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Sample records for invasive nonnative species

  1. Invasive, Nonnative Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy) (Webinar) | Open EnergyInvasive,

  2. Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods Charles G Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes

  3. Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, S.J.

    2002-11-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of this research can be used to prioritize management and research activities related to these invasive taxa on the Research Park as a whole and for specific Natural or Reference Areas. Additional research on the autecology and synecology of each species surveyed is suggested. In particular, research should focus on assessing the impacts of these species on the invaded plant and animal communities and ecosystems. Finally, this ranking system could be used to similarly rank the many other nonnative, invasive species present on the Research Park not included in this study.

  4. An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China of invasive alien species in China. NeoBiota 15: 1­26. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 Abstract Invasive alien: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 www.pensoft.net/journals/neobiota review ArtiCle Advancing research on alien

  5. THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INTRODUCTION OF POTENTIALLY INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES FOR HORTICULTURAL PURPOSES IN NORTH: The Introduction of Potentially Invasive Alien Plant Species for Horticultural Purposes in North America: Assessing/Approved: ________________________________________ #12;iii ABSTRACT Invasive alien plant species are known to cause significant economic and ecological

  6. Marine Introduced Species Q13: Are threats from marine invasive species increasing in Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappal, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    Non-native species have emerged as one of the leading environmental threats to our coastal habitats. These species have been recognized globally as a major threat to biological diversity as well as to agriculture and other ...

  7. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  8. Prevention and Management of Aquatic Invasive Plants in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgerton, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-04

    Determining which non-native aquatic plants have the greatest potential to invade a new area and prohibiting those species prior to their introduction is the key to preventing future injurious invasions. Once introduced ...

  9. New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives? i through batch uploads and quality- controlled online submissions. The New York Natural Heritage Program.NYimapinvasives.org Questions? Contact: imapinvasives@nynhp.org Supported by the New York State Environmental Protection Fund

  10. New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    New York's Online Invasive Species Database and Mapping System What is iMapInvasives? i through batch uploads and quality- controlled online submissions. The New York Natural Heritage Program, and map data www.NYimapinvasives.org Questions? Contact: imapinvasives@nynhp.org Supported by the New York

  11. Adirondack Park GIS interactive non-native invasive plant species project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oles, Hilary; Falge, John; Frantz, Ed; Spada, Dan; Kogut, Ken; Maloney, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    Presentations ADIRONDACK PARK GIS INTERACTIVE NON-NATIVEDemonstrate the interactive GIS database that has beena management plan with a GIS database to test control

  12. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  13. Spatial-Temporal Branching Point Process Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderama, Earvin

    2012-01-01

    A review of models of alien plant spread,” EcologicalThe establishment of alien (invasive) plant and animaleconomic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting regional spread of non-native species using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    that are transported by ocean currents. Given the importance of currents in steering these propagules, ocean- ographic- ingly made use of oceanographic circulation models to estimate currents and track species dispersal models designed to estimate and forecast currents could be valuable for forecasting the spread (Queiroga

  15. Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Vieglais, David A.

    2001-05-01

    ) and commission (including niche space not ,lctually occupied by the 'pecies). Each algorithm for modeling specIes' ecological niches involves a specific com binatiol1 of errors of omission ,md commission. A rel.ltively new approach, called the (;enetic...

  16. Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets Prepared by T. Noma, M. Colunga-Garcia, M. Brewer, J. Landis, and A. Gooch as a part of Michigan State common names Mediterranean snail, common white snail, maritime garden snail Systematic position Mollusca

  17. Application of Branching Models in the Study of Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    and their empirical growth rates. We then characterize the estimated spatial-temporal rate of spread of red banana services. Pimentel et al. (2005, 2007) estimates the financial impact of invasive species in the United States at over 120 billion dollars per year, and Colautti et al. (2006) estimates the cost of eleven

  18. INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    INVASIVE RODENTS ON ISLANDS Avoiding surprise effects on Surprise Island: alien species control Abstract Eradications of invasive alien species have generally benefited biodiversity. However, without following the sudden removal of an invasive alien that was exerting an ecological force on those species

  19. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Julian; et al,

    2014-04-01

    Abstract. Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species’ traits when assessing corridor utility.

  20. Introduction pathways and establishment rates of invasive aquatic species in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Introduction pathways and establishment rates of invasive aquatic species in Europe E. García invasion pathways within Europe. Of the 123 aquatic species introduced into six contrasting Euro- pean of a better establishment capability. The most frequently introduced aquatic species in Europe are freshwater

  1. Managing invasive species: Rules of thumb for rapid assessment Brian Leung a,*, David Finnoff b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    of global environmental change and economic damages, spurring governments worldwide to increase prevention that species invasion is a critical driver of global environmental change has focused attention

  2. ECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Differential Survivorship of Invasive Mosquito Species in South Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliano, Steven A.

    mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (L.), the primary epidemic vector of dengue and yellow fever, was spreadECOLOGY AND POPULATION BIOLOGY Differential Survivorship of Invasive Mosquito Species in South of the arrival of the invasive container mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse), the previously dominant invasive

  3. 3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    3) What makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic concepts: · In most plant communities at most times, most of the resources that are available makes a species invasive? d) Variable resource availability hypothesis Davis et al. (2000) Basic

  4. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, James T.

    Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species Ganesh P of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms. australis stands expanded in size by 6­35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over

  5. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  6. REMOTE SENSING AND GIS APPLICATIONS FOR MAPPING AND SPATIAL MODELLING OF INVASIVE SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REMOTE SENSING AND GIS APPLICATIONS FOR MAPPING AND SPATIAL MODELLING OF INVASIVE SPECIES Chudamani and remote sensing, Mapping techniques, Canopy cover classification ABSTRACT: Biological invasions form invaders. It has long been recognized that remote sensing (RS) and geographical information system (GIS

  7. Investigation of an Invasive Ant Species: Nylanderia fulva Colony Extraction, Management, Diet Preference, Fecundity, and Mechanical Vector Potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Danny 1983-

    2012-11-15

    from The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth. v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my sincere appreciation to all those who have helped facilitate these experiments. I am truly grateful for the good will and generosity of all..., Lowe et al. 2000, Zimmer 2001). The suppression of future introduction of ant species and management of currently known non-native invaders is essential to the conservation of the biodiversity of Earth. A comprehensive understanding of the life...

  8. In the Weeds: Idaho’s Invasive Species Laws and Biofuel Research and Development

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pope, April Lea

    2015-05-01

    Federal laws, policies, and programs that incentivize and mandate the development of biofuels have local effects on both Idaho’s environment and on research supporting biofuels. The passage of a new energy crop rule in Idaho, effective as of March 20, 2014, follows an increased interest in growing, possessing, and transporting energy crops comprised of invasive plant species that are regulated under Idaho’s Invasive Species Act. Idaho’s new energy crop rule is an example of how a state can take measures to protect against unintended consequences of federal laws, policies, and programs while also taking advantage of the benefits of suchmore »policies and programs.« less

  9. Marine Invaders in the Northeast: Rapid Assessment Survey of Non-native and Native Marine Species of Floating Dock Communities, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2005-01-01

    In his seminal book on The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Elton (1958) laid the foundation for the science of biological invasions. He identified the importance of human-mediated vectors as means of transporting ...

  10. Geographic profiling as a novel spatial tool for targeting the control of invasive species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knell, Rob

    of Criminal Justice, Texas State Univ., 601 Univ. Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA. Geographic profiling (GP data from the Biological Records Centre (BRC) for 53 invasive species in Great Britain, ranging from to produce a geoprofile. Geoprofiles do not provide an exact location for the criminal's home, but rather

  11. Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets University IPM Program and M. Philip of Michigan Department of Agriculture. The light brown apple moth and agricultural commodities. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common names apple leafroller

  12. Red-belted clearwing Synanthedon myopaeformis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Red-belted clearwing Synanthedon myopaeformis Michigan State University's invasive species State University IPM Program and M. Philip of Michigan Department of Agriculture. The red-belted. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common names small red-belted clearwing, apple clearwing

  13. Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dunes PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1, ERIC W. SEABLOOM,2 AND SALLY D. HACKER 1 1 Department of Zoology, Oregon may have knock-on effects on non-target native species and ecosystems. For example, coastal dunes arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata. These invasive grasses have converted open, low-lying sand dunes

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of the emerald ash borer invasion on four species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of the emerald ash borer invasion on four species of birds Walter D. Koenig+Business Media Dordrecht 2013 Abstract The emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis, first detected in 2002 that have caused serious damage to North American forest trees, in this case ash trees in the genus Fraxinus

  15. Invasion by alien species and size and location of nature reserves Petr PYSEK\\ Toms KUCERA1 and Vojtech JAROSK2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Invasion by alien species and size and location of nature reserves Petr PYSEK\\ Tomás KUCERA1 in the landscape arfect the probability that it will be exposed to invasion by alien species? ODe of the most large Dnes;we found a weak significant relationship between the occurrence of aliens and reserve area

  16. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D.

    2011-03-01

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  17. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF AN UNPRECEDENTED OUTBREAK Allan L. Carroll University of British Columbia, Department of Forest carbon dynamics. The loss of carbon uptake and the increased emissions from decaying trees have converted

  18. SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects on species, communities and ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects-analysis of 199 articles reporting 1041 field studies that in total describe the impacts of 135 alien plant taxa on resident species, communities and ecosystems. Across studies, alien plants had a significant effect in 11

  19. BROMUS TECTORUM INVASION AND GLOBAL CHANGE: LIKELIHOOD OF SPREAD AND FEASIBILITY OF CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concilio, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    and T. Taylor. 2011. Composting one invasive species toproject, chipping and composting one invasive species was

  20. IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive of a tree can mean to different social groups. The organizers see this "citizen science" (one definition

  1. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01

    soil nitrogen on the dominance of alien annual plants in theNaturalization and invasion of alien plants: Concepts andBerlin. Rundel, P. W. 2000. Alien species in the flora and

  2. Invasive Species in the Forest and the Complexity of their Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    to the US in 1784 from China · Rapid growth · Shade intolerant · Produces wind invasive control · Salt cedar costs $450-2,800 in water loss and $7,400 in removal and restoraPon costs per 2.5 acres. · $50 Billion annually "in reduced

  3. October 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 10 BioScience 919 Biological invasions by nonindigenous species (NIS),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    and NOBOB ships, yet it has sustained surprisingly few initial invasions. Conversely, the waters connecting,regional,and global scales through vectors such as transoceanic shipping, inten- tional release, migration through, Transoceanic Shipping, and the Laurentian Great Lakes KRISTEN T. HOLECK, EDWARD L. MILLS, HUGH J. MACISAAC

  4. Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-121 Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1 Jeffrey E. Hill2 1 of a wide variety of warm-water and tropical species of ornamental, food, bait, and sport fish. In 2012, the farm-gate value of Florida aquaculture was US$69 million, with 40% of that value in ornamental fish

  5. Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native associated with stem cankers on plantation-grown Eucalyptus globulus. Howev- er, very little is known their relationship is to those species infecting Eucalyptus in plantations. The objectives of this study were

  6. Water Quality at Caddo Lake, Center for Invasive Species Eradication: Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Knutson, A.; Ederton, E.; Mukherjee, A.; Baumann, P.; Masser, M.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01

    species in Texas. Special focus of the Center’s efforts was placed on Caddo Lake. It is Texas’ only natural lake and has been plagued by giant salvinia since 2006. Levels of the invader present have risen and fallen with changes in weather and lake levels...

  7. EO 13112: Invasive Species

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA,EnergystudentThis document givesRedWHITE HOUSEthe3

  8. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do, E-mail: ydjung@chonnam.ac.kr

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-?B signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-?B and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-?B, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ? Endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed enhanced invasiveness. ? Nicotine induces uPAR expression and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness. ? MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-?B signals are involved in nicotine-induced uPAR.

  9. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 111 FORESTRY-RELATED PATHWAYS FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), non-wood forest products, and trees for planting. Pests may infest these commodities prior to harvest or transport, or may attach themselves as hitchhikers at any time during the extraction, transport, or trading fauna, and lower the water table. Some invade undisturbed forests, changing species composition

  10. Short pond hydroperiod decreases fitness of nonnative hybrid salamanders in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jarrett

    Short pond hydroperiod decreases fitness of nonnative hybrid salamanders in California J. R, with modified permanent ponds harboring salamanders with a greater proportion of nonnative genes. Our study, nonnative and hybrid. Using experimental pond mesocosms, we implemented three pond drying regimes

  11. Effects of Local Adaptation of Invasion Success: A Case Study of Rhithropanopeus harrisii 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Terrence Michael

    2013-06-04

    A major trend in invasion biology is the development of models to accurately predict and define invasive species and the stages of their invasions. These models focus on a given species with an assumed set of traits. By ...

  12. Conference on Invasive Species in Natural Areas, October 2529, 2010, Coeur D'Alene, ID. Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Wing Alex, Taylor Kim, Rew LJ Vehicles as a vector of plant seed dispersal: quantifying seed loss by vehicles is an important but relatively unmeasured component of the invasion story, and few data exist quantifying how far propagules are dispersed once present on a vehicle and under different driving conditions

  13. Nonnative Plant Response to Silvicultural Treatments: A Model Based on Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Cara

    can have on nonnative vegetation, alter their harvesting techniques to minimize negative nonnative result in substantial adverse effects on the functions of native forest ecosystems, including nutrient in the scientific literature. Of a total of 42 studies that addressed the effects of silvicultural treatments

  14. Selective Herbivory by an Invasive Cyprinid, the Rudd Scardinius erythrophthalmus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapuscinski, Kevin L; John, Farrell M; Stehman, Stephen V; Boyer, Gregory L; Fernando, Danilo D; Teece, Mark A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    1. Herbivory by non-native animals is a problem of growing concern globally, especially for ecosystems where significant native herbivores did not previously exist or have been replaced by non-natives. The rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus) is an omnivorous cyprinid that has a nearly global longitudinal distribution due to human translocations, yet it is unknown whether the rudd feeds selectively among aquatic macrophyte species common to North American waters. 2. We tested a null hypothesis of non-selective feeding by rudds using five species of aquatic macrophytes: Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea canadensis, Najas flexilis, Stuckenia pectinata, and Vallisneria americana. Four rudds were placed in 15 different 890-L tanks and presented with known quantities of each macrophyte species (each tank serving as a block in a randomized complete block design). Each macrophyte bundle was weighed on six dates during a 13 d experiment. Differences in mean percent weight remaining among macrophyte species were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance. We also quantified differences among chemical attributes of the five macrophyte species and qualitatively determined if selective feeding by rudds was related to dry matter content (DMC), percent C by dry weight (%C), percent N by dry weight (%N), and the concentrations of total soluble proteins, two organic acids (aconitic and oxalic acid), total soluble phenolic compounds (<1,000 Da), nine soluble phenolic metabolites, and total phenolic compounds. 3. Selective feeding by rudds was evident, with the order of macrophyte removal (from highest to lowest) being: N. flexilis > E. canadensis > S. pectinata > V. americana > C. demersum. Selection was positively related to %C and atomic C:N, but not DMC, %N, or concentration of total soluble proteins, contrary to the expectation that rudds would select the most nutritious plants available. The concentration of aconitic acid was greatest in N. flexilis, a preferred macrophyte, contrary to the expectation that this compound provides resistance to herbivory. The concentration of oxalic acid, which negatively affects palatability, was highest in C. demersum, the least preferred macrophyte. Selection was also positively related to the concentration of total soluble phenolic compounds; however, examination of the influence of specific phenolic metabolites provided further insights. Concentrations of caffeic acid, trans-caftaric acid, and quercetin were positively related to macrophyte preference by rudds, whereas concentrations of cis-4-O- and trans-4-O-ferulic acid glucoside were negatively related. Patterns between the concentrations of p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, and macrophyte preference by rudds were less obvious. 4. Our results suggest that selective feeding by rudds has the potential to alter macrophyte assemblages and jeopardize habitat restoration projects seeking to establish a diverse plant assemblage. Studies of selective herbivory by various aquatic taxa have provided evidence that selection is simultaneously influenced by multiple plant characteristics, including nutritional quality, morphology, rigidity, and chemical defenses. Future research designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which specific chemical attributes of macrophytes influence selective herbivory by rudds and other taxa will help provide an understanding of how herbivores have changed macrophyte assemblages and make predictions about how macrophyte assemblages will be altered following biological invasions.

  15. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  16. Making the Grade? Idiom processing by native and non-native speakers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Elizabeth

    2012-11-28

    This paper is investigating the processing of idioms by native and non-native speakers. In particular, it seeks to discover whether there is a processing bias, either literally or figuratively, and whether native speakers ...

  17. Investigating Negotiation and Successful Communication in non-Native Directed Speech 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Jean

    2013-03-13

    An abundance of research has been conducted on interactions between native speakers (NS) and non-native speakers (NNS), which has demonstrated that native speakers make conversational adjustments depending on whether they ...

  18. Patterns and pathways in the post-establishment spread of non-indigenous aquatic species: the slowing invasion of North American inland lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Patterns and pathways in the post-establishment spread of non-indigenous aquatic species, but the location of the initial founding population, the mechanisms and pathways of dispersal, and the distribution' over an inhospitable terrestrial environment. Hydrological connections are not always benign passages

  19. Category:NEPA Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    G Geology and Minerals I Induced Seismicity Impact I cont. Intentional Destructive Acts Invasive, Nonnative Species L Lands and Realty Lands with Wilderness Characteristics M...

  20. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

  1. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how) and energy fluxes using the Bowen ratio-energy balance method with measurements of normalized difference

  2. The effects of nonnative interactions on protein folding rates: Theory and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Steven S.

    The effects of nonnative interactions on protein folding rates: Theory and simulation CECILIA interaction energy can actually assist the folding to the native structure. Keywords: protein folding: see www.proteinscience.org The mechanism of protein folding is of central importance to structural

  3. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Ecology 22:55-63. Beggs, J. R. , J. S. Rees, R.and Systematics 38:567-593. Beggs, J. R. , R. J. Toft, J. P.Control 44:399-407. Beggs, J. R. , E. G. Brockerhoff, J. C.

  4. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAboutReubenPress Releases EM PressENERGY STAR® ENERGYEO

  5. INVASION GENETICS: THE BAKER AND STEBBINS LEGACY Comparative genomics in the Asteraceae reveals little

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    pathways may lead to adaptation during introduction and spread in these species. Keywords: Asteraceae been renewed interest in understand- ing the evolutionary changes associated with invasion (Dlugosch

  6. INVASION BY NONNATIVE BROOK TROUT IN PANTHER CREEK, IDAHO: ROLES OF HABITAT QUALITY, CONNECTIVITY, AND BIOTIC RESISTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEDICATION To my wife, Stephanie, and daughter, Rhiannon, for your patience, love, and support. #12;iv. #12;vi TABLE OF CONTENTS DEDICATION ....................................................................

