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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Newfound land : urban highway removal and planning the land it uncovers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the interstate highway system was routed through urban centers during the 1950's and 1960's, few thought these elevated expressways would have a serious detrimental impact on the cities they served. These interstates ...

Masenten, David J. (David Joel), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Statistical description of heavy truck accidents on representative segments of interstate highway  

SciTech Connect

Any quantitative analysis of the risk of transportation accidents requires the use of many different statistical distributions. Included among these are the types of accidents which occur and the severity of these when they do occur. Several previous studies have derived this type of information for truck traffic over U. S. highways in general; these data are not necessarily applicable for the anticipated LMFBR spent fuel cask routes. This report presents data for highway segments representative of the specific LMFBR cask routes which are anticipated. These data are based upon a detailed record-by-record review of filed reports for accidents which occurred along the specified route segments.

Hartman, W.F.; Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Deliverability on the interstate natural gas pipeline system  

SciTech Connect

Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System examines the capability of the national pipeline grid to transport natural gas to various US markets. The report quantifies the capacity levels and utilization rates of major interstate pipeline companies in 1996 and the changes since 1990, as well as changes in markets and end-use consumption patterns. It also discusses the effects of proposed capacity expansions on capacity levels. The report consists of five chapters, several appendices, and a glossary. Chapter 1 discusses some of the operational and regulatory features of the US interstate pipeline system and how they affect overall system design, system utilization, and capacity expansions. Chapter 2 looks at how the exploration, development, and production of natural gas within North America is linked to the national pipeline grid. Chapter 3 examines the capability of the interstate natural gas pipeline network to link production areas to market areas, on the basis of capacity and usage levels along 10 corridors. The chapter also examines capacity expansions that have occurred since 1990 along each corridor and the potential impact of proposed new capacity. Chapter 4 discusses the last step in the transportation chain, that is, deliverability to the ultimate end user. Flow patterns into and out of each market region are discussed, as well as the movement of natural gas between States in each region. Chapter 5 examines how shippers reserve interstate pipeline capacity in the current transportation marketplace and how pipeline companies are handling the secondary market for short-term unused capacity. Four appendices provide supporting data and additional detail on the methodology used to estimate capacity. 32 figs., 15 tabs.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Carrier sense data highway system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A data transmission system includes a transmission medium which has a certain propagation delay time over its length. A number of data stations are successively coupled to the transmission medium for communicating with one another. Each of the data stations includes a transmitter for originating signals, each signal beginning with a carrier of a duration which is at least the propagation delay time of the transmission medium. Each data station also includes a receiver which receives other signals from other data stations and inhibits operation of the transmitter at the same data station when a carrier of another signal is received.

Frankel, Robert (Centereach, NY)

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

HOMES: highway operation monitoring and evaluation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work proposes high-performance critical visualization techniques for exploring real-time and historical traffic loop-detector data. Until recently, it has been difficult to discover trends, identify patterns, or locate abnormalities within the massive ... Keywords: data streams, intelligent transportation system, visualization

Chang-Tien Lu; Arnold P. Boedihardjo; Jing Dai; Feng Chen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

RELWAY: a process data highway system optimized for accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The command/control scheme for the Isabelle accelerator, specifically the process data highway are discussed. (GHT)J

Frankel, R.; Buxton, W,; Kohler, K.; Warkentien, R.; White, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of automated highway system risks and uncertainties. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This volume describes a risk analysis performed to help identify important Automated Highway System (AHS) deployment uncertainties and quantify their effect on costs and benefits for a range of AHS deployment scenarios. The analysis identified a suite of key factors affecting vehicle and roadway costs, capacities and market penetrations for alternative AHS deployment scenarios. A systematic protocol was utilized for obtaining expert judgments of key factor uncertainties in the form of subjective probability percentile assessments. Based on these assessments, probability distributions on vehicle and roadway costs, capacity and market penetration were developed for the different scenarios. The cost/benefit risk methodology and analysis provide insights by showing how uncertainties in key factors translate into uncertainties in summary cost/benefit indices.

Sicherman, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Inductive power coupling for an electric highway system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Dual Mode Electric Transporation (DMET) system is under development in which energy is electromagnetically transferred from a powered roadway to moving vehicles. Energy from the roadway can be used for high-speed, long-range travel and for replenishing energy stored in the vehicle in batteries or flywheels. The stored energy is then available for short-range travel off the powered highway network. The power coupling between roadway and vehicle is functionally similar to a transformer. A source is embedded in the roadway flush with the surface. When the vehicle's pickup is suspended over the source, energy is magnetically coupled through the clearance air gap between pickup and roadway source. The electromagnetic coupling mechanism was extensively studied through computer models, circuit analyses, and by tests of a full-size physical prototype. The results of these tests are described.

Bolger, J.G.; Kirsten, F.A.; Ng, L.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modelling uncertainty in the sustainability of Intelligent Transport Systems for highways using probabilistic data fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation of ITS to increase the efficiency of saturated highways has become increasingly prevalent. It is a high level objective for many international governments and operators that highways should be managed in a way that is both sustainable ... Keywords: Intelligent Transport Systems, Low carbon-energy policy, Uncertainty modelling

Ben Kolosz, Susan Grant-Muller, Karim Djemame

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

12

Corporate Realignments and Investments in the Interstate Natural Gas Transmission System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Examines the financial characteristics of current ownership in the natural gas pipeline industry and of the major U.S. interstate pipeline companies that transported the bulk of the natural gas consumed in the United States between 1992 and 1997, focusing on 14 parent corporations. It also examines the near-term investment needs of the industry and the anticipated growth in demand for natural gas during the next decade.

Information Center

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

14

Fuel cell powered propulsion systems for highway vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Over the past thirty-five years, the transportation sector has accounted for approx.25% of the total gross energy consumption in the US. Transportation's share of petroleum use in this time frame has ranged from 50 to 55%. Therefore, the use of fuel cell power plants that could possibly operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines in this type of application has been examined. In addition, these fuel cell power plants can operate on methanol produced from indigenous, non-petroleum sources and thereby reduce US dependency on petroleum resources. Fuel cell power plant use in city buses and automobiles has been explored and feasibility determined from both performance and cost viewpoints. Fuel cell systems for transportation applications have been selected on the basis of state-of-development, performance (both present and projected), and fuel considerations. In the last 25 years, most of the development work by research organizations and industrial firms has focused on five types of fuel cells, classified according to the electrolyte used. In terms of the overall state-of-development of systems, the ranking is as follows: (1) phosphoric acid, (2) alkaline, (3) proton exchange membrane, (4) molten carbonate, and (5) solid oxide.

