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Sample records for inuktitut inupiaq iranian

  1. COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  2. Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  3. NREL-Costa Rica-Energy Efficiency Workshop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  4. Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  5. LEDS Tool: Step-By-Step Guidance to a Long-Term Framework for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  6. Reducing rural poverty through increased access to energy services...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  7. Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  8. Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  9. Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho,...

  10. National Iranian Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Iranian Oil Company is located in Tehran, Iran About The NIOC is one the largest oil companies in the world. Currently, the company estimates 137 billion barrels of liquid...

  11. Impacts of oil disturbances: lessons from experience. [1973-1974 Oil Crisis; 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution; 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T R

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the impacts of previous oil distrubances can be used to suggest the impacts of future oil disturbances. This paper reviews how the 1973-1974 Oil Crisis, the 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution, and the 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War impacted the US and world oil markets. Various measures of impacts are considered, such as impacts on physical flows of crude and products, crude and product price changes on the US and world markets, impacts on stocks of crude and products, and impacts on refiners' inputs and outputs. Various macroeconomic indicators, such as gross national product, inflation rates, and unemployment, are also considered. Of particular interest in this study are the impacts that oil disturbances have had (and could have) on the availabilities of particular crude types and the abilities of US refiners to process crudes of various types in the short run. In addition, this paper reviews how the actions of the consuming countries and the major oil companies affected the impacts of past disturbances. The paper briefly discusses the likely causes and impacts of future oil distrubances and summarizes the lessons to be learned from past reactions to oil disturbances.

  12. Connie Fredenberg

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connie Fredenberg has a Bachelor of Arts in linguistics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, with minors in the Inupiaq language, education, and biology. She started in the energy business in...

  13. Microsoft Word - whalesice.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    did it go? Did it go to the same place for both "oceans"? 4. How does sea ice keep the water warmer than the air throughout the winter? 5. What are three Inupiaq words for types...

  14. Availability and Price of Non-Iranian Petroleum - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Previous issues: December 2015 October 2015 August 2015 June 2015 April 2015 Februay 2015 December 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014 April 2014 February 2014 December 2013 October 2013 August 2013 June 2013 April 2013 February 2013 December 2012 Octber 2012 August 2012 June 2012 April 2012 February 2012 Go The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran Release date: February 9, 2016 December 2015 - January 2016 Update

  15. doepresentation.dvi

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil Shocks and U.S. External Adjustment Martin Bodenstein, Christopher Erceg, Luca ... Iranian Revolution Arab- Israeli War Effects of An Oil Demand Shock that Drives the Price ...

  16. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    impact demand for petroleum products. Together with robust levels of current global crude oil production, and the potential for additional Iranian exports in 2016, oil prices...

  17. Moshanir | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Moshanir Place: Tehran, Iran (Islamic Republic) Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Iranian state engineering consultant. Involved in the development of...

  18. Microsoft Word - OUTLOOK_SNV_Dec09 edit dec 13 by mary.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... However, oil-price shocks, first during the Arab oil embargo of 1973 and a subsequent decline in imports from the Middle East following the wake of the Iranian revolution in 1979, ...

  19. Iran to build new refinery at Arak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports Iranian plans to construct a grassroots 150,000-b/d refinery in Arak. The plant, to be completed in early 1993, will be capable of producing unleaded gasoline and other light products.

  20. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  1. Econometric study of an oil-exporting country: the case of Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiat, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on the oil-based developing economy of Iran. It focuses on the aggregate behavior of the Iranian economy through a simple linear econometric model. After a survey of the literature on the theoretical framework of macroeconomic models for the developing countries in general, and for the oil-exporting developing countries in particular, a linear econometric model for the Iranian economy if formulated and its logical and economic aspects are explained. The proposed model consists of basic consumption, production, foreign trade, and employment relationship. Results obtained from the estimation of the consumption functions seem to indicate that the aggregate Iranian consumption behavior can be best explained by Fiedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis. In general, the results of this study demonstrate that the links between different sectors of the Iranian economy are very weak and the import-substitution strategy of the government during the period of study failed to establish a genuine domestic industrial base and to reduce its dependence on foreign resources.

