductive Biology of Invasive SpeciesInvasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

).(tree of heaven). Needs pollinators.Needs pollinators. Self incompatibilitySelf incompatibility -- Tamarix).Baker's rule (Baker 1955). 100% of invaders in South Africa self100% of invaders in South Africa self.Mating systems. Usually selfUsually self--compatible or asexual reproduction.compatible or asexual reproduction

Cruzan, Mitchell B.

82

CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) IN THE SAN JUAN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES native fishes. Introduced largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in the San Juan River, New Mexico. The disproportional abundance of native fishes in the diet of juvenile largemouth bass suggests greater susceptibility

Gido, Keith B.

83

Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

Davis, Mark A.

84

vol. 162, no. 4 the american naturalist october 2003 Toward a Mechanistic Understanding and Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of native species with cos- mopolitan, nonnative species is homogenizing the global fauna and flora. While of the global biota. Keywords: invasion, extinction, biodiversity, native, nonnative, hab- itat loss. * E by The University of Chicago. 0003-0147/2003/16204-020366$15.00. All rights reserved. Human-assisted dispersal

Olden, Julian D.

85

Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

Wirmer, Julia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

.\\m. Midi. Nat. 159:55-66 Do Non-native Plant Species Affect the Shape of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Kurt Kotrschal c Rui F. Oliveira a, b a Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA ­ Instituto Universitário is the relation- ship between spatial ability requirements and the relative Key Words Blennies Spatial behavior Published online: February 16, 2011 Silvia Costa Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34 PT

87

Ecological effects of invasive alien insects Marc Kenis Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg Alain Roques Laura Timms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological effects of invasive alien insects Marc Kenis ? Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg ? Alain Roques identified 403 primary research publications that investigated the ecological effects of invasive alien, preda- tion or parasitism. Alien species may also affect native species and communities through more com

Schweik, Charles M.

88

Shoreline Development Drives Invasion of Phragmites australis and the Loss of Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shoreline Development Drives Invasion of Phragmites australis and the Loss of Plant Diversity Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, U.S.A. Abstract: The reed Phragmites australis Cav, eutrophication, habitat degradation, human and shore- line development, invasive species, Phragmites australis

Bertness, Mark D.

89

Muscovy ducks were introduced into the U.S. intentionally as an ornamental species to en-hance the aesthetic of urban parks; the first records of this species in Florida date to the mid-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. However, these protections relate only to areas where and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Invasive tadpoles' salinity tolerance Horse dung--a vector for invasive species

Jawitz, James W.

90

ORIGINAL PAPER Molecular identification of two species of the carnivorous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

along the open coast. Voracious predators that secrete acid, Philine spp. have few natural enemies % of the invasive marine invertebrate and algal species known from western North America (Cohen and Carlton 1995

Krug, Patrick J.

91

Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F. Schaefer b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F 66506, USA b Department of Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 in Oklahoma and Kansas to examine spatial patterns of species invasions in the Great Plains region of the US

Gido, Keith B.

92

Egyptian cottonworm Spodoptera littoralis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pines, poplars, potatoes, radish, roses, soybeans, spinach, sunflowers, taro, tea, tobacco, tomatoes; newly hatched larvae are blackish-grey to dark green; mature larvae are reddish-brown or whitish mm long; initially green with reddish abdomen, then turn to dark reddish-brown. Eggs : Whitish

93

Letters Response Response to Ricciardi. Assessing species invasions as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollution and toxic sediments [4­7]), har- vest for the cultured pearl industry, and loss of native fishes, the primary extinction threats are habitat loss and degradation (including construction of dams, development of the legacy of toxic sediments left from decades of pollution [6]. We feel that it is essential to determine

Padilla, Dianna

94

Mechanisms controlling the distribution of two invasive Bromus species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and altitudinal gradients (Beatley 1966). While B. tectorumand inspiration. References Beatley, J.C. (1966) Ecologicalmid elevations below 1500m (Beatley 1966). More- over, while

Bykova, Olga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Stationary Policies in the Control of Invasive Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant. A CHP plant uses hotter steam and higher pressure boilers. It, too

96

Budapest slug Tandonia budapestensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as cemeteries, greenhouses, gardens, roadsides, ruins, waste ground, and farmland (especially where potatoes of root crops such as potatoes and other commodities in Europe. It burrows underground and often occurs slug is a pest of potatoes, other root crops, cereals, and some ornamental flowers in Western Europe

97

Golden nematode Globodera rostochiensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Venezuela. Oceania

98

HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):181203, Fall 2012 Brown treesnakes: a potential invasive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the United States SAMANTHA S. KAHL, 274 Ellington Plant Sciences Building, Department of Forestry, Wildlife or endangered many native animal populations, attacked pets and poultry, bitten humans, and caused power outages species, reproduction Invasive species are a serious threat to ecosystems and are rated second after

99

Sensitive Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plants and animals not protected by the federal Endangered Species Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, but are protected on state or local levels. The Sensitive Species Best...

100

Research Symposium January 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in New York is to remove the offending coyote using lethal control. Non-lethal methods to prevent? Non-native invasive species are considered a serious ecological and economic threat. Because of this. However, little is known about the impact these organizations have on invasive plant populations

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361 Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasions in Areas of alien plant species. This is particularly problematic in areas which have experienced disturbances

Standiford, Richard B.

102

Monitoring the invasion of Phragmites australis in coastal marshes of Louisiana, USA, using multi-source remote sensing data.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring the invasion of Phragmites australis in coastal marshes of Louisiana, USA, using multi University, USA. ABSTRACT Phragmites australis a native marshland species to the North American Atlantic Phragmites australis (common reed) is a native species to North America, it was historically restricted

Cronin, James T.

103

Predicting invasive plants in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pueraria montana (Lour. ) Merr. Kudzu Bignoniaceae Spathodeaan animal forage species, kudzu (Pueraria montana) escapedthe southern United States. Kudzu is neither naturalized nor

Brusati, Elizabeth D; Johnson, Douglas W; DiTomaso, Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Title: Stepping stones for biological invasion: A bioeconomic model of transferable risk Authors: Travis Warziniacka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equilibrium estimates. If ecosystem services and market goods are substitutes the partial equilibrium bias #12;2 1. Introduction We investigate three sources of bias in valuation methods for invasive species), failure to consider nonseparability of ecosystem services with market goods (general equilibrium

Toledo, University of

105

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

106

Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis............................................................... 8 Jatropha observations.................................................................. 9 Jatropha risk synthesis................................................................. 12 and invasiveness. Observations were made around field plantings of banagrass, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas

107

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects dozens of alien species. 2. Invasions are highly nonrandom with respect to the taxonomic identity, which probably have been underestimated as an ecological force. 4. The number of alien species

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 2008. 1 J. Aquat. Plant Manage. 46: 1-7 Summary: % of the fish species listed in the Endangered Spe- cies Act (Lassuy 1994). Invasive aquatic plant...

109

PERSPECTIVE Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions Antoine Guisan,1,2,3,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for analysis and learning. Furthermore, the decision framework within which SDMs are used is rarely made explicit. Using case studies from biological invasions, identification of critical habitats, reserve planning, critical habitats, environmental suitability, reserve selection, species distribution model

Alvarez, Nadir

110

symposium summary: Introduced conifer invasions in South America: an update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conifer invasions in South America: short fuse burning?of introduced conifers in South America: Lessons from otherconifer invasions in South America: an update One-day

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The History and Economics of Melaleuca Management in South Florida1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S health." Alien or invasive species have affected many, if not most, countries around the world in some there is an enormous potential for non-native species to become naturalized to ecosystems within the State. Figure 1

Florida, University of

112

Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

Orth, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wide, and are infested with the plant?s only biological enemy, the salvinia weevil. #22;e weevil prefers warm temperatures and eats the giant salvinia as its only food source. #22;ese tanks are being used to grow giant salvinia and propagate... the growth of giant salvinia. Photo by Lucas Gregory. Project members of the recently funded Center for Invasive Species Eradication (CISE) have been hard at work managing the center?s #28;rst undertaking, the Caddo Lake Giant Salvinia Eradication...

Orth, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

GENOTYPE STUDIES Baumel, M. L. Ainouche and J. E. Levasseur. 2001. Molecular investigations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2002. Cryptic invasion by a non-native genotype of the common reed, Phragmites australis, into North

115

Special Status Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region -SonelgazSunbelt WindAssociationSpecies Jump

116

Social aspects include following applicable laws and international treaties; using open and transparent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs' influencing supply, demand, and prices and the possibility of the distortion of markets in climate conditions. Bioenergy choices can also have direct influences on local land-use changes as well the potential of bioenergy crops spreading genetically modified organisms, invasive species, or nonnative

117

Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Protected-Area Boundaries as Filters of Plant Invasions LLEWELLYN C. FOXCROFT of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa Abstract: Human land uses surrounding protected areas provide propagules for colonization of these areas by non-native species, and corridors between protected-area

Kratochvl, Lukas

118

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 28, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental and economic impact of invasive non-native species in Canada and United States. The North American for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tracks information regarding disease prevalence/incidence, NAISN activities on public conservation lands and waterways in terms of prevention and early detection efforts

Jawitz, James W.

119

TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

120

Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH Endang Species Res  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include thermal expansion of the warming oceans along with melting of glaciers and ice caps (Church et al considerably this century, potentially affecting species that rely on coastal habitat. The Northwestern

Aberdeen, University of

122

Continuous Non-Invasive Arterial Blood Pressure Measurement Using Photoplethysmography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006. J. Herisson, The Sphygmomanometer, an instrument which8 Conventional Sphygmomanometer using Auscultatory gap todevices like a sphygmomanometer are noninvasive methods of

Gunasekaran, Venmathi

123

TGF-{beta}1 increases invasiveness of SW1990 cells through Rac1/ROS/NF-{kappa}B/IL-6/MMP-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Rac1 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced SW1990 invasion through MMP-2 secretion and activation. {yields} NADPH-generated ROS act downstream of Rac1 in TGF-{beta}1-challenged SW1990 cells. {yields} TGF-{beta}1-stimulated ROS activate NF-{kappa}B in SW1990 cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B-induced IL-6 release is required for secretion and activation of MMP-2 in SW1990 cells. -- Abstract: Human pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis have been found to correlate with increased levels of active matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2). The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) has been shown to increase both secretion of MMP-2 and invasion by several pancreatic cancer cell types. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathway involved in TGF-{beta}1-promoted MMP-2 secretion and invasion by human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990. Using specific inhibitors, we found that stimulation of these tumor cells with TGF-{beta}1 induced secretion and activation of the collagenase MMP-2, which was required for TGF-{beta}1-stimulated invasion. Our results also indicate that signaling events involved in TGF-{beta}1-enhanced SW1990 invasiveness comprehend activation of Rac1 followed by generation of reactive oxygen species through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, activation of nuclear factor-kappa beta, release of interleukin-6, and secretion and activation of MMP-2.

Binker, Marcelo G. [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada) [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada); CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Binker-Cosen, Andres A. [CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gaisano, Herbert Y. [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada)] [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada); Cosen, Rodica H. de [CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cosen-Binker, Laura I., E-mail: laura.cosen.binker@utoronto.ca [Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A8 (Canada); CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Summer fruit tortrixAdoxophyes orana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ornamental plantings. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common name smaller tea tortrix : Up to 20 mm long; body yellow-green to dark- green ornamented with warts and light hairs; head brown

125

132008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species DISPERSALAND DYNAMICS OF THE WOODWASP SIREX NOCTILIO IN ARGENTINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

population outbreaks. In Patagonia (Southern Argentina), pine trees (mainly Pinus ponderosa) are increasingly ecological and behavioral studies of this forest pest carried out in Patagonia. Our aim is to help increase). Number of attacked trees was estimated through a census of a 70-ha pine plantation in Northwest Patagonia

126

Managing invasive species: Rules of thumb for rapid assessment Brian Leung a,*, David Finnoff b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Act, 2000) and international agreements (Inter- national Plant Protection Convention, 1997 and control investments. Unfortunately, recent research is frequently in a form inaccessible to policy for prevention and control investments. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Exotic; Decision

Leung, Brian

127

Adapting to an invasive species: Toxic cane toads induce morphological change in Australian snakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adaptive evolution in populations as a consequence of overfishing (10), global warming (11), and heavy-metal pollution (12). These studies highlight the importance of examining the potential for adaptive change

Shine, Rick

128

Golden twin spot Chrysodeixis chalcites Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper) Global distribution any time of year. Flights occur at dusk and moths are attracted to lights. Identification Adult State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color

129

Silver Y moth Autographa gamma Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Other common name gamma moth Systematic position Insecta > Lepidoptera > Noctuidae > Autographa gamma per year in Asia and Europe, and adults are seen from May through October. Identification Adult moth programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender

130

88 2008 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species AN ASSESSMENT OF SIREX NOCTILIO SPREAD AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-FBM biophysical component simulates the spread of invading organism, forest biomass growth, timber yields AND POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON PINE WOOD SUPPLY AND HARVESTS IN EASTERN CANADA Denys Yemshanov1 , Daniel W. McKenney1 Forest Service, Great Lakes Forestry Centre 1219 Queen St. East, Sault Ste. Marie, ON, P6A 2E5 Canada 2 U

131

Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shelters. Older larvae may create nests by folding or webbing leaves, buds and fruits together where-11 mm long; pale to dark brown; can be found in leaves that are spun together. Eggs : About 1 mm (folded leaves or leaves, buds and fruits webbed together). Superficial fruit damage; point-like holes

132

Cherry ermine moth Yponomeuta padella Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and tie leaves together in loose webs. Pupation occurs in cocoons that are suspended within larval webbing in four rows; hindwings dark grey. Larva : Up to 19 mm long; body grayish with black- spotted lines; head black; prothoracic and anal plates blackish. Pupa: About 10 mm long; body light brown and head dark

133

European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or fruits of host plants. Larvae spin silken webs to tie leaves, inflorescences or fruit clusters. The spring generation larvae feed on flower buds and pupate within webbed plant parts. The summer generation and brown markings; hind wings are white (male) or dark gray (female). Larva : Up to 10 mm long; body

134

Pale cyst nematode Globodera pallida Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, United Kingdom; Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Venezuela

135

Chrysanthemum white rust Puccinia horiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Uruguay, Venezuela. Quarantine status Localized introductions

136

Turbulent dispersal promotes species coexistence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drive all other species to extinction. However, empiricalA will always drive species B to extinction (unless f A = fductivity species (species B) to extinction (Fig. 2a). In

Berkley, Heather A; Kendall, Bruce E.; Mitarai, Satoshi; Siegel, David A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient biological invasion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

this beautiful little beetle such a successful invasive? What is the prognosis for its ash hosts, the genus... be applied to existing and future invasive forest pests? The...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced minimally invasive Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and sustain human livelihoods by minimizing the spread and impact of invasive alien... 1 Invasion Biology 1958-2004: The Pursuit of Science and Conservation Mark A. Davis...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - advancing minimally invasive Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and sustain human livelihoods by minimizing the spread and impact of invasive alien... 1 Invasion Biology 1958-2004: The Pursuit of Science and Conservation Mark A. Davis...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted minimally invasive Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and sustain human livelihoods by minimizing the spread and impact of invasive alien... 1 Invasion Biology 1958-2004: The Pursuit of Science and Conservation Mark A. Davis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien invasive slider Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

w..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Biological invasions complicate the conservation of Summary: project (www.europe-aliens.org) DAISIE (Delivering Alien Invasive...