  7. Aspects of Applied Biology 104, 2010 What makes an alien invasive? Risk and policy responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspects of Applied Biology 104, 2010 What makes an alien invasive? Risk and policy responses 37 of the `alien' species invasion and their impact on the native ecosystems is therefore a problem of high practical importance. Biological invasion typically has a few distinctly different stages such as (i) alien

  8. Alien Plants Introduced by Different Pathways Differ in Invasion Success: Unintentional Introductions as a Threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Alien Plants Introduced by Different Pathways Differ in Invasion Success: Unintentional the dimensions of pathways of introduction of alien plants is important for regulating species invasions, but how rigorously tested. We asked whether invasion status, distribution and habitat range of 1,007 alien plant

  9. Proficiency and working memory based explanations for nonnative speakers’ sensitivity to agreement in sentence processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Caitlin E.; Tremblay, Annie

    2013-03-07

    by the KU Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright. This is the published version of the article, made available with the permission of the publisher. The original published version can be found at the link below. Caitlin E. Coughlin... based explanations for nonnative speakers’ sensitivity to agreement in sentence processing CAITLIN E. COUGHLIN and ANNIE TREMBLAY University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Received: August 14, 2010 Accepted for publication: June 16, 2011 ADDRESS...

  10. HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, George

    to recognize that only a small percentage of exotic species are invasive. Many exotic plants that are featured of all, they are located primarily in urban areas, where many gardens include some of the most invasive species. These gardens provide seeds of exotics that can enter the greenway by being blown in by wind

  11. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  12. Genetic signature of a recent invasion: The ragged sea hare Bursatella leachii in Mar Menor (SE Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Rita

    Genetic signature of a recent invasion: The ragged sea hare Bursatella leachii in Mar Menor (SE, Portugal b Departamento de Ciencias del Mar y Biología Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San hypothesis for the origin of invasions is that colonization by invasive species is most often associated

  13. Ecological effects of invasive alien insects Marc Kenis Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg Alain Roques Laura Timms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Ecological effects of invasive alien insects Marc Kenis Ć Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg Ć Alain Roques identified 403 primary research publications that investigated the ecological effects of invasive alien, preda- tion or parasitism. Alien species may also affect native species and communities through more com

  14. Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirmer, Julia

    2005-01-01

    For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming may freeze the invasion of big-headed ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming may freeze the invasion of big-headed ants Cleo Bertelsmeier · Gloria is that these threats interact, and that a globally warming climate could favour invasive species. In this study we techniques, 3 Global Circu- lation Models and 2 CO2 emission scenarios, we generated world maps with suitable

  16. INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    INVASION NOTE Crassostrea gigas in natural oyster banks in southern Brazil Cla´udio M. R. Melo Ć.V. 2009 Abstract We report on the invasion of Brazil by the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and discuss was found amongst the native species in oyster banks up to 100 km south of oyster farms in South Brazil

  17. Controlling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvinia-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  18. Contolling invasive weed: Center begins evaluating giant salvina-eating weevils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    26 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Melanie Orth Caddo Lake is the focus of the first project for the Center for Invasive Species Eradication. Scientists will demonstrate and evaulate different methods for controlling and preventing...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petite, Samuel

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial spread of an alien tree species in a heterogeneous forest landscape the observed invasion patterns of an alien tree species, Prunus serotina Ehrh., in a heterogeneous managed

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER A review of the alien and expansive species of freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER A review of the alien and expansive species of freshwater cyanobacteria and algae their impact on local species and other real or potential risks resulting from their spread. The list of alien Alien species Á Invasive species Á Expansive species Á Cyanobacteria Á Algae Á Freshwater Á Czech

  1. Mathematical models of biological invasions A case study of gypsy moth in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is spent annually to control invasive species and their impact (Defenders of wildlife) One of the largest to the ground becomes a tree" (A. Liebhold) Upon arrival, exotic species need to overcome certain obstacles effect) Common causes: inbreeding depression, absence of cooperative feeding, failure to satiate natural

  2. Biological Invasions 5: 179192, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    : biological invasion, introduced species, nativism, Nazis, racism, xenophobia Abstract Critics from the fields to control introduced species as infected by nativism, racism, and xenophobia. Many appeals against a particular aesthetic judgment is in no way underlain by xenophobia or racism. Certainly the Nazi drive

  3. Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Which Factors Affect the Success or Failure of Eradication Campaigns against Alien Species? Therese, The Netherlands Abstract Although issues related to the management of invasive alien species are receiving factors that relate to the success of management campaigns aimed at eradicating invasive alien

  4. Combating Invasive Species Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioenergetics model that indicates Asian carp cannot survive in Lake Michigan given the available food types and bioenergetics modeling are providing information for the first two projects. Bioenergetics is the study

  5. Egyptian cottonworm Spodoptera littoralis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    , pines, poplars, potatoes, radish, roses, soybeans, spinach, sunflowers, taro, tea, tobacco, tomatoes; newly hatched larvae are blackish-grey to dark green; mature larvae are reddish-brown or whitish mm long; initially green with reddish abdomen, then turn to dark reddish-brown. Eggs : Whitish

  6. Carthusian snail Monacha cartusiana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    of live and dead plants (Taylor 1917). Biology The Carthusian snail is an air-breathing land snail. It inhabits sunny and dry bushes and grassy slopes, hedges and street sides in low altitudes (Anon.). After pest mollusks found in Michigan. Economic and environmental significance to Michigan This snail feeds

  7. The Utilization of Listening Strategies in the Development of Listening Comprehension among Skilled and Less-skilled Non-native English Speakers at the College Level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yi-Chun

    2011-02-22

    ) Is there a difference between skilled and less-skilled non-native English speakers in the self-reported use of four categories of listening strategies (memory, cognitive, meta-cognitive, and socio-affective)? 3) What factors influence the use of self...

  8. Predicting trends of invasive plants richness using local socio-economic data: An application in North Portugal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Mario; Freitas, Raul; Crespi, Antonio L.; Hughes, Samantha Jane; Cabral, Joao Alexandre

    2011-10-15

    This study assesses the potential of an integrated methodology for predicting local trends in invasive exotic plant species (invasive richness) using indirect, regional information on human disturbance. The distribution of invasive plants was assessed in North Portugal using herbarium collections and local environmental, geophysical and socio-economic characteristics. Invasive richness response to anthropogenic disturbance was predicted using a dynamic model based on a sequential modeling process (stochastic dynamic methodology-StDM). Derived scenarios showed that invasive richness trends were clearly associated with ongoing socio-economic change. Simulations including scenarios of growing urbanization showed an increase in invasive richness while simulations in municipalities with decreasing populations showed stable or decreasing levels of invasive richness. The model simulations demonstrate the interest and feasibility of using this methodology in disturbance ecology. - Highlights: {yields} Socio-economic data indicate human induced disturbances. {yields} Socio-economic development increase disturbance in ecosystems. {yields} Disturbance promotes opportunities for invasive plants.{yields} Increased opportunities promote richness of invasive plants.{yields} Increase in richness of invasive plants change natural ecosystems.

  9. LettersForum512 Can biological invasions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Odorico, Paolo

    LettersForum512 Letters Can biological invasions induce desertification? A common form of land present a new desertification paradigm that includes the invasion of stable desert shrublands by exotic

  10. Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361 Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasions in Areas of alien plant species. This is particularly problematic in areas which have experienced disturbances

  11. Social aspects include following applicable laws and international treaties; using open and transparent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the potential of bioenergy crops spreading genetically modified organisms, invasive species, or nonnative Biodiversity and habitat Genetically modified organisms and invasives Soil health Environ -mental mic for animal feed, food, and processed-food ingredients. Economic factors are influenced by government policies

  12. Noticing in text-based computer-mediated communication: a study of a task-based telecommunication between native and nonnative English speakers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen-Chun

    2009-05-15

    , 3 Fujiwara, & Fearnow, 1999; Lai & Zhao, 2006; Loewen, 2002, 2003a, 2003b, 2004, 2005; Long, 1991; Mackey, 2006; Smith, 2003a, 2003b). Noticing 1 is an internal operation through which a learner processes input and transforms it into knowledge..., 2002; Skehan, 2003), interlocutors (native vs. nonnative speaking interlocutors of different language proficiency, or teacher vs. student) (Fernandez-Garcia & Martinez-Arbelaiz., 2002; Gass & Varonis, 1985; Long, 1983a, 1983b; Mackey, 2006; Pica...

  13. Biological Invasions 6: 269281, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudouresque, Charles F.

    ) reaches the Canary Islands (north-east Atlantic) Marc Verlaque1, , Julio Afonso-Carrillo2 , M. Candelaria: Atlantic, Bryopsidales, Canary Islands, Caulerpa racemosa, introduced species, invasive algae, 18S intron into the Mediterranean Sea also occurs in the Canary Islands. This is the first report of C. racemosa var. cylindracea

  14. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  15. Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alien species in fresh waters: ecological effects, interactions with other stressors, and prospects dozens of alien species. 2. Invasions are highly nonrandom with respect to the taxonomic identity, which probably have been underestimated as an ecological force. 4. The number of alien species

  16. Sensitive Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species Sensitive Species By avoiding or minimizing the

  17. Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization APPENDIX I This chapter describes the fish selected the focal species based on their significance and ability to characterize the health

  18. Invasive Pathogens By: Kelly Moffett, Ryan Crawford,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    ;Literature Review Invasion Pathways of Terrestrial Plant-Inhabiting Fungi (Mary E. Palm and Amy Y Rossman Collected data on Native/Introduced areas Introduction pathways Time of Introduction Analyzed Types of Invasive Pathogens Introduction type Accidental pathways Resources Used Internet databases, including

  19. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  20. One of the most pervasive human impacts to salt marshes around the world is the introduction of nonnative species. Plant introductions to salt marsh systems have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    . The aboveground structure shades the substrate, reducing photosynthesis of benthic microalgae and restricts water plant biomass and peat production, influence sediment chemistry and metabolism. In addition, belowground plant biomass can preempt substantial amounts of belowground habitat, directly reducing benthic

  1. Endangered Species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJonHereEndangered Species

  2. Colonial Invasions, Colonial Lives History 302

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 Colonial Invasions, Colonial Lives History 302 Consider Resources Primary Resources: diaries (scholarly vs popular), theses, the Web... Check subject guide under: Research by Subject History Library Reference collection unless otherwise indicated. Encyclopedia of Cuba: People, History, Culture

  3. Invasion of a Sphagnum-peatland by Betula spp and Molinia caerulea impacts on organic matter biochemistry. Implications for carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the extent of the influence of this invasion on the biochemical characteristics of the peat. Elemental substrate injection as invading plants have a lower ratio than Sphagnum spp and Sphagnum peat. Total the availability of resources to other species (Jones et al, 1994). Sphagnum species, by regulating

  4. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  5. The importance of Opuntia in Mexico and routes of invasion and impact of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soberó n, Jorge; Golubov, J.; Sarukhá n, J.

    2001-12-01

    for these two purposes. By using bioclimatic modeling, we predicted the potential distribution of C. cactorum and overlaid this on the actual distribution of Opuntia species. The resulting maps indicate that the possible routes of invasion to Mexico are 1) along...

  6. The War against Biotic Invasion - A New Challenge of Biodiversity Conservation for China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuhong

    2006-01-01

    AND ADMINISTRATION, CONTROL OF ALIEN NOTICE INVASIVE ONTHE WORLD'S WORST INVASIVE ALIEN SPE- available at http://Law Making to Prevent Alien Biological Invasion, LEGAL

  7. Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion Dana Blumenthala,1, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor levels of available resources in their native range are particularly susceptible to enemies

  8. Invasion of Iraq & Looting of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasion of Iraq & Looting of the National Museum Army Reserve Major Corine Wegener is mobilized for Everyone (SAFE) develops the DoD Iraq & Afghanistan Heritage Reference Websites. DoD hosts a symposium Iraq/Afghanistan Playing Cards sent to US military locations and in-theatre. CENTCOM Historical

  9. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  10. Images courtesy Iridium, Rochester Institute of Technology 10/27/11! 1!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ! ­ Invasive non-native plant species! ­ Development of Urban / Wildland Interfaces! · Recent fires cost Greece Fire Size Elapsed time (min) FireSize(ha) Fig. 15 Cumulative median fire size (ha) for the Dogrib model (September 25, 2001 near Nordegg, in central Alberta. Assumed wind speed 47km/h, ignition from a point source

  11. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    ecological indicators of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. non-native species, such as house

  12. Full story from the April 2010 issue CENTER FOR INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT | Montana State University | PO Box 173120 Bozeman, MT 59717

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    .weedcenter.org | email: weedcenter@montana.edu Seed Dispersal by Vehicles By Dr. Lisa Rew and Fredric Pollnac1 If you have ever driven your vehicle off-road or on an unpaved road surface, chances are that you have played vehicle only moved a few seeds of this invasive species a short distance, natural events such as wind

  13. Corridors and plant invasions: A comparative study of the role of roadsides and hiking trails on plant invasions in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochrein, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Habitat  invasions  by  alien  plants:  a  quantitative Context  on  Patterns  of  Alien  Plant  Invasions  along W.   1985.   Impact  of  Alien  Plants  on  Hawai‘i?s 

  14. Ecological niche and potential geographic distribution of the invasive fruit fly *Bactrocera invadens* (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, M. De; Robertson, M. P.; Mansell, M. W.; Ekesi, S.; Tsuruta, K.; Mwaiko, W.; Vayssiè res, J-F; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-01

    niches in evolutionary time. Science 285, 1265-1267. 22 Peterson, A.T. & Vieglais, D.A. (2001) Predicting species invasions using ecological 23 niche modeling. BioScience 51, 363-371. 24 doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2009.11.014 Peterson A.T., Pape?, M... global scale. Global Change Biology 11, 2234-2250. 3 USDA/APHIS (2000) Cooperative Carambola fruit fly Eradication Program. 4 Environmental Assesment, December 2000. 5 http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppd/es/pdf%20files/carambola.pdf 6 Vargas, R.I., Chang, H...

  15. Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M.

    2008-04-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

  16. SYNTHESIS Invisible invaders: non-pathogenic invasive microbes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Invisible invaders: non-pathogenic invasive microbes in aquatic on invasive plants and animals has risen exponentially, little is known about invasive microbes, especially but are much harder to detect than invasions by macroorganisms. Invasive microbes have the potential

  17. TGF-{beta}1 increases invasiveness of SW1990 cells through Rac1/ROS/NF-{kappa}B/IL-6/MMP-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binker, Marcelo G.; CBRHC Research Center, Buenos Aires ; Binker-Cosen, Andres A.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Cosen, Rodica H. de; Cosen-Binker, Laura I.

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Rac1 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced SW1990 invasion through MMP-2 secretion and activation. {yields} NADPH-generated ROS act downstream of Rac1 in TGF-{beta}1-challenged SW1990 cells. {yields} TGF-{beta}1-stimulated ROS activate NF-{kappa}B in SW1990 cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B-induced IL-6 release is required for secretion and activation of MMP-2 in SW1990 cells. -- Abstract: Human pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis have been found to correlate with increased levels of active matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2). The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) has been shown to increase both secretion of MMP-2 and invasion by several pancreatic cancer cell types. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathway involved in TGF-{beta}1-promoted MMP-2 secretion and invasion by human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990. Using specific inhibitors, we found that stimulation of these tumor cells with TGF-{beta}1 induced secretion and activation of the collagenase MMP-2, which was required for TGF-{beta}1-stimulated invasion. Our results also indicate that signaling events involved in TGF-{beta}1-enhanced SW1990 invasiveness comprehend activation of Rac1 followed by generation of reactive oxygen species through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, activation of nuclear factor-kappa beta, release of interleukin-6, and secretion and activation of MMP-2.

  18. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  19. Summer fruit tortrixAdoxophyes orana Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    and ornamental plantings. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests. Other common name smaller tea tortrix : Up to 20 mm long; body yellow-green to dark- green ornamented with warts and light hairs; head brown

  20. Citrus long-horned beetle Anoplophora chinensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    host plants for this insect are present in urban landscapes, orchards, hardwood forests, and riparian in orchards in an attempt to reduce populations (McDougall 2001). Economic and environmental significance

  1. Why should you care? Zebra mussels are invasive species that cause declines in native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and industrial water supply systems by colonizing the insides of pipelines and restricting the flow of water Union, zebra mussels are firmly established in Europe and have invaded much of the U.S. On April 3, 2009 and Trinity River systems as well as much of Texas. Both river systems extend southward to the Gulf of Mexico

  2. Occupation, Dispersal, and Economic Impact of Major Invasive Plant Species in Southern U.S. Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan

    2011-02-22

    (Ligustrum sinense Lour.), European Privet (Ligustrum vulgare L.), and Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.). Using data from USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and USGS...

  3. Dynamics of invasion and native species recovery following fire in coastal sage scrub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gressard, Scott Charles

    2012-01-01

    Biology. 16: 909-23. O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal sageSpringer-Verlag, New York O'Leary, J. F. 1990. Post-fireof Vegetation Science 1:173-180 O'Leary, J. F. 1995. Coastal

  4. Silver Y moth Autographa gamma Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    and other plants. Plant hosts There is an extended list of annual and perennial plants and cultivated polyphagous defoliator of many cultivated plants. Its accidental introduction to Michigan may pose a concern in particular to vegetable and floriculture nurseries and industries. Michigan risk maps for exotic plant pests

  5. EDITORIAL: UC and the state of California team up against invasive species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grafton-Cardwell, Elixabeth E

    2014-01-01

    Food and Agriculture provided critical scientific information and outreach to bring pests (insects,Food and Agriculture Code states that “the Department [CDFA] shall prevent the introduction and spread of injurious insects

  6. Potato wart disease Synchytrium endobioticum Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    in the United States (Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia) and Canada (Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island

  7. Advanced Robotics Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotics technologies have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Advanced Robotics Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotics technologies have revolutionized robot technologies for clinical use, researchers and clinicians at Canadian Surgical Technologies & Advanced Robotics (CSTAR) are setting international standards for surgical technology, treatment innovation

  8. Effects of Simvastatin and Fluvastatin on Endothelial Invasion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Evan

    2011-08-04

    (bFGF), as well as the lysosphingolipid Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P). Invasion is distinguishable by dramatic EC morphological changes from simple squamous cells to sprouting structures that ultimately form new lumens. Cholesterol synthesis...

  9. Contributed Paper Latent Extinction and Invasion Risk of Crayfishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    invasive in the future. We evaluated biological and ecological traits with principal coordinate analysis peligro (peque~nos, fecundidad baja, especialistas de h´abitat), por lo tanto soportando la hip´otesis de

  10. Alien invasion Getting to the root of radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Alien invasion Getting to the root of radiation Fighting crime with genetic ingenuity Fall2005 troublesome alien plants in North America, among other faculty research stories. As usual, you will also hear

  11. Exponential growth of ponds in invasion percolation on regular trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    In invasion percolation, the edges of successively maximal weight (the outlets) divide the invasion cluster into a chain of ponds separated by outlets. On the regular tree, the ponds are shown to grow exponentially, with law of large numbers, central limit theorem and large deviation results. The tail asymptotics for a fixed pond are also studied and are shown to be related to the asymptotics of a critical percolation cluster, with a logarithmic correction.

  12. Preservation of a species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Sarah (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01

    To put it simply, humans are going extinct. I identify the source of the problem as an imperceptible societal trend to eliminate the experience that authenticates us as a living species: failure. We've unanimously designated ...