  2. Capping blowouts from Iran's 8-year war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-07-01

    Control well blown up by the Iraqi military were a 2 1/2 year legacy left the National Iranian Oil Co. at the end of this long conflict. This final installment of a 2-part series describes capping of the largest wind oil well.

  3. The United States remains unprepared for oil import disruptions. Volume I. summary: includes conclusions and recommendations. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-29

    The U.S. Government is almost totally unprepared to deal with disruptions in oil imports. Oil import disruptions--such as the 1973 oil embargo and the 1979 Iranian shortfall--pose a significant threat to national security, and the lack of effective contingency planning and program development to data is serious and requires immediate attention. The Government must make a determined commitment to emergency preparedness now, while oil markets are slack, to prepare for any future disruption.

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * On April 2, Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) reached a framework agreement that could result in the lifting of oil- related sanctions against Iran. Lifting sanctions could substantially change the STEO forecast for oil supply, demand, and prices by allowing a significantly increased volume of Iranian barrels to enter the

  5. Capping blowouts from Iran's eight-year war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on capping blowouts from Iran's eight year war. Fires in three Iranian wells (two oil, one gas), started during 1987 by Iraqi sabotage, finally were extinguished during the last several months of 1990. Burning during the final months of the countries' eight-year war, plus another subsequent peaceful two years, the fires consumed millions of barrels of oil and billions of cubic feet of gas before they were capped. Ironically, bringing the wells under control took relatively little time.

  6. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologies in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.

  7. Essays on strategy: hostage rescue planning; maritime theater nuclear capability; strategic psychological operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, R.F.; Thomas, R.E.; Kriesel, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The essays in the volume won recognition in the 1984 Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategy Essay Competition. The volume contains three essays. The author of the first essay considers the requirements for successful planning of hostage rescues, specifically reviewing the Son Tay raid, the Mayaguez crisis, the Entebbe rescue, and the Iranian hostage rescue attempt. The author of the second essay looks at the US Navy's capability for maritime theater nuclear warfare, identifying problems and recommending improvements. The author of the third essay finds the United States lacking a national-level mechanism for coordinating military psychological operations and proposes a way to remedy the problem.

  8. Iran sets sights on 5 million b/d of crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that Iran, currently producing 3.2 million b/d of oil, has set a production target of 5 million b/d by March 1994. On the way to that target Iran's oil flow will climb to 4 million b/d by March 1993, says A. Moshtaqhian, director of exploration and production for National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC). With oil reserves of about 100 million bbl, Iran will find it easy to increase productive capacity, Moshtaqhian told the Gulf Oil and Politics publication.

  9. Iran seeking help in regaining prerevolution oil and gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1996-02-19

    This paper reviews the goals of the Iranian oil and gas industry to rebuild their oil and gas production facilities by using foreign investment. It discusses the historical consequences of war in the region to diminish the production and postpone the recovery of natural gas which is currently flared. It describes the major projects Iran hopes to develop through international partnerships and includes field development, pipeline construction, gas reinjection, gas treatment facilities, and new offshore operation. The paper also reviews the US policy on Iran and its attempt to apply sanctions towards this country.

  10. OPEC: 10 years after the Arab oil boycott

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.H.

    1983-09-23

    OPEC's dominance over world oil markets is waning 10 years after precipitating world-wide energy and economic crises. The 1979 revolution in Iran and the start of the Iranian-Iraqi war in 1980 introduced a second shock that caused oil importers to seek non-OPEC supplies and emphasize conservation. No breakup of the cartel is anticipated, however, despite internal disagreements over production and price levels. Forecasters see OPEC as the major price setter as an improved economy increases world demand for oil. Long-term forecasts are even more optimistic. 24 references, 2 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  11. Crustal structure along geotransect Baghdad-Dohuk, northern Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Saigh, N.H. ); Namik, I.; Hameed, I.A.