Huff, J.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Roach, J.F.; Murray, H.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Test of the performance and characteristics of a prototype inductive power coupling for electric highway systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of an inductively coupled power system for highway applications was begun in 1976. The power system was designed to provide energy to vehicles that also carry a supply of stored energy, thus providing a large measure of operational flexibility to the vehicles and reducing the necessary inventory of powered roadways. The highway power system can support the high-speed, long-range portions of driving cycles, while the stored energy can meet the requirements of driving on non-powered streets. The system thus has been referred to as a ''dual-mode'' system because of the use of the two sources of energy. The results of testing a prototype coupling are presented. No physical contact between the vehicle and the power source is required, i.e., the coupling magnetically links the power system of the vehicle to a power source in the roadway (inductive coupling). Tests were performed to determine the magnetic force and flux distribution, electrical characteristics, thermal efforts and acoustic noise. The test equipment and methods are discussed. The tests confirmed the technical feasibility of this type of non-contacting electrical power coupling, and demonstrated that its components are suited to ordinary materials and manufacturing processes. The test results were found to be consistent with expected characteristics in all important respects.

Bolger, J.G.; Ng, L.S.; Green, M.I.; Wallace, R.I.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission This legislation authorizes the State to join the Interstate Compact for the Conservation of Oil and Gas. The Compact is an agreement that has been entered into by 30 oil- and gas-producing states, as well as eight associate states and 10 international affiliates (including seven Canadian provinces). Members participate in the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact

17

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Ogden, “The Hope for Hydrogen,” Issues in Science andand James S. Cannon. The Hydrogen Energy Transition: MovingHydrogen Highways BY TIMOTHY LIPMAN H 2 T H E S TAT E O F C

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) Interstate Mining Compact Commission (multi-state) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info Start Date 1970 State Alabama Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Mining Compact Commission The Interstate Mining Compact is a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact

19

Acquisition, filtering and toll data processing system for obtaining origin-destination matrix and travel times on highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an acquisition, filtering and real-time toll data processing system that provides a base for resolution and generation of studies and models of behavior on highways. Crossing points estimation, speed calculation, study traffic flow, ... Keywords: origin-destination matrix, toll data processing, traffic management, travel time

Ramón V. Cirilo Gimeno; Antonio García Celda; Pablo Mir Gómez

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Consolidated periphery : commercial and highway interchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway expansion legislation has been a significant catalyst for suburban development. Initially funded for military mobilization in the 1930s , later massively extended in the 1950s, today's highway system, together with ...

McGrath, Christine L. (Christine Lynn)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Traffic congestion and its impacts significantly affect the nation's economic performance and the public's quality of life. In most urban areas, travel demand routinely exceeds highway capacity during peak periods. In addition, events such as crashes, vehicle breakdowns, work zones, adverse weather, railroad crossings, large trucks loading/unloading in urban areas, and other factors such as toll collection facilities and sub-optimal signal timing cause temporary capacity losses, often worsening the conditions on already congested highway networks. The impacts of these temporary capacity losses include delay, reduced mobility, and reduced reliability of the highway system. They can also cause drivers to re-route or reschedule trips. Such information is vital to formulating sound public policies for the highway infrastructure and its operation. In response to this need, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), made an initial attempt to provide nationwide estimates of the capacity losses and delay caused by temporary capacity-reducing events (Chin et al. 2002). This study, called the Temporary Loss of Capacity (TLC) study, estimated capacity loss and delay on freeways and principal arterials resulting from fatal and non-fatal crashes, vehicle breakdowns, and adverse weather, including snow, ice, and fog. In addition, it estimated capacity loss and delay caused by sub-optimal signal timing at intersections on principal arterials. It also included rough estimates of capacity loss and delay on Interstates due to highway construction and maintenance work zones. Capacity loss and delay were estimated for calendar year 1999, except for work zone estimates, which were estimated for May 2001 to May 2002 due to data availability limitations. Prior to the first phase of this study, which was completed in May of 2002, no nationwide estimates of temporary losses of highway capacity by type of capacity-reducing event had been made. This report describes the second phase of the TLC study (TLC2). TLC2 improves upon the first study by expanding the scope to include delays from rain, toll collection facilities, railroad crossings, and commercial truck pickup and delivery (PUD) activities in urban areas. It includes estimates of work zone capacity loss and delay for all freeways and principal arterials, rather than for Interstates only. It also includes improved estimates of delays caused by fog, snow, and ice, which are based on data not available during the initial phase of the study. Finally, computational errors involving crash and breakdown delay in the original TLC report are corrected.

Chin, S.M.

2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

23

Sources of Information in Highways: A Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signal Control Systems Maintenance Management Practices.for highway maintenance and traffic management. ” PrimaryBridge Management: Inspection, Maintenance, Assessment and

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Siting and Permitting Michigan implements the federal requirements of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) through state regulations. Michigan's Rule 821 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with a CAIR Annual NOx Budget

25

Shifting urban priorities : the removal of inner city freeways in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Interstate Highway System transformed the nation's cities and countryside, accelerating suburbanization and leading to unprecedented levels of motorized mobility. While the interstate highways brought ...

Napolitan, Francesca

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Longitudinal review of state-level accident statistics for carriers of interstate freight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-level accident rates by mode of freight transport have been developed and refined for application to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental mitigation program, which may involve large-quantity shipments of hazardous and mixed wastes from DOE facilities. These rates reflect multi-year data for interstate-registered highway earners, American Association of Railroads member carriers, and coastal and internal waterway barge traffic. Adjustments have been made to account for the share of highway combination-truck traffic actually attributable to interstate-registered carriers and for duplicate or otherwise inaccurate entries in the public-use accident data files used. State-to-state variation in rates is discussed, as is the stability of rates over time. Computed highway rates have been verified with actual carriers of high- and low-level nuclear materials, and the most recent truck accident data have been used, to ensure that the results are of the correct order of magnitude. Study conclusions suggest that DOE use the computed rates for the three modes until (1) improved estimation techniques for highway combination-truck miles by state become available; (2) continued evolution of the railroad industry significantly increases the consolidation of interstate rail traffic onto fewer high-capacity trunk lines; or (3) a large-scale off-site waste shipment campaign is imminent.

Saricks, C.; Kvitek, T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

Carrier sense data highway system. [Patent for a two-way Data Transmission System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A data transmission system is disclosed which includes a transmission medium which has a certain propagation delay time over its length. A number of data stations are successively coupled to the transmission medium for communicating with one another. Each of the data stations includes a transmitter for originating signals, each signal beginning with a carrier of a duration which is at least the propagation delay time of the transmission medium. Each data station also includes a receiver which receives other signals from other data stations and inhibits operation of the transmitter at the same data station when a carrier of another signal is received.

Frankel, R.