  13. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  14. Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2008-05-07

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  15. Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

    2007-03-13

    The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the inhibitory effects of CIL-102 on viability and invasiveness in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Sze, Chun-I

    2013-11-01

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone), the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects. Herein, we present an investigation focused on the identification of the target(s) of CIL-102's action and the mechanism of its action in apoptotic and anti-invasive pathways. Proteomic approaches were used to purify and identify the protein substrates using 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to assess changes in the expression of relevant protein treatment with CIL-102 that resulted in the inhibition of viability and invasion. Our results demonstrate that CIL-102 treatment of U87 cells decreased cell proliferation and invasiveness. CIL-102 dose-dependent induction of apoptosis and inhibitory invasiveness were accompanied by sustained phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p70S6K as well as generation of the reactive oxygen species. In addition, differential proteins displayed between CIL-102-treated and untreated U87 were determined and validated. There were 11 differentially expressed proteins between the CIL-102-treated and untreated groups. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CIL-102 inhibited cancer cell proliferation and reduced anti-invasion properties by up-regulating the levels of FUMH (Fumarate hydratase). The investigation demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of FUMH in the CIL-102 reduction in viability and invasion via the activation of JNK1/2 and mTOR signaling modules. NAC administration and shRNA FUMH conferred resistance to CIL-102-inhibited HIF1? and MMP-2 levels via inhibition of JNK1/2 and mTOR activation. We concluded that CIL-102-induced an apoptosis cascade and decreased aggressiveness in astrocytoma cells by modulation of mitochondria function, providing a new mechanism for CIL-102 treatment. - Highlights: • We found the effect of CIL-102 on neuroblastoma cells. • Fumarate hydratase as a CIL-102's target by proteomic differential displays. • CIL-102 regulated-FUMH stimulates apoptosis-related protein and inactivation HIF1.

  17. Endangered Species Consultation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endangered Species Consultation Handbook Procedures for Conducting" " Consz~ltationand Conference Service March 1998 Final #12;FOREWORD It gives us great pleasure to introduce the final Section 7 Handbook Service employees. The Handbook provides internal guidance and establishes national policy for conducting

  18. Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21,...

  19. State Arboretum of Virginia at Blandy Experimental Farm Alien Invasive Landscape Plants in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    State Arboretum of Virginia at Blandy Experimental Farm Alien Invasive Landscape Plants in Virginia The following list contains alien invasive plants that are grown and/or used in the landscape/nursery industry

  20. University of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    , diversions, and inter-basin water transfers alter disturbance regimes (flood frequency, magnitude, timingUniversity of Nevada, Reno Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance GRACE MORTENSON entitled Plant Community Invasibility in Riparian Landscapes: Role of Disturbance

  1. Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: What's Invasive / Project Budburst Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract What's Invasive and Project Budburst are citizen science projects mobile-based citizen science deployment, as well as issues surrounding system development

  2. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  3. NON-INVASIVE MEASUREMENT OF DEEP TISSUE TEMPERATURE CHANGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    deep tissue temperature using subtle spectral features of the water peak at 975 nm.3 A signi- ging (DOSI) to measure deep tissue temperature, using spectral features of the water absorption peakNON-INVASIVE MEASUREMENT OF DEEP TISSUE TEMPERATURE CHANGES CAUSED BY APOPTOSIS DURING BREAST

  4. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation Algorithm (IDEA) is an ex­ ample of one such algorithm. However, little is known about the practical benefits of these algorithms even though AI--techniques are often favored in practice because

  5. Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    in practice because of their general applicability and good performance on com- plicated real­world problemsBringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization in a Minimally Invasive Vascular Intervention Simulation university technical report UU-CS-2004-049 www.cs.uu.nl #12;Bringing IDEAs into Practice: Optimization

  6. Mechanisms Limiting a Vertebrate Invasion: Brook Trout in Mountain Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with channel slopes of 13 % over 67 m. During the summer, brook trout moved upstream more than downstream even, prevented upstream movements. In downstream-directed invasions (originating from headwater lakes), brook trout apparently dispersed downstream through 80 % slopes and over 18-m-high waterfalls and occupied

  7. Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Troy

    REVIEW Next-generation tools for evolutionary invasion analyses Amy Hurford1,*, Daniel Cownden1 on so-called `next-generation' matrices. Although this next-generation matrix approach has sometimes to a wider evolutionary audience in two ways. First, we review the next-generation matrix approach

  8. STRUCTURED AND FLEXIBLE GRAY-BOX COMPOSITION USING INVASIVE DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    problems for SAP AG's SOA infrastructure are considered, e.g., in the CESSA research project). Fig. 1.sudholt@mines-nantes.fr ABSTRACT The evolution of complex distributed software systems often requires intricate composition of complex software systems that require invasive modifications. Concretely, we provide three contributions

  9. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Packer, Samuel (Floral Park, NY)

    1984-01-01

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  10. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  11. 206 Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Invasion Terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    traits of "high-im- pact" invaders. Daehler expresses concern regard- ing the subjectivity of the term206 Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Invasion Terminology: Should Ecologists Define Their Terms Dif- ferently Than Others? No, Not if We Want to be of Any Help! Daehler (2001) recently argued

  12. Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Biological Invasion: Hound's Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) and Livestock Production in British Columbia by Rupananda Widanage Ph.D. (Economics), University of Ruhuna, 2007 M.Sc., Asian: Master of Resource Management Report Number: 529 Title of Research Project: Economics of Biological

  13. Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    With, Kimberly A.

    Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Assessing the Risk of Invasive Spread in Fragmented Landscapes in the field of landscape ecology, provide a tool for assessing the risk of invasive spread in fragmented landscapes. A percolation-based analysis of the potential for invasive spread in fragmented landscapes

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Drought-tolerance of an invasive alien tree, Acacia mearnsii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Drought-tolerance of an invasive alien tree, Acacia mearnsii and two native+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Invasive alien plants (IAPs) have success- fully invaded many riparian zones. Keywords Invasive alien plant Á Water potential Á Carbon isotope Á Restoration Á Streamflow Á Xylem

  15. Part 2. Species Selection Adaptability of Some Eucalyptus Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part 2. Species Selection Adaptability of Some Eucalyptus Species in Southwest Oregon1 Lee O. Hunt2-industrial forest 1 Presented at the Workshop on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento of harvesting in their life- times. The screening of trials of Eucalyptus species were a part of a personal

  16. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ? Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ? Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ? We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ? Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  17. Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Are hybrid species more fit than ancestral parent species in the current hybrid species habitats? L Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Introduction Hybridization is receiving renewed attention as an important). For homoploid hybridization in plants, where chromosome number remains the same, models and empirical evi- dence

  18. Loopless non-trapping invasion percolation model for fracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in hydraulic fracturing (fracking) have enabled the recovery of large quantities of natural gas and oil from old, low permeability shales. These developments include a change from low-volume, high-viscosity fluid injection to high-volume, low-viscosity injection. The injected fluid introduces distributed damage that provides fracture permeability for the extraction of the gas and oil. In order to model this process, we utilize a loopless non-trapping invasion percolation previously introduced to model optimal polymers in a strongly disordered medium, and for determining minimum energy spanning trees on a lattice. We performed numerical simulations on a 2D square lattice and find significant differences from other percolation models. Additionally, we find that the growing fracture network satisfies both Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga network statistics. As with other invasion percolation models, our model displays burst dynamics, in which the cluster extends rapidly into a connected region. W...

  19. From invasion percolation to flow in rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettstein, Salomon J; Araujo, Nuno A M; Lanyon, Bill; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to simulate two-phase flow in the form of immiscible displacement through anisotropic, three-dimensional (3D) discrete fracture networks (DFN). The considered DFNs are artificially generated, based on a general distribution function or are conditioned on measured data from deep geological investigations. We introduce several modifications to the invasion percolation (MIP) to incorporate fracture inclinations, intersection lines, as well as the hydraulic path length inside the fractures. Additionally a trapping algorithm is implemented that forbids any advance of the invading fluid into a region, where the defending fluid is completely encircled by the invader and has no escape route. We study invasion, saturation, and flow through artificial fracture networks, with varying anisotropy and size and finally compare our findings to well studied, conditioned fracture networks.

  20. An option pricing theory explanation of the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhtaseb, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to explain the invasion of Kuwait by making an analogy between a call option and the Iraq-Kuwait situation before the invasion on August 2, 1990. A number of factors contributed to the issuance of a deep-in-the money European call option to Iraq against Kuwait. The underlying asset is the crude oil reserves under Kuwait. Price of crude oil is determined in world spot markets. The exercise price is equal to the cost of permanently annexing and retaining Kuwait. The volatility is measured by the annualized variance of the weekly rate of return of the spot price of crude oil. Time-to-expiration is equal to the time period between decision date and actual invasion date. Finally, since crude oil prices are quoted in U.S. dollars, the U.S. Treasury bill rate is assumed to be the risk-free rate. In a base-case scenario, Kuwait`s oil reserves amount to 94,500 million barrels valued at $18 a barrell in early February 1990 resulting in a market value of $1,701 billion. Because the cost of the war to Iraq is not known, we assume it is comparable to that of the U.S.-led coalition of $51.0 billion. Time-to-expiration is six months. The treasury bill rate in early 1990 was around 7.5 percent. Annualized standard deviation of weekly rates of return is 0.216. The value of Kuwait`s invasion option is $1,642.25 billion. Depending on the scenario, the value of this special option ranged between $1,450 billion and $3.624 billion. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Song-Ze; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling; Michelli-Rivera, Audrey; Han, Shuang-Yin; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J.

    2013-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: • We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. • Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. • It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. • Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and transformation.

  2. Frequent Consumption and Rapid Digestion of Prey by the Lake Erie Watersnake with Implications for an Invasive Prey Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Richard B.

    Frequent Consumption and Rapid Digestion of Prey by the Lake Erie Watersnake with Implications by Lake Erie Watersnakes. Digestive rate trials and maximum voluntary prey consumption trials indicate that gastric digestion is rapid (digestion was 90% complete after just 16.4 hours at 30°C and 20.1 hours at 25

  3. Evaluation of oocyte competency in bovine and canine species via non-invasive assessment of oocyte quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willingham-Rocky, Lauri A.

    2009-05-15

    ), and intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) using rhodamine 123, JC-1 and Fluo-4, AM, respectively in bovine and canine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. Comparison of morphological grading with fluorescence intensity yielded similar trends between all grades...

  4. The distribution and role of an invasive plant species, Lantana camara, in disturbed roadside habitats in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    abilities of most biocontrol agents (Thomas & Ellison 2000).control agent for Lantana camara in Australia. Biocontrol

  5. U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Preventing Invasive Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    all water from the boat hull. · Drain live-wells, bilge, ballast tanks, and transom wells. · Empty weather. Calculate local dry time at: http://www.100thmeridian.org/Emersion.asp · If sufficient drying of last use. If this is not possible, arrange for cleaning at a facility that is specially designed

  6. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California Over 2000-2009: Implications for Emergency Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    meta-analysis. BMJ. of mechanical ventilation: a population-NM, Dettmer M, et al. Mechanical ventilation and Westernet al. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California from

  7. The Role of Native Riparian Vegetation in Resisting Invasion by Giant Reed, Arundo donax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palenscar, Kai

    2012-01-01

    demography of arroyo willow (Salix lasiolepis: Salicaceae).whereas sandbar willow (Salix exigua) facilitated invasion1998). Sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nutt. ) and mulefat (

  8. The size of a pond in 2D invasion percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Jacob van den; Vágvölgyi, Bálint

    2007-01-01

    We consider invasion percolation on the square lattice. It has been proved by van den Berg, Peres, Sidoravicius and Vares, that the probability that the radius of a so-called pond is larger than n, differs at most a factor of order log n from the probability that in critical Bernoulli percolation the radius of an open cluster is larger than n. We show that these two probabilities are, in fact, of the same order. Moreover, we prove an analogous result for the volume of a pond.

  9. Species Doubling and Chiral Lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz; Michel Tytgat

    1996-05-15

    Coupling gauge fields to the chiral currents from an effective Lagrangian for pseudoscalar mesons naturally gives rise to a species doubling phenomenon similar to that seen with fermionic fields in lattice gauge theory.

  10. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  11. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, Michael P. (Albquuerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  12. Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehrbass, Nana

    2005-01-01

    Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

  13. Fire Management Impacts on Invasive Plants in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Review Fire Management Impacts on Invasive Plants in the Western United States JON E. KEELEY U, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, U.S.A. Abstract: Fire management practices affect alien plant invasions in diverse ways. I considered the impact of six fire management practices on alien

  14. Regional analysis of the impacts of climate change on cheatgrass invasion shows potential risk and opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    Regional analysis of the impacts of climate change on cheatgrass invasion shows potential risk to increase invasion risk to native ecosystems. Changing climate creates risk as new terrain becomes, followed by winter temperature. I perform a sensitivity analysis on potential cheatgrass distributions

  15. Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Allee Effects and the Risk of Biological Invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2004 Allee Effects and the Risk of Biological Invasion John M. Drake the importance of considering nonlinear phenomena, including thresholds, when conducting risk analysis been proposed that this theory may be employed in risk analysis of biological invasion to pre

  16. RISK ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES AND INLAND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISK ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES AND INLAND AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS Program in Biological Sciences Notre Dame, Indiana April 2004 #12;RISK ANALYSIS FOR BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS by humans. There are few tools for risk analysis of NIS introductions, most of which are insufficiently

  17. Optimization of a piezoelectric bimorph grasper for use in minimally invasive surgical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Optimization of a piezoelectric bimorph grasper for use in minimally invasive surgical applications for publication on 10 June 2005. DOI: 10.1243/095440505X32607 Abstract: The potential use of piezoelectric bimorph actuators in minimally invasive surgery suture-needle grasper/holder applications is explored

  18. Microbial invasion of the Caribbean by an Indo-Pacific coral zooxanthella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microbial invasion of the Caribbean by an Indo-Pacific coral zooxanthella D. Tye Pettaya,b,1 , Drew Institutes of Energy and the Environment, University Park, PA 16802 Edited by Nancy A. Moran, University functions are poorly documented (6). Microbial invasions are difficult to detect, especially among free

  19. Polo-like Kinase I is involved in Invasion through Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-04-02

    Polo-like kinase 1, PLK1, has important functions in maintaining genome stability and is involved in regulation of mitosis. PLK1 is up regulated in many invasive carcinomas. We asked whether it may also play a role in acquisition of invasiveness, a crucial step in transition to malignancy. In a model of metaplastic basal-like breast carcinoma progression, we found that PLK1 expression is necessary but not sufficient to induce invasiveness through laminin-rich extracellular matrix. PLK1 mediates invasion via Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin, both of which are necessary. We observed that PLK1 phosphorylates Vimentin on serine 82, which in turn regulates cell surface levels of {beta}1 integrin. We found PLK1 to be also highly expressed in pre-invasive in situ carcinomas of the breast. These results support a role for the involvement of PLK1 in the invasion process and point to this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for pre-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma treatment.

  20. Successful spread of a biocontrol agent reveals a biosecurity failure: elucidating long distance invasion pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    Successful spread of a biocontrol agent reveals a biosecurity failure: elucidating long distance to successful invasion. In this study, the dispersal of a classical biological control agent, the mymarid egg. Survey results suggest that invasive orga- nisms, like deliberately released biological control agents

  1. R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon sequestration D . A . P E LT Z E R on the effects of some of the major drivers of global change on carbon (C) sequestration, particularly carbon that drive C sequestration. Keywords: biological invasion, carbon sequestration, community structure, forest

  2. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  3. Redox Protein Expression Predicts Radiotherapeutic Response in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolston, Caroline M.; Al-Attar, Ahmad; Storr, Sarah J.; Ellis, Ian O.; Morgan, David A.L.; Martin, Stewart G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Early-stage invasive breast cancer patients have commonly undergone breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. In a large majority of these patients, the treatment is effective; however, a proportion will develop local recurrence. Deregulated redox systems provide cancer cells protection from increased oxidative stress, such as that induced by ionizing radiation. Therefore, the expression of redox proteins was examined in tumor specimens from this defined cohort to determine whether such expression could predict response. Methods and Materials: The nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of nine redox proteins (glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutaredoxin, glutathione peroxidase 1, 3, and 4, and glutathione S-transferase-{theta}, -{pi}, and -{alpha}) was assessed using conventional immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 224 tumors. Results: A high cytoplasmic expression of glutathione S-transferase-{theta} significantly correlated with a greater risk of local recurrence (p = .008) and, when combined with a low nuclear expression (p = .009), became an independent predictive factor (p = .002) for local recurrence. High cytoplasmic expression of glutathione S-transferase-{theta} also correlated with a worse overall survival (p = .009). Low nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of glutathione peroxidase 3 (p = .002) correlated with a greater risk of local recurrence and was an independent predictive factor (p = .005). These proteins did not correlate with tumor grade, suggesting their function might be specific to the regulation of oxidative stress rather than alterations of tumor phenotype. Only nuclear (p = .005) and cytoplasmic (p = .001) expression of glutathione peroxidase 4 correlated with the tumor grade. Conclusions: Our results support the use of redox protein expression, namely glutathione S-transferase-{theta} and glutathione peroxidase 3, to predict the response to radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer patients. If incorporated into routine diagnostic tests, they have the potential to aid clinicians in their stratification of patients into more tailored treatment regimens. Future targeted therapies to these systems might improve the efficacy of reactive oxygen species-inducing therapies, such as radiotherapy.

  4. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Gang; Department of Pathology, Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin ; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  5. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  6. Invasion theory and biological control William F. Fagan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagan, William

    the spatiotemporal dynamics that occur when a biocontrol agent spreads into a population of an invading pest species and the success of biocontrol agents. We conclude by outlining theoretical results delineating how stochastic- lishment, spatial spread and suppressive effects of biological control agents, Shea & Possingham (2000

  7. Simulation methods and tissue property models for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Christopher W

    2005-01-01

    Many brain tumors are localized deeply and are currently surgically inaccessible without causing severe damage to the overlying structures of the brain. The current spectrum of non-invasive methods for treating such tumors ...

  8. Chaos and Cossacks, two fatal vendettas : the invasions of Russia in 1708 and 1812

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollander, Samuel, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There were two invasions of Russia by foreign powers in the early eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Charles XII of Sweden entered Russia in 1708 and was destroyed in battle outside Poltava in 1709. Napoleon ...

  9. Smart Moves: Effects of Relative Brain Size on Establishment Success of Invasive Amphibians and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Smart Moves: Effects of Relative Brain Size on Establishment Success of Invasive Amphibians skills, as well as cognitive ability). Citation: Amiel JJ, Tingley R, Shine R (2011) Smart Moves: Effects

  10. Ezrin phosphorylation on tyrosine 477 regulates invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mak, Hannah

    Background The membrane cytoskeletal crosslinker, ezrin, a member of the ERM family of proteins, is frequently over-expressed in human breast cancers, and is required for motility and invasion of epithelial cells. Our group ...

  11. Non-invasive assessment of ventilation maldistribution in lung disease using multiple breath inert gas washouts. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horsley, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research in cystic fibrosis (CF) requires study endpoints that are sensitive to airways disease, repeatable and non-invasive. Despite significant advances in the treatment of CF, lung function assessments continue ...

  12. Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellites Show Multiple Introductions in the Worldwide Invasion History of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellites Show Multiple Introductions in the Worldwide Invasion its worldwide population genetic structure, using both nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers. Our results indicate that the expansion in Europe mostly occurred through long-distance dispersal

  13. Back Story: Migration, Assimilation and Invasion in the Nineteenth Century [book chapter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritvo, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Research from a humanist perspective has much to offer in interrogating the social and cultural ramifications of invasion ecologies. The impossibility of securing national boundaries against accidental transfer and the ...