    1990-06-01

    Seismic reflection data correlated to five exploration wells along with geological, gravity, and magnetic data are used to construct the subsurface structure along an approximately 100 km wide corridor that traverses central Iraq in a SE-NW direction for a distance of about 500 km from Baghdad in the central part of Iraq to Dohuk near the Turkish border. This transect is one of few such transects that represents the Iraqi contribution to the Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project. A strong reflector has been identified at a depth of about 10- 13 km. This reflector is believed to be the top surface of the crystalline basement. This seismic evidence finds support in the interpretation of gravity and magnetic data. The crystalline basement becomes shallower as the authors approach the Turkish border, until about 100 km from the border, and then becomes deeper again to subduct under the Anadolian plate. In central Iraq the basement also becomes deeper as they approach the Iranian border to subduct under the Iranian plate. It appears that the thickness of the crust varies between 35.5 km in the central part of Iraq and about 30.5 km near the Turkish border.

  12. Future oil and gas: Can Iran deliver?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takin, M.

    1996-11-01

    Iran`s oil and gas production and exports constitute the country`s main source of foreign exchange earnings. The future level of these earnings will depend on oil prices, global demand for Iranian exports, the country`s productive capability and domestic consumption. The size of Iranian oil reserves suggests that, in principle, present productive capacity could be maintained and expanded. However, the greatest share of production in coming years still will come from fields that already have produced for several decades. In spite of significant remaining reserves, these fields are not nearly as prolific as they were in their early years. The operations required for further development are now more complicated and, in particular, more costly. These fields` size also implies that improving production, and instituting secondary and tertiary recovery methods (such as gas injection), will require mega-scale operations. This article discusses future oil and gas export revenues from the Islamic Republic of Iran, emphasizing the country`s future production and commenting on the effects of proposed US sanctions.

  13. Property-rights application in utilization of natural resources: the case of Iran's natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abghari, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    The concessionaries produce more oil in Iran because of fear of nationalization, lower oil production costs in the Middle East, and more investment opportunities around the globe. This higher discount rate means more oil production and also, more natural gas, a joint product, is produced. Produced natural gas could have been used in the Iranian market, or exported. Low oil prices and high transportation costs of natural gas resulted in the low well-head value of natural gas. The fear of nationalization kept concessionaires from utilizing natural gas in Iran's domestic market. The high transportation costs of natural gas was a negative factor in export utilization. Also, if natural gas, which can be substituted for oil in many uses, were to be utilized, concessionaires would have had to produce less oil. Because oil had a well-established market, it would have been contrary to their interest to leave a lot of oil underground while their concessions ran out. Consequently, they chose to take the oil and flare natural gas. The Iranian government must take responsibility in this matter also. The country's rulers were not concerned with maximizing the country's wealth, but maximizing the security of their regimes, and their personal wealth and pleasure.

  14. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  15. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, David

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  16. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  17. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.

  18. Evolution of a genetic disease in an ethnic isolate:. beta. -Thalassemia in the Jews of Kurdistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rund, D.; Cohen, T.; Filon, D.; Rachmilewitz, E.; Oppenheim, A. ); Dowling, C.E.; Warren T.C.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. ); Barak, I. )

    1991-01-01

    {beta}-Thalassemia is a hereditary disease caused by any of 90 different point mutations in the {beta}-globin gene. Specific populations generally carry a small number of mutations, the most common of which are those that are widely distributed regionally. The present study constitutes an extensive molecular characterization of this disease in a small, highly inbred ethnic group with a high incidence of {beta}-thalassemia-the Jews of Kurdistan. An unusual mutational diversity was observed. In 42 sibships 13 different mutations were identified, of which 3 are newly discovered. Four of the mutations are unique to Kurdish Jews and have not been discovered in any other population. A fifth was found outside Kurdish Jews only in an Iranian from Khuzistan, a region bordering Kurdistan. Two-thirds of the mutant chromosomes carry the mutations unique to Kurdish Jews. The authors traced the origin of the mutations to specific geographic regions within Kurdistan. This information, supported by haplotype analysis, suggests that thalassemia in central Kurdistan (northern Iraq) has evolved primarily from multiple mutational events. They conclude that several evolutionary mechanisms contributed to the evolution of {beta}-thalassemia in this small ethnic isolate.