1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm Renewable Energy Rebates Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm Renewable Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Energy Efficient Wind: $35,000 Standard Wind: $30,000 Energy Efficient PV: $25,000 Standard PV: $20,000 Biomass: $500,000 Anaerobic Digester: $200,000 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Wind: $0.75/kWh Standard Wind: $0.25/kWh Energy Efficient PV: $1/kWh Standard PV: $0.50/kWh Biomass: 50% of system cost Anaerobic Digester: 50% of system cost Provider Alliant Energy The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers rebates for

30

Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate In recent years, experts have started drawing att ention to the need to improve the system that transmits electricity from power plants to demand centers. Congestion on existing lines, increased energy demand that suggests a need for new electric transmission and the challenge of connecting renewable energy sources to load centers highlight some needs that could be underserved by the existing system in the near future. While improved demand-side management (including energy effi ciency and demand response), bett er utilization of the existing transmission grid, and other strategies (such as distributed

31

Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland) Interstate Mining Compact (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Interstate Mining Compact Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Interstate Mining Compact, a multi-state governmental agency / organization that represents the natural resource and related environmental protection interests of its member states. Currently, 23 states are members to the compact, and 6 additional states are associate members. The compact is administered by the Interstate Mining Compact Commission, which does not possess regulatory

32

Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors who are responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the State of California. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. Report for MOU 3005

Harry H. Cheng; Ben Shaw; Joe Palen; Bin Lin; Xudong Hu; Bo Chen; Jason Parks; Harry H. Cheng; Ben Shaw; Joe Palen; Bin Lin; Xudong Hu; Bo Chen; Jason Parks

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Emerging Issues for Interstate Transportation Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emerging Issues for Interstate Transportation Market. ... How, when or will the pricing structure change from cost of service rates to market based rates?

34

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state) Eligibility...

35

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States)...

36

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Eligibility...

37

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding the CSG Interstate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the CSG Interstate Transmission Siting Compact - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding the CSG Interstate Transmission Siting Compact - June 6, 2013 EAC...

38

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and...

39

highway | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

highway highway Dataset Summary Description The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data on rates and revenue statistics up to 1995. The data includes state motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995, state motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995, and state and federal motor fuel tax rates, 1919-1995 The data is presented in .xlsx format. Source DOT Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOT highway motor vehicles rates revenues Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995 (xlsx, 13.8 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995 (xlsx, 78.5 KiB)

40

An investigation into the use of highway traffic signals at highway-railroad grade crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail-highway grade crossings are amongst the most dangerous of intersections a driver will encounter. One out of every nine accidents at rail-highway crossings produces a fatality. In half of these cases, the crossing is an active crossing, meaning that active devices such as flashing lights with or without automatic gates signal the approach of a train. Annually, approximately 250 people die in crashes with trains at active crossings. Another form of active protection is the use of highway traffic signals. Highway traffic signals have been used as a form of active rail-highway crossing control in several states. The Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices currently prohibits the use of highway traffic signals on mainline track crossings even though these devices are a well understood and common traffic control device at highway-highway intersections, particularly in urban environments where the majority of active crossings are to be found. The objective of this research was to determine the factors that contribute to fatal vehicle train crashes at rail-highway crossings equipped with either flashing light signals, flashing light signals with automatic gates, or highway traffic signals. Secondly, it attempted to determine whether the use of highway traffic signals at railhighway crossings offer any safety benefits over the use of conventional active traffic control devices. Fatal accident records obtained from the Fatal Accident Reporting System (FARS) were used in this analysis. The driver related factors coded by the police officers in FARS, at fatal active grade crossing locations, were predominantly driver error factors. Three contributing factors that were common to all active crossing fatalities were the involvement of young drivers (less than 30 years old), drunk drivers and the lack signals appeared to offer safety benefits over the other standard active devices with regards to the above three contributing factors, the apparent benefit may be due to the fact that highway traffic signals experience lower night time train volumes. The accuracy of the FARS database description of the traffic control device was also of concern, after a cross check with the DOT/AAR database was performed.

Frieslaar, Andre Henry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

California Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PG&E Gas Transmission - NW Tuscarora Pipeline (Malin OR) 110 Mmcf/d 2,080 Mmcf/d Total Interstate Pipeline Capacity into California 7,435 Mmcf/d Net Natural Gas ...

42

Federal Highway Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The updated Transportation Planner’s Safety Desk Reference includes strategies derived from the National Cooperative Highway Research Program’s (NCHRP) Report 500 Guidance for Implementation of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Strategic Highway Safety Plan. All 22 emphasis areas are now covered, including five new ones (young drivers, bicycle collisions, speeding, head-on collisions on freeways, and motorcycles). Additional sections on collecting and analyzing highway safety data and developing emphasis area plans have also been added. This document discusses the planner’s role in transportation safety and the incorporation of safety into the transportation planning process. Each emphasis area section includes: overview of the problem; data defining the problem; descriptions of safety strategies that are most relevant to planners; crash modification factors that can be used to determine the reduction in crashes anticipated from specific safety improvements; and additional resources and best practices, where available. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

Davis, S.C.

2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geothermal applications for highway rest areas  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study, made for the South Dakota Department of Transportation, regarding geothermal applications for highway rest areas is described. This preliminary information indicated that the retrofit of the heating systems in the rest area structures was feasible. Specific design assumptions, equipment selections, costs, and other data are reported. This information is conceptual in nature.

Strawn, J.A.; Engen, I.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

FINAL REPORT: PHASE FOUR HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE CONCEPT VEHICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the maintenance management system. Phase IV has two major strands, technical and financial. The outcome of Phase ................................................................................................................. 55 AMS-200 (Application Management System) Console innovation in highway maintenance management, maintenance operations practices, and research. CTRE provided

Beresnev, Igor

46

Highways of hope  

SciTech Connect

It is hoped that through public-private partnerships between Alpha Natural Resources and Pioneer Group and Virginia Department of Transportation, and between one of these coal companies and Buchanan County, Virginia, Industrial Development Authority a four-lane 'highway of hope' between Lovers Gap and Poplar Gap will be paved and a ridge top connector route will eventually be completed to Bull Gap where it will intersect with the Coalfields Expressway and US 460. The town of Grundy is also looking into strip mining coal from beneath the small mountaintop airport at Lovers Gap and turning it into a regional airport. The article discusses these plans. 4 photos.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - States Dependent on Interstate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines States Dependent on Interstate Pipelines About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates States in grey which are at least 85% dependent on the interstate pipeline network for their natural gas supply are: New England - Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Southeast - Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee Northeast - Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, District of Columbia Midwest - Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin Central - Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota West - Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washington Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency, 2007 Map: Interstate Natural Gas Supply Dependency

48

EIA - AEO2010 - Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and modeling in AEO2010 On December 23, 2008, the D.C. Circuit Court remanded but did not vacate CAIR [17], overriding its previous decision on February 8, 2008, to remand and vacate CAIR. The December decision, which is reflected in AEO2010, allows CAIR to remain in effect, providing time for the EPA to modify the rule in order to address objections raised by the Court in its earlier decision. A similar rule, referred to as the CAMR, which was to set up a cap-and-trade system for reducing mercury emissions by approximately 70 percent, is not represented in the AEO2010 projections, because it was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February 2008.