  14. Development and application of a non invasive image matching method to study spine biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shaobai

    2008-01-01

    Research on spine biomechanics is critical to understand pathology such as degenerative changes and low back pain. However, current study on in-vivo spine biomechanics is limited by the complex anatomy and invasive ...

  15. INFORMATION INVASION IN ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS Modelling, simulating and analysing system-level information propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Peter

    INFORMATION INVASION IN ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS Modelling, simulating and analysing system@ecs.soton.ac.uk Keywords: Enterprise information systems, Systems-level modelling, System simulation. A significant problem facing these organisations is how their information systems will cope with inconsistency

  16. Invasive potential of cattle fever ticks in the southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Busch, Joseph D.; Olafson, Pia U.; Scoles, Glen A.; Davey, Ronald B.; Pound, J. Mathews; Kammlah, Diane M.; Lohmeyer, Kimberly H.; Wagner, David M.

    2014-04-17

    Background For >100 years cattle production in the southern United States has been threatened by cattle fever. It is caused by an invasive parasite-vector complex that includes the protozoan hemoparasites Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, which...

  17. Evaluation of Force Feedback Requirements for Minimally Invasive Lung Tumour Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naish, Michael D.

    Evaluation of Force Feedback Requirements for Minimally Invasive Lung Tumour Localization Greig L describes experiments that were conducted on ex-vivo porcine lung, using artificial tumours, to elucidate

  18. Role of the scaffolding protein p62Dok in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkington, Ryan

    2011-08-08

    Tumor cells use actin-based structures capable of degrading the extracellular matrix during the process of invasion and metastasis. Recent studies demonstrate that the adaptor protein Nck-2, an important link between tyrosine phosphorylation...

  19. Ultra-low-power electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    New electronics for non-invasive medical monitoring promise low-cost, maintenance-free, and lightweight devices. These devices are critical in long-term medical measurements and in home-based tele-monitoring services, which ...

  20. The Role of Nck in Breast Carcinoma Cell Invasion and Metastasis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, David Christopher

    2015-07-15

    in the cytoskeletal organization of tumor cells and the physiochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are key drivers of invasion and metastasis. Aberrant activation of phosphotyrosine signaling results in the formation of actin-based structures, called...

  1. A non invasive, wearable sensor platform for multi-parametric remote monitoring in CHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu?trek, Mitja

    ; Congestive Heart Failure (CHF); Multi- parametric monitoring; Electrocardiogram (ECG); Skin temperature1 A non invasive, wearable sensor platform for multi-parametric remote monitoring in CHF patients parameters. In this context, accurate and reliable remote monitoring solutions based on state

  2. Continuous and non-invasive blood pressure monitoring using ultrasonic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Joohyun

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a continuous and non-invasive arterial blood pressure (CNAP) monitoring technique using ultrasound. An arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform provides valuable information in treating cardiovascular ...

  3. NASA Ames Saves Energy and Reduces Project Costs with Non-Invasive Retrofit Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the NASA Ames Research Center's effort to save energy and reduce project costs with non-invasive retrofit technologies.

  4. Quantitative assessment of invasive mena isoforms (Menacalc) as an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Seema

    Introduction: Mena, an Ena/VASP protein family member, is a key actin regulatory protein. Mena is up-regulated in breast cancers and promotes invasion and motility of tumor cells. Mena has multiple splice variants, including ...

  5. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandel, Navdeep S

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (mROS) as a natural by-product of electron transport chain activity. While initial studies focused on the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species, a recent paradigm shift ...

  7. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-04-15

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  8. Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective Md. Istiak Sobhan #12;Promoters: Prof. Dr University, the Netherlands #12;Species discrimination from a hyperspectral perspective Md. Istiak Sobhan in the auditorium of ITC, Enschede #12;Species discrimination from hyperspectral perspective © 2007 Md. Istiak

  9. eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

  10. Body size and invasion success in marine bivalves Kaustuv Roy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be significantly related to the colonization success of introduced species. Roy et al. (2001) showed from non-mar- iculture species and showed that successfully introduced mariculture species are indeed

  11. Consumers' Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Responses to an Invasion of Privacy: Essays on Understanding Consumer's Privacy Concerns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Mona

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on the discrepancy between consumers’ attitudes towards privacy and actual behavior. Although consumers increasingly protest against invasions of privacy, they routinely disclose more information ...

  12. Genomic definition of species. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Dramanac, R.

    1992-06-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called (species) genome. The definition of species based on chromosomes, genes, or genome common to its member organisms has been implied or mentioned in passing numerous times. Some population biologists think that members of species have similar ``homeostatic genotypes,`` which are to a degree resistant to mutation or environmental change in the production of a basic phenotype.

  13. Genomic definition of species. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1993-03-01

    A genome is the sum total of the DNA sequences in the cells of an individual organism. The common usage that species possess genomes comes naturally to biochemists, who have shown that all protein and nucleic acid molecules are at the same time species- and individual-specific, with minor individual variations being superimposed on a consensus sequence that is constant for a species. By extension, this property is attributed to the common features of DNA in the chromosomes of members of a given species and is called species genome. Our proposal for the definition of a biological species is as follows: A species comprises a group of actual and potential biological organisms built according to a unique genome program that is recorded, and at least in part expressed, in the structures of their genomic nucleic acid molecule(s), having intragroup sequence differences which can be fully interconverted in the process of organismal reproduction.

  14. Resistivity measurements at the bit provide real-time formation evaluation before invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergt, D.

    1995-06-01

    Real-time formation evaluation with today`s conventional horizontal drilling techniques is limited by the distance between the bit and resistivity measurements. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) sensors reach the formation long before wireline measurements, and so generally view it before wellbore degradation, but not before some invasion has occurred. Rapid invasion, called spurt, may mask true resistivity in some formations. The solution to this problem is to relocate logging measurements to the bit itself. A new LWD resistivity tool improves and simplifies formation evaluation by allowing geologists to visualize and log the formation around the wellbore before mud invasion or wellbore damage has occurred. The tool is normally run as a near-bit stabilizer on a rotary bottomhole assembly or just above the motor in a steerable assembly. It makes five formation evaluation resistivity measurements and an azimuthal gamma ray measurement. This paper reviews the performance of this tool.

  15. Journal of Theoretical Biology 238 (2006) 1835 Spatiotemporal complexity of patchy invasion in a predator-prey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Federation b Ecological Complexity and Modeling Laboratory, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences to extinction; thus, the patchy spread can be qualified as the invasion at the edge of extinction. Finally, we, in many cases invasion ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/yjtbi 0022-5193/$ - see front matter r

  16. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment and inhibits indigenous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    Pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) invasion of Cape Cod pond shores alters abiotic environment 25 April 2003 Abstract Invasion by pitch pine (Pinus rigida Mill.) on coastal plain pond shores may that had been invaded by P. rigida and those that had not on two Cape Cod ponds. Soil under living pines

  17. 3D computational study of non-invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    -invasive patient-specific microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer Earl Zastrow, Susan C Hagness and Barry Non-invasive microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer is investigated using three), the most common stages of diagnosis of breast cancer are stages I and II, which include localized tumors

  18. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica...

  19. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designing remediation strategies for such pollutants. Phylogenetic analyses place this new species within the deeply divergent order Gleobacterales, a branch that diverged...

  20. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Nancy L., E-mail: nlcho@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lin, Chi-Iou [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Du, Jinyan [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States)] [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ito, Hiromichi [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States); Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation. Conclusion: Global kinome analysis enables the discovery of novel targets for thyroid cancer therapy. Further investigation of Src targeted therapy for advanced thyroid cancer is warranted.

  1. 1 Evaluating Efficacy of an Environmental Policy to Prevent Biological 2 Invasions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    1 Evaluating Efficacy of an Environmental Policy to Prevent Biological 2 Invasions 3 Sarah A-6 Evaluating the efficacy of 39 any environmental policy, such as regulations aimed at preventing 40 regulatory environment and 42 inadequate funding.5,7 Measuring the success of an environmental 43 policy

  2. Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Reducing New Hampshire Crop Losses to a Serious Invasive Insect Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension February 2015 Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a Chinese insect that reached New Hampshire in 2011 that it occurred here, it caused $1.516 million in crop loss in New Hampshire. The UNH Cooperative Extension IPM

  3. Annual Logging Symposium, June 4-7, 2006 ASSESSMENT OF SHOULDER-BED, INVASION, AND LAMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Annual Logging Symposium held in Veracruz, Mexico, June 4-7, 2006. ABSTRACT We quantify the relative effects of shoulder beds, layer thickness, invasion, and sand-shale laminations on monopole and dipole soft and hard formations bounded by shale layers. The thickness of the formation is changed to consider

  4. Light brown apple moth (LBAM) (Epiphyas postvittana) is an important invasive leafroller pest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Light brown apple moth (LBAM) (Epiphyas postvittana) is an important invasive leafroller pest for Light Brown Apple Moth IN CALIFORNIA NURSERIES Eggs are not easily observed by nursery scouts or other the head. Male light brown apple moths caught in pheromone traps. e wing-color pattern of males can

  5. Mathematical Analysis of a model describing the invasion of bacteria in burn wounds #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    and references). The rapid development of antibiotic resistance among bacteria has added urgency to the taskMathematical Analysis of a model describing the invasion of bacteria in burn wounds # D. Hilhorst arises as a model for host tissue degradation by bacteria and involves a parameter describing

  6. Mathematical Analysis of a model describing the invasion of bacteria in burn wounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    and references). The rapid development of antibiotic resistance among bacteria has added urgency to the taskMathematical Analysis of a model describing the invasion of bacteria in burn wounds D. Hilhorst arises as a model for host tissue degradation by bacteria and involves a parameter describing

  7. Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems result in increased risk of flooding in coastal areas. In the Pacific Northwest (USA), coastal dunes and reducing dune height. Here we quantify the relative exposure to storm-wave induced dune overtopping posed

  8. Invited Paper Ultra-low-power Electronics for Non-invasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    Invited Paper Ultra-low-power Electronics for Non-invasive Medical Monitoring L. Turicchia1 , S on the monitoring of the heart--because of its importance--and we describe a micropower electrocardiograph, an ultra-low-power pulse oximeter, an ultra-low-power phonocardiograph, an integrated- circuit switched-capacitor model

  9. Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

  10. Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization and laser ablation electrospray ionization mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Minimally invasive monitoring of cellulose degradation by desorption electrospray ionization cellulose degradation products produced by accelerated aging in unsized cotton paper. Soluble extracts from and degradation rate of cellulose in aging paper has been of great concern in applications where the long term

  11. Migration and Proliferation Dichotomy in Tumor-Cell Invasion Sergei Fedotov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedotov, Sergei

    Migration and Proliferation Dichotomy in Tumor-Cell Invasion Sergei Fedotov1 and Alexander Iomin2 1 a two-component reaction-transport model for the migration-proliferation dichotomy in the spreading and migration. The transport process is formulated in terms of the CTRW with an arbitrary waiting

  12. Biological Invasions 2: 279288, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundell, Rebecca J.

    resource, it has also been proposed as a possible biocontrol agent against aquatic weeds. Various factors as a biological control agent for aquatic weeds. Introduction Human-mediated biological invasions are initiatedHawaiiBiologicalSurvey. effects(e.g., Cowie, inpressa). Organismsperceivedas having value as food resources or as biocontrol

  13. 48 American Entomologist Spring 2006 iological invasions represent one of the most serious contem-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    pathways is essential for de- veloping effective biosecurity strategies (Byers et al. 2002, National Research Council 2002). There has been substantial progress in characterizing invasion pathways of aquatic organisms (Carlton and Geller 1993, Gollasch 2002, Maki and Galatowitsch 2004) and of terrestrial invaders

  14. Using Continuum Robots to Enable Transoral Access to the Peripheral Lung for Minimally Invasive Biopsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Continuum Robots to Enable Transoral Access to the Peripheral Lung for Minimally Invasive Biopsy Arthur W. Mahoney, Philip J. Swaney, and Robert J. Webster III Lung cancer kills more people than reach regions adjacent to bronchii. Enables access to the peripheral lung for biopsy without puncturing

  15. Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evolution of a Non-Invasive Method for Providing Assistance to the Heart H. S. Soroff, MD and J. Rastegar The primary function of the ventricular chambers of the heart is to provide the proper volume, in the first part of the cardiac cycle, when the heart is relaxed, cardiac diastole, the device exerts

  16. Invasion and expansion of cooperators in lattice populations: Prisoner's dilemma vs. snowdrift games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauert, Christoph

    Invasion and expansion of cooperators in lattice populations: Prisoner's dilemma vs. snowdrift and the social sciences. Two social dilemmas, the prisoner's dilemma and the snowdrift game have emerged interactions has long been identified as a potent promoter of cooperation in the prisoner's dilemma

  17. Biological Invasions 1: 3341, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    of Barbados Irby J. Lovette1,2,, Gilles Seutin1,3, Robert E. Ricklefs4 & Eldredge Bermingham1 1Smithsonian-215-898-8780) Received 16 February 1999; accepted in revised form 26 February 1999 Key words: Barbados, Coereba flaveola and anthropogenic invasions. Barbados, an outlying island in the Lesser Antilles, was formed approximately 700

  18. Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential could threaten those services, with unknown environmental consequences. The outbreak of emerald ash borer is an imminent threat to the ash population in North America. In the Minneapolis­Saint Paul

  19. Differential radioactivity monitor for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1982-09-23

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  20. How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine invasion success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddad, Nick

    149 How invader traits interact with resident communities and resource availability to determine for limited resources is considered a key factor controlling invasion success. Resource availability can be viewed in either the long or short-term. Long-term availability depends on the baseline nutrient

  1. Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Target Invasion in the Gustatory System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibáńez, Carlos

    Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Target Invasion in the Gustatory System Thomas of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF of the pos- terior part of the tongue is derived from the petrosal ganglion, whereas trigeminal neurons

  2. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1957 Marine Biological Laboratory;#12;ABSTRACT This report presents data on the species composition of the industrial trawl fish catch landed OF TABLES Page Table 1. 1957 landings and number of trips of industrial trawl fish vessels at Pt. Judith

  3. SERI Aquatic Species Program: 1983 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    During 1983 research was carried out under three tasks: biological, engineering, and analysis. Biological research was aimed at screening for promising species of microalgae, macroalgae, and emergent plants that could be cultivated for energy products. Promising species were studied further to improve yields.

  4. Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eukaryotic microbes, species recognition and the geographic limits of species: examples from of eukaryotic microbes, the Fungi. We show that inferred geographic range of a fungal species depends upon structure (Finlay & Fenchel 2004). Finlay & Fenchel's claim of global ranges for eukaryotic microbes echoes

  5. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  6. Low doses ionizing radiation enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ning; Yang, Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Low doses ionizing irradiation would enhance the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation induced morphologic changes in breast cancer cells. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation led to upregulation of mesenchymal markers and down-regulation of epithelial markers. {yields} Low doses ionizing radiation increased migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process cellular morphologic and molecular alterations facilitate cell invasion. We hypothesized that low dose ionizing irradiation (LDIR) enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. The effects of LDIR on cellular morphology and the EMT markers of MCF-7 breast cancer cells were analyzed by western blot/RT-PCR and migration/invasion was examined using the transwell assay. We found that LDIR led to the phenotypic changes of EMT in MCF-7 cells and down-regulation of epithelial differentiation markers and transcriptional induction of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, the radiated cells demonstrated enhanced migration/invasion MCF-7 cells compared with non-radiated cells. In summary, LDIR promotes the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings may ultimately provide a new targeted approach for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of radiation in breast cancer.

  7. Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

    2006-01-01

    with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

  8. MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

    2006-01-01

    with consumption of microalgae and physical disturbancedetritus and 13 C-labeled microalgae by infaunal species at

  9. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Leyuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wang Zhiming [Department of Medical Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Gao Yabo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wang Lingyan [Experimental Research Center, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)] [Experimental Research Center, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zeng Zhaochong, E-mail: zeng.zhaochong@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of metastasis-related cytokines and factors from NPCs after irradiation may be a possible mechanism for the radiation-induced invasiveness and metastatic potential of HCC.

  10. Defining viral species: making taxonomy useful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-07-23

    Virus taxonomy at present is best characterized as a categorization of convenience, without a firm basis in the principles of evolutionary biology. Specifically, virus species definitions appear to depend more on tradition and popular opinion among...

  11. Effect of Variable Surrounding on Species Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Nowicka; Artur Duda; Miroslaw R. Dudek

    2002-07-08

    We construct a model of speciation from evolution in an ecosystem consisting of a limited amount of energy recources. The species posses genetic information, which is inherited according to the rules of the Penna model of genetic evolution. The increase in number of the individuals of each species depends on the quality of their genotypes and the available energy resources. The decrease in number of the individuals results from the genetic death or reaching the maximum age by the individual. The amount of energy resources is represented by a solution of the differential logistic equation, where the growth rate of the amount of the energy resources has been modified to include the number of individuals from all species in the ecosystem under consideration. We observe that small evolutionary changes of the inherited genetic information lead to spontaneous bursts of the evolutionary activity when many new species may appear in a short period.

  12. Irreversibility and uncertainty in species valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Eileen L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper incorporates an option value into deforestation policy analysis. Similar to an option value in finance, the option value here reflects the advantage to delaying irreversible species extinction until more information ...

  13. Aquatic Species Program (ASP): Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, E. E.

    2008-02-01

    Presentation on lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Aquatic Species Program 1978-1996 microalgae R&D activities, presented at the 2008 AFOSR Workshop in Washington, D.C.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  15. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kogou, Sotiria; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-01-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the microstructure and light scattering properties of the substrate while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty six 19th century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Hort...

  16. 312 BioScience April 2011 / Vol. 61 No. 4 www.biosciencemag.org Should Biological Invasions Be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    of invasions--like that of natural disasters--requires international coordination of early-warning systems). These definitions are typically used to describe a physical event, such as an earthquake, tsunami, or a flood; more

  17. Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    properties, we simulate the process of invasion with both water- and oil-base muds. Resulting spatial distributions of water saturation and salt concentration in the near-borehole region give rise to spatial

  18. Targeting ILK and {beta}4 integrin abrogates the invasive potential of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Kim, Baek Gil; Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul ; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kang, Suki; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of targeting ILK and integrins for highly aggressive ovarian cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unanticipated synergistic effect for the combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ILK/{beta}4 integrin effectively inhibited the PI3K/Akt/Rac1 cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting of {beta}4 integrin/ILK had potent inhibitory effects in ovarian cancer. -- Abstract: Integrins and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are essential to cancerous invasion because they mediate physical interactions with the extracellular matrix, and regulate oncogenic signaling pathways. The purpose of our study is to determine whether deletion of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK, alone or in combination, has antitumoral effects in ovarian cancer. Expression of {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin and ILK was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 196 ovarian cancer tissue samples. We assessed the effects of depleting these molecules with shRNAs in ovarian cancer cells by Western blot, conventional RT-PCR, cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vitro Rac1 activity assays, and in vivo xenograft formation assays. Overexpression of {beta}4 integrin and ILK in human ovarian cancer specimens was found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. Depletion of these targets efficiently suppresses ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and xenograft tumor formation in vivo. We also demonstrated that single depletion of ILK or combination depletion of {beta}4 integrin/ILK inhibits phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets, p-Ser 473 Akt and p-Thr202/Tyr204 Erk1/2, and activation of Rac1, as well as reduce expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and increase expression of caspase-3 in vitro. In conclusion, targeting {beta}4 integrin combined with ILK can instigate the latent tumorigenic potential and abrogate the invasive potential in ovarian cancer.