  19. Crisis in American mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The crisis in American mining is discussed. The discussion focuses on the outlook for coal in the overall energy picture. Because of the Arab oil embargo of 1973, the Iranian disruption of 1979, and the tenfold increase in oil prices over the past decade, radical changes have taken place in energy supply and demand patterns. Two of the most important of these changes relate to investment. First, large investments have been made in energy-efficient plants, equipment, buildings, and vehicles. Their effect will restrain energy demand growth for the foreseeable future. Second, investments have been made in fuel-switching, from oil to coal and nuclear power. As a result the oil demand at the end of this century will be at approximately the same level as it is today. Natural gas demand is also likely to be flat. Coal demand, on the other hand, is expected to increase steadily over the long term. Recent conditions in the coal industry are reviewed, and a specific 10-year forecast is given.

  20. Oil and power: an analysis of United States economic interests and strategies in the Middle East. Study project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poche, C.D.

    1988-05-31

    The United States met virtually all of its oil needs from domestic sources until the early 1970s. This self-sufficiency gradually eroded as our internal production failed to keep pace with rising levels of energy consumption. As a result, our new energy needs have been satisfied primarily by petroleum imports. The 1973 Arab oil embargo and supply curtailments associated with the Iranian Revolution in 1979 were painful experiences for the nation. By 1980, the United States was importing 8.5 million barrels of oil per day at a cost many times higher than the going rate in earlier years. Dependence on Middle East oil had become a frightening reality. During the same period, trade deficits, inflation, interest rates, and balance of payment problems were increasing at an alarming rate. Since that point in time, the United States has made progress in building a strong foundation for energy security. Despite these gains the United States is rapidly approaching another critical juncture in its battle to reduce dependency on imported oil. It also suggests national economic strategies that could be employed to improve America's energy prospects for the future.

  1. Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.

  2. Discrimination Analysis of Earthquakes and Man-Made Events Using ARMA Coefficients Determination by Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AllamehZadeh, Mostafa

    2011-12-15

    A Quadratic Neural Networks (QNNs) model has been developed for identifying seismic source classification problem at regional distances using ARMA coefficients determination by Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). We have devised a supervised neural system to discriminate between earthquakes and chemical explosions with filter coefficients obtained by windowed P-wave phase spectra (15 s). First, we preprocess the recording's signals to cancel out instrumental and attenuation site effects and obtain a compact representation of seismic records. Second, we use a QNNs system to obtain ARMA coefficients for feature extraction in the discrimination problem. The derived coefficients are then applied to the neural system to train and classification. In this study, we explore the possibility of using single station three-component (3C) covariance matrix traces from a priori-known explosion sites (learning) for automatically recognizing subsequent explosions from the same site. The results have shown that this feature extraction gives the best classifier for seismic signals and performs significantly better than other classification methods. The events have been tested, which include 36 chemical explosions at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan and 61 earthquakes (mb = 5.0-6.5) recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN). The 100% correct decisions were obtained between site explosions and some of non-site events. The above approach to event discrimination is very flexible as we can combine several 3C stations.

  3. Iraqi crude exports may rise further

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-08

    Iraq will soon start exporting crude oil through a 550 mi, 500,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline from Iraq to Banias, Syria, on the Mediterranean. Iraq has already been transporting a reported 400,000 bbl/day in a 700,000 bbl/day capacity pipeline that goes to Dortyol, Turk., on the Mediterranean. Iraq's theoretical export capacity will soon reach 1.2 million bbl/day (compared with 3.2 million bbl/day before the war), assuming that the facilities are undamaged. Iran has been exporting some crude from its Kharg Island terminal, presumably by Iranian boat to the Lavan Island terminal at the southern end of the gulf, where it would be transported along with crude from offshore fields in the area. The exports apparently had been large enough to keep spot-market prices from rising much above the $40/bbl level, and in Dec. 1980, the spot-market prices eased to just under the $40 mark. Indonesia has raised the premium on its Sumatran light crude by $1/bbl, bringing the total to $35.20. Other producers have not yet raised their prices correspondingly. The agenda of the Dec. 1980 price-fixing meeting in Indonesia (assuming it takes place as planned) is discussed.