49

Wisconsin Strategic Highway Safety Plan 2011 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsin Strategic Highway Safety Plan 2011 ­ 2013 Published by the Wisconsin Department preventable traffic death is one too many Wisconsin Strategic Highway Safety Plan 2011 ­ 2013 Wisconsin Strategic Highway Safety Plan for 2011-2013. This document provides background and details about highway

Sheridan, Jennifer

50

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Montana) Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

51

Statistics of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents financial and operating information of all major interstate natural gas pipeline companies that operated in the United States during 1990. (VC)

Not Available

1992-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

52

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit Program Info Start Date 1981 State Alaska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Northwest Interstate Compact The Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management, enacted in 1981, was ratified by Congress in 1985. The Compact is a cooperative effort of the party states to protect their citizens, and maintain and enhance economic viability, while sharing the responsibilities

53

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) Interstate Oil and Gas Conservation Compact (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission assists member states efficiently maximize oil and natural gas resources through sound regulatory practices while protecting the nation's health, safety and the environment. The Commission serves as the collective voice of member governors on oil and gas issues and advocates states' rights to govern petroleum resources within their borders. The Commission formed the Geological CO2 Sequestration Task Force, which

54

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Attic and Wall Insulation: $1000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Construction: $600-$3500/home Home Energy Audit: Free Boilers: $150 or $400 depending on AFUE Furnaces: $250 or $400 depending on AFUE Programmable Thermostats: $25

55

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings New Construction: Varies widely

56

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Multi-Family Residential Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Tank Water Heater: $50 Furnace: $250-$400 Boiler: $150 or $400 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Windows/Sash: $20 Custom: Based on Annual Energy Dollar Savings Provider

57

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Insulation: $5000 (each type) Sealing: $1500 Multi-Family Insulation/Sealing: $5,000 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings

58

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $300/ton + $50/EER/ton Fan Motors: $50/unit Programmable Thermostats: $25 Tank Water Heater: $50

59

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Caulking/Weather Stripping: $200 Ceiling/Foundation/Wall Insulation: $750 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boilers: $150 - $400 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Efficient Fan Motor: $50 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Furnace or Boiler Clean and Tune: $30

60

Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project Under Way  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

rucks that travel in the western rucks that travel in the western United States will soon be able to operate clean-burning alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) along the Interstate Clean Transpor- tation Corridor (ICTC). The ICTC project is the first effort to develop clean transportation corridors to connect Los Angeles, San Bernar- dino, the San Joaquin Valley, Sacra- mento/San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Reno, and Las Vegas along routes 1-15, 1-80, and 1-5/CA-99. The ICTC team, headed by California- based Gladstein and Associates, plans to have commitments by early 1997 for 10 to 15 fueling sites located approximately 180 miles apart. These sites will serve 250 new heavy-duty AFVs and 500 local delivery vehicles. Their fuels will displace 4.7 million gallons of petroleum and mitigate more than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amount 1,500 - 25,000 Provider Customer Service Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells Fargo Bank, offers a low-interest loan for residential,...

62

Interstate Power and Light Co (Minnesota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interstate Power and Light Co (Minnesota) Interstate Power and Light Co (Minnesota) Jump to: navigation, search Name Interstate Power and Light Co Place Minnesota Utility Id 9417 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0969/kWh Industrial: $0.0757/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Interstate Power and Light Co (Minnesota). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

63

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Contact Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Farm Energy Audit: Free Automatic Milker Takeoffs: $5/cow Dairy Scroll Compressor: $250 Heat Reclaimers: $5/cow Milk Precooler: $3.40/cow Variable Speed Drives for Dairy Vacuum Pumps: $5/cow Motors: Up to $1080 Variable Frequency Drives: $30/HP

64

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info Start Date 1986 State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Atlantic Compact Commission The Atlantic (Northeast) Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is a cooperative effort to plan, regulate, and administer the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the region. The states of Connecticut, New Jersey, and South Carolina are party to this compact

65

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Interstate Pipelines Segment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

66

Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Counsel's Notice of Inquiry concerning the preparation of a report to Congress on the Price-Anderson Act. Comments of the Western Interstate Energy Board's High-Level Radioactive...

67

California Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

68

California Natural Gas Interstate Deliveries to All States (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Deliveries to All States (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Interstate Deliveries to All States (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

69

New Hampshire International and Interstate Movements of Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont : 1989-1998: International & Interstate Deliveries (To) 104,713: 154,268: 115,474: 126,880: 132,564: 152,537: 1988-2011: International Deliveries : 0: 64: 0 ...

70

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light- New Home Construction Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light's New Home Program gives incentives to builders and contractors who build energy efficient homes. A base rebate is available to those customers that make the minimum...

71

Figure 14. Net interstate movements, imports, and exports of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States, 2012 (million cubic feet) TrinidadTobago India Trinidad Tobago Yemen Brazil Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI TN FL MA CT...

72

New Mexico Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

73

New Mexico Natural Gas Interstate Deliveries (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Deliveries (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Interstate Deliveries (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

74

Application for State Highway Approach | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Highway Approach Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Highway Approach Details Activities (0) Areas (0)...

75

Application & Checklist for Highway Right of Way Lease | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Checklist for Highway Right of Way Lease Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application and Checklist for Highway Right of Way Lease...

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Highway Electric Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Highway Electric State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on

78

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable Energy Rebates Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Solar Thermal Water Heater: $750 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Solar PV: $1.25/kWh x estimated first year output Standard Solar PV: $0.75/kWh x estimated first year output Energy Efficient Wind: $0.75/kWh x estimated first year output Standard Wind: 0.25/kWh x estimated first year output Solar Thermal Water Heater (electric): $0.35 x annual kWh savings Solar Thermal Water Heater (natural gas): $2.50 x annual therm savings

79

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 90 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing State and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Incentives Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - New Home Construction Incentives < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Builder Option Package: Up to $2,000 Advanced Builder Option Package: Up to $2,800 Energy Star Qualified Home: Up to $3,500 Multi-Family Incentives: See program web site Provider

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction: Varies, see program web site Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings

82

Financing West Virginia's Highways: Challenges and Opportunities1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

need for additional funding for West Virginia's highway infrastructure. The funding for West Virginia To better understand the logical basis for how federal and state governments fund public highway are insufficient for the funding of public highways. Table B5 from the Federal Highway Administration shows

Mohaghegh, Shahab

83

An observational Study of the “Interstate 5” Dust Storm Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 29 November 1991 a series of collisions involving 164 vehicles occurred on Interstate 5 in the San Joaquin Valley in California in a dust storm that reduced the visibility to near zero. The accompanying high surface winds are hypothesized to ...