  19. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16

    DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2009 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE...

  20. Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael Thomas

    2012-07-16

    been lost since the 1930s and losses in the Lower Neches watershed have been some of the most extensive. Restoration is a way to mitigate these losses and can be accomplished in many ways. Each restoration design creates different aquatic habitats...

  1. Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through Invasive Species Control and by Providing Technical and Financial Assistance to Reduce Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Porter, A.; Knutson, A.; Muegge, M.

    2013-01-01

    the use of biological saltcedar controls across the watershed, and conducting prescribed burning on saltcedar stands in areas previously treated with aerially applied chemicals. Additional activity included in this project was administration and reporting...

  2. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01

    infestation sampling sites. Salix laevigata leaves wereA. donax only (Table 5). Salix laevigata leaves containedA. Gray) and red willow (Salix laevigata Bebb) in the canopy

  3. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  4. Research Symposium January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    in the Northeast. I developed a list of organizations which have controlled forest invasive plants for at least two Resources Cornell University Charlotte Acharya Managing forest invasive plants: looking at the resource capabilities and strategies used by organizations in the Northeast The spread of non-native, invasive plants

  5. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne; Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele; Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  6. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S.more »enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.« less

  7. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M. [Univ. of Missouri - St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Granger, Brian R. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Segre, Daniel [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Harcombe, William R. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S. enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.

  8. Effects of ethanol and reactive species on Hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seronello, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    polymerase chain reaction; RNS, reactive nitrogen species;oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and decreased antioxidantincrease the levels of ROS/RNS, oxidized thioredoxin, lipid

  9. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

  10. Ecological effects of an invasive social wasp on Hawaiian arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Erin Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,insect species represent an important and underappreciated food

  11. Invasive Plants, Fire Succession, and Restoration of Creosote Bush Scrub in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steers, Robert Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Challenges in the quest for keystones. BioScience 46:609-189. Whitford, W. G. 2000. Keystone Arthropods as Webmasterscompensation for missing keystone species by colonization.

  12. The role of annexin A1 in expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and invasion of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Hyereen [Department of Medicine, Graduate School, University of Ulsan, Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medicine, Graduate School, University of Ulsan, Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jesang [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Sung-Wuk, E-mail: swjang@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Medicine, Graduate School, University of Ulsan, Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medicine, Graduate School, University of Ulsan, Pungnap-2 dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of ANXA1 on promoting migration and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 siRNA inhibits invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 regulates MMP-9 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANX-1 siRNA inhibits the activation of NF-{kappa}B in MDA-MB-231 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of MMP-9 expression and its biological effects on breast cancer development remain obscure. In the current study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in regulating migration and invasion in breast cancer cell lines. Both ANXA1 mRNA and protein are expressed in the highly invasive, hormone-insensitive human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3, but not in the hormone-responsive cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression with specific small interfering RNAs (ANXA1 siRNA) in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. Ablation of ANXA1 expression decreases the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and also reduces the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, silencing ANXA1 also decreases the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by the suppression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-{kappa}B) activity. Collectively, these results indicate that ANXA1 functions as a positive regulator of MMP-9 expression and invasion of breast cancer cells through specific activation of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  13. A non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S.H.; Das, Krishna; Blust, Ronny

    2011-10-15

    In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18 years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. - Highlights: > PBPK modeling was used to study the kinetics of several PCBs in a marine mammal. > Harbor porpoises are sensitive to pollution and therefore ideal model organisms. > Black Sea data were used for parameterization. > North Sea data for assessing temporal trends (1990-2008). > PBPK modeling is a non-invasive and non-destructive tool.

  14. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  15. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01

    ; 000 cells total for the region). We report on results for 40 species of a owering plant family Proteaceae (of about 330 in the CFR) for a de ned subregion. Using a Bayesian framework, we develop a two stage, spatially explicit, hierar- chical logistic...

  16. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M.; Liu, Jinsong; Chadee, Deborah N.

    2012-08-15

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  17. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lu, Na [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ? We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ? VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ? VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ? VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ? VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-?B and AP-1.

  18. Accounting for species taxonomy improves distribution models Aidin Niamir a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models, multispecies models, species distribution models Abstract: The use of species atlas data of species distribution models. Using atlas data, two taxonomically enhanced datasets were created for 356. Enhancement of atlas data by excluding irrelevant absences based on species taxonomy significantly improved

  19. Juniper invasion and community development in the Post Oak Savanna of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Terry Lee

    1986-01-01

    with and without a live post oak center tree. 32 Table 8: Correlat1ons between redcedar variables and live center tree va ri ah 1 ss 33 Table 9: Data used to construct regress1on model to estimate redcedar ages 35 Table 10: Regression analys1s results...J UNIPER INVASION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNA OF TEXAS A Thesis by TERRY LEE COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  20. Movement, impacts and management of plant distributions in response to climate change: insights from invasions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1265 Movement, impacts and management of plant distributions in response to climate change and management of species responses to climate change. Synthesis A major challenge in this era of rapid climate climate change. Global climate change will likely result in species extinctions, disruption of ecosystem

  1. Current generation by minority species heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1980-07-01

    It is proposed that electric currents be generated from the preferential heating of ions traveling in one direction but with no net momentum injected into the system. This can be accomplished with, for example, traveling waves in a two-ion-species plasma. The current can be generated efficiently enough for the scheme to be of interest in maintaining steady-state toroidal currents in a reactor.

  2. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-11-15

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  3. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  4. Rew, L J; Seipel, T (in press) Ain't no mountain high enough: Plant invasions reaching new elevations. Frontiers in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Rew, L J; Seipel, T (in press) Ain't no mountain high enough: Plant invasions reaching new and ETH Zurich working on the role of climate matching for plant invasions into mountains. Tim Seipel (tim Consortium ­ www.miren.ethz.ch/people/ - is associated with GMBA and MRI. 25[ Mountain Forum Bulletin July

  5. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Foxcroft LC (2009) A list of alien plants in the Kruger2003) A revised list of alien plants for the Kruger Nationalmaintains a list of 373 alien plant species (Foxcroft et al.

  6. Biological Invasions 3: 18, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von Holle, Betsy

    . How many, and which, plants will invade natural areas? Julie L. Lockwood1 , Daniel Simberloff2-eating birds rep- resenting 67 species were imported into the United States (Nilsson 1981). How does one go

  7. SYSTEMATICS The Field Cricket Gryllus assimilis and Two New Sister Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, David A.

    for species with supposed transcontinental distributions must be resolved. One such species, Gryllus assimilis

  8. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M. ); Sprague, S. )

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  9. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew Species of

  10. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew Species

  11. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNew SpeciesNew

  12. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supports returningNew MexicoReactors |NewNewNew Species

  13. New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications64 2.251 2.211New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms

  14. Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Assessment Of Potential Indicator Species For Monitoring Environmental Contamination contamination in the aquatic component of the Fraser River Basin, British Columbia. A list of criterion were species for laboratory study; and 5) knowledge availability pertaining to contaminant research

  15. DESIGNATION OF FOCAL VERTEBRATE SPECIES FOR THE LAKE TAHOE BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extirpated species were candidates for focal species status: Mountain sheep, heather vole, canyon mouse, white-tailed hare, wolverine, Sierra Nevada red fox, and grizzly bear. Amphibians and Reptiles We

  16. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER A novel, combined approach to assessing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morphological species of freshwater microalgae often have broad geographic distribution. However, traditional distribu- tional stability among microalgal species groups such as the desmids. Keywords Microalgae microalgae have recently been undergoing major conceptual changes in the light of increasing evidence

  17. Mycosphaerella species causing leaf disease in South African Eucalyptus plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycosphaerella species causing leaf disease in South African Eucalyptus plantations Gavin C. HUNTER Eucalyptus plantations provide an important source of hardwood for forestry industries, worldwide. Several species of Mycosphaerella are associated with a destructive Eucalyptus leaf disease known

  18. Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

    2005-01-01

    Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

  19. Sexual Dimorphism in the Sceloporus undulatus Species Complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittmer, Drew

    2012-10-19

    suggests four species lineages occur within S. undulatus. Traits within an interbreeding species that are influenced by sexual selection are under different selection pressures and may evolve independently from the selective forces of habitat. Sceloporus...

  20. A new species of Quexua from southeastern Peru (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Daniel J.

    2011-10-28

    A distinctive new species of the crabronine wasp genus Quexua Pate is described and figured from a single male collected from lowland Amazonian rain forest in southeastern Peru. Quexua cicra sp. n. is the only species in ...

  1. perspective: The keystone species concept: a critical appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottee-Jones, Henry Eden W; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    the popular use  of  keystone,  flagship  and  umbrella key? stone  species  and  keystone  links  in  size?based Bond, W.  J.  (1993) Keystone species.  In: Biodiversity 

  2. Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological-rays from H will be a function of the soils' water-content. To the best of our knowledge

  3. Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yongchun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Xu Yuqiao [Department of Pathology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Su Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, 306th Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Mei Shi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Guo Guozhen, E-mail: guozhenguo@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Xijing Hospital Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

  4. Evaluating the Interactive Effects of Seasonal Prescribed Fire and Grazing On Invasive Grass Abundance and Woody Brush Encroachment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Michele Diane

    2014-12-10

    and grazing on invasive grass abundance and woody brush density. Thirty-six 10m x 10m plots were assigned six treatments including: i.) summer burned-fenced ii.) summer burned-unfenced iii.) winter burned-fenced iv.) winter burned-unfenced v.) unburnedfenced...

  5. Transcriptome Profiles of Carcinoma-in-Situ and Invasive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer as Revealed by SAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Raymond T.

    Transcriptome Profiles of Carcinoma-in-Situ and Invasive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer as Revealed, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Abstract Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presents) of the lung, and compared these with expression profiles generated from both bronchial epithelium

  6. Group B Streptococcal b-Hemolysin/Cytolysin Promotes Invasion of Human Lung Epithelial Cells and the Release of Interleukin-8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    Group B Streptococcal b-Hemolysin/Cytolysin Promotes Invasion of Human Lung Epithelial Cells and lung injury are hallmarks of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) infections. Production. To elucidate the contribution of the b-h/c toxin to lung injury, the interactions of GBS wild-type strains

  7. Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic diversity and invasion patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic): Catalogue of alien plants of the Czech Republic (2nd edition): checklist update, taxonomic diversity and invasion patterns. ­ Preslia 84: 155­255. A complete list of all alien taxa ever recorded in the flora

  8. Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Distributions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) disturbance frequency, and (4) the severity9 of the disturbance. Both frequency and severity are important1 Role of Soil Disturbances in Determining Post-Harvest Plant1 Biodiversity and Invasive Weed Telephone: +01-928-556-2176, FAX +01-928-556-21308 9 SHORT TITLE: Soil Disturbances, Biodiversity

  9. Technical Briefs in hisTorical archaeology, 2008, 3: 3947 Previous attempts to plot the exact invasion route of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    conflict with the gauls and the trek over a major col of passage into italia.The use of various scientific route,and sites of interest to geoarchaeologists. Introduction The Punic invasion of italia in 218 B recently prompted four expeditions to survey the approach routes through the Pyrenees and the alps (figure

  10. Wettability stabilizes fluid invasion into porous media via nonlocal, cooperative pore filling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Holtzman; Enrico Segre

    2015-09-15

    We study the impact of the wetting properties on the immiscible displacement of a viscous fluid in disordered porous media. We present a novel pore-scale model that captures wettability and dynamic effects, including the spatiotemporal nonlocality associated with interface readjustments. Our simulations show that increasing the wettability of the invading fluid (the contact angle) promotes cooperative pore filling that stabilizes the invasion, and that this effect is suppressed as the flow rate increases, due to viscous instabilities. We use scaling analysis to derive two dimensionless numbers that predict the mode of displacement. By elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we explain classical yet intriguing experimental observations. These insights could be used to improve technologies such as hydraulic fracturing, CO$_{2}$ geo-sequestration, and microfluidics.

  11. Wettability stabilizes fluid invasion into porous media via nonlocal, cooperative pore filling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzman, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of the wetting properties on the immiscible displacement of a viscous fluid in disordered porous media. We present a novel pore-scale model that captures wettability and dynamic effects, including the spatiotemporal nonlocality associated with interface readjustments. Our simulations show that increasing the wettability of the invading fluid (the contact angle) promotes cooperative pore filling that stabilizes the invasion, and that this effect is suppressed as the flow rate increases, due to viscous instabilities. We use scaling analysis to derive two dimensionless numbers that predict the mode of displacement. By elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we explain classical yet intriguing experimental observations. These insights could be used to improve technologies such as hydraulic fracturing, CO$_{2}$ geo-sequestration, and microfluidics.

  12. Go-Smart: Web-based Computational Modeling of Minimally Invasive Cancer Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weir, Phil; Ellerweg, Roland; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Voglreiter, Philip; Mariappan, Panchatcharam; Flanagan, Ronan; Park, Chang Sub; Payne, Stephen; Staerk, Elmar; Voigt, Peter; Moche, Michael; Kolesnik, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The web-based Go-Smart environment is a scalable system that allows the prediction of minimally invasive cancer treatment. Interventional radiologists create a patient-specific 3D model by semi-automatic segmentation and registration of pre-interventional CT (Computed Tomography) and/or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) images in a 2D/3D browser environment. This model is used to compare patient-specific treatment plans and device performance via built-in simulation tools. Go-Smart includes evaluation techniques for comparing simulated treatment with real ablation lesions segmented from follow-up scans. The framework is highly extensible, allowing manufacturers and researchers to incorporate new ablation devices, mathematical models and physical parameters.

  13. THE CARTESIAN CLOSED BICATEGORY OF GENERALISED SPECIES OF STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winskel, Glynn

    THE CARTESIAN CLOSED BICATEGORY OF GENERALISED SPECIES OF STRUCTURES M. FIORE, N. GAMBINO, M. HYLAND, AND G. WINSKEL Abstract. The concept of generalised species of structures between small establishes that the bicategory of generalised species of structures is cartesian closed. 1. Introduction

  14. Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Thermal physiology and species distribution models reveal climate vulnerability warming than tropical species based on their larger thermal safety margins, the distance between ambient temperatures and species' thermal optima. We sought to test the prediction that high latitude amphibians

  15. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of seven oreo species ITeleostei, Oreosomatidae species was examined.Allozyme variation at 26 loci was examined in seven species: six from Australasia. helgae). Two phenetic trees were constructed: an unweighted pair- group method with arithmetic averag

  16. Microbial immobilization drives nitrogen cycling differences among plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    1840 Microbial immobilization drives nitrogen cycling differences among plant species Ramesh cycling. We examined four potential mechanisms of plant species effects on nitrogen (N) cycling. We found no species differences in gross ammonification suggesting there are no changes in the ecosystem N cycling

  17. SPECIATION IN MAMMALS AND THE GENETIC SPECIES CONCEPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    of mammals. We review criteria and methods for recognizing species of mammals and explore a theoretical, design of conservation initiatives, zoonoses, and so on. A paradigm shift relative to this and other Concept uses genetic data from mitochondrial and nuclear genomes to identify species and species

  18. San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program 1 San Dieguito Citizen Science Multiple Species Monitoring Program The goal from current citizen science groups (such as Audubon and SD Tracking Team

  19. DNA sequence incongruence and inconsistent morphology obscure species boundaries in the Teratosphaeria suttonii species complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the international paper and pulp industry (Turnbull 2000). The trees are propagated extensively as exoticsFULL PAPER DNA sequence incongruence and inconsistent morphology obscure species boundaries plantation industry in the sub- tropical and tropical areas of Australia (Andjic et al.

  20. SpecieS in the Spotlight: Survive to thrive Recovering threatened and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for taking the time to review this annual report to Congress. The report is important because it documents with renewed commitment and intensified efforts. Starting on May 15, 2015--Endangered Species Day) ·Central California Coast Coho Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) ·Cook Inlet Beluga Whale DPS ·Hawaiian

  1. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  2. Population dynamics of species-rich ecosystems: the mixture of matrix population models approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Vivien

    , tropical marine fish or coral reefs, high diversity implies that the sample size for most species. 2007), species extinction or conservation of endangered species (Cropper & Loudermilk 2006

  3. The Pricelessness of Biodiversity: Using the Endangered Species Act to Help Combat Extinction and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falberg, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    over others 200 because keystone “species are the buildingexample to demonstrate how a “keystone species” works in anor endangered is a keystone species of an ecosystem. If such

  4. Linking fisheries management and conservation in bioengineering species: the case of South American mussels (Mytilidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carranza, Alvar; Defeo, Omar; Beck, Mike; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    and conservation in bioengineering species: the case oftives for these key bioengineering species. Keywords Mytilusto identify mytilid bioengineering species (i.e. , those

  5. www.frontiersinecology.org The Ecological Society of America Planning an invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudycha, Jeff

    . He is interested in the microinvertebrate community of small ponds and wants to assess the role animals from a few dozen ponds in the region, mixing them together in a cattle tank, and then inoculating 24 ponds with a sample of the total regional species pool. All ponds involved in the study have

  6. Monoclonal antibodies of diverse isotype induced by an O-antigen glycoconjugate vaccine mediate in vitro and in vivo killing of African invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goh, Yun Shan; Clare, Simon; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; Mastroeni, Pietro; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2015-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS), particularly S. enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, are responsible for a major global burden of invasive disease with high associated case-fatality rate. We recently reported the development of a...

  7. Non-Invasive Beam Detection in a High-Average Power Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Harris, J. [Colorado State U.; Martinez, J. [Colorado State U.; Milton, S. V. [Colorado State U.; Van Keuren, J. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Steve V. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Neil, George R. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    For a free-electron laser (FEL) to work effectively the electron beam quality must meet exceptional standards. In the case of an FEL operating at infrared wavelengths in an amplifier configuration the critical phase space tends to be in the longitudinal direction. Achieving high enough longitudinal phase space density directly from the electron injector system of such an FEL is difficult due to space charge effects, thus one needs to manipulate the longitudinal phase space once the beam energy reaches a sufficiently high value. However, this is fraught with problems. Longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation can both disrupt the overall phase space, furthermore, the phase space disruption is exacerbated by the longitudinal phase space manipulation process required to achieve high peak current. To achieve and maintain good FEL performance one needs to investigate the longitudinal emittance and be able to measure it during operation preferably in a non-invasive manner. Using the electro-optical sampling (EOS) method, we plan to measure the bunch longitudinal profile of a high-energy (~120-MeV), high-power (~10kW or more FEL output power) beam.