  4. Gulf Cooperation Council: search for security in the Persian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kechichian, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study purports to analyze the conservative Arab monarchies' search for regional security in the Persian Gulf. It speculates on the GCC's future prospects as a vehicle of cooperation in the field of security. Threats to the member states of the GCC stem from the policies pursued by revolutionary Iran, Israel, the Soviet Union and its proxies, and a regime in Iraq. The proposition is developed that these sources of threat present an overwhelming challenge to the security and stability of GCC states. Second, it examines the capabilities of the GCC member states for coping with threats. Conceived broadly, both military and non-military capabilities are examined. Security relations of the GCC states with external powers as a means of enhancing their abilities to cope more effectively with both internal and external threats are examined. Particular attention is devoted to the domestic consequences of these special relations. Third, it discusses the GCC's reactions to perceived regional threats. These include the Iran-Iraq War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Soviet threat, and potential political sources of dissidence in member states. It is argued that although GCC states have adopted a number of joint policies, they did not respond to or initiate action on either the Iranian Revolution, the Palestine conflict, the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, the Gulf war or the recent Israeli invasion of Lebanon.

  5. OPEC reorganization could spell relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    Last year proved to be one of carnage in the oil industry, with only the large, vertically integrated, international oil companies showing strength during the oil price collapse. Independent producers and the manufacturing/service sector watched 50% or greater reductions in income. And this year holds little prospect for significant relief during its first half, although the last half could be better if and when Opec decides to once again test its strength. An Iranian victory in the Iran/Iraq war could also cause an upward movement in price. However, price instability should be less than in 1986, as the business heads toward a consensus price via political factors. The U.S. economy again showed improvement through 1986, with moderate growth of 2.6% in Gross National Product (GNP). The ongoing expansion has lasted four years and is already 17 months longer than the average peacetime expansion. However, important energy components did not show strength, and industrial production continued at level rates for the past two years.

  6. Huge natural gas reserves central to capacity work, construction plans in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-11

    Questions about oil production capacity in Iran tend to mask the country's huge potential as a producer of natural gas. Iran is second only to Russia in gas reserves, which National Iranian Gas Co. estimates at 20.7 trillion cu m. Among hurdles to Iran's making greater use of its rich endowment of natural gas are where and how to sell gas not used inside the country. The marketing logistics problem is common to other Middle East holders of gas reserves and a reason behind the recent proliferation of proposals for pipeline and liquefied natural gas schemes targeting Europe and India. But Iran's challenges are greater than most in the region. Political uncertainties and Islamic rules complicate long-term financing of transportation projects and raise questions about security of supply. As a result, Iran has remained mostly in the background of discussions about international trade of Middle Eastern gas. The country's huge gas reserves, strategic location, and existing transport infrastructure nevertheless give it the potential to be a major gas trader if the other issues can be resolved. The paper discusses oil capacity plans, gas development, gas injection for enhanced oil recovery, proposals for exports of gas, and gas pipeline plans.