Patricia M. Pauley; Nancy L. Baker; Edward H. Barker

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Design of highway embankments using tire chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes research undertaken to develop design procedures for using shredded scrap tires as a lightweight fill material in highway construction. The benefits of using scrap tires are particularly enhanced if they can be used to replace virgin construction materials made from nonrenewable resources. This paper addresses the use of tire chips as a highway embankment material. Design parameters for embankments constructed using discarded shredded tires are presented based on laboratory model studies, numerical analyses, and field performance of test fills. The conclusions of this report support the use of tire chips as an environmentally acceptable lightweight fill in highway applications if properly confined. Recommendations for design procedures and construction specifications for the use of tire chips in highway fills are provided.

Bosscher, P.J.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Kuraoka, S. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Measurements of Enhanced Turbulent Mixing near Highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August and September of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada). In situ turbulence measurements were made with a mobile laboratory while driving on the ...

Mark Gordon; Ralf M. Staebler; John Liggio; Paul Makar; Shao-Meng Li; Jeremy Wentzell; Gang Lu; Patrick Lee; Jeffrey R. Brook

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Regional analyses of highway energy use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional variation among selected factors affecting energy use in highway transportation is described and analyzed. Highway vehicle use accounts for about 95% of all motor gasoline used and a substantial portion of the diesel fuel consumed in the US. For the purposes of analysis, highway energy use can be divided into three sectoral users: household, commercial, and government. Chapter 1, Nonhighway Use of Gasoline, covers agriculture, marine, aviation, industrial and commercial, construction, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Chapter 2, Topics in Commercial Highway Energy Use, includes the following: Commercial Use of Gasoline in Highway Transportation, Automotive Fleets and Electric Vehicle Applicability; Local and Short-Haul Commercial Trucking; Intercity Trucking; and Intracity Bus Service. Chapter 3, Selected Characteristics of Highway Energy Use by the Household Sector, includes sections entitled: Regional Gasoline Use; Ownership of New and Used Vehicles; Fuel Efficiencies and Market Shares of New Vehicle Registrations; Regional Trends in Import Passenger Car Sales and in Light Truck and Van Sales; Regional Variations in Recreational Vehicle Shipments and in Gasoline Consumption, 1977; Regional Patterns of Motorcycle and Moped Use; and An Analysis of the Differences in Carpooling Across Metropolitan Areas.

Kulp, G.; Greene, D.L.; Walton, G.H.; Collins, M.J.; Shonka, D.B.; Blue, J.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Real- Time Laser-Based Detection System for Measurement ofTime Laser- Based Prototype Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement

Cheng, Harry H.; Shaw, Ben; Palen, Joe; Wang, Zhaoqing; Chen, Bo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Uses of recycled rubber tires in highways: A synthesis of highway practice. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis on the use of recycled rubber tires in highways will be of interest to administrators and policymakers; pavement, materials, geotechnical, environmental, and traffic operations engineers; and research engineers involved with highway design and construction issues. Information is provided on the uses of rubber tires in asphalt paving materials as well as other uses, such as on fills and embankments, for erosion control and on railroad grade crossings. Specifically, information is included which identifies the highway agencies using or implementing applications for recycled rubber tires and defines the design parameters, technical and construction limitations, performance, costs, benefits, environmental limitations, specifications, and availability. This synthesis of information defines the use of recycled rubber tires in highways and is based on a review of nearly 500 references and on information recorded from state highway agency responses to a 1991 survey of practice.

Epps, J.A.; Mason, L.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development and Testing of Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurementsystems are entirely dependent on time-of-?ight laser measurements

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fuel used for off-highway recreation  

SciTech Connect

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation by transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund of individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile.

Hu, P.S.; Trumble, D.; Lu, A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Appendix D - Federal Highway User Fees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D - FEDERAL HIGHWAY USER FEES D - FEDERAL HIGHWAY USER FEES FEDERAL HIGHWAY-USER FEES 1/ OCTOBER 2001 TABLE FE-21B USER FEE TAX RATE DISTRIBUTION OF TAX EFFECTIVE DATE HIGHWAY TRUST FUND LEAKING UNDER- GROUND STORAGE TANK TRUST FUND GENERAL FUND HIGHWAY ACCOUNT MASS TRANSIT ACCOUNT Fuel Taxes (Cents per Gallon) Gasoline 18.3 01/01/96 12 2 - 4.3 18.4 10/01/97 15.44 2.86 0.1 - Diesel and Kerosene fuel 24.3 01/01/96 18 2 - 4.3 24.4 10/01/97 21.44 2.86 0.1 - Special fuels 2/ 3/ 18.3 01/01/96 12 2 - 4.3 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 13.6 10/01/97 11.47 2.13 - - Liquefied Natural Gas 11.9 10/01/97 10.04 1.86 - - Other Special Fuels 18.4 10/01/97 15.44 2.86 0.1 - Neat alcohol (85% alcohol) 3/ 4/ 9.25 10/01/97 7.72 1.43 0.1 - Compressed natural gas 5/ 4.3 10/01/93 - - - 4.3

92

Interstate Power and Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interstate Power and Light Co Interstate Power and Light Co Address 200 1st Street Southeast Place Cedar Rapids, Iowa Zip 52401 Website www.alliantenergy.com/ind Utility Id 9417 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Residential Residential

93

A 100-Gigbit Highway for Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A 100-Gigabit Highway for A 100-Gigabit Highway for Science News & Publications ESnet in the News ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net A 100-Gigabit Highway for Science Researchers Take a "Test Drive" on ANI Testbed April 30, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Network Initiative (ANI) Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 A warming climate will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. This image represents one frame from a simulation called "Hurricane Season" that was created to study how well NCAR's Community

94

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies 1985  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of the 91 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1986-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gas supplies of interstate natural gas pipeline companies, 1984  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the total reserves, production, and deliverability capabilities of 89 interstate pipeline companies. The gas supplies of interstate pipeline companies consist of the certificated, dedicated, recoverable, salable natural gas available from domestic in-the-ground reserves; gas purchased under contracts with other interstate pipeline companies; domestically produced coal gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and synthetic natural gas (SNG); and imported natural gas and LNG. The domestic in-the-ground reserves consist of company-owned reserves including natural gas in underground storage, reserves dedicated to or warranted under contracts with independent producers, and supplemental or short-term supplies purchased from independent producers and intrastate pipeline companies. To avoid duplicate reporting of domestic in-the-ground reserves, the volumes of gas under contract agreement between jurisdictional pipelines have been excluded in summarizing state and national reserves. Volumes contracted under agreements with foreign suppliers include pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico and LNG from Algeria. 8 figs., 18 tabs.