  8. Non-invasive geophysical investigation and thermodynamic analysis of a palsa in Lapland, northwest Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohout, Tomáš; Rasmus, Kai; Leppäranta, Matti; Matero, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive geophysical prospecting and a thermodynamic model were used to examine the structure, depth and lateral extent of the frozen core of a palsa near Lake Peeraj\\"arvi, in northwest Finland. A simple thermodynamic model verified that the current climatic conditions in the study area allow sustainable palsa development. A ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of the palsa under both winter and summer conditions revealed its internal structure and the size of its frozen core. GPR imaging in summer detected the upper peat/core boundary, and imaging in winter detected a deep reflector that probably represents the lower core boundary. This indicates that only a combined summer and winter GPR survey completely reveals the lateral and vertical extent of the frozen core of the palsa. The core underlies the active layer at a depth of ~0.6 m and extends to about 4 m depth. Its lateral extent is ~15 m x ~30 m. The presence of the frozen core could also be traced as minima in surface temperature and ground condu...

  9. Method and apparatus for non-invasive monitoring of blood glucose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Graham H. (Livermore, CA); Watson, Roger M. (Modesto, CA); Noell, J. Oakey (Mishawaka, IN)

    1992-06-09

    A new and improved method and apparatus are provided for non-invasive monitoring of changes in blood glucose concentration in a tissue specimen and particularly in an individual. The method uses acoustic velocity measurements for monitoring the effect of glucose concentration upon the density and adiabatic compressibility of the serum. In a preferred embodiment, the acoustic velocity measurements are made through the earlobe of a subject by means of an acoustic probe or monitor which includes a transducer for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic energy pulses to and from the blood flowing in the subject's earlobe and a reflector for facilitating reflection of the acoustic pulses from the blood. The probe is designed in such a way that when properly affixed to an ear, the transducer is positioned flush against the anterior portion of an earlobe while the reflector is positioned flush against the interior portion of the earlobe. A microthermocouple is provided on the probe for monitoring the internal temperature of the blood being sampled. An electrical system, essentially comprising a frequency generator, a time intervalometer and an oscilloscope, is linked to the glucose monitoring probe. The electrical system analyzes selected ones of the pulses reflected from the blood sample in order to determine therefrom the acoustic velocity of the blood which, in turn, provides a representation of the blood glucose concentration levels at the time of the acoustic velocity measurements.

  10. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Distenfeld, Carl H. (Mattituck, NY); Klemish, Jr., Joseph R. (Bohemia, NY)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector.

  11. Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 50 CFR 402 Interagency Cooperation - Endangered Species Act of 1973, as...

  12. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    11] Witten, I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical MachineData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  13. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  14. Data Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilches, Erika; Escobar, Ivan A.; Vallejo, E E; Taylor, C E

    2006-01-01

    I. ; Frank, E. ; Data Mining: Practical Machine LearningData Mining Applied to Acoustic Bird Species Recognitionthe application of data mining techniques to the problem of

  15. FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FERC Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species - A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  16. Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species A Guide for Applicants...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydropower Licensing and Endangered Species A Guide for Applicants, Contractors, and Staff Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Hydropower...

  17. Effects of ethanol and reactive species on Hepatitis C virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seronello, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    the mutation rate of hepatitis C virus RNA. Manuscript inreactive oxygen species during hepatitis C virus infection.2010) Ethanol enhances hepatitis C virus replication through

  18. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant...

  19. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-221 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing found in similar shallow-water habitats in southernNewHampshire(JenkinsandBabbitt2003). The spotted, and a Species of Special concern in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Because their habitat overlaps

  20. A new species of Liphanthus from Peru (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Victor H.; Rasmussen, Claus; Engel, Michael S.

    2014-04-10

    . Liphanthus Reed, 1894 (Hymenoptera, Andrenidae, Protandrenini): Two new Argentine species and keys to the species of the subgenera Liphanthus s.str. and Melaliphan- thus Ruz & Toro, 1983. Zootaxa 1854: 55?62. ZooBank: urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BFB4BEEF-3F91...

  1. Protogynous species require special management considerations when fish-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    232 Protogynous species require special management considerations when fish- ing reduces). However, pro- togyny does not automatically imply elevated vulnerability to fishing if the population, to predict stock dynam- ics and a species' response to fishing pressure, it is important not only

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Valerie

    ; microbiome Introduction All species of plants and animals harbor assem- blages of microbes the microbiomes of different species of animals, and fewer still have examined animals in the wild. We sampled: microbe­microbe and microbe­host interactions Keywords: amphibian; skin; bacteria; host specific

  3. A New Species of Cryptotriton (Caudata: Plethodontidae) from Eastern Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A New Species of Cryptotriton (Caudata: Plethodontidae) from Eastern Guatemala Carlos R. Va (Plethodontidae) is described from the mountains of eastern Guatemala. The new species is distinguished from all~as del este de Guatemala. Cryptotriton sierraminensis se distingue de todos los otros miembros de su ge

  4. The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    The unholy trinity: taxonomy, species delimitation and DNA barcoding Rob DeSalle*, Mary G. Egan are clarified and resolved, before the use of DNA as a tool for taxonomy and species delimitation can framework for interweaving classical taxonomy with the goals of `DNA barcoding'. Keywords: DNA barcoding

  5. Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations Bongani MASEKOa, *, Treena I the cause of collar and root rot disease outbreaks of cold tolerant Eucalyptus species in South Africa and has a slower growth rate in culture. Both P. frigida and P. alti- cola are pathogenic to Eucalyptus

  6. Soil Conservation Service Tests of Eucalyptus Species for Windbreaks1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Conservation Service Tests of Eucalyptus Species for Windbreaks1 Gary L. Young2 The Soil in the southwest. We are looking for widely adapted cultivars of several Eucalyptus species for use 1 Presented at the Workshop on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento

  7. Two new species of Leptolalax (Anura: Megophryidae) from northern Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Bob

    Two new species of Leptolalax (Anura: Megophryidae) from northern Vietnam Amy ~ a t h r o and Biological Resources, Nghia Do, Tu Liem, Hanoi, Vietnam Abstract. Two new species of Leptolalnx are described from two mountain ranges in northern Vietnam (Song Gam and Tain Dao) that are less than 150 km apart

  8. Proceedings of the Subcontractors' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  9. Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    in nitrification, denitrification and trace nitrogen gas losses. Plant species also impact herbivore behaviourREVIEW Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling J. M. H. Knops,1 * K. L. Bradley1 and D. A. Wedin2 1 School of Biological Sciences, 2 School of Natural Resource Sciences

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER A new, disjunct species of Speleonectes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , and it is now protected as an endemic species of the Canary Islands. First indications of the presence, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain Mar Biodiv (2009) 39:215­225 DOI 10.1007/s12526-009-0021-8 #12;columnORIGINAL PAPER A new, disjunct species of Speleonectes (Remipedia, Crustacea) from the Canary

  11. NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorken, Marcel

    NOTE / NOTE Sex ratio variation in gynodioecious species of Echium endemic to the Canary Islands Marcel E. Dorken Abstract: Species of Echium from the Canary Islands represent an adaptive radiation fertility of females and hermaphrodites were de- tected. Key words: Canary Islands, Echium, island radiation

  12. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  13. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  14. Measurement of Species Distributions in Operating Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partridge Jr, William P; Toops, Todd J; Parks, II, James E; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2004-10-01

    Measurement and understanding of transient species distributions across and within fuel cells is a critical need for advancing fuel cell technology. The Spatially Resolved Capillary Inlet Mass Spectrometer (SpaciMS) instrument has been applied for in-situ measurement of transient species distributions within operating reactors; including diesel catalyst, air-exhaust mixing systems, and non-thermal plasma reactors. The work described here demonstrates the applicability of this tool to proton exchange membrane (PEM) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) research. Specifically, we have demonstrated SpaciMS measurements of (1) transient species dynamics across a PEM fuel cell (FC) associated with load switching, (2) intra-PEM species distributions, and transient species dynamics at SOFC temperatures associated with FC load switching.

  15. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Giant Haemangiomas of the Liver: Embolisation With Bleomycin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozkaya, Halil Cinar, Celal; Besir, Fahri Halit; Par?ldar, Mustafa Oran, Ismail

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThe management of patients with giant haemangioma of the liver remains controversial. Although the usual treatment method for symptomatic giant haemangioma is surgery, the classical paradigm of operative resection remains. In this study, we evaluated the symptomatic improvement and size-reduction effect of embolisation with bleomycin mixed with lipiodol for the treatment of symptomatic giant hepatic haemangioma.MethodsThis study included 26 patients [21 female, five male; age 41–65 years (mean 49.83 ± 1.53)] with symptomatic giant haemangioma unfit for surgery and treated with selective embolisation by bleomycin mixed with lipiodol. The patients were followed-up (mean 7.4 ± 0.81 months) clinically and using imaging methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0, and p < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance.ResultsEmbolisation of 32 lesions in 26 patients was performed. The mean volume of the haemangiomas was 446.28 ± 88 cm{sup 3} (range 3.39–1559 cm{sup 3}) before intervention and 244.43 ± 54.38 cm{sup 3} (range 94–967 cm{sup 3}) after intervention. No mortality or morbidity related to the treatment was identified. Symptomatic improvement was observed in all patients, and significant volume reduction was achieved (p = 0.001).ConclusionThe morbidity of surgical treatment in patients with giant liver hemangioma were similar to those obtained in patients followed-up without treatment. Therefore, follow-up without treatment is preferred in most patients. Thus, minimally invasive embolisation is an alternative and effective treatment for giant symptomatic haemangioma of the liver.

  16. Application of optical lens of a CD writer for detecting the blood glucose semi-invasively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshram, N. D., E-mail: meshramnileshsd@gmail.com [Mathuradas Mohota College of Sciences, Nagpur-440009 (India); Dahikar, P. B., E-mail: pbdahikar@rediffmail.com [Kamla Nehru Mahavidyalaya, Sakkardara Square, Nagpur-440009 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Recent technological advancements in the photonics industry have led to a resurgence of interest in optical glucose sensing and to realistic progress toward the development of an optical glucose sensor. Such a sensor has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life for the estimated 16 million diabetics in this country by making routine glucose measurements more convenient. Currently over 100 small companies and universities are working to develop noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensing technologies, and optical methods play a large role in these efforts. It has become overwhelmingly clear that frequent monitoring and tight control of blood sugar levels are requisite for effective management of Diabetes mellitus and reduction of the complications associated with this disease. The pain and trouble associated with current “finger-stick” methods for blood glucose monitoring result in decreased patient compliance and a failure to control blood sugar levels. Thus, the development of a convenient noninvasive blood glucose monitor holds the potential to significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with Diabetes. A method and apparatus for noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration based on transilluminated laser beam via the Index Finger has been reported in this paper. This method depends on photodiode based laser operating at 632.8 nm wavelength. During measurement, the index finger is inserted into the glucose sensing unit, the transilluminated optical signal is converted into an electrical signal, compared with the reference electrical signal, and the obtained difference signal is processed by signal processing unit which presents the results in the form of blood glucose concentration. This method would enable the monitoring blood glucose level of the diabetic patient continuously, safely and noninvasively.

  17. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  18. Non Invasive estimation of aluminum concentration in Hall-Heroult reduction cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bell

    2004-03-01

    The present best practice for the preparation of primary aluminum is by electrolysis of alumina in the traditional Hall-Heroult reduction cell. The process conditions in the electrolyte of this cell required for the reduction to proceed are sufficiently harsh to have precluded the implementation of in situ sensing of the electrolyte composition, specifically the concentration of the ionized alumina. This report reveals the theoretical basis for a non-invasive method for estimation of the ionized alumina concentration which does not require the use of any sensor in direct contact with the cell electrolyte. The proposed method can in principle be applied with equal efficacy to the so-called drained cathode cell designs and to cells having any anode composition, because only knowledge of the electrolyte conduction behavior is required a priori. For an operating cell, the proposed method requires only readily available electrical measurements and the facilities to process the acquired signals. The proposed method rests on the ability to identify certain characteristics of the transients in the reduction cell terminal voltages caused by the quasiperiodic introduction of alumina. It will be shown that these voltage transients manifest measurable properties, in a statistical sense, that should permit estimation of the ionized alumina concentration with a delay of one alumina feed cycle. The next logical step following the present work, consistent with the Aluminum Technology Roadmap [1], is to experimentally verify the predictions made here; no doubt practical refinements to the proposed approach will evolve during the course of experimentation. Successful verification of the proposed estimation method will permit the design of reduction cell control algorithms based directly on the mass balance of alumina in the electrolyte. This report assumes that the reader understands certain basic concepts important to the operation of electrolytic cells, and the Hall-Heroult cell in particular. References [2,3] provide such concepts in a manner accessible to the technically educated reader; reference [6] is a more thorough treatment.

  19. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  20. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

  1. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  2. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Manning, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States); Moody, John S., E-mail: john.moody@mosescone.com [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued research into bladder preservation strategies and suggest that definitive radiotherapy represents a viable initial treatment strategy for those who wish to attempt to preserve their native bladder.

  3. Basal-like grade III invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: patterns of metastasis and long-term survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulford, Laura G; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Ryder, Kenneth; Jones, Chris; Gillett, Cheryl E; Hanby, Andrew M; Easton, Douglas F; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2007-01-11

    Cancer Res 2006, 12:4185-4191. 27. Lakhani SR, Reis-Filho JS, Fulford L, Penault-Llorca F, van der Vijver M, Parry S, Bishop T, Benitez J, Rivas C, Bignon YJ, et al.: Prediction of BRCA1 status in patients with breast cancer using estrogen receptor... and basal phenotype. Clin Cancer Res 2005, 11:5175-5180. 28. Jones C, Ford E, Gillett C, Ryder K, Merrett S, Reis-Filho JS, Ful- ford LG, Hanby A, Lakhani SR: Molecular cytogenetic identifica- tion of subgroups of grade III invasive ductal breast carcinomas...

  4. Remodeling of central metabolism in invasive breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue - a GC-TOFMS based metabolomics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budczies, Jan; Denkert, Carsten; Müller, Berit M.; Brockmöller, Scarlet F.; Klauschen, Frederick; Györffy, Balazs; Dietel, Manfred; Richter-Ehrenstein, Christiane; Marten, Ulrike; Salek, Reza M.; Griffin, Julian L.; Hilvo, Mika; Oreši?, Matej; Wohlgemuth, Gert; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-07-23

    , provided the orOpen Access tabolism in invasive o normal breast d metabolomics study Brockmöller1, Frederick Klauschen1, Balazs Györffy1,2, n4, Reza M Salek5, Julian L Griffin5, Mika Hilvo6,al Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms... , Cambridge CB2 1GA, United Kingdom. 6VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland. 7Genome Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA. Received: 30 November 2011 Accepted: 23 July 2012Marker metabolites and cancer detection Separation...

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Driven Angiogenesis by Inorganic Nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    The exact mechanism of angiogenesis by europium hydroxide nanorods was unclear. In this study we have showed that formation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2·?) is involved in redox signaling pathways during angiogenesis, ...

  6. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  7. Negative magnetophoresis of submicron species in magnetic nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Lino A. (Lino Alberto), 1976-

    2009-01-01

    In this work we studied the focusing and trapping of submicron, nonmagnetic species immersed in a magnetic nanofluid under applied magnetic fields. Focusing was achieved using two pairs of permanent magnets, which forced ...

  8. An Evolutionary Algorithm for the Selection of Geographically Informative Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    the correlation of the geographic distances between ponds with the Hamming distances between ponds computed from zooplankton in 1604 Canadian ponds. A species is geographically informative if its presence or absence on Canadian ponds cover

  9. Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Ashley

    2012-02-14

    Minnows of the genus Dionda (Cyprinidae, Teleostei) inhabit spring-fed streams in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Five nominal species of Dionda (D. argentosa, D. diaboli, D. episcopa, D. nigrotaeniata and D. ...

  10. MICROBIOLOGY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions Loganathan Ponnusamy & Dawn M. Wesson & Consuelo Arellano & Coby use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing

  11. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

  12. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-328 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing roost sites, each within rock crevices in outcrops near the base of the Surry Mountain Lake dam

  13. Ecological risk assessment and the Endangered Species Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, S.G.; Abood, K.A. [Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The presence of a threatened or endangered species (TES) at a CERCLA site requires that applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) to protect the species and its habitat be included in the remedial investigation/feasibility study process. In such cases there is a propensity to use the species as an endpoint in the ecological assessment of the site. This approach ensures the inclusion of the TES-related ARAR and provides for cost efficiency, but may not result in a thorough assessment of risks associated with remedial alternatives, especially if the TES is a state-listed rather than a federal species. This paper explores the importance of identifying ARARs related to TES, and the values and limitations of using TES as endpoints. In doing so it explores the technical vs emotional basis for TES-based risk assessments.

  14. Ecological niche structure determines rangewide abundance patterns of species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Dí az-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yá ñ ez-Arenas, Carlos

    2012-09-03

    Spatial abundance patterns across species’ ranges have seen intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographic distance from the range center (‘abundant-center ...

  15. Grain Accumulation of Selenium Species in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Lombi, Enzo; Newville, Matt; Choi, Yongseong; Norton, Gareth J.; Price, Adam H.; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2012-09-05

    Efficient Se biofortification programs require a thorough understanding of the accumulation and distribution of Se species within the rice grain. Therefore, the translocation of Se species to the filling grain and their spatial unloading were investigated. Se species were supplied via cut flag leaves of intact plants and excised panicle stems subjected to a {+-} stem-girdling treatment during grain fill. Total Se concentrations in the flag leaves and grain were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Spatial accumulation was investigated using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microtomography. Selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenomethylcysteine (SeMeSeCys) were transported to the grain more efficiently than selenite and selenate. SeMet and SeMeSeCys were translocated exclusively via the phloem, while inorganic Se was transported via both the phloem and xylem. For SeMet- and SeMeSeCys-fed grain, Se dispersed throughout the external grain layers and into the endosperm and, for SeMeSeCys, into the embryo. Selenite was retained at the point of grain entry. These results demonstrate that the organic Se species SeMet and SeMeSeCys are rapidly loaded into the phloem and transported to the grain far more efficiently than inorganic species. Organic Se species are distributed more readily, and extensively, throughout the grain than selenite.

  16. New species of the Eastern Hemisphere genera Afroheriades and Noteriades (Hymenoptera, Megachilidae), with keys to species of the former

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griswold, Terry; Gonzalez, Victor H.

    2011-11-23

    New species of the rarely encountered megachilid genera Afroheriades Peters from South Africa, Afroheriades hyalinus sp. n., and Noteriades Cockerell from Myanmar and Thailand, Noteriades jenniferae sp. n. and Noteriades spinosus sp. n...

  17. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenberg, Kari M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a statistically significant relationship between bat diversity and month of the year. Future studies will be implemented based on these findings.