142

The Role of Native Riparian Vegetation in Resisting Invasion by Giant Reed, Arundo donax  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arundo donax and Phragmites australis in North America.two reed beds (Phragmites australis) in the Scheldt estuary.invasive grass, Phragmites australis. Biological Invasions,

Palenscar, Kai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ENDANGERED SPECIES PETITION MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 a. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A. Petitions to List, Reclassify, or Delist Species

144

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Key words: dam decommissioning, exotic fish removal, invasive species, native fish, stream restoration on stream restoration in the United States in the last decade, yet fewer than 10% of projects monitorR E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Effects of Flow Restoration and Exotic Species Removal on Recovery

Marks, Jane

145

Preservation of a species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Brassica tournefortii: Phenology, Interactions and Management of an Invasive Mustard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasions 11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1966). "EcologicalEcology 47(4): 548-&. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological11(3): 673-686. Beatley, J. C. (1974). "Phenological events

Marushia, Robin Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Population ecology and management of the invasive plant, Lespedeza cuneata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lespedeza cuneata is one of the worst invasive plants across much of the North American Great Plains. In this dissertation, I describe the combination of field experimentation, statistical modeling and spatially explicit ...

Emry, David Jason

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

148

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast Technical Document Tree Species A document listing the tree species included in the 2011 Production Forecast Tom Jenkins Justin Gilbert Ewan Mackie Robert Matthews #12;PF2011 ­ List of tree species The following is the list of species used within the Forecast System. Species are ordered alphabetically

149

Remote sensing has been used to determine the occurrence of many non-indigenous plant species. GIS are used to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requires an objective-based approach using integrated techniques and technology for geospatial analysis are used to manage data acquired with remote sensing and field surveys. Geospatial models are designed." Invasive Plant Species Management with Geospatial Information Technologies and Computational Science

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

150

Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Property:EnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration

152

Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production in British Columbia by Rupananda Widanage Ph.D. (Economics), University of Ruhuna, 2007 M.Sc., Asian: Master of Resource Management Report Number: 529 Title of Research Project: Economics of Biological

153

Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

154

Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Invasive Interactive Visualization of Dynamic Architectural Environments Christopher Niederauer exploded views of 3D architectural environments such as multi-story buildings. These exploded views allow viewers to simultaneously see the internal and external structures of such environments. To create

Stanford University

155

Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Packer, Samuel (Floral Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses Amy Hurford1,*, Daniel Cownden1 on so-called `next-generation' matrices. Although this next-generation matrix approach has sometimes to a wider evolutionary audience in two ways. First, we review the next-generation matrix approach

Day, Troy

158

ORIGINAL PAPER Litter legacy increases the competitive advantage of invasive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Litter legacy increases the competitive advantage of invasive Phragmites australis monospecific dominance has rarely been investigated. We used stands of the common reed, Phragmites australis positioned on Phragmites expansion fronts, we removed litter to isolate its effect from live Phragmites

Bertness, Mark D.

159

Exotic Species What's the Problem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of introduced species as "the stealth destroyers of the American environment" (McDonald 1999: A15). Another seeds, eggs, spores, or other biological material capable of propagating that species

Callender, Craig

160

The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ? Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ? Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ? We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ? Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

Terakawa, Yuzo [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Croul, Sidney E. [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Division of Neuropathology, University Health Network, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (Canada); Rutka, James T., E-mail: james.rutka@sickkids.ca [The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

Mickley, Loretta J.

162

ORIGINAL PAPER Drought-tolerance of an invasive alien tree, Acacia mearnsii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Drought-tolerance of an invasive alien tree, Acacia mearnsii and two native+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Invasive alien plants (IAPs) have success- fully invaded many riparian zones. Keywords Invasive alien plant Á Water potential Á Carbon isotope Á Restoration Á Streamflow Á Xylem

163

Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats? L Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction Hybridization is receiving renewed attention as an important). For homoploid hybridization in plants, where chromosome number remains the same, models and empirical evi- dence

Rieseberg, Loren

164

Loopless non-trapping invasion percolation model for fracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless non-trapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium, and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a 2D square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. W...

Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and transformation.

Ding, Song-Ze, E-mail: dingsongze@hotmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Michelli-Rivera, Audrey [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Han, Shuang-Yin [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial Peoples Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 141 MANAGING SIREX NOCTILIO POPULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN PATAGONIA (ARGENTINA): SILVICULTURE AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL José Villacide, Deborah Fischbein, Nélida Jofré (Corley and Villacide 2005). In Patagonia (Argentina), as in other Sirex-affected regions, remarkable contribution to woodwasp mortality in Patagonia (Corley and Bruzzone 2009). We note that, among an array

167

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 69 DISTRIBUTION AND BIOLOGY OF NATIVE SIRICIDAE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

placed in each of the three states. Traps were baited with Sirex lure alone, Sirex lure + ethanol. There was no significant difference in catches between Sirex lure alone and Sirex lure + UHR ethanol. More siricids were as including ethanol. Future studies will focus on re-sampling these study sites using similar trapping methods

168

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 107 ATTRACTANTS FOR LONGHORN BEETLES IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pheromones, ipsenol and ipsdienol, to the binary combination of pine volatiles, ethanol and (-)--pinene). The following treatments were randomly assigned to one of the three traps within each replicate: ethanol + (-)--pinene (EA) ; ipsenol and ipsdienol (SD); and ethanol, (-)--pinene, ipsenol and ipsdienol (EA + SD

169

2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 93 IMPACT OF ENHANCIN GENES ON POTENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lacking E1 (E1cat), E2 (E1del) or both (E1delE2del) in larvae fed on artificial diet in the presence enhancin genes (E1 and E2) encoding proteases that degrade key peritrophic matrix (PM) proteins, thereby

170

Evaluation of oocyte competency in bovine and canine species via non-invasive assessment of oocyte quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) using rhodamine 123, JC-1 and Fluo-4, AM, respectively in bovine and canine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. Comparison of morphological grading with fluorescence intensity yielded similar trends between all grades...

Willingham-Rocky, Lauri A.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

82 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 MULTITROPHIC EFFECTS OF CALCIUM AVAILABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Delaware, Departments of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology, Newark, DE 19716 ABSTRACT Acid rain adsorbed to soil surfaces, and (2) aluminum is released to soil water by acid rain and displaces adsorbed, causing calcium to be more readily leached from the soil. The effects of acid rain on soil calcium

172

2 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 PROGRESS IN UNDERSTANDING THE ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

testing for evidence of positive density dependence in North American populations, which would suggest and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa 5USDA APHIS PPQ, Otis of catastrophic outbreaks in the Southern Hemisphere. We suggest that the population dynamics of S. noctilio may

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien invasive centaurea Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alien invasive centaurea Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Communications Ecological Applications,...

174

Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplification targeting invasive Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or threat status. Non-invasive sampling of hairs left on hair snares ... Source: USDA, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station - Flagstaff Lab Collection: Environmental...

176

Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

Nehrbass, Nana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs Serena whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type

Miller, Thomas E.

178

Gemini: A Non-Invasive, Energy-Harvesting True Power Meter Bradford Campbell and Prabal Dutta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gemini: A Non-Invasive, Energy-Harvesting True Power Meter Bradford Campbell and Prabal Dutta,prabal}@umich.edu Abstract--Power meters are critical for submetering loads in residential and commercial settings, but high by proposing non-invasive meters that easily clip onto a wire, or stick onto a circuit breaker, to perform

Dutta, Prabal

179

Biological Invasions 4: 333338, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Netherlands. Invasion note First report of the Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida in the northeastern Pacific in revised form 28 May 2002 Key words: California, invasions, kelp, nonindigenous, Undaria, wakame Abstract The Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida was discovered in southern California in the spring of 2000

180

Polo-like Kinase I is involved in Invasion through Extracellular Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polo-like kinase 1, PLK1, has important functions in maintaining genome stability and is involved in regulation of mitosis. PLK1 is up regulated in many invasive carcinomas. We asked whether it may also play a role in acquisition of invasiveness, a crucial step in transition to malignancy. In a model of metaplastic basal-like breast carcinoma progression, we found that PLK1 expression is necessary but not sufficient to induce invasiveness through laminin-rich extracellular matrix. PLK1 mediates invasion via Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin, both of which are necessary. We observed that PLK1 phosphorylates Vimentin on serine 82, which in turn regulates cell surface levels of {beta}1 integrin. We found PLK1 to be also highly expressed in pre-invasive in situ carcinomas of the breast. These results support a role for the involvement of PLK1 in the invasion process and point to this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for pre-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma treatment.

Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract What's Invasive and Project Budburst are citizen science projects of citizen science investigations. Associated Links The following links are to projects and related work

Crowston, Kevin

182

Economic Incentives for Controlling Trade-Related Biological Invasions in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Incentives for Controlling Trade-Related Biological Invasions in the Great Lakes Richard D proxy-based and technology-based economic incentives to reduce the threat of new invasions of Ponto management, perform- ance-based incentives, environmental subsidies The economic and environmental impacts

Lupi, Frank

183

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasion Ecology of Aquatic Animals FAS 4932 (section 8143) and FAS 6932 (Section 6725) Fall 2006 will provide a comprehensive overview of the field of invasion ecology and will emphasize aspects related will be presented the ecological concepts and debates underlying this developing field; the biology and life history

Watson, Craig A.

184

R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon sequestration D . A . P E LT Z E R on the effects of some of the major drivers of global change on carbon (C) sequestration, particularly carbon that drive C sequestration. Keywords: biological invasion, carbon sequestration, community structure, forest

Berkowitz, Alan R.

185

Insect Conservation under the Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 'protection for species on the verge of extinction. 43. Id.about the extinction of any species 3 1 and, unlike earlier

Lugo, Ezequiel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction? Yimin Du Penny Langhammer Yijun Lou John population declines, species extinctions Biodiversity loss Theoretical Host extinction generally to amphibian species Stuart et al. 2004. Science 306: 17831786 #12;Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd

Linder, Tams

187

Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Game and Parks Commission is responsible for implementing and promulgating regulations to protect species named in the Endangered Species Act, as well as other endangered or threatened species...

188

Phosphotyrosine Profiling of NSCLC Cells in Response to EGF and HGF Reveals Network Specific Mediators of Invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth factor signaling is deregulated in cancer and often leads to invasion, yet receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways driving invasion under different growth factor conditions are not well understood. To identify ...

Johnson, Hannah

189

Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

190

Effects of unseeded areas on species richness of coal mines reclaimed with municipal biosolids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land application of municipal biosolids on coal mine spoils can benefit vegetation establishment in mine reclamation. However, the application of biosolids leads to domination by early-successional species, such as grasses, and low establishment of woody and volunteer species, thus reducing potential for forestry as a postmining land use. In this experiment, tree seedlings were planted in strips (0.6-, 1-, and 4-m wide) that were not seeded with grasses, and the effects of unseeded strip width on seedling growth and species richness were assessed. Planted seedling mortality was high; therefore, the effect of unseeded strip width on seedling growth could not be determined. However, it was found that natural plant invasion and species richness were highest in the 4-m unseeded strips. The practice of leaving 4-m-wide unseeded strips in mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States, along with the improvement of tree seedling planting practices and planting stock, would help promote a more species-rich plant community that could be utilized for forestry or a variety of other postmining land uses.

Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). School for Forest Resources

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

Polani, Sagi, E-mail: sagi.polani@gmail.co [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Roca, Alfred L., E-mail: roca@illinois.ed [Department of Animal Sciences and Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosensteel, Bryan B., E-mail: bryanr1@umbc.ed [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis, E-mail: koloko@amnh.or [Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila, E-mail: bargal@agri.huji.ac.i [Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS Biotic interactions and plant invasions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as in abiotic conditions, may explain the demographic success of the introduced plant populations relative and competitors from their native ranges, and gain interactions with new species, under new abiotic conditions to conspecifics in their native range. Within invaded communities, the new interactions and conditions experienced

Crews, Stephen

193

Ranking species in mutualistic networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm --similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity-- here we propose a method which --by exploiting their nested architecture-- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

Domnguez-Garca, Virginia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chaos and Cossacks, two fatal vendettas : the invasions of Russia in 1708 and 1812  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: There were two invasions of Russia by foreign powers in the early eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Charles XII of Sweden entered Russia in 1708 and was destroyed in battle outside Poltava in 1709. Napoleon ...

Hollander, Samuel, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

McGee, Sasha Alanda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien plant invasions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alien plant invasions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 5) Management a) How big of a problem is...

197

Back Story: Migration, Assimilation and Invasion in the Nineteenth Century [book chapter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research from a humanist perspective has much to offer in interrogating the social and cultural ramifications of invasion ecologies. The impossibility of securing national boundaries against accidental transfer and the ...

Ritvo, Harriet

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Design and thermal modeling of a non-invasive probe for measuring perfusion by thermodiffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research 1) explores the feasibility of developing a non-invasive probe to precisely quantify microcirculatory blood flow (tissue perfusion), in real time and in absolute units, and 2) presents designs and models of ...

Charles, Steven Knight

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the Southwestern United and decision products will be based on geospatial modeling coupled with field experiments and draw on a wealth

Nishiguchi, Michele

200

Ultra-low-power electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring promise low-cost, maintenance-free, and lightweight devices. These devices are critical in long-term medical measurements and in home-based tele-monitoring services, which ...

Turicchia, Lorenzo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Continuous and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using ultrasonic methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a continuous and non-invasive arterial blood pressure (CNAP) monitoring technique using ultrasound. An arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform provides valuable information in treating cardiovascular ...

Seo, Joohyun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

From Seed Banks to Communities: Effects of Plant Invasions and Nitrogen Deposition on Desert Annual Forbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasions 11:673-686. Beatley, J. C. 1967. Survival ofPress, San Diego, CA. Beatley, J. C. 1966. Ecological statuswater pulses (Went 1948, Beatley 1967, Noy-Meir 1973).

Schneider, Heather

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Simulation methods and tissue property models for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many brain tumors are localized deeply and are currently surgically inaccessible without causing severe damage to the overlying structures of the brain. The current spectrum of non-invasive methods for treating such tumors ...

Connor, Christopher W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development and application of a non invasive image matching method to study spine biomechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on spine biomechanics is critical to understand pathology such as degenerative changes and low back pain. However, current study on in-vivo spine biomechanics is limited by the complex anatomy and invasive ...

Wang, Shaobai

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate non-invasive estimation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO, NIBP & TPR Summary: (Non-Invasive Blood Pressure) A) Using a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer, measure each team member... script that uses the values from part A to estimate...

207

Quantitative assessment of invasive mena isoforms (Menacalc) as an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: Mena, an Ena/VASP protein family member, is a key actin regulatory protein. Mena is up-regulated in breast cancers and promotes invasion and motility of tumor cells. Mena has multiple splice variants, including ...

Agarwal, Seema

208

Identification, Distribution and Control of an Invasive Pest Ant, Paratrechina sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION, DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL OF AN INVASIVE PEST ANT, Paratrechina SP. (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE), IN TEXAS A Dissertation by JASON MICHAEL MEYERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2008 Major Subject: Entomology IDENTIFICATION, DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL OF AN INVASIVE PEST ANT, Paratrechina SP. (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE), IN TEXAS A...

Meyers, Jason

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Strength in Numbers: Setting Quantitative Criteria for Listing Species under the Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the trend toward species extinction, whatever the cost." 9 'to any species at a "measurable risk" of extinction. H.R.dan- ger of extinction while those species that are listed

Robbins, Kalyani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

Chandel, Navdeep S

211

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

Pace, Michael L.