  7. Iran outlines oil productive capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-09

    National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

  8. Arms and oil: US military strategy and the Persian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaugher, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    In the oil-rich Persian Gulf, a region crucial to the world's security and economic health, the United States confronts major challenges to its military and diplomatic skills. The Iranian revolution, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and unpredictable turbulence have contributed to declining US influence in the area. In the United States, military questions about force size and strategy have sparked controversy over the proper US role in the Gulf. In this book Thomas L. McNaugher offers a military strategy for the Gulf that seeks to balance the risks of overinvolvement against the risks of neglect. The author, a research associate in the Brookings Foreign Policy Studies program, believes that the United States must cultivate the traditional security mechanisms of the states on the Arabian Peninsula, and he encourages cooperation with allies like Great Britain and France that historically have been involved in Gulf security. He argues that the United States should focus on protecting the Gulf states from external attack and on deterring further Soviet encroachment in the region, leaving internal security largely to the states themselves. 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  10. Regionalization and calibration of seismic discriminants, path effects and signal-to-noise for station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A.J.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    We report measurements and analysis of regional seismic phase amplitude ratios and signal-to-noise for earthquakes observed at the International Monitoring System primary station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan). We measured noise and phase amplitudes of the regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg in four frequency bands between 0.75-9.0 Hz. Measurements were made in both the time and frequency domains. The spatial variation of amplitude ratios (e.g., Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg, Pn/Sn, Pg/Sn) and signal-to-noise (phase/noise) reveal significant path effect differences between the Hindu Kush, Kazahk Platform, Iranian Plateau and Caspian Sea. In order to represent this behavior, we have investigated several techniques for characterizing the data. These techniques are: 1) correlation with along-path distance and waveguide properties; 2) sector analysis; and 3) spatial averaging. Along-path waveguide properties, such as mean elevation and rms topographic slope are found to be the strongest factors related to Pg/Lg amplitude ratios at the lowest frequencies (<3.0 Hz). Other path properties such as mean crustal thickness and basement depth are not strongly correlated with Pg/Lg ratios. For sector analysis we divided the data into four (4) azimuthal sectors and characterized the data within each sector by a distance trend. Sectors were chosen based on the behavior of Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg and Pn/Sn amplitude ratios as well as topographic and tectonic character. Results reveal significant reduction (up to a factor of two) in the scatter of the Pn/Lg and Pg/Lg amplitude ratios for the sectorized data compared to the entire data set from all azimuths. Spatial averaging involves smoothing and interpolation for the ratios projected at the event location. Methods such as cap averaging and kriging will be presented at the meeting. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Case Study: Iran, Islam, the NPT, and the Bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, E .

    2011-04-01

    The goals of this case study are: (1) To examine the correlation between Iran's nuclear program and clerical statements; (2) To evaluate the importance of these statements; (3) To understand the relationship between policy and fatwas (Islamic decrees); (4) To address the issue of a 'nuclear fatwa'; and (5) To examine how, if at all, Sharia (Islamic law) has influenced Iran's actions or inactions with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Iran's adherence to its IAEA Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol. The Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter Iran) is one of two theocracies in the world, the second being Vatican City. Iran's government derives its constitutional, moral, and political legitimacy from Islam. As a result of this theocratic culture, rules are set and interpreted with a much different calibrator than that of the Western world. Islam affects all aspects of Iranian life. This is further complicated by the fact that Islam is not a nationalistic faith, in that many people all over the world believe in and adhere to Islamic principles. As a result, a political system that derives much of its fervor from being nationalistic is caught between two worlds, one within the land boundaries of Iran and the other within a faith that transcends boundaries. Thus, any understanding of Islamic law must first be understood within this delicate balance of nationalism and transcendence. Iran has found itself on the international stage concerning its nuclear program. Because Iran is a theocratic state, it is imperative to examine its political moves, speeches, rights, and obligations through the lens of Islam. This study will examine how Islam plays a role in Iran's dealing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its understanding of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), including parties obligations under Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol, and also provide a

  12. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  13. Ground Truth, Magnitude Calibration and Regional Phase Propagation and Detection in the Middle East and Horn of Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyblade, A; Brazier, R; Adams, A; Park, Y; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-08