Price, R.

1985-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Interstate Renewable Energy Council IREC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interstate Renewable Energy Council IREC Interstate Renewable Energy Council IREC Jump to: navigation, search Name Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) Place Latham, New York Zip 12110-1156 Sector Renewable Energy Product US non-profit organisation with mission of accelerating the sustainable utilization of renewable energy sources and technologies in and through state and local government and community activities. Coordinates 39.098856°, -83.247057° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.098856,"lon":-83.247057,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.

Hu, P.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $25,000 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,500 - $25,000 Provider Customer Service Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells

99

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates to Iowa customers for a variety of home upgrades. Rebates are available for certain heating, insulation,...

100

Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Southeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact is administered by the Compact Commission. The Compact provides for rotating responsibility for the region's low-level...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates and incentives for Iowa customers for a variety of technologies. Rebates are available for certain HVAC...

102

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding the CSG Interstate Transmission Siting Compact- June 6, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding the CSG Interstate Transmission Siting Compact, approved at the June 5-6, 2013 EAC Meeting.

103

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers a number of energy efficiency rebates for Minnesota residential customers which implement HVAC, lighting, appliance, window, insulation and water...

104

The vascular flora of Breaks Interstate Park, Pike County, Kentucky, and Dickenson County, Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The vascular flora of Breaks Interstate Park was documented during two growing seasons, 2008 and 2009; with supplemental collections made in 2010 and 2011. The… (more)

Clark, Julie Bennett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for windows/sashes, programmable thermostats, water...

106

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for high efficiency lighting equipment, occupancy...

107

Addressing Inappropriate Driver Behavior at Rail-Highway Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ragland. Driver Behavior at Rail Crossings. Draft Report, 5.T.G. Driver Behavior at Rail- Highway Grade Crossings: Aof Locomotive Horns at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings: Final

Cooper, Douglas L.; Ragland, David R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Addressing Inappropriate Driver Behavior at Rail-Highway Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail Grade Crossings in the United States. July 2000–July 2001, Transportation ResearchRail- Highway Grade Crossings: A Signal Detection Theory Analysis. In: Safety of Highway-Railroad Grade Crossings, Research

Cooper, Douglas L.; Ragland, David R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the construction and performance testing of a 3000-ft length of fly ash base under a highway shoulder. Following three years of service, the road shoulder shows no signs of premature deterioration. This report should aid utilities seeking to increase ash-use rates in highway-related projects, as well as state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

3. Deliverability on the Interstate Network  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

nondiscriminatory transporters and mandated open access to ... independent operators are linked to natural gas ... occurred on the Texas Eastern Transmission system as

111

NewsletterA Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) of The University of Kansas Transportation Center In cooperation with Kansas Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NewsletterA Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) of The University of Kansas Transportation Center In cooperation with Kansas Department of Transportation and Federal Highway Administration KUTC Commissioners about the future of the county highway system. The problem Property taxes are the County's primary

Peterson, Blake R.

112

Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transportation infrastructure systems in the United States were built between the 50's and 80's, with 20 years design life. As most of them already exceeded their original life expectancy, state transportation agencies (STAs) are now under increased needs to rebuild deteriorated transportation networks. For major highway maintenance projects, a federal rule enforces to perform a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). The lack of analytical methods for LCCA creates many challenges of STAs to comply with the rule. To address these critical issues, this study aims at developing a new methodology for quantifying the future maintenance cost to assist STAs in performing a LCCA. The major objectives of this research are twofold: 1) identify the critical factors that affect pavement performances; 2) develop a stochastic model that predicts future maintenance costs of flexible-type pavement in Texas. The study data were gathered through the Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) containing more than 190,000 highway sections in Texas. These data were then grouped by critical performance-driven factor which was identified by K-means cluster analysis. Many factors were evaluated to identify the most critical factors that affect pavement maintenance need. With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models. Lastly, a validation study with PRESS statistics was conducted to evaluate reliability of the model. The research results reveal that three factors, annual average temperature, annual precipitation, and pavement age, were the most critical factors under very low traffic volume conditions. This research effort was the first of its kind undertaken in this subject. The maintenance cost lookup tables and stochastic model will assist STAs in carrying out a LCCA, with the reliable estimation of maintenance costs. This research also provides the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine long-term maintenance costs in estimating life-cycle costs. It will reduce the agency's expenses in the time and effort required for conducting a LCCA. Estimating long-term maintenance cost is a core component of the LCCA. Therefore, methods developed from this project have the great potential to improve the accuracy of LCCA.

Kim, Yoo Hyun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

[Interstate Clean Transportation]. Final Report for FG02-99EE50591  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Interstate Clean Transportation (ICTC) purpose is to develop a public-private partnership dedicated to accelerating the market penetration of clean, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in interstate goods movement. In order to foster project development, the ICTC activity sought to increase awareness of heavy-duty AFVs among truck fleet operators.

Wendt, Lee

2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: May 10, 2004 9: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on

115

Renewable Energy and the Clean Air Interstate Rule  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Joe Bryson Joe Bryson US Environmental Protection Agency Climate Protection Partnerships Division January 12, 2006 bryson.joe@epa.gov (202) 343-9631 Renewable Energy and the Clean Air Interstate Rule My Perspective Where I Sit: Climate Change Protection Division * Energy STAR products, buildings, and homes * Green Power Partnership * CHP Partnership * Climate Leaders * EPA-State Partnerships on Clean Energy and Utility Regulation Who I Coordinate with: Clean Air Markets Division * Responsible for the design, analysis, and implementation of EPA's cap and trade programs for SO2, NOx, and Hg Information from Two Views Environmental Regulatory Perspective Renewable Energy Perspective Environmental Regulatory Perspective States have full authority and flexibility to allocate NOx

116

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric) - Farm Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: $100 Refrigerator Replacement: $50 Dishwasher Replacement: $20 Freezer: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Water Heater: $50 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $100 Circulating Fans: $25 - $75

117

Colorado's Prospects for Interstate Commerce in Renewable Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Colorado has more renewable energy potential than it is ever likely to need for its own in-state electricity consumption. Such abundance may suggest an opportunity for the state to sell renewable power elsewhere, but Colorado faces considerable competition from other western states that may have better resources and easier access to key markets on the West Coast. This report examines factors that will be important to the development of interstate commerce for electricity generated from renewable resources. It examines market fundamentals in a regional context, and then looks at the implications for Colorado.