212

Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saving Million Species EXTINCTION RISK FROM CLIMATE CHANGE Edited by Lee Hannah ISLANDPRESS-in-Publication Data Saving a million species : extinction risk from climate change / edited by LeeHannah. p. cm. ISBN, extinction, extinction risk, biodiversity,freshwater, marine, biology, coral bleaching, species area

Poff, N. LeRoy

213

Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Yoon, Y. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Structure and Biochemical Properties of PRL-1, a Phosphatase Implicated in Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Tumor Invasion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) phosphatases constitute a novel class of small, prenylated phosphatases that are implicated in promoting cell growth, differentiation, and tumor invasion, and represent attractive targets for anticancer therapy. Here we describe the crystal structures of native PRL-1 as well as the catalytically inactive mutant PRL-1/C104S in complex with sulfate. PRL-1 exists as a trimer in the crystalline state, burying 1140 Angstroms{sup 2} of accessible surface area at each dimer interface. Trimerization creates a large, bipartite membrane-binding surface in which the exposed C-terminal basic residues could cooperate with the adjacent prenylation group to anchor PRL-1 on the acidic inner membrane. Structural and kinetic analyses place PRL-1 in the family of dual specificity phosphatases with closest structural similarity to the Cdc14 phosphatase and provide a molecular basis for catalytic activation of the PRL phosphatases. Finally, native PRL-1 is crystallized in an oxidized form in which a disulfide is formed between the active site Cys104 and a neighboring residue Cys49, which blocks both substrate binding and catalysis. Biochemical studies in solution and in the cell support a potential regulatory role of this intramolecular disulfide bond formation in response to reactive oxygen species such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

Sun,J.; Wang, W.; Yang, H.; Liu, S.; Liang, F.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Zhang, Z.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Plant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Genetics, Graduate School of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, JapanPlant Species Biology (2003) 18, 123127 2003 The Society for the Study of Species Biology Blackwell Science, LtdOxford, UKPSBPlant Species Biology1442-1984The Society for the Study of Species

Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Amy L Campbell Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, December 2007 Thesis Topic: "Sexual Reproduction in Non-native Common Reed, Phragmites australis" GPA: 3, August, 2010 "Sexual Reproduction in Non-native Common Reed, Phragmites australis," Ohio Invasive Plants, Phragmites australis," Phragmites Workshop, Cornell University, NY, October, 2007 Honors/ Awards: First Place

Snow, Allison A.

217

Threatened and Endangered Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective JumpInc., 2010) |TheseeSprings Wind Park

218

PET imaging to non-invasively study immune activation leading to antitumor responses with a 4-1BB agonistic antibody  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AS, Radu CG, Ribas A: PET imaging of the immune system:as: Escuin-Ordinas et al. : PET imaging to non-invasivelyRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access PET imaging to non-invasively

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Distributed Controller Synthesis for Local Speci cations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

| and a speci#12;cation, say, a temporal logic formula. The plant is viewed as an existing program which speci Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA (On leave from Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India) thiagu as a temporal logic formula, whether there exists a program for the system such that no matter how

Parthasarathy, Madhusudan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

346; SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 346 #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FishKernan, Director SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL-FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 by Robert L. Edwards

222

Abstract--Thoracocardiography approach pretends to non-invasively monitor stroke volume by inductive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Thoracocardiography approach pretends to non- invasively monitor stroke volume. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of thoracocardiography to estimate stroke volumes while apnea with open glottis. We hypothesized that, when glottis is open, stroke volumes would

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-Invasive Measurement of Heartbeat with a Hydraulic Bed Sensor Progress, Challenges}@mail.missouri.edu, SkubicM@missouri.edu Abstract--A hydraulic bed sensor has been developed to non and development of the system. Keywords--hydraulic bed sensor; eldercare monitoring; ballistocardiography I

He, Zhihai "Henry"

224

Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

Rieseberg, Loren

225

Polo-like Kinase I is involved in Invasion through Extracellular Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oncogene, 19: 5606-5613, 2000. Figure 2. P^KI VIM-VIM-p-S82 surface ^1 integrin invasionQ Vimentin siRNA A J > J| VIM B-actin 1 OLE. ts iS 120,

Rizki, Aylin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The effect of fibrillar matrix architecture on tumor cell invasion of physically challenging environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments Asja Guzman, Michelle J. Ziperstein, Laura J. Kaufman* Department of Chemistry, Columbia) extracellular matrix culture systems was studied. This work showed that in 3D fibrillar environments composed architecture is a crucial factor that allows for efficient 3D invasion. In a 3D non-fibrillar environment

Kaufman, Laura

227

Fluorescent probes for non-invasive bioenergetic studies of whole cyanobacterial cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorescent probes for non-invasive bioenergetic studies of whole cyanobacterial cells Markus of bioenergetic processes in whole cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Acridine yellow to be created. In sum- mary, bioenergetic £uorescence measurement com- bines the advantages of an easy

Roegner, Matthias

228

Journal of Theoretical Biology 236 (2005) 335348 Spatial invasion by a mutant pathogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Theoretical Biology 236 (2005) 335­348 Spatial invasion by a mutant pathogen Wei Wei the factors (position, transmission rate, pathogen-induced death rate) that influence the fate of a mutant a spatially distributed population of susceptible hosts typically occurs along traveling wavefronts. The shape

Krone, Steve

229

Differential radioactivity monitor for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart H. S. Soroff, MD and J. Rastegar The primary function of the ventricular chambers of the heart is to provide the proper volume, in the first part of the cardiac cycle, when the heart is relaxed, cardiac diastole, the device exerts

Webster III, Robert James

231

Predicting worldwide invasiveness for four major problematic decapods: an evaluation of using different calibration sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different calibration sets Ce´sar Capinha, Brian Leung and Pedro Anasta´cio C. Capinha (capinha of occurrence data to use for model calibration. Additionally, pseudo-absences are also known to cause different calibration sets for building worldwide invasiveness models for four major problematic decapods

Leung, Brian

232

Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome Analyses of an Aggressive and Invasive Lineage of the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen David E since the 19th century Irish famine, potato late blight has exemplified this threat. The causal oomycete lineage are among the most aggressive on cultivated potatoes, outcompete other aggressive lineages

Grünwald, Niklaus J.

233

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

234

IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i IMPROVED QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR MULTIPLE NEUROPHARMACOLOGICAL NON-INVASIVE BRAIN PET STUDIES.2.2 Multiple Neuropharmacological Measures from a single PET scan ................. 4 1.2.2.1 Dual ...................................................................................... 5 1.2.3 Reduction of inter-scanner PET image variability

Fessler, Jeffrey A.

235

Dexterity optimization by port placement in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dexterity optimization by port placement in robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery Shaun Selha1 port triplets ranked according to tool dexterity and endoscopic view quality at each surgical site involved in a procedure. A computer simulation allows the surgeon to select from among the proposed port

Dupont, Pierre

236

Biological Invasions 3: 5168, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, invertebrates, Juncus gerardii, New England, Phragmites australis, Spartina patens, tidal marsh Abstract. On the eastern seaboard of the USA, Phragmites australis has invaded both brackish and salt marsh habitats. Phragmites australis influence on sediments and fauna was investigated along a salinity and invasion

Levin, Lisa

237

LEAH GERBER The U.S.Endangered Species Act establishes categories for endangered and threatened species but provides no crite-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and threatened species but provides no crite- ria for deciding when a species should be listed, delisted

Gerber, Leah R.

238

COOPERATION WITH THE STATES THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT SECTION 6 PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endangered and threatened species, candidate species, and recently de-listed species. Under section 6, NMFS

239

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

240

Reactive Gliosis Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. By sensing the electric signals generated by other 3368 Reactive Gliosis #12;individuals, mormyrids are alsoReactive Gliosis Glial Scar Reactive Oxygen Species: Superoxide Anions Neuroinflammation motor output. Reafferent Control in Electric Communication Reafferent Control in Electric Communication

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

Domnguez-Caballero, Jos Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

Jarvis, E. E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Languages and Species: Threats and Global Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both languages and species are threatened with extinction. This talk will compare patterns of cultural and biological diversity. The aims will be to compare the extinction risk of languages with other groups and then compare the patterns...

Sutherland, William

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and photolytic methods. The current work involves the measurement of fundamental physical constants of the XO species. The bond dissociation energy of IO is measured. Vibrational level dependent correlated final state branching ratios of the predissociation...

Dooley, Kristin S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or â??clearing houseâ? for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

A harvest failure approach to assess the threat from an invasive species Denys Yemshanov a,*, Daniel W. McKenney a,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,*, Daniel W. McKenney a,1 , Peter de Groot a,2 , Dennis Haugen b,3 , John Pedlar a , Derek Sidders c,4

249

Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Chenier P lains freshwater marsh system, but the introduction of salt water through drainage canals connected to the Intracoastal Waterway and Entergy (formally Gulf State Utilities) outfall canals in the 1950s caused the freshwater marsh vegetation...

Bell, Michael Thomas

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source water quality impacts. Environmental Management 17:water quality in agricultural watersheds. Environmental Management.

Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using a Nitrogen Gas Analyzer combustion method (LECO FP-was determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Methodwas determined by the combustion gas analyzer method (Method

Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through Invasive Species Control and by Providing Technical and Financial Assistance to Reduce Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leaf beetle Successful defoliation of saltcedar continued in 2013 as well and with the extensive distribution of beetles from their release sites, beetle collections were kept to a minimum. In some locations, beetles have been observed about 50.../salt-cedar-bugs-found-eddy- county; https://today.agrilife.org/2013/07/29/theres-a-new-bug-in-town/). [9] Figure 6: Saltcedar biological release sites and chemical control distribution south of I-10 Figure 7: Saltcedar biological release...

Gregory, L.; Porter, A.; Knutson, A.; Muegge, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Post-Project Evaluation of Channel Morphology, Invasive Plant Species, and Native Fish Habitat in Putah Creek in Winters, CA Six Years After Channel Relocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land floodplains of the Yolo Bypass through channelizationhabitat conditions in the Yolo Bypass, but may compromisefor Native Fish in the Yolo Bypass. Accessed December 2011.

Blackledge, Gina; Boisrame, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Multi-scale approach to invasion percolation of rock fracture networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-scale scheme for the invasion percolation of rock fracture networks with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields is proposed. Inside fractures, fluid transport is calculated on the finest scale and found to be localized in channels as a consequence of the aperture field. The channel network is characterized and reduced to a vectorized artificial channel network (ACN). Different realizations of ACNs are used to systematically calculate efficient apertures for fluid transport inside differently sized fractures as well as fracture intersection and entry properties. Typical situations in fracture networks are parameterized by fracture inclination, flow path length along the fracture and intersection lengths in the entrance and outlet zones of fractures. Using these scaling relations obtained from the finer scales, we simulate the invasion process of immiscible fluids into saturated discrete fracture networks, which were studied in previous works.

Ali N. Ebrahimi; Falk K. Wittel; Nuno A. M. Arajo; Hans J. Herrmann

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

Two-phase flow in porous media: Crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by a wide ranage of applications, from enhanced oil recovery to carbon cioxide sequestions, we have developed a pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous, capillary, and gravitational effects. We have validated this model quantitatively, in the very different limits of zero viscosity ratio and zero capillary number. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (u injected/ u displaced >=1), we have increased the capillary number, Nc, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from capillary fingering (the fractal flow of invasion percolation) and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. Results exhibiting this crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion are presented for the saturation profile and the average position of the injected fluid. The modeling reuslts agree with earlier predictions.

Ferer, M.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Anti-Chinese Sentiment in Russia: Threats of "Chinese Invasion" or Fears of Russian Xenophobia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ruoxi Du Laird Essay Competition 2012 Anti-Chinese Sentiment in Russia: Threats of Chinese Invasion or Fears of Russian Xenophobia Try googling the keywords Russian Far East and China (Dalnii vostok and Kitai), and you... East (Express Gazeta). Results from English sources are similar, where typical titles include China Looms over the Russian Far East (The Diplomat) and Russias Far East Turning Chinese (ABC News). Indeed, Russia has all kinds of reasons...

Du, Ruoxi

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

257

Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information than their disclosure...

Srivastava, Mona

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-temporal variation in resource assimilation and isotopic enrichment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI 10.1007/s00442-010-1694-1 COMMUNITY ECOLOGY - ORIGINALPAPER Trophic ecology of the invasive argentine ant: spatio-variation in the trophic ecology of prominent members of

Menke, Sean B.; Suarez, Andy V.; Tillberg, Chadwick V.; Chou, Cheng T.; Holway, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

Wallin, Asa R. [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Svanvik, Joar [Department of Surgery, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Adell, Gunnar [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden); Sun Xiaofeng [Department of Oncology, Institute of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoeping, Linkoeping (Sweden)]. E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion for two-phase drainage with stable viscosity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by a wide range of applications from enhanced oil recovery to carbon dioxide sequestration, we have developed a two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous, capillary, and gravitational effects. This model has been validated quantitatively, in the very different limits of zero viscosity ratio and zero capillary number; flow patterns from modeling agree well with experiment. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (?injected/?displaced 1), we have increased the capillary number, Nc, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from capillary fingering (the fractal flow of invasion percolation) and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. Results exhibiting this crossover from capillary fingering to compact invasion are presented for the average position of the injected fluid, the fluidfluid interface, the saturation and fractional flow profiles, and the relative permeabilities. The agreement between our results and earlier theoretical predictions [Blunt M, King MJ, Scher H. Simulation and theory of two-phase flow in porous media. Phys Rev A 1992;46:768099; Lenormand R. Flow through porous media: limits of fractal patterns. Proc Roy Soc A 1989;423:15968; Wilkinson D. Percolation effects in immiscible displacement. Phys Rev A 1986;34:138090; Xu B, Yortsos YC, Salin D. Invasion Percolation with viscous forces. Phys Rev E 1998;57:73951] supports the validity of these general theoretical arguments, which were independent of the details of the porous media in both two and three dimensions.

Ferer, M.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Smith, D.H

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species interactions in central California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable effects of a kelp foundation species on rocky intertidal diversity and species Facilitation Foundation species Kelp Negative effects Species diversity The effect of foundation species scales. Egregia menziesii (Turner) J.E. Areschoug is a large and robust perennial kelp that creates

California at Santa Cruz, University of

263

A hierarchical perspective on the ecology of biological invasions:: impact of red imported fire ants on grassland ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences A HIERARCHICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ECOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS: IMPACT OF RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS ON GRASSLAND ECOSYSTEMS A Thesis Revin Lee...A HIERARCHICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ECOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS: IMPACT OF RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS ON GRASSLAND ECOSYSTEMS A Thesis REVIN LEE STOKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Stoker, Revin Lee

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

anthocyanic plant species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roger 109 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

265

altered plant species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roger 129 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

266

Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Hydrogen Species Motion in Piezoelectrics: A Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering Study. Abstract: Hydrogen...

267

amazonian plant species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species. In 1999, the National Key Protected Wild Plants identified about 1700 rare and endangered plant species (Chinese State Report on Biodiversity Editorial...

268

Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Kourakis, Ioannis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Species Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

droughts. Eco- logical responses to climate change in regions with Mediterranean climate regimes maySpecies Interactions Reverse Grassland Responses to Changing Climate K. B. Suttle,1 * Meredith A. Thomsen,2 Mary E. Power1 Predictions of ecological response to climate change are based largely on direct

Wilmers, Chris

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - al10 suppresses invasion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aka "Escape from... in their native range are suppressed by natural enemies Alien species are immigrants to a new area ... Source: Nowak, Robert S. - Department of...