  18. Osthole inhibits the invasive ability of human lung adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of NF-?B-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shang-Jyh [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Su, Jen-Liang [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chi-Kuan [Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Ming-Chih; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Chang, Jer-Hua [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bien, Mauo-Ying [School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shun-Fa [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chien, Ming-Hsien, E-mail: mhchien1976@gmail.com [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    The induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is particularly important for the invasiveness of various cancer cells. Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative extracted from traditional Chinese medicines, is known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells, but the effect of osthole on the invasiveness of tumor cells is largely unknown. This study determines whether and by what mechanism osthole inhibits invasion in CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Herein, we found that osthole effectively inhibited the migratory and invasive abilities of CL1-5 cells. A zymographic assay showed that osthole inhibited the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in CL1-5 cells. Inhibition of migration, invasion, and MMP2 and/or MMP-9 proteolytic activities was also observed in other lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H1299 and A549). We further found that osthole inhibited MMP-9 expression at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that osthole inhibited the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by suppressing the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-?B in the MMP-9 promoter. Using reporter assays with point-mutated promoter constructs further confirmed that the inhibitory effect of osthole requires an NF-?B binding site on the MMP-9 promoter. Western blot and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that osthole inhibited NF-?B activity by inhibiting I?B-? degradation and NF-?B p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that osthole inhibits NF-?B-mediated MMP-9 expression, resulting in suppression of lung cancer cell invasion and migration, and osthole might be a potential agent for preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. -- Highlights: ? Osthole treatment inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cells migration and invasion. ? Osthole reduces the expression and proteolytic activity of MMP-9. ? Osthole inhibits MMP-9 transcription via suppression of NF-?B binding activity. ? Osthole inhibits I?B? degradation and NF-?B nucleus translocation. ? Osthole suppresses EMT by repressing vimentin and inducing E-cadherin expression.

  19. A revision of the Larainae (Coleoptera, Elmidae) of Venezuela, with description of nine new species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Crystal A.

    2013-09-05

    The species of the riffle beetle subfamily Larainae occurring in Venezuela are revised. Examination of 756 specimens yielded 22 species in nine genera occurring throughout the country. Seven species are newly recorded from the country: Phanoceroides...

  20. Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

    2009-08-31

    Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

  1. Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

  2. Background In March, 2003, military forces, mainly from the USA and the UK, invaded Iraq. We did a survey to compare mortality during the period of 146 months before the invasion with the 178 months after it.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chazelle, Bernard

    , invaded Iraq. We did a survey to compare mortality during the period of 14·6 months before the invasion with the 17·8 months after it. Methods A cluster sample survey was undertaken throughout Iraq during September invasion of Iraq. Violence accounted for most of the excess deaths and air strikes from coalition forces

  3. Systems Biology Analysis of Brucella Infected Peyers Patch Reveals Rapid Invasion with Modest Transient Perturbations of the Host Transcriptome 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Siddavatam, Prasad; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E.; Gull, Tamara; Khare, Sangeeta; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2013-12-09

    Brucella melitensis causes the most severe and acute symptoms of all Brucella species in human beings and infects hosts primarily through the oral route. The epithelium covering domed villi of jejunal-ileal Peyer’s patches ...

  4. Implantation, flux and recoil distributions for plasma species impinging on tokamak divertor materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshman, Nathan David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. APlasma Species Impinging on Tokamak Divertor Materials. byquantities needed to couple tokamak edge plasma to coolant

  5. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  6. Life cycle studies of the red tide dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosnahan, Michael L. (Michael Lewis)

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  7. Multiple prey traits, multiple predators: keys to understanding complex species interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Randall Brian

    2002-01-01

    Species interactions generate both natural selection and ecological community structure. Among the more interesting species interactions are those that create adaptive tradeoffs-where phenotypes conferring improved ...

  8. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Lee

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for translational development of molecular biodosimetry instrumentation to assess human exposure to mixed radiation fields.

  9. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  10. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  11. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  12. Monte Carlo Modeling of Nuclear Measurements in Vertical and Horizontal Wells in the Presence of Mud-Filtrate Invasion and Salt Mixing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    of Mud-Filtrate Invasion and Salt Mixing1 Alberto Mendoza2 , William E. Preeg3 , Carlos Torres-Verdín2 the influence of the spatial distributions of fluid saturation and salt concentration on generic compensated-bearing formation. The simulations also consider the mixing of salt between mud-filtrate and connate water. Subse

  13. Invasion Correction of Acoustic Logs in a Gas Reservoir Shihong Chi*, Jianghui Wu, and Carlos Torres-Verdin, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Invasion Correction of Acoustic Logs in a Gas Reservoir Shihong Chi*, Jianghui Wu, and Carlos-wave velocities in the near-wellbore region. This study focuses on two wells in a gas reservoir. The radial saturation distribution of mud filtrate and connate formation fluids is first obtained by simulating the mud

  14. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  15. Ganodermanontriol (GDNT) exerts its effect on growth and invasiveness of breast cancer cells through the down-regulation of CDC20 and uPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiahua; Jedinak, Andrej; Sliva, Daniel; Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN; Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma mushroom alcohol, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors but not in the tumor surrounding tissue in breast cancer patients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits expression of CDC20 in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits cell adhesion, cell migration and cell invasion of breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GDNT inhibits secretion of uPA and down-regulates expression of uPAR in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom that has been recognized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although some of the direct anticancer activities are attributed to the presence of triterpenes-ganoderic and lucidenic acids-the activity of other compounds remains elusive. Here we show that ganodermanontriol (GDNT), a Ganoderma alcohol, specifically suppressed proliferation (anchorage-dependent growth) and colony formation (anchorage-independent growth) of highly invasive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. GDNT suppressed expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein CDC20, which is over-expressed in precancerous and breast cancer cells compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, we found that CDC20 is over-expressed in tumors when compared to the tissue surrounding the tumor in specimens from breast cancer patients. GDNT also inhibited invasive behavior (cell adhesion, cell migration, and cell invasion) through the suppression of secretion of urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and inhibited expression of uPA receptor. In conclusion, mushroom GDNT is a natural agent that has potential as a therapy for invasive breast cancers.

  16. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-323 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Silver-haired bats do not remain in New Hampshire during the winter (see Izor 1979 for discussion to their summer habitat in New Hampshire (or, more gener- ally, to northern states; Cryan and Veilleux in press

  17. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-534 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Special Concern Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1 was listed as Threatened in New Hampshire between 1980 and 1986, was on the American Birds Blue List through

  18. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-184 Federal Listing: None State Listing 1989). Natu- ral vegetation commonly occurring in these New Hampshire sandy soils include white pine't occur in Vermont or Maine. New Hampshire's peripheral population of hognose snakes is state threatened

  19. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-553 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G4 State Rank: S2 Author: Carol R. Foss, New Hampshire Audubon Element 1: Distribution and Habitat 1.1 Habitat description Breeding habitat for the rusty blackbird in New Hampshire

  20. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-218 Federal Listing: None State Listing: None Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Authors: Kim A. Tuttle and M. N. Marchand, New Hampshire Fish and Game grass- lands, pine barrens, blueberry barrens, and grassy hilltops (Klemens 1993, New Hampshire Reptile

  1. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-580 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing: Not listed Global Rank: G5 State Rank: S3 Author: Jillian R. Kelly, New Hampshire Fish and Game Element 1). In the winter, spruce grouse feed entirely on short conifer needles (Nature- Serve 2005). New Hampshire natural

  2. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-64 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing, and Wisconsin (NatureServe 2004). New Hampshire and Maine represent the northernmost extent of the known to New Jersey are vulnerable to development. In New Hampshire, ringed boghaunter populations are limited

  3. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action PlanA-276 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing Eastern red bats inhabit New Hampshire during the summer. Individuals migrate to southern states in the fall and return to New Hampshire and other northern states in the spring (Cryan and Veilleux in press

  4. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-523 Federal Listing: Not listed State Listing included peer-re- viewed literature, Breeding Bird Survey Database, New Hampshire's Breeding Bird Atlas, and expert consultation. 1.8 Extent and Quality of Data The annual breeding bird survey, New Hampshire

  5. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    of continuous values, and are more often used for predict- ing species distributions (Guisan & Zim- mermann regions. The structural complexity of vegetation and the relative proportion of cover in the understorey scattering data, both of which provide a much greater range of continuous data values than vegetation

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecological Differentiation of Cryptic Species within an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicated the existence of phyloge- netic signal in at least two phenotypic characters (production of hydro for macroscopic animals and plants because most small-sized protist species have global dispersal (Fenchel 2005; Fenchel and Finlay 2004). Accord- ing to this theory, the small size, extremely large popula- tions

  7. Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, MarĂ­a Victoria

    Steam boiler control speci cation problem: A TLA solution Frank Le ke and Stephan Merz Institut fur of the state of the steam boiler, detect failures, and model message transmission. We give a more detailed between the physi- cal state of the steam boiler and the model maintained by the controller and discuss

  8. parczoologiquedeparis.fr --1 --A new species of zoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN THE WORLD TO HAVE BEEN ENTIRELY REBUILT A MOSAIC OF DIFFERENT LANDSCAPES, STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN NATURE of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy. The Museum manages two other animal parks: the Ménagerie (zoo AROUND THE WORLD 180 DIFFERENT SPECIES ANIMAL WELFARE CUSTOM-MADE STRUCTURES P24 THE TOUR FROM PATAGONIA

  9. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  10. Novel Flaviviruses Detected in Different Species of Mosquitoes in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figuerola, Jordi

    by arthropods. The genus includes major human path- ogens such as Yellow fever virus (YFV), Dengue virus (DENVNovel Flaviviruses Detected in Different Species of Mosquitoes in Spain Ana Va´zquez,1 Mari the characterization of three novel flaviviruses isolated in Spain. Marisma Mosquito virus, a novel mosquito borne

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species and conservation listing: insights from nature of biotic taxonomies and how these changes alter perceptions of extinction risk and conservation that the activity of a new, fine-scale taxonomy may have an effect in the taxonomy structure producing a taxonomic

  12. A Review of Interactions Between Hawaii's Fisheries and Protected Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lose bait and catch to bottlenose dolphins, rough-toothed dol phins, and Hawaiian monk seals. Trollfish fisheries. 55(2),1993 gered species involved in fishery in teractions are the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus turtles, seabirds, and monk seals take bait and are known to become hooked, and false killer whales may

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are influ- encedORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest carbon release under broadleaved forest floors may explain this difference. Spruce forest floor exhibited

  14. MOLECULAR ENTOMOLOGY Molecular Identification Key for Pest Species of Scirtothrips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    primers and determining the size of the products by using standard agarose gel electrophoresis, followed, Neohydatothrips, molecular identiŢcation key, exotic pests, nondestruc- tive DNA extraction The genus Scirtothrips, several species of Scirtothrips have (or have the potential to) spread from their natural habitats

  15. Cuticular Hydrocarbonsfor Species Determination of Tropical Termites1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    species from loca- tions in the Pacific Rim and several Caribbean islands. We recently reexam- ined for People of the Pacific, XVII Pacific Science Congress, May 27-28, 1991, Honolulu, Hawaii. 2SupervisoryResearch Entomologist and Biological Technician, respec- tively, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U

  16. Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    Chapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power about the effects of plant viruses despite their ubiquitous distribution in plants. Several recent studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996

  17. Growth of 11 Introduced Tree Species on Selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eucalyptus (ElIca1.l'PIU.1 microcorys) plantation grows in the Kalopa section of the Hamakua Forest Reserve Silk-oak 3 Norfolk-Island-Pine 4 Redwood 6 Loblolly Pine and Slash Pine 6 Eucalyptus Species 8!.), slash pine (Pinus elliO/lii Engelm.), loblolly pine (Pinus taeda 1..), tallowwood eucalyptus (Eucalyptus

  18. Phylogeography of the magpie-robin species complex (Aves: Turdidae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winker, Kevin

    ) reveals a Philippine species, an interesting isolating barrier and unusual dispersal patterns, and the Indian Ocean from Madagascar to the Greater Sunda and Philippine islands. Methods We sequenced 1695. saularis, making C. saularis polyphyletic. Malagasy and non- Philippine Asian populations form

  19. Deer were among the species studied by biologists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Stuart

    Deer were among the species studied by biologists CATEGORIES TV RADIO COMMUNICATE WHERE I LIVE Rural housing market in 'crisis' Scottish horse racing romps home Buy-out may cut it for Caithness Homepage >> | BBC Sport >> | BBC Weather >> | BBC World Service >> About BBC News | Help | Feedback | News

  20. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-01-01

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  1. Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, John R.

    Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species ELLIOT ALTMAN, JOHN R. ROTH in genetic analysis, with emphasis on work done in Salmonella typhimurium (official designation, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium) and on the methods available for use in Salmonella spp. Many of these methods

  2. RARE SPECIES CONSERVATORY FOUNDATION, INC. EIN: 65-0560456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    platform to facilitate global management of the species and in situ conservation investment in Brazil, along with field-based research, habitat protection and local capacity building, are directed toward-brows to the Brazilian government in recognition of Brazil's governing authority and progressive conservation and law

  3. performance. An absence of entrainment in such species would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    performance. An absence of entrainment in such species would raise the question of what else is required for entrainment. One possibility is the propensity to engage in joint social action. A recent study of entrainment in human children [11] showed that young children find it difficult to entrain

  4. ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: SECTION 7 CONSULTATION BIOLOGICAL OPINION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the following information sources: · Request by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) for a LOA (USFWS), depending upon the protected species that may be affected. Formal consultations on most listed Division (NMFS PRl) requested formal consultation on regulations and subsequent Letter ofAuthorization (LOA

  5. Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Does GM wheat affect saprophagous Diptera species (Drosophilidae, Phoridae)? Marco Peter, Andreas Antifungal resistance Powdery mildew Pleiotropic effect S u m m a r y Genetically modified (GM) plants might. Therefore, an ecological risk assessment for GM plants also has to include decomposers. In a laboratory diet

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Cichlid species diversity in naturally and anthropogenically turbid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Nile perch introduction, and decreases in water transparency and dissolved oxygen concentrations due-collapse period, spawning occurred year-round in shallow areas with hard substrates and relatively clear water differentiation in feeding techniques as well as year-round spawning, and both may facilitate species coexistence

  7. Proceedings, 16th U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on gypsy moth and other invasive species 005 GTR-NE-337 SIREX NOCTILIO (HYMENOPTERA: SIRICIDAE)--THE NEW ZEALAND EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Australia, Brazil, Chile, United Kingdom, USA and Uruguay. Sirex noctilio F. is a wood wasp that is widely (195), Uruguay (1980), Argentina (1985), Brazil (1988), South Africa (1994) and Chile (001). The usual

  8. Collection of Digital Imagery in Support of Aquatic Invasive Species Program and CERP Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    : The US Army Corps of Engineers. $330,000. 2006-Present. · Development of the IFAS Vegetation Mobile. $130,000. 2001-2002. Mapping and Monitoring of Sedimentation and Sand Dune Encroachment in Lake Nasser in the Southeastern Lower Coastal Plain Region of the U.S. Sponsor: NASA. $370,000. 1999-2002. Biological Diversity

  9. Phylogeny of the pollinating yucca moths, with revision of Mexican species (Tegeticula and Parategeticula;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    reported four species of pollinators (Riley, 1892; Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982; Powell, 1984), including three

  10. The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Requirements for Collision Data on the Species Helium, Beryllium and Boron in Magnetic Confinement Fusion

  11. The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    REPORT The Allee effect, stochastic dynamics and the eradication of alien species Andrew Liebhold1 biology of eradication have assumed that eradication can only be achieved via 100% removal of the alien of alien species. While most alien species have relatively few effects, many species have caused

  12. Surface species produced in the radiolysis of zirconia nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrasco-Flores, Eduardo A.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2007-12-21

    Modifications to water-zirconia nanoparticle interfaces induced by {gamma} irradiation have been examined using diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT), Raman scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Spectroscopy with in situ heating was used to probe variations in the dissociatively bound chemisorbed water on the zirconia nanoparticles following evaporation of the physisorbed water. DRIFT spectra show that the bridged Zr-OH-Zr species decreases relative to the terminal Zr-OH species upon irradiation. No variation is observed with Raman scattering, indicating that the zirconia morphology is unchanged. EPR measurements suggest the possible formation of the superoxide ion, presumably by modification of the surface OH groups. Trapped electrons and interstitial H atoms are also observed by EPR.

  13. Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  14. An alternative to climate change for explaining species loss in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    : J.M., S.C., R.D., and W.W. wrote the paper. The authors declare no conflict of interest. 1To whom.'s (1) 2003­2007 floral surveys, deer densities were likely between 5.7 and 9.6 km 1 , with locally). Many of the plant species groups listed as most reduced in their surveys (dogwoods, lillies, many or

  15. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  16. They're out there.The problem of invasive plants is as close as your own backyard.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    government agencies, as well as the media, the basic question for most homeowners is simply, "How do I get and digging Many herbaceous plants and some woody species (up to about one inch in diameter), if present as possible; even a small por- tion can restart the infestation. Pull plants by hand or use a digging fork

  17. Two-photon 3-D mapping of ex vivo human skin endogenous fluorescence species based on fluorescence emission spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laiho, Lily H.

    Spectral resolved tissue imaging has a broad range of biomedical applications such as the minimally invasive diagnosis of diseases and the study of wound healing and tissue engineering processes. Two-photon microscopy ...

  18. A new species of Chilicola from Bahia, Brazil (Hymenoptera, Colletidae), with a key to the species of the megalostigma group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Favizia; Mahlmann, Thiago; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-12-09

    ) C. longiceps (Ashmead, 1900) ?? Mexico: Jalisco; St. Vincent C. huberi (Ducke, 1908) ? Brazil: Ceará C. aequatoriensis Benoist, 1942 ?? Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela C. mexicana Toro & Michener, 1975 ?? Mexico: México, Hidalgo, Morelos C.... In addition, we provide an expanded and updated identification key to species for the megalostigma group. Material and methods Morphological terminology used herein is adapted from Engel (2001) and Michener (2007), while the format for the description...

  19. Characterization of GSTA3 Gene Products in Multiple Species and Demonstration of their Conservation in Divergent Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peer, Shawna Marie

    2015-05-12

    of all species investigated including those used as reference ……………………………………….. 51 7 Double stranded DNA sequences of the putative amplicons of GSTA1 and GSTA3 with primer binding sites for primers used... in qRT-PCR highlighted to demonstrate the primers’ specificity for GSTA3 ……………………….. 56 !ix LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Critical amino acids (AA) for 3-ketosteroid isomerase activity of GSTA3....... 13 2 PCR primer...

  20. Welcome everyone, thank you for coming. My name is ___. I'm a volunteer with Speaking for Wildlife. Speaking for Wildlife is a program by the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension that brings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    . Speaking for Wildlife is a program by the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension that brings presentation is about three of the nonnative invasive insects that are a risk to New Hampshire's trees woolly adelgid (pictured in the middle), and one not yet known to be in New Hampshire but is certainly

  1. Kalaupapa National Historical Park National Park Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    , and endangered Hawaiian monk seals. invasive plants Non-native plants like Christmas berry and lantana use water Park established (1980) limited hunting, food imported limited fishing, food imported Hawaiian monk 1794/1795 represent turning points in the rise and fall of the Hawaiian Kingdom. McCoy, Mark D. 2007

  2. Protection and reliability : an examination of the quality and quantity of ant protection in the food-for- protection mutualism between Ferocactus viridescens, Crematogaster californica and the invasive Linepithema humile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludka, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Biology 12 (1): 39- Ness, J. H. and J. Bronstein. 2004.Invasions 6: 445-461. Ness, J. H. 2006. A mutualism’spollinators. OIKOS 113: 506-514. Ness, J. , W.F. Morris, and

  3. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Alam, Samina; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-02-15

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER?) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  4. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  5. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} ? N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  6. Theory of electromagnetic fluctuations for magnetized multi-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, Roberto E. Muńoz, Víctor; Araneda, Jaime; Moya, Pablo S.; Vińas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2014-09-15

    Analysis of electromagnetic fluctuations in plasma provides relevant information about the plasma state and its macroscopic properties. In particular, the solar wind persistently sustains a small but detectable level of magnetic fluctuation power even near thermal equilibrium. These fluctuations may be related to spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations arising from the discreteness of charged particles. Here, we derive general expressions for the plasma fluctuations in a multi-species plasma following arbitrary distribution functions. This formalism, which generalizes and includes previous works on the subject, is then applied to the generation of electromagnetic fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma of two proton populations described by drifting bi-Maxwellians.