    In this project, we are exploiting several seismic data sets to improve U.S. operational capabilities to monitor for low yield nuclear tests across the Middle East (including the Iranian Plateau, Zagros Mountains, Arabian Peninsula, Turkish Plateau, Gulf of Aqaba, Dead Sea Rift) and the Horn of Africa (including the northern part of the East African Rift, Afar Depression, southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden). The data sets are being used to perform three related tasks. (1) We are determining moment tensors, moment magnitudes and source depths for regional events in the magnitude 3.0 to 6.0 range. (2) These events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds, especially from events in Iran recorded at stations across the Arabian Peninsula. (3) We are collecting location ground truth at GT5 (local) and GT20 (regional) levels for seismic events with M > 2.5, including source geometry information and source depths. Towards meeting these objectives, seismograms from earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains recorded at regional distances have been inverted for moment tensors, which have then been used to create synthetic seismograms to determine the source depths of the earthquakes via waveform matching. The source depths have been confirmed by modeling teleseismic depth phases recorded on GSN and IMS stations. Early studies of the distribution of seismicity in the Zagros region found evidence for earthquakes in the upper mantle. But subsequent relocations of teleseismic earthquakes suggest that source depths are generally much shallower, lying mainly within the upper crust. All of the regional events studied so far nucleated within the upper crust, and most of the events have thrust mechanisms. The source mechanisms for these events are being used to characterize high-frequency (0.5-16 Hz) regional phase attenuation and detection thresholds for broadband seismic stations in the Arabian Peninsula, including IMS

  14. ADVANCED WAVEFORM SIMULATION FOR SEISMIC MONITORING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmberger, Donald V.; Tromp, Jeroen; Rodgers, Arthur J.

    2008-10-17

    This quarter, we have focused on several tasks: (1) Building a high-quality catalog of earthquake source parameters for the Middle East and East Asia. In East Asia, we computed source parameters using the CAP method for a set of events studied by Herrman et al., (MRR, 2006) using a complete waveform technique. Results indicated excellent agreement with the moment magnitudes in the range 3.5 -5.5. Below magnitude 3.5 the scatter increases. For events with more than 2-3 observations at different azimuths, we found good agreement of focal mechanisms. Depths were generally consistent, although differences of up to 10 km were found. These results suggest that CAP modeling provides estimates of source parameters at least as reliable as complete waveform modeling techniques. However, East Asia and the Yellow Sea Korean Paraplatform (YSKP) region studied are relatively laterally homogeneous and may not benefit from the CAP method’s flexibility to shift waveform segments to account for path-dependent model errors. A more challenging region to study is the Middle East where strong variations in sedimentary basin, crustal thickness and crustal and mantle seismic velocities greatly impact regional wave propagation. We applied the CAP method to a set of events in and around Iran and found good agreement between estimated focal mechanisms and those reported by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. We found a possible bias in the moment magnitudes that may be due to the thick low-velocity crust in the Iranian Plateau. (2) Testing Methods on a Lifetime Regional Data Set. In particular, the recent 2/21/08 Nevada Event and Aftershock Sequence occurred in the middle of USArray, producing over a thousand records per event. The tectonic setting is quite similar to Central Iran and thus provides an excellent testbed for CAP+ at ranges out to 10°, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D, and

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of a gecko and the phylogeneticposition of the Middle Eastern teratoscincus keyserlingii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Shafiei,Soheila; Ananjeva, Natalia B.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-22

    Sqamate reptiles are traditionally divided into six groups: Iguania, Anguimorpha, Scincomorpha, Gekkota (these four are lizards), Serpentes (snakes), and Amphisbaenia (the so-called worm lizards). Currently there are complete mitochondrial genomes from two representatives of the Iguania (Janke et al., 2001; Kumazawa, 2004), three from the Anguimorpha (Kumazawa, 2004; Kumazawa and Endo, 2004), two from the Scincomorpha (Kumazawa and Nishida, 1999; Kumazawa, 2004), two from Serpentes (Kumazawa et al., 1998; Kumazawa, 2004) and 12 from Amphisbaenia (Macey et al., 2004). The only traditional group of Squamata from which a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced is the Gekkota. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Teratoscincus keyserlingii, a Middle Eastern representative of the Gekkota. The gekkonid lizard genus Teratoscincus is distributed throughout the deserts of central and southwest Asia as shown in figure 1, with five species currently recognized (Macey et al. 1997a, 1999b). Included in this figure are the positions of mountain ranges discussed in the text; see also figure 1 in Macey et al. (1999b). Two species, T. bedriagai and T. microlepis, are restricted to Southwest Asia south of the Kopet Dagh and Hindu Kush in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (Anderson, 1999). Two species are found in the deserts of western China and Mongolia, with T. przewalskii occurring in the Taklimakan and lowland Gobi deserts, and T. roborowskii restricted to the Turpan Depression. The fifth species, T. scincus, is sometimes considered to be restricted to the Caspian Basin in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzistan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Alternatively, Teratoscincus populations in Southwest Asia, primarily on the Iranian Plateau, situated directly north of the Arabian Plate, are sometimes considered to be a subspecies of T. scincus or, otherwise, to constitute a sixth species, T. keyserlingii. Macey et al. (1999b) assessed the phylogenetic