273

Objectives for Multiple-Species Conservation EMILY NICHOLSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of extinction for multiple species. Although the assessment of extinction risk for single species is common, few researchers have formu- lated an objective function that combines the extinction risks of multiple species. We functions based on extinction risk across many species and illustrated the differences between

Queensland, University of

274

How Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for two species to coexist, driving the others to extinction. In case n = 3, it is shown that every extinct. Every solution approaches a singlespecies or twospecies steady state. However, as already notedHow Many Species Can Two Essential Resources Support? Bingtuan Li # Department of Mathematics

275

THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

276

TAXON 43 -FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The converse pro- cess, the winnowing of lineages or extinction, acts through disappearance of species, since genera and families go extinct when their last species disappears. Species also represent the basic unitTAXON 43 - FEB 1994 Are many plant species paraphyletic? Loren H. ~ i e s e b e r ~ '& Luc

Rieseberg, Loren

277

Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vidra What are exotic plant species? Perhaps you have noticed huge thickets of kudzu vine along, it grows _ inch per hour! Kudzu is one example of an exotic plant species. In North Carolina, exotics change the structure of the forest, as kudzu does when it covers every surface. Exotics may also

Hess, George

279

Appendix S1 -A greener Greenland? Normand et al. Appendix S1: Study species and species occurrence data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix S1 - A greener Greenland? Normand et al. 1 Appendix S1: Study species and species as in one or several of the floristic provinces bordering Greenland (Fig. S1.1). The selection were based subspecies) was considered. The selected species were assigned maximum heights and Greenlandic species

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

280

Species differences in courtship acoustic signals among five Lake Malawi cichlid species (Pseudotropheus spp.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ao em Eco-Etologia, ISPA, Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal, Departamento de Biologia of the sounds produced in the early stage of court- ship by males of three closely related species from Lake

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Minimally Invasive Radiologically Guided Intervention for the Treatment of Salivary Calculi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the technique and examine the value of salivary stone extraction using a minimally invasive, radiologically guided approach as an alternative to salivary gland surgery for the treatment of benign salivary gland obstruction. Methods: Eighty-six cases of sialolithiasis (83 patients) were treated by stone removal using a Dormia basket under local anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperative assessment was made clinically at review, by sialogram and by questionnaire. Results: Of 86 cases of sialolithiasis treated, in 55 (64%)it was possible to remove all stones. In 12 cases (14%) part of a stone or some of a number of calculi were removed and in 19 cases (22%) the procedure failed. The commonest reason for failure was fixation of the stone within the duct. Symptoms at review (range 1-49 months, mean 17 months) were relieved in 55 of 67 (82%) of cases where a stone or portion of stone was removed. Conclusions:Stone removal from the salivary duct system by radiologically guided,minimally invasive approach is a simple procedure with low morbidity and high patient acceptance when appropriate selection criteria are applied. These criteria are considered and recommendations made.

Brown, Jackie E.; Drage, Nicholas A. [Department of Dental Radiology, Guy's Dental Hospital, Guy's and St. Thomas' Dental Hospital Trust, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Escudier, Michael P. [Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, LondonSE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Wilson, Ron F. [Dental Clinical Research, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); McGurk, Mark [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' Dental Institute, LondonSE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States) [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)] [University of Arizona Arizona Cancer Center Tissue Tech Inc, 7000 SW 97th Avenue Suite 212, Miami, FL 33173 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

publication 420-323 Several species of Asian honeysuckle have been intro-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than hollow stems and typically do not form extensive invasions. Control Herbicide control. 2005. Herbicides and forest vegeta- tion management: Controlling unwanted trees, brush, and other

Liskiewicz, Maciej

285

Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and its lower right at 34?20.5 S, 19?16.5 E, with total area of 4,456 km2. It comprises a rectangular area including the Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve and beyond, extending 41m east and 107m north from Cape Hangklip. The region is shown in Figure 1.... The survey paper of Guisan and Zimmerman (2000) provides discussion and extensive referencing. Let log ( p(k)i 1 ? p(k)i ) = wi??k + ?k + ?i, (5) where wi is a vector of grid cell level characteristics, and the ?ks are species level coefficients associated...

Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov Ron WalliANewNew Species of

287

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov Ron WalliANewNew Species ofNew

288

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn CyberNeutrons usedDOE ProjectNew Species of

289

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn CyberNeutrons usedDOE ProjectNew Species ofNew

290

California Endangered Species Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2California Endangered Species

291

An Urban Estuary in a Changing World: Diversity, Invasions, and Climate Change in San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

33: 167. ????. 2006. Water Quality of San Francisco Bay.within and among shallow- water Ciona species (Ascidiacea).induced changes in estuarine water quality. Marine Ecology

Chang, Andrew L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Endangered, Threatened, and Species of Special Concern (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document lists endangered, threatened, and species of special concern in Connecticut, along with procedures for petitioning to add or remove a species from these lists and to add or remove an...

293

A new species of Chiasmognathus from Kazakhstan (Hymenoptera: Apidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new species of the ammobatine bee genus Chiasmognathus Engel (Nomadinae: Ammobatini) is described and figured from near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Chiasmognathus scythicus Engel & Packer, new species, is superficially similar to C. gussakovskii (Popov...

Engel, Michael S.; Packer, Laurence

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER A novel, combined approach to assessing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Morphological species of freshwater microalgae often have broad geographic distribution. However, traditional distribu- tional stability among microalgal species groups such as the desmids. Keywords Microalgae microalgae have recently been undergoing major conceptual changes in the light of increasing evidence

296

Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are important relative to monitoring habitat deterioration. This study used genetic data from geographic samples of the five nominal species of Dionda in Texas waters to document the conservation-genetics status of populations in each species. Fish were...

Hanna, Ashley

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened and Endangered Species on U.S. Army-05 #12;#12;Disturbance Dependent T&E Species Documentation of Disturbance-Dependent Threatened

298

Sexual Dimorphism in the Sceloporus undulatus Species Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................................... xi CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION ................................................................................ 1 II VARIATION IN SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM AMONG 4 SPECIES IN THE Sceloporus undulatus SPECIES COMPLEX ..... 7 Introduction............................................................................................................................. 69 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Sexual size dimorphism index (SDI) for all four species groups and all 12 populations...

Dittmer, Drew

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

TWO NEW SPECIES OF THE ANT GENUS PERISSOMYRMEX SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO NEW SPECIES OF THE ANT GENUS PERISSOMYRMEX SMITH (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM CHINA1 Shanyi Zhou2 and Jianhua Huang3 ABSTRACT: Two new species of the ant genus Perissomyrmex Smith are described, China The ant genus Perissomyrmex was described by M. R. Smith in 1947 based on the type species P

Villemant, Claire

300

Epidemics in Two Competing Species Litao Han 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infection and competition are revealed: (1) a species that would get extinct without the infection, may the infection, is driven to extinction by the infection; (3) an infection that would die out in either species: Epidemic model, Multi-host infection, Species extinction, Uniform persistence, Hopf bifurcation, Periodic

Pugliese, Andrea

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Species Loss and Aboveground Carbon Storage in a Tropical Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tropical tree species on carbon storage by simulating 18 possible extinction scenarios within a well-studied 50-hectare tropical forest plot in Panama, which contains 227 tree species. Among extinction as well as the size and longevity of tropical trees. Instead, we simulated species extinctions

Bunker, Daniel E.

302

RESEARCH ARTICLE Modelling multi-species response to landscape dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the spatio-temporal configuration of urban brownfield habitats in a multi-species approach (37 plant and 43- sion time of brownfield habitats required to support all and especially regionally rare species Dynamic landscape Á Species distribution model Á Habitat model Á Urban brownfields Á Model averaging Á

Kleyer, Michael

303

Conservation & the U.S. Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

birds #12;History of species-related legislation · Lacey Act (1900) · Migratory Bird Treaty Act (1918 Bird Treaty Act (1918) ­ All migratory birds are subject to federal regulation ­ Established protective as well as protected species #12;History of species-related legislation · Lacey Act (1900) · Migratory

Schweik, Charles M.

304

NON-NATIVE TREES Why and how to choose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when planning the establishment of woodland on brownfield land. But for any particular set of site the revegetation of brownfield land, especially if woodland habitat creation and enhancement of biodiversity is one of the imagination can brownfield land, however well reclaimed, be compared with natural ecosystem conditions

305

4,398 words Src family tyrosine kinases-driven colon cancer cell invasion is induced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. (a), ASN2324598 inhibits Csk activity in vitro (upper panel) and in MCF7 cells (lower panel). (b), ASN2324598 potentiates growth in soft-agar (left) and invasion (right) of MCF7 cells. (c), Csk 160 Colo205 cellinvasion MCF7 a b MCF7 0 100 200 300 400 500 Colo205 #colonies 5 10 - 5- 10

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil water potential that describes the energy status of the soil water and is an important parameterNon-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological

Johnson, Peter D.

307

Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic diversity and invasion patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic): Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic diversity and invasion patterns. ­ Preslia 84: 155­255. A complete list of all alien taxa ever recorded in the flora

Kratochvíl, Lukas

308

forthcoming in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics Effects of the Private-Label Invasion in Food Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Food Industries Abstract Using supermarket scanner data, we test a variety of hypotheses from trade journals about the invasion of private-label food products. According to conventional industry wisdom, name, Economic Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture We are very grateful to Mark Denbaly

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

309

Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 121136 Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

311

Non-Invasive Neuroimaging Using Near-Infrared Light Gary Strangman, David A. Boas, and Jeffrey P. Sutton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Non-Invasive Neuroimaging Using Near-Infrared Light Gary Strangman, David A. Boas, and Jeffrey P. Sutton This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared function capitalizes on the absorption and scattering properties of near-infrared light to provide

312

Species Discovery versus Species Identification in DNA Barcoding Efforts: Response to Rubinoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the discus- sion. I start with Rubinoff's second point that there are "problems with DNA barcodes and species needs to be tested in a scientific context (Goldstein et al. 2000; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Sites of taxonomy (Dunn 2003; Lipscomb et al. 2003; Seberg et al. 2003). On the other hand DNA sequences can be used

DeSalle, Rob

313

Factoring species, non-species values and threats into biodiversity prioritisation across the ecoregions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

population density, and the extinction risk of species. This threat index is positively correlated with all the ecoregions of Africa and its islands Neil D. Burgessa,b, *, Jennifer D'Amico Halesa , Taylor H. Rickettsa I N F O Article history: Received 3 September 2004 Available online 11 October 2005 Keywords: Africa

Vermont, University of

314

New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis of Other Iranian Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Species of Aphanius (Teleostei, Cyprinodontidae) from Isfahan Province of Iran and a Reanalysis isfahanensis, is described from the Isfahan basin of Iran. It is distinguished from the other Iranian species in Iran. THE extant and extinct species of the killifish genus Aphanius Nardo, 1827 (Cyprinodon- tiformes

Hrbek, Tomas - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

315

In Silico Modeling of Geobacter Species.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project employed a combination of in silico modeling and physiological studies to begin the construction of models that could predict the activity of Geobacter species under different environmental conditions. A major accomplishment of the project was the development of the first genome-based models of organisms known environmental relevance. This included the modeling of two Geobacter species and two species of Pelobacter. Construction of these models required increased sophistication in the annotation of the original draft genomes as well as collection of physiological data on growth yields, cell composition, and metabolic reactions. Biochemical studies were conducted to determine whether proposed enzymatic reactions were in fact expressed. During this process we developed an Automodel Pipeline process to accelerate future model development of other environmentally relevant organisms by using bioinformatics techniques to leverage predicted protein sequences and the Genomatica database containing a collection of well-curated metabolic models. The Automodel Pipeline was also used for iterative updating of the primary Geobacter model of G. sulfurreducens to expand metabolic functions or to add alternative pathways. Although each iteration of the model does not lead to another publication, it is an invaluable resource for hypothesis development and evaluation of experimental data. In order to develop a more accurate G. sulfurreducens model, a series of physiological studies that could be analyzed in the context of the model were carried out. For example, previous field trials of in situ uranium bioremediation demonstrated that Geobacter species face an excess of electron donor and a limitation of electron acceptor near the point of acetate injection into the groundwater. Therefore, a model-based analysis of electron acceptor limitation physiology was conducted and model predictions were compared with growth observed in chemostats. Iterative studies resulted in the model accurately predicting acetate oxidation and electron acceptor reduction. The model also predicted that G. sulfurreducens must release hydrogen under electron-accepting conditions in order to maintain charge and electron balance. This prediction was borne out by subsequent hydrogen measurements. Furthermore, changes in gene expression were consistent with model predictions of flux changes around central metabolism. The model revealed multiple redundant pathways in central metabolism suggesting an apparent versatility unusual in microbial metabolism. The computational analysis led to the identification of 32 reactions that participated in eight sets of redundant pathways. The computational results guided the design of strains with mutations in key reactions to elucidate the role of the alternate pathways and obtain information on their physiological function. A total of seven strains with mutations in genes encoding five metabolic reactions were constructed and their phenotypes analyzed in 12 different environments. This analysis revealed several interesting insights on the role of the apparent redundant pathways. 13C labeling approaches were developed for further elucidation of metabolic pathways with model-driven interpretation. For example, the model was used to calculate the optimal acetate 13C labeling ratio for distinguishing flux through various pathways based on amino acid isotopomer distributions. With this method it was possible to elucidate the pathways for amino acid biosynthesis. Surprisingly, the labeling pattern of isoleucine deviated significantly from what was predicted by the metabolic reconstruction. Detailed analysis of the labeling patterns with the model led to the discovery that there are two pathways for leucine biosynthesis, including a novel citramalate pathway that was subsequently confirmed with biochemical analysis. In summary, the combined computational and experimental studies have been instrumental in further characterizing the central metabolism of members of the Geobacteraceae. Furthermore, the methods developed in these

Lovley, Derek, R.

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/EL TN-13-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques against the invasive wetland plant phragmites (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud of Invasive Phragmites in a Great Lakes Marsh: A Field Demonstration by Kurt D. Getsinger, Angela G. Poovey by the non-native weed, phragmites (Tulbure and Johnston 2010). Phragmites (also known as common reed) has

US Army Corps of Engineers

318

Recent Swiss records of rare bee species (Hymenoptera, Apidae) with two species new to Switzerland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the cities of Zürich and Lucerne did not yield any new or very rare bee species. The known distribution was conducted on 106 sampling sites in the Swiss cities of Zürich (47°22 N, 8°31 E), Lucerne (47°05 N, 8°17 E), and Lugano (46°07 N, 8°56 E) from June 13th to August 3rd 2006. In Lucerne, 34 sampling locations were chosen

Richner, Heinz

319

Revision of the bee genus Chlerogella (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), Part IV: A new species from southwestern Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terminalia can distinguish these species. Revised couplets are provided to the South American species of Chlerogella to permit identification of the new species....

Engel, Michael S.; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

update: Speciesarea curves and the estimation of extinction rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011) Extinctions: consider all species. Nature,474,Speciesarea relationships alwaysoverestimateextinctionandtheestimationofextinctionrates The speciesarea

Beck, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting species diversity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: affecting species diversity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Community Ecology & Species Assemblages Summary: affect species distributions Tropical regions - most...