Hurlbut, D. J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The economic impacts of highway widening projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway widening is one alternative for increasing capacity on a particular section of roadway. Capacity is the maximum hourly rate at which vehicles can reasonably be expected to traverse a uniform section of a roadway during a given time under prevailing roadway, traffic, and control conditions. Added capacity has economic, environmental, and social impact tradeoffs that must be considered. Economic tradeoffs of land value impacts were considered for this research study. Land scarcity, as related to value, was analyzed with respect to highway widening improvements on abutting land use. Previous literature included several modelling techniques used for measuring economic impacts of highway improvements. The before-and-after study approach was selected for analyzing land values, rather than parallel-area or control-area study approaches. This study involved a before-and-after economic analysis, where the before period d represented economic make-up of land parcels without Improvements, while the after period represented market value on land parcels once construction was completed. A design matrix was developed from data available for two highway types, multilane highway and freeway, on pre-selected sites. Location selection was based on prior knowledge and availability of land value data. Study variables included four design characteristics and four property types. These variables were used to determine whether increases in land value occurred on adjacent properties as a result of widening. A paired data statistical analysis was performed for both facility types. Results of the statistical analysis indicated that property values generally decreased for both facilities. Impacts on abutting property for each location reflected minimal changes in value. Therefore, the results do not suggest an increase in property values because of highway widening. The most important recommendation from this research study includes a combination of two factors.- 1) further research needed to look at areas outside of the construction zone and 2) consideration for lengthening the after study period. The parallel-area or control-area study approach is recommended for further study of economic impacts on land values. In addition, more data for the after construction period, preferably five to ten years, could be applied to better estimate effects.

Jackson, Patricia Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Safety Analysis Of Automated Highway Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hazard analysis of process-control software requirements. In contrast, the analyst does not have a tool

Leveson, Nancy G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Safety Analysis Of Automated Highway Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Possibility of mode severe accident Figure 2.9: An eventtrip may lead to a severe accident if the standby boilerthe probability of a severe accident is = [I - P ( a ) ] [

Leveson, Nancy G.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

California Hydrogen Highway Network October 3, 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Highway Hydrogen Highway Network April 3, 2008 California Air Resources Board California Blueprint Plan * Phased approach to infrastructure implementation * Environmental goals * Shared risk CaH2Net Background * Governor's Executive Order, S-7-04 formed the CaH2Net in April 2004 * A Blueprint Plan, May 2005 * Legislative Authority - SB76, $6.5 Million, stations, vehicles, support - Budget Act 2006, $6.5 Million, ZBuses, stations - Budget Act 2007, $6 Million, stations, support The State's Contribution * Vehicles * Stations * CaH2Net Membership * Hydrogen Fuel Quality Standard * Environmental Standards for Hydrogen * Public outreach and education Over 90% of Californians Breathe Unhealthy Air at Times 0-5 Days >100 Days 6-50 Days 50-100 Days Days Over State 24-Hour PM10 Standard

122

The Full Cost of Intercity Highway Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction There has been a great deal of recent interest in identifying and measuring the full costs of transportation, particularly highways (see for instance: Keeler et al. 1974, Fuller et al. 1983, Quinet 1990, Mackenzie et al. 1992, INRETS 1993, Miller and Moffet 1993, IWW/INFRAS 1995, IBI 1995, Levinson et al. 1996, Delucchi 1996). This debate questions whether various modes of transportation are implicitly subsidized and to what extent this biases investment and usage decisions. While environmental impacts are used to stop new infrastructure, the full costs to society of transportation are not generally calculated for financing projects or charging for their use. In this paper we review the theoretical and empirical literature on the cost structure of the provision of intercity highway transportation and specify and estimate our own cost functions . In defining this framework we distinguish between internal (private) and external (social) costs, long and short run cos

David Gillen; David Levinson; David M. Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Highway and interline transportation routing models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important issues to shippers, carriers, and the general public. Since transportation routes are a central characteristic in most of these issues, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward the resolution of these issues. In addition, US Department of Transportation requirements (HM-164) mandate specific routes for shipments of highway controlled quantities of radioactive materials. In response to these needs, two routing models have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These models have been designated by DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Transportation Management Division (DOE/EM) as the official DOE routing models. Both models, HIGHWAY and INTERLINE, are described.

Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

U.S. Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 50,697,415 1990's 51,022,894 49,708,414 52,574,795 52,674,053 57,969,941 61,167,051 62,953,877 61,199,549 55,139,674 57,323,473 2000's 58,570,289 65,774,849 63,389,468 65,793,961 64,423,388 63,027,775 61,863,323 66,858,134 70,305,954 72,022,602 2010's 74,778,078 74,661,629 70,195,553 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: U.S. International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State

125

Application of fuel cells to highway and nonhighway transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation is the nation's largest single energy user and accounts for approximately 50% of our current petroleum consumption. This fact not only defines the urgency of the problem, it also delineates the magnitude of the infrastructure already in place and the built-in inertia of the system. Major changes in our modes of transportation will not take place instantly, as we might wish, but will certainly require years and, perhaps, decades of steady evolution and technological development. Fuel cells are a promising alternate power source for transportation applications for a number of reasons. Modeling studies have indicated the potential for providing highway vehicles with performance and range comparable to those provided by internal combustion engines. Fuel cells are efficient and therefore reduce energy consumption. They are nonpolluting in terms of both air and noise pollution - highly desirable features for urban applications. In addition, they can operate on nonpetroleum fuels such as hydrogen or hydrogen in combined form, for example, methanol or ammonia, thereby reducing the nation's petroleum dependency. The investigation of the application of fuel cells to the highway transportation described began in 1977. Recently, the scope was broadened to include a determination of the feasibility of using fuel cells in nonhighway transportation, i.e., rail and marine.

Huff, J.R.; McCormich, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Bobbett, R.E.; Dooley, G.R.; Derouin, C.R.; Murray, H.S.; Srinivasan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Application of fuel cells to highway and nonhighway transportation  

SciTech Connect

Transportation is the nation's largest single energy user and accounts for approximately 50% of our current petroleum consumption. This fact not only defines the urgency of the problem, it also delineates the magnitude of the infrastructure already in place and the built-in inertia of the system. Major changes in our modes of transportation will not take place instantly, as we might wish, but will certainly require years and, perhaps, decades of steady evolution and technological development. Fuel cells are a promising alternate power source for transportation applications for a number of reasons. Modeling studies have indicated the potential for providing highway vehicles with performance and range comparable to those provided by internal combustion engines. Fuel cells are efficient and therefore reduce energy consumption. They are nonpolluting in terms of both air and noise pollution - highly desirable features for urban applications. In addition, they can operate on nonpetroleum fuels such as hydrogen or hydrogen in combined form, for example, methanol or ammonia, thereby reducing the nation's petroleum dependency. The investigation of the application of fuel cells to the highway transportation described began in 1977. Recently, the scope was broadened to include a determination of the feasibility of using fuel cells in nonhighway transportation, i.e., rail and marine.