  7. Species composition and distribution of the macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Douglas Edward

    1977-01-01

    . (t) indicates presence of organism in samples. Copepoda Cladocera Diptera e V ts m c e V V J V V e l V V m m V l c V V V c 0 I n c c v l W V V V e V I o 0 V l"I 51 ml al Ol al lcl Ol Hl ZI all O I Ol &I &I 23 April 9 Slay...) ember) August 1977 ABSTRACT Species Composition and Distribut ion of the Macrozooplankton in Postoak Lake. (August 1977). Douglas E. Welch, B. S. , University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point Chairman of Advisory Cormpfittee: Dr. Richard Noble A...

  8. 31 TAC 65.175 - Threatened Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpecies | Open Energy31 TAC 65.175

  9. 31 TAC 65.176 - Endangered Species | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpecies | Open Energy31 TAC

  10. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  11. Species Diversity and Distribution in Presence?Absence Matrices: Mathematical Relationships and Biological Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arita, Hé ctor T.; Christen, J. André s; Rodrí guez, Pilar; Soberó n, Jorge

    2008-10-01

    mathematical and biological relationships. We develop a theory and analyze data for North American mammals to interpret range?diversity plots in which the species diversity of sites and the geographic range of species can be depicted simultaneously. We show...

  12. Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species diversity in southern Rocky Mountain headwater and Conditions #12;MOLECULAR APPROACHES IN FRESHWATER ECOLOGY Morphological taxonomy, DNA barcoding, and species: diversity, elevation, DNA barcoding, taxonomy, aquatic insect, EPT, southern Rocky Mountain Elevation

  13. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06

    in low-yielding farming systems, but there was considerable turnover between these systems and forests, with widespread generalists replacing narrowly endemic forest-dependent species. Species most dependent on forest as a natural habitat, those...

  14. Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective, we investigated the response of six willow (Salix) species to a short- term drought. In a greenhouse

  15. Taxonomy is important in conservation: a preliminary reassessment of Philippine species-level bird taxonomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2006-01-01

    careful analysis. In this paper, I develop a first-pass assessment of Philippine bird taxonomy under an alternative species concept, and compare the results with the traditional biological species concept lists. Differences between the two lists were...

  16. Evolutionary implications of microsatellite variation in the Peromyscus maniculatus species group 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chirhart, Scott Edward

    2004-11-15

    Given the distribution and probable evolutionary history of the Peromyscus maniculatus species group, an interspecific comparison of microsatellite variation among these species would be logically based (at least initially) on primers isolated from...

  17. Observer error in identifying species using indirect signs: analysis of a river otter track survey technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jonah Wy

    2007-09-17

    Indirect signs of species presence (e.g., tracks, scats, hairs) are frequently used to detect target species in occupancy, presence/absence, and other wildlife studies. Indirect signs are often more efficient than direct ...

  18. Road traffic noise modifies behaviour of a keystone species Graeme Shannon a, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeloni, Lisa

    Road traffic noise modifies behaviour of a keystone species Graeme Shannon a, * , Lisa M. Angeloni the influence of traffic noise on foraging and vigilance in a keystone species in North American prairie systems

  19. Abundance, diversity, and resource use in an assemblage of Conus species in Enewetak lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Eight species of the gastropod genus Conus co-occur in sand substrate and an adjacent meadow of Halimeda stuposa in Enewetak lagoon, an unusually diverse assemblage for this type of habitat. Population density is high, and large species predominate; they represent all major feeding groups in the genus: predators on polychaetes, enteropneusts, gastropods, and fishes. Although the two most common Conus species eat primarily the same prey species, they mainly take prey of different sizes in different microhabitats. The results suggest that sufficient microhabitat heterogeneity and prey diversity exist to permit spatial segregation and specialization on different prey resources by the different Conus species present. Between-species dissimilarity in resource use thus agrees with previous observations on more diverse Conus assemblages of subtidal coral reef platforms. Prey species diversity is inversely related to body size, confirming and extending a previously identified pattern among Conus species that prey on sedentary polychaetes.

  20. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, ZhengHua; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. •MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. •p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  1. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  2. Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species Boundaries in the Lichenized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Mycological Society of America A Gene Genealogical Approach to Recognize Phylogenetic Species-8897 A gene genealogical approach to recognize phylogenetic species boundaries in the lichenized fungus, was investigated as a model system in which to recognize species boundaries. Gene genealogies of 6 and 12 loci were

  3. Mycological Society of America Identification of Armillaria Species from New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Thomas C.

    Mycological Society of America Identification of Armillaria Species from New Hampshire Author(s): T-5126 BRIEF ARTICLE IDENTIFICATION OF ARMILLARIA SPECIES FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE T. C. Harrington Department? ton, 1993). We have identified six species of Ar? millaria in New Hampshire. Herein we record

  4. 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilu, Khidir

    165 11Skewed Distribution of Species Number in Grass Genera: Is It a Taxonomic Artefact? K. W. Hilu .................................................................................................................................... 176 ABSTRACT The grass family (Poaceae) comprises about 10,000 species distributed in some 785 genera, seven large subfamilies and a few small ones. The distribution of species in genera appears skewed

  5. The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    720 The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem- perate and tropical); numerically, the blue shark is the top nontarget species captured by the U.S. longline pelagic Atlantic fleet) on the catch rate of several target and bycatch species, including the blue shark. However, they did

  6. Reliable DNA Barcoding Performance Proved for Species and Island Populations of Comoran Squamate Reptiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a DNA barcoding study of squamates of the Comoros archipelago, a poorly studied group of oceanic islands of the 29 currently recognized squamate species of the Comoros, including 17 of the 18 endemic species. Some species considered endemic to the Comoros according to current taxonomy were found to cluster with non

  7. A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES. is described on the basis of specimens found in the lungs of 2 species of agamid lizards: the Philippine flying in Aurora Province, Luzon Island, Philippines. The new species of Rhabdias is characterized by presence of 4

  8. Modelling butterfly species richness using mesoscale environmental variables: model construction and validation for mountain ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the central Great Basin of western North America. Species inventory data and values for 14 environmental variation in species richness, we generated and tested predictions of species richness for `new' locations comprehensive field inventories. However, inventory data for many regions are sparse, and logistics and funding

  9. ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Microbial. Perceived disadvantages and counterpoints: too simple, too artificial microbes are fundamentally different;ESPM 131 Using microbes to understand effects S06 and drivers of species diversity Species richness

  10. vol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Andrew

    on spatial turnover in the species com- position (beta diversity). Our results suggest that if energy richness, species-energy relationships, potential evapotranspiration, spatial scale, beta diversity, fishesvol. 171, no. 6 the american naturalist june 2008 Scale Dependence of Species-Energy Relationships

  11. Of the more than 110 species of Sebastes recognized worldwide, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    preserved for over a century. Ranging around the rim of the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, from Japan of species are found in the North Pacific Ocean, where about 100 species are currently considered valid (Kai of Alaska. In the western Pacific, Matsubara (1934) described two species similar to Sebastes aleutianus, S

  12. Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela S. R. The Botryosphaeriaceae include several well recognised Eucalyptus pathogens of which various species have recently been found on Eucalyptus spp. in Venezuela. An initial inoculation trial was conducted using seven species

  13. Taxonomy and pathogenicity of Ceratocystis species on Eucalyptus trees in South China, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taxonomy and pathogenicity of Ceratocystis species on Eucalyptus trees in South China, including C Research Foundation 2012 Abstract Commercial plantations of Eucalyptus species have been established economy. As part of a survey of fungal diseases affecting Eucalyptus species in South China, Ceratocystis

  14. PROACTIVE ASSESSMENT OF IMPACTS TO USACE NAVIGATION FROM PROPOSED THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    or plant from the list of Endangered and Threatened wildlife and Plants. Distinct Population Segment (DPS that is proposed in the Federal Register to be listed under Section 4 of the Endangered Species Act. Plants to adversely affect listed species, proposed species, or designated critical habitat. Biological Opinion

  15. Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Ian

    Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison Alejandro, a synthetic view of multi-trait differences between alien and native species is not yet available. 2. We separately, co-occurring native and alien species significantly differed in their traits. These differences

  16. REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS TEASIng apart alien species risk assessments: a framework for best practices and Montserrat Vila`13 Abstract Some alien species cause substantial impacts, yet most are innocuous. Given limited resources, forecasting risks from alien species will help prioritise management. Given that risk

  17. Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    Re ning Abstract Machine Speci cations of the Steam Boiler Control to Well Documented Executable the steam boiler control speci cation problem to il- lustrate how the evolving algebra approach to the speci, in June 1995, to control the Karlsruhe steam boiler simulator satisfactorily. The abstract machines

  18. Revealing patterns of local species richness along environmental1 gradients with a novel network tool2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, Angel "Anxo"

    33 large scale patterns by including at the local community level information about species37 variance of the newly defined species richness, highlighting that, at the local scale, communities,8, while ambient energy becomes limiting in cold climates1.50 Analyses of species richness

  19. Food-Web Models Predict Species Abundances in Response to Habitat Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    sizes of food-web constituents than did simple keystone species models, models that included only-species demographic analyses [9] and assessments of extinction risk. Single-factor models also include keystone species effects, which emphasize responses of populations to changes in the abundance of a single keystone

  20. Stages common to all biofilms (medical and environmental) Stages unique to aquatic biofouling BiofilmThickness(m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Develop better antifouling surfaces to improve shipping fuel efficiency, reduce invasive species transport

  1. Variability in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism: A Survey of North Carolina Succulent Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Craig E.; Lubbers, Anne E.; Teeri, James A.

    1982-01-01

    non- succulent species of genera previously reported to have CAM were sampled, e.g., Yucca and Tillandsia. Only species growing in the state of North Carolina (one study site wTas located in South Carolina near the North Carolina border) were... of these species were examined previously. Atriplex patula is a C 3 species (BJORKMAN 1973) . Although dark 1 4 C 0 2 up­ take was reported in Salicornia europaea, S. virginica, and Borrichia frutescens ( W E B B and BURLEY 1965) , TABLE 1 SPECIES, STUDY SITES...

  2. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  3. A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Jurez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico 55 A new species of Bolitoglossa (Amphibia, Caudata) from the Sierra de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico Sean M de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, AP 70-153, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510

  4. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (2998 Plaza Blanca, Santa Fe, NM 87505)

    1999-01-01

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a plasma containing the species after a sufficient time period has elapsed after the generation of the plasma and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample.

  5. Fragmentation, domain formation and atom number fluctuations of a two-species Boseâ??Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Uttam; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2012-01-01

    Two-species atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) exhibitof a two-species Bose–Einstein condensate in an opticalof a two-species Bose–Einstein condensate to an optical

  6. Clade Age and Diversification Rate Variation Explain Disparity in Species Richness among Water Scavenger Beetle (Hydrophilidae) Lineages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Devin D.; Fiká ?ek, Martin; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2014-06-02

    Explaining the disparity of species richness across the tree of life is one of the great challenges in evolutionary biology. Some lineages are exceptionally species rich, while others are relatively species poor. One ...

  7. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surdutovich, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well.

  8. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University] [Penn State University

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  9. Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shuster, Stephen [Penn State University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Stephen Shuster of Penn State University gives a presentation on "Genomics of Extinct and Endangered Species" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  10. Apparatus and method for polarizing polarizable nuclear species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersman, F. William; Leuschner, Mark; Carberry, Jeannette

    2005-09-27

    The present invention is a polarizing process involving a number of steps. The first step requires moving a flowing mixture of gas, the gas at least containing a polarizable nuclear species and vapor of at least one alkali metal, with a transport velocity that is not negligible when compared with the natural velocity of diffusive transport. The second step is propagating laser light in a direction, preferably at least partially through a polarizing cell. The next step is directing the flowing gas along a direction generally opposite to the direction of laser light propagating. The next step is containing the flowing gas mixture in the polarizing cell. The final step is immersing the polarizing cell in a magnetic field. These steps can be initiated in any order, although the flowing gas, the propagating laser and the magnetic field immersion must be concurrently active for polarization to occur.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  12. Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates novel targets: Moesin contributes to cancer cell proliferation and invasion in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Nohata, Nijiro; Fuse, Miki [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Kikkawa, Naoko [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Fujimura, Lisa; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Yamada, Yasutoshi; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshitaka [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Seki, Naohiko, E-mail: naoseki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates moesin (MSN) expression in HNSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of MSN in HNSCC cells suppressed proliferation, migration and invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Recently, many studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the development, invasion and metastasis of various types of human cancers. Our recent study revealed that expression of microRNA-133a (miR-133a) was significantly reduced in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and that restoration of miR-133a inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HNSCC cell lines, suggesting that miR-133a function as a tumor suppressor. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-133a transfectants and TargetScan database showed that moesin (MSN) was a promising candidate of miR-133a target gene. MSN is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin and moesin) protein family and ERM function as cross-linkers between plasma membrane and actin-based cytoskeleton. The functions of MSN in cancers are controversial in previous reports. In this study, we focused on MSN and investigated whether MSN was regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a and contributed to HNSCC oncogenesis. Restoration of miR-133a in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu, HSC3, IMC-3 and SAS) suppressed the MSN expression both in mRNA and protein level. Silencing study of MSN in HNSCC cell lines demonstrated significant inhibitions of cell proliferation, migration and invasion activities in si-MSN transfectants. In clinical specimen with HNSCC, the expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. These data suggest that MSN may function as oncogene and is regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a. Our analysis data of novel tumor-suppressive miR-133a-mediated cancer pathways could provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis.

  13. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  14. RCUT: A Non-Invasive Method for Detection, Location, and Quantification of Radiological Contaminants in Pipes and Ducts - 12514

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratton, Wesley L.; Maresca, Joseph W. Jr.; Beck, Deborah A.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Characterization Using Tracers (RCUT) is a minimally invasive method for detection and location of residual radiological contamination in pipes and ducts. The RCUT technology utilizes reactive gaseous tracers that dissociate when exposed to gamma and/or beta radiation emitting from a radiological contaminant in a pipe or duct. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) was selected as a tracer for this radiological application, because it is a chemically inert gas that is both nonflammable, nontoxic, and breaks down when exposed to gamma radiation. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the tracer pair of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} formed SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} when exposed to a gamma or beta radioactive field, which indicated the presence of radiological contamination. Field application of RCUT involves first injecting the reactive tracers into the pipe to fill the pipe being inspected and allowing sufficient time for the tracer to interact with any contaminants present. This is followed by the injection of an inert gas at one end of the pipe to push the reactive tracer at a known or constant flow velocity along the pipe and then out the exit and sampling port at the end of the pipeline where its concentration is measured by a gas chromatograph. If a radiological contaminant is present in the pipe being tested, the presence of SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. The time of arrival of the SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} can be used to locate the contaminant. If the pipe is free of radiological contamination, no SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. RCUT and PCUT are both effective technologies that can be used to detect contamination within pipelines without the need for mechanical or human inspection. These methods can be used to detect, locate, and/or estimate the volume of a variety of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, and heavy metals. While further optimization is needed for RCUT, the key first step of identification of a tracer compound appropriate for the application of detecting radioactive pipeline contamination through the detection of decomposition products of SF{sub 6} has been demonstrated. Other tracer gases that will also undergo radiolysis will be considered in the future. The next step for the RCUT development process is conducting laboratory scale tests using short pipelines to define analytical requirements, establish performance boundaries, and develop strategies for lower exposure levels. Studies to identify additional analytical techniques using equipment that is more field rugged than a GC/MS would also be beneficial. (authors)

  15. Invasive Group B Streptococcal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - nant compared to types Ib (5.1%), II (2.5%), and V (2.5%) (Table). Capsular types IV, and VI­IX were

  16. Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loge, Gary W. (304 Cheryl Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1998-01-01

    Method for determining the concentration of atomic species in gases and solids. Measurement of at least two emission intensities from a species in a sample that is excited by incident laser radiation. Which generates a plasma therein after a sufficient time period has elapsed and during a second time period, permits an instantaneous temperature to be established within the sample. The concentration of the atomic species to be determined is then derived from the known emission intensity of a predetermined concentration of that species in the sample at the measured temperature, a quantity which is measured prior to the determination of the unknown concentration, and the actual measured emission from the unknown species, or by this latter emission and the emission intensity of a species having known concentration within the sample such as nitrogen for gaseous air samples.

  17. Biodiesel from aquatic species. Project report: FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.; Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Zeiler, K.G.

    1994-01-01

    Researchers in the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. It is estimated that 150 to 400 barrels of oil per acre per year (0.06 to 0.16 million liters/hectar) could be produced with microalgal oil technology. Initial commercialization of this technology is envisioned for the desert Southwest because this area provides high solar radiation and offers flat land that has few competing uses (hence low land costs). Similarly, there are large saline aquifers with few competing uses in the region. This water source could provide a suitable, low-cost medium for the growth of many microalgae. The primary area of research during FY 1993 was the effort to genetically improve microalgae in order to control the timing and magnitude of lipid accumulation. Increased lipid content will have a direct effect on fuel price, and the control of lipid content is a major project goal. The paper describes progress on the following: culture collection; molecular biology of lipid biosynthesis; microalgal transformation; and environmental, safety, and health and quality assurance.

  18. Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.; Jarvis, E.; Dunahay, T.; Roessler, P.; Zeiler, K. ); Sprague, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The primary goal of the Biodiesel/Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology for growing microalgae as a renewable biomass feedstock for the production of a diesel fuel substitute (biodiesel), thereby reducing the need for imported petroleum. Microalgae are of interest as a feedstock because of their high growth rates and tolerance to varying environmental conditions, and because the oils (lipids) they produce can be extracted and converted to substitute petroleum fuels such as biodiesel. Microalgae can be grown in arid and semi-arid regions with poor soil quality, and saline water from aquifers or the ocean can be used for growing microalgae. Biodiesel is an extremely attractive candidate to fulfill the need for a diesel fuel substitute. Biodiesel is a cleaner fuel than petroleum diesel; it is virtually free of sulfur, and emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulates during combustion are significantly reduced in comparison to emissions from petroleum diesel. Biodiesel provides essentially the same energy content and power output as petroleum-based diesel fuel.

  19. Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2014-05-14

    Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed.

  20. Genera of orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa, Hexacorallia), and their type species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Zelenchuk, Taras; Raveendran, Dinesh

    2007-12-21

    relatively small taxon, containing 1426 nominal species, of which 1103 are currently considered valid (Fautin 2007). However, it is rich in genera, 425 having been made available. We determined the type species, if any, for all genera of the order..., there are no junior homonyms and one senior homonym; 13 are currently considered valid. The name Endocoelactis was proposed for an actiniarian genus by Carlgren (1897) but no species was attributed to the genus, so it is a nomen nudum (ICZN Article 12...