322

Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hartley, Harris & Lester Quantifying uncertainty in the potential distribution of an invasive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species: climate and the Argentine ant Stephen Hartley1 , Richard Harris2,3 and Philip J. Lester1 Ecology & Collingwood 1981 Mexico Suarez et al. 2001 New Zealand AMNZ, Charles et al. 2001, Harris & Ward 2003, P.J.; Way, M. J.; Paiva, M. R. (1996) Diversity and structure of ant communities associated with oak, pine

Hartley, Stephen

325

Hedychium gardnerianum invasion into Hawaiian montane rainforest: interactions among litter quality,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-canopy forests and, despite inter-specific differences in litter quality and quantity between understory and domi strongly influenced by native species, which contribute the most to overall stand biomass. A negative a combination of litter quality and quantity (e.g., Ehrenfeld 2003), the results from these studies

Funk, Jennifer

326

Minimizing invasive potential of Miscanthus 3 giganteus grown for bioenergy: identifying  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proportion of energy to be derived from biofuels (Robertson et al. 2008). Dedicated bioenergy crops are hence with grain-based biofuels. By cultivating bioenergy crops on marginal lands unfit for food crops, it may, USA Summary 1. Many species prioritized for bioenergy crop development possess traits associated

Sims, Gerald K.

327

Species' geographic distributions through time: Playing catchup with changing climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cold temperatures, produced by orbitally controlled phenomena termed Milankovitch cycles occurred during this period. For instance, during warm intervals, hippopotami frolicked in the Thames River, and during cold intervals, ice sheets progressed... new distributional opportunities and barriers for species and biotas. The relevance of these major changes to the distributional biology of species, of course, depends critically on the age of the species, which depends on the higher taxon...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Lieberman, Bruce S.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

A study of selected species of Rosa using isozyme polymorphisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: avid H. yrne (Chair of ommittee) S ephan L. Hatch (Member) James R. Manhart (Member) R. Daniel Lineber r (Head of Department) December 1994 Major Subject: Horticulture ABSTRACT A Study of Selected Species of Rosa Using Isozyme Polymorphisms.... Three of the subgenera are monotypic. The species in the subgenus Rosa are classified into 11 sections. Forty seven R o s a species (116 total accessions) from subgenera Rosa and Plaryrhodon were characterized for isozyme phenotypes using starch gel...

Kim, Young-Ju

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ecology of toxigenic bacillus species in rice products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Bacillus cereus is the most prevalent pathogenic Bacillus species found in foods, causing food spoilage and two types of toxin-mediated food poisoning known as the (more)

Oh, Mi Hwa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Arkin, Adam P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a Fragmented World Melanie Hagen*, W 172 10. Conclusions 175 Acknowledgements 177 Appendix 177 References 181 Abstract Biodiversity

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

332

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

Williams, J. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Harris, J. [Colorado State U.; Martinez, J. [Colorado State U.; Milton, S. V. [Colorado State U.; Van Keuren, J. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Steve V. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Non-invasive geophysical investigation and thermodynamic analysis of a palsa in Lapland, northwest Finland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-invasive geophysical prospecting and a thermodynamic model were used to examine the structure, depth and lateral extent of the frozen core of a palsa near Lake Peeraj\\"arvi, in northwest Finland. A simple thermodynamic model verified that the current climatic conditions in the study area allow sustainable palsa development. A ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of the palsa under both winter and summer conditions revealed its internal structure and the size of its frozen core. GPR imaging in summer detected the upper peat/core boundary, and imaging in winter detected a deep reflector that probably represents the lower core boundary. This indicates that only a combined summer and winter GPR survey completely reveals the lateral and vertical extent of the frozen core of the palsa. The core underlies the active layer at a depth of ~0.6 m and extends to about 4 m depth. Its lateral extent is ~15 m x ~30 m. The presence of the frozen core could also be traced as minima in surface temperature and ground condu...

Kohout, Tom; Rasmus, Kai; Leppranta, Matti; Matero, Ilkka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Feasibility of Diffraction Radiation for a Non-invasive Diagnostics of the SLAC Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the non-invasive bunch size diagnostics based on the diffraction radiation is now in progress in frame of TPU-KEK-SLAC collaboration. The experimental test of a transverse beam size measurement was performed successful on the KEK-ATF extracted electron beam. However many difficulties emerge if we going from the one GeV electron energy to the several tenth GeV electron beams. The extremely high Lorenz-factor value gives rise to the some problems, such as large contribution of a radiation from an accelerator construction elements in submillimeter wavelength region, extremely pre-wave zone effect even in the optical range, exceeding of the electron beam divergence over the diffraction radiation cone, and so on. More over, the sensitivity of the method based on the optical diffraction radiation from flat slit target decrease catastrophic when an electron energy increase up to several tenth GeV. We suggest the new method based on the phase shift on the slit target, consisting on the two semi-planes which are turned at a some angle one to other (crossed target technique) and present here the results of experimental test of this technique. Also we discuss the origins of indicated difficulties and suggest the ways of these problems solution.

Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; /Tomsk Polytechnic U.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Hayano, H.; Karataev, P.; Muto, T.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ross, M.; /SLAC; Cline, D.; Fukui, Y.; /UCLA; Hamatsu, R.; /Tokyo Metropolitan U.

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Non-Invasive, Non-Contact Heart Monitoring of Hemodialysis Patients with a Micropower Impulse Radar Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the LLNL LDRD funded portion of a collaborative project to demonstrate and clinically evaluate the micropower impulse radar technology as a means to non-invasively monitor the heart of chronic care patients undergoing hemodialysis. The development is based upon technologies and expertise unique to LLNL. The LLNL LDRD funded portion of this project was used to assist in the definition, design, construction, and evaluation of the prototype.

Chang, J; Levin, N; Poland, D; Welsh, P; Paulsen, C; Trebes, J; Rosenbury, R; Killip, T

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in the Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arf6activationtothedownstream activationofRac1. invasionassociatedfactordownstreamofAktsignaling. RolesofAkt1andAkt2DownstreamofSrcFamilyKinasesin

Chiueh, Venice Calinisan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mena invasive (Mena[superscript INV]) and Mena11a isoforms play distinct roles in breast cancer cell cohesion and association with TMEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mena, an actin regulatory protein, functions at the convergence of motility pathways that drive breast cancer cell invasion and migration in vivo. The tumor microenvironment spontaneously induces both increased expression ...

Roussos, Evanthia T.

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - across-species across-assay investigation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Data collection Summary: across species employing a phylogeny for sex changing animals presented elsewhere 2 . Species may... Supplementary Information...

340

FLORISTICS LABORATORY CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Level Surveys · Invasive Species Inventories · Endangered/Sensitive Plant Species Surveys · Database

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive oxygen species deglycosilate glomerular a-dystroglycan NPJ Vogtla¨nder1 , WPM Tamboer1 open. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to degrade and depolymerize carbohydrates, and to playDa in skeletal muscle, ranging from 120 kDa in brain to 190 kDa in the Torpedo electric organ.8

Campbell, Kevin P.

342

A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW SPECIES OF MATELEA (APOCYNACEAE: ASCLEPIADOIDEAE) FROM HISPANIOLA Alexander Krings Herbarium_Krings@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT A new species of Matelea is described from Hispaniola, resulting from study of subtribe Hispaniola: Matelea pentactina Krings, sp. nov. (Fig. 1, A­B, E). TYPE: HAITI: Les Roseaux, Massif de la

Krings, Alexander

343

ORIGINAL PAPER Alpinesubalpine species richness of the Romanian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Alpine­subalpine species richness of the Romanian Carpathians and the current in the Romanian Carpathians is centralized and analyzed for the first time. A network with 472 grid cells of 12­ subalpine species richness, continues with a comparison between the different sub groups of the Romanian

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

344

Optimal Conservation of Migratory Species Tara G. Martin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. Conclusions/ Significance. We

Queensland, University of

345

Design of Dissimilarity Measures: a New Dissimilarity between Species Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Dissimilarity Measures: a New Dissimilarity between Species Distribution Areas Christian, 20146 Hamburg, Germany Abstract. We give some guidelines for the choice and design of dissimilarity mea distribution areas in biogeography. Species distribution data can be digitized as presences and absences

Guillas, Serge

346

ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/nutrient ratios, pH and nutrient contents according to the tree species (Vesterdal and Raulund-Rasmussen 1998ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract · Background Among forest management practices, forest tree

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species M. SORIA* , P. FREON § and P, Nouvelle-Calédonie, France Schooling fish species are conventionally subdivided into obligate interactions, Schooling behaviour, Polarity, Pelagic fish Running headline: Schooling properties of two fish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT HASSAN H. FADL, REDA F. BAKR, RAWDA M. BADAWY AND MOSTAFA R. SHARAF Entomology Dept., Fac. Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. ABSTRACT Six new ant species from Egypt Cerapachys collingwoodi, Cataglyphis agostii, Messor eglalae

Villemant, Claire

349

Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness Richard G. Davies1,*, C data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test, 1988; Currie 1991; Allen et al. 2002). Its role is also argued to extend to the influence of solar

Storch, David

350

Species separation and kinetic effects in collisional plasma shocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of collisional shock waves propagating in uniform plasmas are studied with ion-kinetic calculations, in both slab and spherical geometry and for the case of one and two ion species. Despite the presence of an electric field at the shock frontand in contrast to the case where an interface is initially present [C. Bellei et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 044702 (2013)]essentially no ion reflection at the shock front is observed due to collisions, with a probability of reflection ?10{sup ?4} for the cases presented. A kinetic two-ion-species spherical convergent shock is studied in detail and compared against an average-species calculation, confirming effects of species separation and differential heating of the ion species at the shock front. The effect of different ion temperatures on the DT and D{sup 3}He fusion reactivity is discussed in the fluid limit and is estimated to be moderately important.

Bellei, C., E-mail: bellei1@llnl.gov; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Global attractors and extinction dynamics of cyclically competing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transitions to absorbing states are of fundamental importance in non-equilibrium physics as well as ecology. In ecology, absorbing states correspond to the extinction of species. We here study the spatial population dynamics of three cyclically interacting species. The interaction scheme comprises both direct competition between species as in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, and separated selection and reproduction processes as in the May-Leonard model. We show that the dynamic processes leading to the transient maintenance of biodiversity are closely linked to attractors of the nonlinear dynamics for the overall species' concentrations. The characteristics of these global attractors change qualitatively at certain threshold values of the mobility, and depend on the relative strength of the different types of competition between species. They give information about the scaling of extinction times with the system size and thereby the stability of biodiversity. We define an effective free energy as the negative...

Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Delphinidin inhibits cell proliferation and invasion via modulation of Met receptor phosphorylation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HGF/Met signaling pathway is deregulated in majority of cancers and is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Delphinidin, present in pigmented fruits and vegetables possesses potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic properties. Here, we assessed the anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of delphinidin on HGF-mediated responses in the immortalized MCF-10A breast cell line. Treatment of cells with delphinidin prior to exposure to exogenous HGF resulted in the inhibition of HGF-mediated (i) tyrosyl-phosphorylation and increased expression of Met receptor, (ii) phosphorylation of downstream regulators such as FAK and Src and (iii) induction of adaptor proteins including paxillin, Gab-1 and GRB-2. In addition, delphinidin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of HGF-activated (i) Ras-ERK MAPKs and (ii) PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathways. Delphinidin was found to repress HGF-activated NF{kappa}B transcription with a decrease in (i) phosphorylation of IKK{alpha}/{beta} and I{kappa}B{alpha}, and (ii) activation and nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B/p65. Inhibition of HGF-mediated membrane translocation of PKC{alpha} as well as decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 was further observed in delphinidin treated cells. Finally, decreased cell viability of Met receptor expressing breast cancer cells treated with delphinidin argues for a potential role of the agent in the prevention of HGF-mediated activation of various signaling pathways implicated in breast cancer.

Syed, Deeba N.; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami; Khan, Naghma; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Mukhtar, Hasan [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)], E-mail: hmukhtar@wisc.edu

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Application of optical lens of a CD writer for detecting the blood glucose semi-invasively  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent technological advancements in the photonics industry have led to a resurgence of interest in optical glucose sensing and to realistic progress toward the development of an optical glucose sensor. Such a sensor has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life for the estimated 16 million diabetics in this country by making routine glucose measurements more convenient. Currently over 100 small companies and universities are working to develop noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensing technologies, and optical methods play a large role in these efforts. It has become overwhelmingly clear that frequent monitoring and tight control of blood sugar levels are requisite for effective management of Diabetes mellitus and reduction of the complications associated with this disease. The pain and trouble associated with current finger-stick methods for blood glucose monitoring result in decreased patient compliance and a failure to control blood sugar levels. Thus, the development of a convenient noninvasive blood glucose monitor holds the potential to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with Diabetes. A method and apparatus for noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration based on transilluminated laser beam via the Index Finger has been reported in this paper. This method depends on photodiode based laser operating at 632.8 nm wavelength. During measurement, the index finger is inserted into the glucose sensing unit, the transilluminated optical signal is converted into an electrical signal, compared with the reference electrical signal, and the obtained difference signal is processed by signal processing unit which presents the results in the form of blood glucose concentration. This method would enable the monitoring blood glucose level of the diabetic patient continuously, safely and noninvasively.

Meshram, N. D., E-mail: meshramnileshsd@gmail.com [Mathuradas Mohota College of Sciences, Nagpur-440009 (India); Dahikar, P. B., E-mail: pbdahikar@rediffmail.com [Kamla Nehru Mahavidyalaya, Sakkardara Square, Nagpur-440009 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

355

Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Accounting for Incomplete Species Detection in Fish Community Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Riverine fish assemblages are heterogeneous and very difficult to characterize with a one-size-fits-all approach to sampling. Furthermore, detecting changes in fish assemblages over time requires accounting for variation in sampling designs. We present a modeling approach that permits heterogeneous sampling by accounting for site and sampling covariates (including method) in a model-based framework for estimation (versus a sampling-based framework). We snorkeled during three surveys and electrofished during a single survey in suite of delineated habitats stratified by reach types. We developed single-species occupancy models to determine covariates influencing patch occupancy and species detection probabilities whereas community occupancy models estimated species richness in light of incomplete detections. For most species, information-theoretic criteria showed higher support for models that included patch size and reach as covariates of occupancy. In addition, models including patch size and sampling method as covariates of detection probabilities also had higher support. Detection probability estimates for snorkeling surveys were higher for larger non-benthic species whereas electrofishing was more effective at detecting smaller benthic species. The number of sites and sampling occasions required to accurately estimate occupancy varied among fish species. For rare benthic species, our results suggested that higher number of occasions, and especially the addition of electrofishing, may be required to improve detection probabilities and obtain accurate occupancy estimates. Community models suggested that richness was 41% higher than the number of species actually observed and the addition of an electrofishing survey increased estimated richness by 13%. These results can be useful to future fish assemblage monitoring efforts by informing sampling designs, such as site selection (e.g. stratifying based on patch size) and determining effort required (e.g. number of sites versus occasions).

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Jager, Yetta [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Spatial synchronization and extinction of species under external forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interplay between synchronization and extinction of a species. Using a general model we show that under a common external forcing, the species with a quadratic saturation term in the population dynamics first undergoes spatial synchronization and then extinction, thereby avoiding the rescue effect. This is because the saturation term reduces the synchronization time scale but not the extinction time scale. The effect can be observed even when the external forcing acts only on some locations provided there is a synchronizing term in the dynamics. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction.