  16. Final report to the President on oil supply shortages during 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    Stockpile levels at the beginning of 1979, imports during the first half of the year, and inventory management were primarily responsible for the oil supply shortage in the spring and summer of 1979. There was a 3.1% reduction in oil supply in May to July of 1979 relative to the same period in 1978, and a 0.2% reduction relative to 1977. The reduction in available oil between 1979 and previous years was even greater than the reduction in supply. Domestic production of crude oil declined between May to July of 1978 and the same period in 1979. This was consistent with the long-term trend. Free-world oil production dropped by about 2 million b/d during the first quarter of 1979 as a result of the loss of Iranian production. Production returned to pre-disruption levels by the middle of 1979. The US share of free-world oil supply dropped by 2% in the second quarter of 1979 compared to the 1977-78 average. Gasoline supplied to consumers during May to July 1979 was 8.5% less than in the same period in 1978, and 7 to 9% less than the amount that would have been consumed if there had been no supply restriction. Compared to 1978, reduced gasoline production during this period in 1979 accounted for 36% of the supply reduction, and reduced use of stocks accounted for 64% of the supply reduction. Refiners could have made more gasoline available during May to July of 1979 without reducing stocks below minimum operating levels. The yield of gasoline relative to other petroleum products went down in May to July of 1979 as compared to the same period in 1977 and 1978. Most of the increase was in production of petrochemical feedstocks. Refiners who were bound by DOE price controls or who were complying with CWPS guidelines could not have increased allowable revenues by delaying the sale of gasoline. Virtually all of the gasoline price increases that took place between January and August 1979 were based on cost increases.

  17. IMPROVED GROUND TRUTH IN SOUTHERN ASIA USING IN-COUNTRY DATA, ANALYST WAVEFORM REVIEW, AND ADVANCED ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engdahl, Eric, R.; Bergman, Eric, A.; Myers, Stephen, C.; Ryall, Floriana

    2009-06-19

    A new catalog of seismicity at magnitudes above 2.5 for the period 1923-2008 in the Iran region is assembled from arrival times reported by global, regional, and local seismic networks. Using in-country data we have formed new events, mostly at lower magnitudes that were not previously included in standard global earthquake catalogs. The magnitude completeness of the catalog varies strongly through time, complete to about magnitude 4.2 prior to 1998 and reaching a minimum of about 3.6 during the period 1998-2005. Of the 25,722 events in the catalog, most of the larger events have been carefully reviewed for proper phase association, especially for depth phases and to eliminate outlier readings, and relocated. To better understand the quality of the data set of arrival times reported by Iranian networks that are central to this study, many waveforms for events in Iran have been re-picked by an experienced seismic analyst. Waveforms at regional distances in this region are often complex. For many events this makes arrival time picks difficult to make, especially for smaller magnitude events, resulting in reported times that can be substantially improved by an experienced analyst. Even when the signal/noise ratio is large, re-picking can lead to significant differences. Picks made by our analyst are compared with original picks made by the regional networks. In spite of the obvious outliers, the median (-0.06 s) and spread (0.51 s) are small, suggesting that reasonable confidence can be placed in the picks reported by regional networks in Iran. This new catalog has been used to assess focal depth distributions throughout Iran. A principal result of this study is that the geographic pattern of depth distributions revealed by the relatively small number of earthquakes (~167) with depths constrained by waveform modeling (+/- 4 km) are now in agreement with the much larger number of depths (~1229) determined using reanalysis of ISC arrival-times (+/-10 km), within their