R. E. Amritkar; Govindan Rangarajan

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

Zhu, Yingting, E-mail: yitizhu@yahoo.com [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States) [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 (United States); Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)] [Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

FIVE SPECIES OF DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE, BRYOPHYTA) NEW FOR RUSSIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIVE SPECIES OF DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE, BRYOPHYTA) NEW FOR RUSSIA DIDYMODON (POTTIACEAE.Saito, D. luridus Hornsch. and D. maschalogenus (Renauld & Cardot) Broth. were discovered as new for Russia of Didymodon currently known in Russia is provided. , , Didymodon: D. brachyphyllus

Kucera, Jan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Pervasive poleward shifts among North American bird species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is expected to influence species geographic distributions in the form of poleward and upward range expansion combined with extirpations from the equatorial and downslope sides of the distribution, but such shifts observed to date...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Utilizing spatial technologies to understand and model wildlife species distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and slopes found on Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area (GEWMA) and Richland Creek Wildlife Management Area (RCWMA). The resulting model output was displayed as a map, depicting the spatial distribution of habitat suitability for each of the 3 species...

Daugherty, Brad Ellis

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

364

ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major amphibian populations. Keywords Amphibia . Beta chain . Gene walking . Lithobates . Positive selection balancing selection Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251

Zamudio, Kelly R.

365

affecting ornamental species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: FA182...

366

Reactive oxygen species: a breath of life or death?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AP1, activator protein-1; ODD, oxygen-dependent degradationSignaling response when oxygen levels decrease (Fig. 1C;3. Halliwell B. Reactive oxygen species in living sys- tems:

Fruehauf, John P; Meyskens, Frank L Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insects in urban brownfields Analyses of species occurrences, community composition, and trait brownfields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 Habitat models forces for insects in urban brownfields 41 4.1 Introduction

Kleyer, Michael

368

Spatial effects on species persistence and implications for biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ecosystems are characterized by striking diversity of form and functions and yet exhibit deep symmetries emerging across scales of space, time and organizational complexity. Species-area relationships and species-abundance distributions are examples of emerging patterns irrespective of the details of the underlying ecosystem functions. Here we present empirical and theoretical evidence for a new macroecological pattern related to the distributions of local species persistence times, defined as the timespans between local colonizations and extinctions in a given geographic region. Empirical distributions pertaining to two different taxa, breeding birds and herbaceous plants, analyzed in a new framework that accounts for the finiteness of the observational period, exhibit power-law scaling limited by a cut-off determined by the rate of emergence of new species. In spite of the differences between taxa and spatial scales of analysis, the scaling exponents are statistically indistinguishable from each oth...

Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea; 10.1073/pnas.1017274108

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

370

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

Fisher, Bob

371

Rare Species Are Valued Big Time Elena Angulo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as ecotourism or the keeping of exotic pets may cause this effect ­ known as the anthropogenic Allee effect high prices [8­10]; negative impacts of ecotourism on species via disturbance would be mostly focused

Courchamp, Franck

372

Clonality as a taxonomic character of Actinian species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea anemones of some species have been considered to exist both clonally and as solitary individuals. In two temperate taxa, these alternative forms have been demonstrated through molecular techniques actually to belong ...

Fautin, Daphne G.; Smith, Deborah R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

anopheles funestus species: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a spatial resolution of 1 arc-minute (9 185 275 cells of approximately 4 sq km). Using a maximum entropy method we construct niche models for 10 malaria vector species based on...

374

Herpetologica, 70(2), 2014, 135148 2014 by The Herpetologists' League, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diseases, environmental pollution, nonnative species, increases in UV-B irradiation, and exploitation for food, medicine, and the pet trade (Blaustein and Kiesecker, 2002; Beebee and Griffiths, 2005). Few

North, Malcolm

375

Chemical, physical, and organoleptic properties of acorns of selected species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis By RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE J'anuary 1969 Major Subject& Food Technology CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL, AND ORGANOLEPTIC PROPERTIES OF ACORNS OF SELECTED SPECIES A Thesis RALPH PAUL OFCARCIK Approved as to style and content by: (Chaxrman C ttee) (Head of Department) mber...

Ofcarcik, Ralph Paul

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Species composition and distribution of the macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and winter months. Cladocera predominated in late October and early November. The lnean momentary composition of Postoak Lake included 5. 6 cladoceran species and 3. 0 copepod species. Density differences between inshore and offshore areas occurred... but were not consistent over time. The cyclopoid opp d. T. ~o' 1 D ' * ' . d~M1~ edax were generally more abundant offshore. The calanoid . pp dp t*, ~11'd h d ho *ffh preference. The cladoceran Cerio~da hnia lacustris exhibi ed uniform horizonta...

Welch, Douglas Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Comparison of sampling techniques for Heliothis species in cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 19g& Najor Subject: Entomology COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR HELIOTHIS SPECIES IN COTTON A Thesis by MICHELLE LYNN WALTERS Approved as to style and content by: J. K. Walker, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) J. K. Olson (Member) A. E.... Percival (Member) 2 & F/yg. (Member) F, G. Maxwell (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRACT Comparison of Sampling Techniques for Heliothis Species in Cotton. (December 1986) Nichelle Lynn Walters, B. S. , Arizona State University; Chairman...

Walters, Michelle Lynn

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Using species distribution models to inform IUCN Red List assessments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to these as SRLI species because the occurrence data for these came from the plant component of the Sampled Red List Index (SRLI), an indicator to measure the current rate of loss of biodiversity by tracking trends in the conservation status of 6 a randomly... the Mesoamerica biodiversity hotspot (Myers et al. 2000). Many species in this region are poorly represented in the worlds herbaria, so limited knowledge of their true distribution exists; nonetheless, conservation assessments are urgently needed...

Syfert, Mindy M.; Joppa, Lucas; Smith, Matthew J.; Coomes, David A.; Bachman, Steven P.; Brummitt, Neil A.

2014-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Island biogeography Much of our current understanding of how many species occupy a community comes from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a balance between ongoing immigration of new species to the island and continuous extinction of species') and E is the maximum rate of extinction (the rate of extinction when the number of species on the island there are no species on the island (logically). But extinction rate increases with increasing species on the island

Creel, Scott

380

Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N. perkinsii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three new phylogenetic and biological Neurospora species: N. hispaniola, N. metzenbergii and N description of species and, having failed to discredit the approach, describe the new species, N. hispaniola

382

Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in conservation actions that generate substantial non-use benefits, such as species and biodiversity conservation1 Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental: Environmental value transfer and species conservation Key words: environmental value transfer, uncertainty

Botea, Adi

383

Review of the Berosus Leach of Venezuela (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Berosini) with description of fourteen new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The species of the water scavenger beetle genus Berosus Leach occurring in Venezuela are reviewed. Thirty-six species are recorded, including fifteen new species, fourteen of which are described here as new: Berosus aragua sp. n., Berosus...

Oliva, Adriana; Short, Andrew E. Z.

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides...

Maier, Crystal A.

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

Weiblen, George D

386

Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Three-fold way to extinction in cyclically competing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species extinction occurs regularly and unavoidably in ecological systems. The time scales for extinction can broadly vary and inform on the ecosystem's stability. We study the spatio-temporal extinction dynamics of a paradigmatic population model where three species exhibit cyclic competition. The cyclic dynamics reflects the non-equilibrium nature of the species interactions. We identify three types of dynamics that leave leave their fingerprints in the extinction-time probability distribution: rapid extinction, heteroclinic orbits, and metastable traveling weaves. Based on these three types we develop semi-phenomenological arguments for the functional form and the scaling behavior of the extinction-time probability distribution. These analytical results are supported by extensive numerical simulations.

Rulands, S; Frey, E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal species specific Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training in safe handling techniques for the specific large animal species. 3.1.3 CARE and EHS... Inoculation of Infectious Agents in Large Animal Species Animal Biosafety...

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects species abundances Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Density Dependence Shapes Species Abundances in a Tropical Tree Community Liza S. Comita,1... a species' relative abundance, but empirical tests are ... Source: Reich, Peter...

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal species population Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Biodiversity Summary: of populations is a single species is important to conservation management.species is important to conservation... Criteria Populations...

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean wild species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 wild species and Andean germplasm... landraces, 11 Chilean landraces, and two wild potato species as out- groups, and with chloroplast DNA data... through breeding efforts of...

393

Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species andBactericidal...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulator plant species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: accumulator plant species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Introduction Biodiversity in the sense of species richness may play a crucial role for maintaining ecosys-...

395

Inhibition and success of prymnesium parvum invasion on plankton communities in Texas, USA and prymnesium parvum pigment dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prymnesium parvum Carter, a haptophyte species capable of forming harmful algal blooms (HABs), has been identified in fresh and brackish water habitats worldwide. In Texas, P. parvum blooms have diminished local community revenues from losses...

Errera, Reagan Michelle

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for translational development of molecular biodosimetry instrumentation to assess human exposure to mixed radiation fields.

Goldstein, Lee [Boston University] [Boston University

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

398

Quantitative Ecology and the Conservation of Biodiversity: Species Richness, Abundance, and Extinction in Human-Altered Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for predicting species extinction by linking populationfor estimates of species extinctions. Ecology 81:3305estimates of single-species extinction risks and community-

Kitzes, Justin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electro-diffusion in a plasma with two ion species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric field is a thermodynamic force that can drive collisional inter-ion-species transport in a multicomponent plasma. In an inertial confinement fusion capsule, such transport causes fuel ion separation even with a target initially prepared to have equal number densities for the two fuel ion species. Unlike the baro-diffusion driven by ion pressure gradient and the thermo-diffusion driven by ion and electron temperature gradients, electro-diffusion has a critical dependence on the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. Specifically, it is shown here that electro-diffusion vanishes if the ion species have the same charge-to-mass ratio. An explicit expression for the electro-diffusion ratio is obtained and used to investigate the relative importance of electro- and baro-diffusion mechanisms. In particular, it is found that electro-diffusion reinforces baro-diffusion in the deuterium and tritium mix, but tends to cancel it in the deuterium and helium-3 mix.

Kagan, Grigory; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Towards an Algebraic Speci cation of the Java Virtual Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards an Algebraic Speci cation of the Java Virtual Machine K Stephenson Department of Computer of the architecture of an abstract and simpli ed version of the Java Virtual Machine JVM. This concentration on the implementation-independent features of the machine allows us to build a clean and easily comprehensible model

Grant, P. W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Plasma equilibria with multiple ion species: Equations and algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Axisymmetric equilibrium of a magnetically confined plasma with multiple ion species is considered. To describe hot plasmas with isothermal surfaces, we adopt a formulation consistent with zero poloidal ion flow. This formulation includes all magnetic field components and also correctly includes all effects of toroidal ion rotation. There are two free surface functions for each species and a third which is determined by a differential equation relating surface functions per species. We have developed and implemented an algorithm for the solution of the resulting nonlinear equations and found solutions with large charge and mass contrast among the ion species for both compact (r = 0 included) and annular (r = 0 excluded) domains. Our solution method allows for arbitrary domain shapes, includes far-field conditions, and treats any combination of electrically conducting or insulating walls. Appropriate surface functions are used to describe the transition from closed to open field plasma in a reasonable manner. Solutions for advanced fuel cycle fusion systems (both D-{sup 3}He and p-{sup 11}B) are presented to illustrate the power of the method. Finally, we briefly discuss the special issues associated with obtaining very elongated solutions and describe the algorithm for implementing these features.

Galeotti, L.; Ceccherini, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Barnes, D. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Pegoraro, F. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of Tree Species on Carbon in Forest Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species differ in productivity, litter quality and quantity, canopy structure and nitrogen deposition.1.6 Mycelia production (Paper V) 23 4.2 Vegetation 23 4.2.1 Tree biomass and litterfall (Paper II) 23 4.2.2 Understorey vegetation (Paper II) 24 4.2.3 Fine root biomass (Paper V) 25 4.2.4 Fine root production

404

A new deep sea species of Paramphinome (Polychaeta: Amphinomidae) from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paramphinome Sars, 1872 includes small deep-water species which are often very abundant in quantitative deep, mainly in deep waters and is characterized by the presence of one, two or three pairs of small notopodial made by PETROBRAS (Brazilian Petroleum Company) under the scope of the project `Campos Basin Deep

Paiva, Paulo Cesar de

405

Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

Watson, Craig A.

406

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

Canet, Léonie

407

Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness Peter B. Adler,1 * Eric W. Seabloom,2 that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found

Orrock, John

408

Cross-Species Pathogen Transmission and Disease Emergence in Primates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their rapidly growing human populations, close proximity to apes, and population centers with high density and Ebola, are zoonotic, having shifted from wildlife populations. Critical questions for predicting disease is greatest. We find that central Africa and Amazonia are hotspots for cross-species transmission events

Pedersen, Amy B.

409

ORIGINAL PAPER Dominant species' resprout biomass dynamics after cutting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vegetatively (Murphy and Lugo 1986; Ky-Dembele et al. 2007), and coppice growth is an important species-specific trait that strongly influences fuelwood production and regeneration (Kaschula et al. 2005). Coppice to regenerate vegetatively, as well as the resilience of resultant coppice regrowth to anthropogenic disturbance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Cytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The spotted bass that were intro- duced (most likely by members of a bass- fishing club) are thought to haveCytonuclear Introgressive Swamping and Species Turnover of Bass After an Introduction J. C. Avise Fish and WUdllfe Research Unit (Pierce) and the National Biological Service (Van Den Avyle), Daniel B

Avise, John

411

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

412

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

413

Spatial effects on species persistence and implications for biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ecosystems are characterized by striking diversity of form and functions and yet exhibit deep symmetries emerging across scales of space, time and organizational complexity. Species-area relationships and species-abundance distributions are examples of emerging patterns irrespective of the details of the underlying ecosystem functions. Here we present empirical and theoretical evidence for a new macroecological pattern related to the distributions of local species persistence times, defined as the timespans between local colonizations and extinctions in a given geographic region. Empirical distributions pertaining to two different taxa, breeding birds and herbaceous plants, analyzed in a new framework that accounts for the finiteness of the observational period, exhibit power-law scaling limited by a cut-off determined by the rate of emergence of new species. In spite of the differences between taxa and spatial scales of analysis, the scaling exponents are statistically indistinguishable from each other and significantly different from those predicted by existing models. We theoretically investigate how the scaling features depend on the structure of the spatial interaction network and show that the empirical scaling exponents are reproduced once a two-dimensional isotropic texture is used, regardless of the details of the ecological interactions. The framework developed here also allows to link the cut-off timescale with the spatial scale of analysis, and the persistence-time distribution to the species-area relationship. We conclude that the inherent coherence obtained between spatial and temporal macroecological patterns points at a seemingly general feature of the dynamical evolution of ecosystems.

Enrico Bertuzzo; Samir Suweis; Lorenzo Mari; Amos Maritan; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species Andrew Liebhold1 biology of eradication have assumed that eradication can only be achieved via 100% removal of the alien of alien species. While most alien species have relatively few effects, many species have caused

Liebhold, Andrew

415

Differential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION IN A PERIODIC CHEMOSTAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the single-species growth model, has a threshold between global extinction and uniform persistenceDifferential and Integral Equations Volume...., Number....., pp. N-SPECIES COMPETITION is proved and then applied to models of single-species growth and n-species competition in a periodically

Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

416

Xero-thermophilous and grassland ubiquist species dominate the weevil fauna of Swiss cities (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Curculionoidea) was sampled in the three Swiss cities of Lucerne, Lugano and Zurich. In total, 3448 individuals from 129 species were collected (Lucerne: 64 species; Lugano: 69 species; Zurich: 83 species). The most (Soerensen index) was highest be- tween the cities of Lucerne and Zurich, which could be expected since

Richner, Heinz

417

A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linostachys (Euphorbiaceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linostachys (Euphorbiaceae) Josl~ MARIA). A synopsis of the Colombian species of Acalypha subgenus Linos- tachys (Euphorbiaceae). Brittonia 46: 200 and illustraled, and several species are reduced to synonymy. A key is provided to the Colombian species

Cardiel, José María

418

Extracting Species Trees From Complex Gene Trees: Reconciled Trees And Vertebrate Phylogeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, trypsinogen, tyrosinase, vassopressin, and Wnt-7). The resulting species tree shows much similarity

Page, Roderic

419

CONSEQUENCES OF SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL CLIMATE VARIABILITY FOR SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change, habitat loss, protected areas and the climate adaptation potential of species in Mediterranean

Fernandez, Miguel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Composition of Salamander SpeciesComposition of Salamander Species Utilizing the Pigeon River WatershedUtilizing the Pigeon River Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to process wood · Toxic byproducts were dumped directly into the Pigeon River ­ Dioxins, furans" by Redmond & Scott documents species in Cocke Co. but no records exist for Pigeon · Know dioxins have for ResearchJustification for Research · Dioxins act as an endocrine disrupter and can cause abnormal

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Introduced Fish Species: "What do Introduced Fish Species: "What do the locals think?"the locals think?"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bass grass carp Currently 56 species of introduced fish in Tennessee waters 12 exotic to US12 exotic release Bait bucket Game fish introductions Procambarus acutus Two local examples brook troutstriped bass #12;10/19/2009 4 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Anadromous fish native to Atlantic and Gulf coasts

Gray, Matthew

422

Guidelines for Housing Multiple Species of Large Laboratory Animals Animals should not be housed with or near another species of animal that might compromise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Guidelines for Housing Multiple Species of Large Laboratory Animals I. General Animals should or in quarters designed to provide visual and auditory separation from other species. Dogs should be transported by the use of physical barriers, chemical restraint, visual separation, assignment of different species

Bandettini, Peter A.

423

Surface species produced in the radiolysis of zirconia nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications to water-zirconia nanoparticle interfaces induced by {gamma} irradiation have been examined using diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), Raman scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Spectroscopy with in situ heating was used to probe variations in the dissociatively bound chemisorbed water on the zirconia nanoparticles following evaporation of the physisorbed water. DRIFT spectra show that the bridged Zr-OH-Zr species decreases relative to the terminal Zr-OH species upon irradiation. No variation is observed with Raman scattering, indicating that the zirconia morphology is unchanged. EPR measurements suggest the possible formation of the superoxide ion, presumably by modification of the surface OH groups. Trapped electrons and interstitial H atoms are also observed by EPR.

Carrasco-Flores, Eduardo A.; LaVerne, Jay A. [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556 (United States)

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ecological niche modelling and prioritizing areas for species reintroductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, topographic index; USGS, 1997) and annual means of climate variables (diurnal temperature range, precipitation, maximum, minimum, and mean temperatures, solar radiation, wet days, and vapour pressure; IPCC, 1999). Environmental data sets were resampled to a...): (1) habitat quality of release area, (2) release site relative to historical distribution of the species, and (3) number of individuals released. Reintroductions generally involve analysis, planning, and selection of optimal areas. Such analyses have...

Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Peterson, A. Townsend; Serví n, Jorge I.; Kiff, Lloyd F.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Temporal modulation of plasma species in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in helium is a pulsed discharge in nature and the moment of maximum species densities is almost consistent with peak discharge current density. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to investigate the temporal structure of plasma species in an atmospheric He-N{sub 2} dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It is demonstrated that there exist microsecond delays of the moments of the maximum electron and ion densities from the peak of discharge current density. These time delays are caused by a competition between the electron impact and Penning ionizations, modulated by the N{sub 2} level in the plasma-forming gas. Besides, significant electron wall losses lead to the DBD being more positively charged and, with a distinct temporal separation in the peak electron and cation densities, the plasma is characterized with repetitive bursts of net positive charges. The temporal details of ionic and reactive plasma species may provide a new idea for some biological processes.

Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Dingxin; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Kong, Michael G. [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Virginia 23508 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sound pressure and particle acceleration audiograms in three marine fish species from the Adriatic Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umbra using the non-invasive auditory evoked potential-recording technique. Hearing thresholds were and 600 Hz, respectively. The low auditory thresholds and the large hearing bandwidth of S. umbra indicate that sound pressure may play a role in S. umbra's hearing, even though pronounced connections between

Ladich, Friedrich

428

USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. 2008 61 Introduction ____________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Nonnative Invasive Plants in the Northeast Bioregion Alison C. Dibble Kristin Zouhar Jane Kapler Smith occur in scattered areas and on abandoned farm land (old fields) (Garrison and others 1977; Smith and others 2001).Standsofeasternwhitepineoftenoccupyformer agricultural fields. Fire History in the Northeast

429

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contains established stands of the nonnative, invasive, emergent plant (Phragmites australis). Two sites. australis would not be successful due to tidal restriction and reestablishing the full tidal range the homogeneous P. australis stands. #12;Submerged Aquatic Vegetation. Twelve sites have been selected in Broad

US Army Corps of Engineers

430

USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 6. 2008 261 Introduction ____________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

locations for fuel treatments that target hazardous accumulations of native fuels). Disturbances such as fire may promote nonnative plant invasions by increasing available light and nutrients.Dependingontheintensity,severity,size,and seasonalityofafueltreatment,increasedavailabilityof light, water, and nutrients may result (Covington and Erik J. Martinson

431

Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER?) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

Bostanci, Zeynep, E-mail: zbostanci@hmc.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Alam, Samina, E-mail: sra116@psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Soybel, David I., E-mail: dsoybel@hmc.psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Kelleher, Shannon L., E-mail: slk39@psu.edu [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, 209 Chandlee Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

Pearsons, Todd N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Liebhold, A.M., W.L. Macdonald, D.Bergdahl, and V.C. Mastro. 1995. Invasion by Exotic Forest Pests: A Threat to Forest Ecosystems. Forest Science Monographs 30. 49 p.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liebhold, A.M., W.L. Macdonald, D.Bergdahl, and V.C. Mastro. 1995. Invasion by Exotic Forest Pests: A Threat to Forest Ecosystems ANDREW M. LIEBHOLD WILLIAM L. MACDONALD DALE BERGDAHL VICTOR C. MASTRO FOREST

Liebhold, Andrew

434

Demographic modeling of selected fish species with RAMAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microcomputer program RAMAS 3 developed for EPRI, has been used to model the intrinsic natural variability of seven important fish species: cod, Atlantic herring, yellowtail flounder, haddock, striped bass, American shad and white perch. Demographic data used to construct age-based population models included information on spawning biology, longevity, sex ratio and (age-specific) mortality and fecundity. These data were collected from published and unpublished sources. The natural risks of extinction and of falling below threshold population abundances (quasi-extinction) are derived for each of the seven fish species based on measured and estimated values for their demographic parameters. The analysis of these species provides evidence that including density-dependent compensation in the demographic model typically lowers the expected chance of extinction. This is because if density dependence generally acts as a restoring force it seems reasonable to conclude that models which include density dependence would exhibit less fluctuation than models without compensation since density-dependent populations experience a pull towards equilibrium. Since extinction probabilities are determined by the size of the fluctuation of population abundance, models without density dependence will show higher risks of extinction, given identical circumstances. Thus, models without compensation can be used as conservative estimators of risk, that is, if a compensation-free model yields acceptable extinction risk, adding compensation will not increase this risk. Since it is usually difficult to estimate the parameters needed for a model with compensation, such conservative estimates of the risks of extinction based on a model without compensation are very useful in the methodology of impact assessment. 103 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

Saila, S.; Martin, B.; Ferson, S.; Ginzburg, L.; Millstein, J. (Applied Biomathematics, Inc., Setauket, NY (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cargo transportation by two species of motor protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cargo motion in living cells transported by two species of motor protein with different intrinsic directionality is discussed in this study. Similar to single motor movement, cargo steps forward and backward along microtubule stochastically. Recent experiments found that, cargo transportation by two motor species has a memory, it does not change its direction as frequently as expected, which means that its forward and backward step rates depends on its previous motion trajectory. By assuming cargo has only the least memory, i.e. its step direction depends only on the direction of its last step, two cases of cargo motion are detailed analyzed in this study: {\\bf (I)} cargo motion under constant external load; and {\\bf (II)} cargo motion in one fixed optical trap. Due to the existence of memory, for the first case, cargo can keep moving in the same direction for a long distance. For the second case, the cargo will oscillate in the trap. The oscillation period decreases and the oscillation amplitude increases with the motor forward step rates, but both of them decrease with the trap stiffness. The most likely location of cargo, where the probability of finding the oscillated cargo is maximum, may be the same as or may be different with the trap center, which depends on the step rates of the two motor species. Meanwhile, if motors are robust, i.e. their forward to backward step rate ratios are high, there may be two such most likely locations, located on the two sides of the trap center respectively. The probability of finding cargo in given location, the probability of cargo in forward/backward motion state, and various mean first passage times of cargo to give location or given state are also analyzed.

Yunxin Zhang

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

Properties of Reactive Oxygen Species by Quantum Monte Carlo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of Chemistry, Biology and Atmospheric Science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab-initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as $N^3-N^4$, where $N$ is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

Andrea Zen; Bernhardt L. Trout; Leonardo Guidoni

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

437

Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} ? N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

Zen, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica, La Sapienza - Universit di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Trout, Bernhardt L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Guidoni, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.guidoni@univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universit degli studi de L'Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 Coppito, L'Aquila (Italy)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Spatial resolution of temperature and chemical species in a flame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Winefordner et al. (51). AE . /k A. g. I. B. ln ~ + ln ? + 1n? 1 A. g. i B. (36) where: subscript i = the level excited by the source subscript j = the thermally assisted level flame temperature AE . . ij the difference in energy between i and j.... Schweikert (Member) Abdel-Kad Ayou (Memb ) Vaneica . Y ng (Member) May 1984 ABSTRACT Spatial Resolution of Temperature and Chemical Species in a Flame. (May 1984) Fakhrildeen Niema Albahadily, B. S. , University of Basrah/Iraq Chairman of Advisory...

Albahadily, Fakhrildeen Niema

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

31 TAC 65.175 - Threatened Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species | Open Energy

440

31 TAC 65.176 - Endangered Species | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species | Open Energy6 - Endangered

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

Navarro, Roberto E., E-mail: roberto.navarro@ug.uchile.cl; Muoz, Vctor [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Concepcin, Concepcin 4070386 (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C. 20064 (United States); Vias, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, Juan A. [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Estudios Interdisciplinarios Bsicos y Aplicados en Complejidad, CEIBA complejidad, Bogot (Colombia)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

Crews, Stephen

443

Biodiversity and the Courts: Endangered Species Law in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1973). [10] Environment Australia. Recovery Plan for MarineSpecies Law in the US, Australia, and Canada Robert Sha?erSpecies Law in the US, Australia, and Canada. As a broader

Shaffer, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

Martone, Patrick T.

445

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

Sachs, Julian P.

446

E-Print Network 3.0 - anopheles gambiae species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: anopheles gambiae species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Insect Molecular Biology (2005) 14(6), 599605 2005 The Royal Entomological Society 599 Summary: species. To...

447

E-Print Network 3.0 - alien fish species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fish species Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alien fish species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Hydrobiologia 500: 217230, 2003. K....

448

Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

Olson, Mark

449

A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis from the Central African Republic (Hymenoptera: Apidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new species of the allodapine bee genus Braunsapis Michener (Allodapini: Allodapina) is described and figured from a series of females collected in the Central African Republic. Braunsapis maxschwarzi Engel, new species, ...

Engel, Michael S.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

450

SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project examined snake species richness and relative abundances in a heterogeneous landscape within the post oak savannah of East Central Texas. Snakes were sampled using funnel traps (with drift fences for terrestrial species) and hand capture...

Putegnat, John

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

451

Differences in sounds made by courting males of three closely related Lake Malawi cichlid species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. C. P. AMORIM*, M. E. KNIGHT, Y. STRATOUDAKIS§ AND G. F. TURNER{ *Unidade de Investigac¸a~o em Eco species, court- ship calls of three species of Pseudotropheus that co-occur at Nkhata Bay, on the western

452

Tropical leguminous species for acid soils: studies on plant form and growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fixing ability were analyzed for species at four abandoned pasture sites at the La Selva Biological Station, Sarapiqui, Costa Rica. Survival of the majority of the species after 3 years was high. Pithecellobium idiopodum, Inga edulis, A lbizia guichapele...

Tilki, Fahrettin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Reproductive traits of pioneer gastropod species colonizing deep-see hydrothermal vents after an eruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The colonization dynamics and life histories of pioneer species are vital components in understanding the early succession of nascent hydrothermal vents. The reproductive ecology of pioneer species at deep-sea hydrothermal ...

Bayer, Skylar (Skylar Rae)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

John Wright; Carolyn Auchter; Chen-Kuan Chou; Richard D. Graham; Thomas W. Noel; Tomasz Sakrejda; Zichao Zhou; Boris B. Blinov

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well-established techniques that provide valuable information in a diverse set of disciplines but are currently limited to macroscopic sample volumes. Here we demonstrate nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear species, using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond as sensors. With single, shallow NV centres in a diamond chip and samples placed on the diamond surface, we perform NMR spectroscopy and one-dimensional MRI on few-nanometre-sized samples containing $^1$H and $^{19}$F nuclei. Alternatively, we employ a high-density NV layer near the surface of a diamond chip to demonstrate wide-field optical NMR spectroscopy of nanoscale samples containing $^1$H, $^{19}$F, and $^{31}$P nuclei, as well as multi-species two-dimensional optical MRI with sub-micron resolution. For all diamond samples exposed to air, we identify a ubiquitous $^1$H NMR signal, consistent with a $\\sim 1$ nm layer of adsorbed hydrocarbons or water on the diamond surface and below any sample placed on the diamond. This work lays the foundation for nanoscale NMR and MRI applications such as studies of single proteins and functional biological imaging with subcellular resolution, as well as characterization of thin films with sub-nanometre resolution.

Stephen J. DeVience; Linh M. Pham; Igor Lovchinsky; Alexander O. Sushkov; Nir Bar-Gill; Chinmay Belthangady; Francesco Casola; Madeleine Corbett; Huiliang Zhang; Mikhail Lukin; Hongkun Park; Amir Yacoby; Ronald L. Walsworth

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Scalable Quantum Computing Architecture with Mixed Species Ion Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on progress towards implementing mixed ion species quantum information processing for a scalable ion trap architecture. Mixed species chains may help solve several problems with scaling ion trap quantum computation to large numbers of qubits. Initial temperature measurements of linear Coulomb crystals containing barium and ytterbium ions indicate that the mass difference does not significantly impede cooling at low ion numbers. Average motional occupation numbers are estimated to be $\\bar{n} \\approx 130$ quanta per mode for chains with small numbers of ions, which is within a factor of three of the Doppler limit for barium ions in our trap. We also discuss generation of ion-photon entanglement with barium ions with a fidelity of $F \\ge 0.84$, which is an initial step towards remote ion-ion coupling in a more scalable quantum information architecture. Further, we are working to implement these techniques in surface traps in order to exercise greater control over ion chain ordering and positioning.

Wright, John; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Graham, Richard D; Noel, Thomas W; Sakrejda, Tomasz; Zhou, Zichao; Blinov, Boris B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

Wu, Huijuan [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Xiao, ZhengHua [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China)] [Department of gynecology, Yongchuan Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing City 404100 (China); Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Hao, Quan, E-mail: quanhao2002@163.com [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)] [Department of Gynecological Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

Invasive interactions of Monomorium minimum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) infected with Thelohania solenopsae (Microsporida: Thelohaniidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 24 1 INTRODUCTION Solenopsis invicta Buren, the red imported fire ant (RIFA) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), was introduced into the United States at Mobile Alabama between 1933 and 1945 from South America (Lofgren et al 1975... et al. 1974, Lofgren et al. 1975). Since its introduction, RIFA has spread fairly rapidly throughout the southeastern U.S., and is now considered the dominant ant species in Texas, infesting approximately the eastern one third of the State...

Keck, Molly Elizabeth

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

Börger, Egon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Project 35013 Species-and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

three species tend to be bottom oriented and deep water species, and most TDG effects are in the upperProject 35013 Species- and Site-specific Impacts of Gas Supersaturation on Aquatic Animals Sponsor in the river?" The proposal was submitted primarily at the request of the state water quality agencies

462

Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of reactive oxygen species by a persulfide (BnSSH) Tonika Chatterji, Kripa Keerthi generate reactive oxygen species under biologically rele- vant conditions via the sequence of reactions by reactive oxygen species generated in this manner may contribute to the cytotoxic properties of leinamycin

Gates, Kent. S.

463

Appendix 15 Red and Blue-Listed Vertebrate and Vascular Plant Species The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix 15 Red and Blue-Listed Vertebrate and Vascular Plant Species The report that follows lists red- and blue-listed species occurring in the Cranbrook Forest District and in the Southern Rocky risk' as either vulnerable in BC (Blue-listed), or endangered or threatened (Red-listed). The species

464

A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE A unified model of species immigration, extinction and abundance on islands James and extinction rates as functions of species richness at dynamic equilibrium. In contrast, the approach results highlight the importance of species abundances as indi- cators of immigration and extinction rates

Harmon, Luke

465

Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially Synchronous Extinction of Species under External Forcing R. E. Amritkar* Physical a synchronizing term. Absence of the quadratic saturation term can help the species to avoid extinction. DOI: 10 other examples are documented in Ref. [10]. The second important phenomenon is the extinction of species

Rangarajan, Govindan

466

Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thus, rarer species may be more buffered from extinction than expected from neutral sampling effects. However, time-lagged extinctions due to extinction debt may lead to additional species loss (31 species abundances, at least until future extinction debt is paid. References and Notes 1. M. Gaertner, A

Tong, Liang

467

The Value of Endangered Species: the Importance of Conserving Biological Diversity1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tion. Since time began, countless species have gone extinct from natural processes. The extinction of dinosaurs is the best known example. Why Save Endangered Species? If extinction is a natural process, why extinction of plants and animals to natural causes. Today most species of plants and animals become extinct

Mazzotti, Frank

468

Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global Biodiversity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global subordinate species less intelligent than us, at risk of extinction. In other words, anthropogenic activities have made other species sensitive to changes in climate and habitat vulnerable to extinction [Parry et

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

469

Size-dependent species richness: trends within plant communities and across latitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result of sampling effects (McGeoch & Gaston 2002). Likewise, for even-aged populations, plant density, Ithaca, NY, USA 2 Department of Botany, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa 3 Department.edu Abstract We examine how species richness and species-specific plant density (number of species and number

Rand, Richard H.

470

Vol. 21 No. 3 2004 Endangered Species UPDATE 87 Andrew C. Keller &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has declined by 33% since delisting (Rugh 2003). In light of this population decline, in this paper we of delisted species, monitoring beyond the 5 years required by the ESA is needed to ensure long-term viability UPDATE Vol. 21 No. 3 200488 Introduction Does delisting species under the En- dangered Species Act (ESA

Gerber, Leah R.

471

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water, Sediment, and Biota Data Series 658 #12;#12;Mercury Species and Other Selected Constituent Concentrations in Water.J., 2012, Mercury species and other selected constituent concentrations in water, sediment, and biota

472

What Is the Indicator and Why Is It Important? As the number of species considered rare increases,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the likelihood of species extinction increases. This indicator focuses on species that have the greatest chance of species, tracking the number of species at risk of extinction can potentially indicate whether the use? The trend in species extinction since the turn of the 20th century varies by taxonomic group (figure 7

473

Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other potential complexants. The sodium nitrate and sodium phosphate salts that form most of the salt cake layers have little interaction with plutonium in the wastes and contain relatively small plutonium concentrations. For these reasons the authors consider plutonium species in the sludges and supernate solutions only. The low concentrations of plutonium in waste tank supernate solutions and in the solid sludges prevent identification of chemical species of plutonium by ordinary analytical techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements are not sensitive enough to identify plutons oxidation states or complexes in these waste solutions. Identification of solid phases containing plutonium in sludge solids by x-ray diffraction or by microscopic techniques would be extremely difficult. Because of these technical problems, plutonium speciation was extrapolated from known behavior observed in laboratory studies of synthetic waste or of more chemically simple systems.

Barney, G.S.

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Species measurements in a hypersonic, hydrogen-air, combustion wake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A continuously sampling, time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used to measure relative species concentrations in a two-dimensional, hydrogen-air combustion wake at mainstream Mach numbers exceeding 5. The experiments, in a free piston shock tunnel, yielded distributions of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, water, and nitric oxide at stagnation enthalpies ranging from 5.6 MJ/kg to 12.2 MJ/kg and at a distance of approximately 100s times the thickness of the initial hydrogen jet. The amount of hydrogen mixed in stoichiometric proportions was approximately independent of the stagnation enthalpy, despite the fact that the proportion of hydrogen in the wake was increased with stagnation enthalpy. Roughly 50% of the mixed hydrogen underwent combustion at the highest enthalpy. The proportion of hydrogen reacting to water could be approximately predicted using reaction rates based on mainstream temperatures.

Skinner, K.A.; Stalker, R.J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

477

Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

478

Apparatus and method for polarizing polarizable nuclear species  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a polarizing process involving a number of steps. The first step requires moving a flowing mixture of gas, the gas at least containing a polarizable nuclear species and vapor of at least one alkali metal, with a transport velocity that is not negligible when compared with the natural velocity of diffusive transport. The second step is propagating laser light in a direction, preferably at least partially through a polarizing cell. The next step is directing the flowing gas along a direction generally opposite to the direction of laser light propagating. The next step is containing the flowing gas mixture in the polarizing cell. The final step is immersing the polarizing cell in a magnetic field. These steps can be initiated in any order, although the flowing gas, the propagating laser and the magnetic field immersion must be concurrently active for polarization to occur.

Hersman, F. William; Leuschner, Mark; Carberry, Jeannette

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Productivity Is a Poor Predictor of Plant Species Richness.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, the relationship between net primary productivity and species richness has generated intense debate in ecology about the processes regulating local diversity. The original view, which is still widely accepted, holds that the relationship is hump-shaped, with richness first rising and then declining with increasing productivity. Although recent meta-analyses questioned the generality of hump-shaped patterns, these syntheses have been criticized for failing to account for methodological differences among studies. We addressed such concerns by conducting standardized sampling in 48 herbaceous-dominated plant communities on five continents. We found no clear relationship between productivity and fine-scale (meters-2) richness within sites, within regions, or across the globe. Ecologists should focus on fresh, mechanistic approaches to understanding the multivariate links between productivity and richness.

Peter B. Adler; et al.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico Sean M de Biologa, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mexico, AP 70-153, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510

Wake, David B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "invasive nonnative species" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manager of the processor. (xii) A signed statement from the applicant and from all persons who are listed for personal injury, death, sickness, damage to property directly or indirectly due to activities conducted§ 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation Program 50 CFR 679b26.doc § 679.26 Prohibited Species Donation

482

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus (Leptodactylidae) in the cordillera occidental in Peru with descriptions of three new species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and two are members of the Eleutherodactylus unistrigatus Group. We recognize 15 species of Eleutherodactylus in the Cordillera Occidental; 10 of these species are reported for the first time from the Cordillera Occidental. Four of these species are shared...

Duellman, William E.; Lehr, Edgar

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

484

NEPA Lessons Learned Quarterly Report - 1st Quarter FY 1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Updates ... 10 q Executive Order Issued on Invasive Species ... 11 q Documents Issued First Quarter FY...

485

Saimiri sciureus and Cebus apella Mixed-Species Associations in Raleighvallen, Suriname Ultimate Functions and Proximate Mechanisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A mixed-species association (MSA) is two or more species traveling and foraging together as a cohesive group. Prior research suggests that MSAs are adaptive responses, (more)

Phillips, Carson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Integrating fundamental concepts of ecology, biogeography, and sampling into effective ecological niche modeling and species distribution modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlative techniques for estimating environmental requirements of species variably termed ecological niche modeling or species distribution modeling are becoming very popular tools for ecologists and biogeographers ...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Soberó n, Jorge

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

RCUT: A Non-Invasive Method for Detection, Location, and Quantification of Radiological Contaminants in Pipes and Ducts - 12514  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological Characterization Using Tracers (RCUT) is a minimally invasive method for detection and location of residual radiological contamination in pipes and ducts. The RCUT technology utilizes reactive gaseous tracers that dissociate when exposed to gamma and/or beta radiation emitting from a radiological contaminant in a pipe or duct. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) was selected as a tracer for this radiological application, because it is a chemically inert gas that is both nonflammable, nontoxic, and breaks down when exposed to gamma radiation. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the tracer pair of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} formed SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} when exposed to a gamma or beta radioactive field, which indicated the presence of radiological contamination. Field application of RCUT involves first injecting the reactive tracers into the pipe to fill the pipe being inspected and allowing sufficient time for the tracer to interact with any contaminants present. This is followed by the injection of an inert gas at one end of the pipe to push the reactive tracer at a known or constant flow velocity along the pipe and then out the exit and sampling port at the end of the pipeline where its concentration is measured by a gas chromatograph. If a radiological contaminant is present in the pipe being tested, the presence of SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. The time of arrival of the SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} can be used to locate the contaminant. If the pipe is free of radiological contamination, no SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. RCUT and PCUT are both effective technologies that can be used to detect contamination within pipelines without the need for mechanical or human inspection. These methods can be used to detect, locate, and/or estimate the volume of a variety of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, and heavy metals. While further optimization is needed for RCUT, the key first step of identification of a tracer compound appropriate for the application of detecting radioactive pipeline contamination through the detection of decomposition products of SF{sub 6} has been demonstrated. Other tracer gases that will also undergo radiolysis will be considered in the future. The next step for the RCUT development process is conducting laboratory scale tests using short pipelines to define analytical requirements, establish performance boundaries, and develop strategies for lower exposure levels. Studies to identify additional analytical techniques using equipment that is more field rugged than a GC/MS would also be beneficial. (authors)

Bratton, Wesley L.; Maresca, Joseph W. Jr.; Beck, Deborah A. [Vista Engineering Technologies, L.L.C., Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Long-term trends in the avifauna of the Sierra Nevada: community dynamics and species occupancy over a century of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat loss on extinctions at species' low-latitude rangeand local extinction when a species is detected imperfectly.species, with implications for Pleistocene extinctions and

Tingley, Morgan Winn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed.

Wesolowski, Tomasz A. [Dpartement de Chimie Physique, Universit de Genve, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve 4 (Switzerland)] [Dpartement de Chimie Physique, Universit de Genve, 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve 4 (Switzerland)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

491

Kinetic theory and numerical simulations of two-species coagulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we study the stochastic process of two-species coagulation. This process consists in the aggregation dynamics taking place in a ring. Particles and clusters of particles are set in this ring and they can move either clockwise or counterclockwise. They have a probability to aggregate forming larger clusters when they collide with another particle or cluster. We study the stochastic process both analytically and numerically. Analytically, we derive a kinetic theory which approximately describes the process dynamics. One of our strongest assumptions in this respect is the so called well-stirred limit, that allows neglecting the appearance of spatial coordinates in the theory, so this becomes effectively reduced to a zeroth dimensional model. We determine the long time behavior of such a model, making emphasis in one special case in which it displays self-similar solutions. In particular these calculations answer the question of how the system gets ordered, with all particles and clusters moving in the same direction, in the long time. We compare our analytical results with direct numerical simulations of the stochastic process and both corroborate its predictions and check its limitations. In particular, we numerically confirm the ordering dynamics predicted by the kinetic theory and explore properties of the realizations of the stochastic process which are not accessible to our theoretical approach.

Carlos Escudero; Fabricio Macia; Raul Toral; Juan J. L. Velazquez

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

492

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. Which generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples.

Loge, Gary W. (304 Cheryl Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method is described for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. The method involves measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. This generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples. 4 figs.

Loge, G.W.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

494

Species specific blood typing in birds using hemagglutin and precipitin techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to focus on the reactivity across several species in an attempt to relate their taxonomic relationships. The blood from six species; Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Bl khllldl'Dk(hdkdh 11), kghlggdgk (B 1 ~k), d G ld Ph (Ch PP(h B' ) 1- lected... used see Table 3. Taxonomic Grouping Ending Example order family subfamily tribe genus specific epithet species -iformes -idae -inae ? ini Anseriformes Anatidae Anserinae Anserini Branta canadensis Branta canadensis Canada Goose...

Cragg, Peter Charles

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Revision of Neartic species in Opius (Gastrosema)(Hymenoptera:Braconidae:Opiinae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . 91 17 Shape of the mandible in lateral view and the mandibular teeth in frontal view. A, Mandible of Opi us alconanus in lateral view. B, Mandibular teeth of O. alconanus in frontal view. C, Mandible of O. castaneigaster in lateral view. D..., 500 described species, Opiinae is one of the most speciose braconid subfamilies (Wharton 1997d). Relative to other braconid subfamilies, only Braconinae (over 2, 000 species), Microgastrinae (over 1, 400 species), Doryctinae (approximately 1, 178...

Kula, Robert R

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Effect of collision parameters in electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ion neutral collision is shown for two species of positive ions in electronegative plasma. The ion neutral collision is modeled using power law of collision cross section. It is a usual case for processing plasma to have two species of positive ions and hence we attempt to study the dynamics of the two species of ions inside the collisional sheath of electronegative plasma.

Moulick, R.; Goswami, K. S. [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India)] [Center of Plasma Physics, Institute for plasma Research, Sonapur, Guwahati 782402 (India); Mahanta, M. K. [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Arya Vidyapeeth College, Guwahati 781016 (India)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Biodiversity and the Courts: Endangered Species Law in the US, Australia, and Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polar bear Ursus maritimus in Canada. Ottawa: Committeeof Endangered Wildlife in Canada, 2008. [8] DeterminationSpecies at Risk Act. 145 Canada Gazette 27 (July 2, 2011):

Shaffer, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

E-Print Network 3.0 - allogamous forage species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

barley... dock species corn jimsonweed flax johnsongrass millet kochia oats lambsquarters rape nightshade ... Source: Wilkins, Neal - Institute of Renewable Natural Resources &...

499

Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Enterohepatic Helicobacter Species Isolated from Both Laboratory and Wild Rodents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The draft genome sequences of eight enterohepatic Helicobacter species, H. muridarum, H. trogontum, H. typhlonius, and five unnamed helicobacters, are presented here. Using laboratory mice pervasively infected with ...

Sheh, Alexander

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal model species Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Faculty of Science and Technology Summary: species of animals, such as beef, swine, sheep, poultry, aquaculture, and so forth 2. There are three... on the relational data...