Huff, J.R.; McCormich, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Bobbett, R.E.; Dooley, G.R.; Derouin, C.R.; Murray, H.S.; Srinivasan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Feebates, Footprints and Highway Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of a market-based policy aimed at encouraging manufacturers to develop more fuel efficient vehicles without affecting the car buyer s choice of vehicle size. A vehicle s size is measured by its footprint , the product of track width and wheelbase. Traditional market-based policies to promote higher fuel economy, such as higher gasoline taxes or gas guzzler taxes, also induce motorists to purchase smaller vehicles. Whether or not such policies affect overall road safety remains controversial, however. Feebates, a continuous schedule of new vehicle taxes and rebates as a function of vehicle fuel consumption, can also be made a function of vehicle size, thus removing the incentive to buy a smaller vehicle. A feebate system based on a vehicle s footprint creates the same incentive to adopt technology to improve fuel economy as simple feebate systems while removing any incentive for manufacturers or consumers to downsize vehicles.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary...

129

OFF-HIGHWAY GASOLINE CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODELS USED IN THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION ATTRIBUTION AND PROCESS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

222 222 Center for Transportation Analysis Energy and Transportation Science Division OFF-HIGHWAY GASOLINE CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODELS USED IN THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION ATTRIBUTION AND PROCESS 2008 Updates Ho-Ling Hwang, Ph.D. Stacy Davis Date Published: December 2009 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6283 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES....................................................................................v LIST OF ACRONYMS .................................................................................................... vii ABSTRACT ....................................................................................................................... ix

130

,"U.S. Natural Gas Net Interstate Receipts (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Receipts (MMcf)" Interstate Receipts (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Net Interstate Receipts (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1260_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1260_nus_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:38:24 PM"

131

Guidelines for Leasing State Highway Right of Way Tracts | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Guidelines for Leasing State Highway Right of Way Tracts Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

132

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized ...  

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized with Coal Fly Ash Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Professor, Geo Engineering Program Dept. of ...

133

OFF-HIGHWAY TRANSPORTATION-RELATED FUEL USE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highway Administration FOKS Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales GGE gasoline gallons equivalent LNG liquid natural gas LPG liquid petroleum gas MBPD million barrels per day MPH miles per...

134

Waiver of Preferential Right to Lease Highway Right of Way |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waiver of Preferential Right to Lease Highway Right of Way Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Waiver of Preferential Right to Lease...

135

Recent market activities of major interstate pipeline companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to analyzing trends in wellhead purchases over the past year, this study also presents information and analysis of natural gas purchases from other pipeline companies, and sales to several types of customers. Activities of 20 major interstate pipeline companies were analysed in response to market developments over the past 4 years and over the past year in particular. This study includes an analysis of trends in natural gas sales and of the effects of increasing prices since 1979. It includes separate analyses of direct industrial sales, sales to major pipeline companies, and other sales for resale, as well as analyses of the volumes transported for sale to others. It also reports on purchase patterns in general since 1979 and on purchase projection patterns for particular types of gas since 1981. The differing behavior of pipeline companies in purchasing high-cost gas in the current market is also analyzed. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Rail Crossings: A Strategy to Select Countermeasure Improvements for Rail-Highway Crossings in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photo Enforcement at Highway–Rail Grade Crossings in theH. Lambert. Audit of the Highway-Rail Grade Crossing SafetyE. H. Summary of the DOT Rail-Highway Crossing Resource

Cooper, Douglas L.; MacLeod, Kara E.; Ragland, David R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an agreement between the states of Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin that provides for the cooperative and safe...

138

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy), in conjunction with Wells Fargo Bank, offers a low-interest loan for residential, commercial and agricultural customers who purchase and install energy...

139

Overcoming shadows of the past : post-conflict interstate reconciliation in East Asia and Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the origins of interstate reconciliation after traumatic conflicts, mainly through the comparative study of postwar Sino-Japanese and (West) German-Polish relations. While Germany and Poland have ...

He, Yinan, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)- Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy (Interstate Power and Light - IP&L) offers low-interest financing program for the installation of energy efficient improvements. Businesses, Residences, farms or ag-related...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers a wide variety of incentives for commercial customers to save energy in eligible facilities, whether they are upgrading existing facilities or building new...

142

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3000-ft-length fly ash base under a highway shoulder will help demonstrate the impact of reused ash on structural integrity and groundwater. This report provides valuable design details for utilities seeking to increase ash reuse and for state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Applying Safety Treatments To Rail-Highway At-Grade Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Treatments To Rail-Highway At-Grade Crossings Douglas12! SECTION 2: AT-GRADE RAIL CROSSING SAFETYTreatments at Rail-Highway Level Crossings.. 51!

Cooper, Douglas L; Ragland, David R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

pipeline companies are handling the secondary market for The overall scope and content of the report was ... Average Length of Long-Term Firm ...

145

Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Monthly May 1998 vii The following article is the Executive Summary from the recently published report Deliverability ...

146

Energy Star Concepts for Highway Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

37 37 Energy Star Concepts for Highway Vehicles June 2003 David L. Greene Oak Ridge National Laboratory Robert C. Gibson The University of Tennessee K. G. Duleep Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

147

Prepared by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation Work Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

national coalition of personnel from the environmental regulatory agencies of some 40 states and the District of Columbia; three federal agencies; tribes; and public and industry stakeholders. The organization is devoted to reducing barriers to, and speeding interstate deployment of, better, more cost-effective, innovative environmental techniques. ITRC operates as a committee of the Environmental Research Institute of the States (ERIS), a Section 501(c)(3) public charity that supports the Environmental Council of the States (ECOS) through its educational and research activities aimed at improving the environment in the United States and providing a forum for state environmental policy makers. More information about ITRC and its available products and services can be found on the Internet at www.itrcweb.org. DISCLAIMER This document is designed to help regulators and others develop a consistent approach to their evaluation, regulatory approval, and deployment of specific technologies at specific sites. Although the information in this document is believed to be reliable and accurate, this document and all material set forth herein are provided without warranties of any kind, either express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of the accuracy or completeness of information

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes  

SciTech Connect

Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highways Division Highways Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Address 869 Punchbowl Street, Room 513 Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96809 Website http://hawaii.gov/dot/highways Coordinates 21.303779°, -157.860047° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.303779,"lon":-157.860047,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Wisconsin No 2 Diesel Off-Highway Construction (Thousand Gallons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wisconsin No 2 Diesel Off-Highway Construction (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 16,323: 12,292 ...

151

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

U.S. International and Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International & Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State International & Interstate Movements of Natural Gas by State (Million Cubic Feet) Area: U.S. Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period:

153

Real-time highway traffic condition assessment framework using vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) with artificial intelligence (AI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework for real-time highway traffic condition assessment using vehicle kinetic information, which is likely to be made available from vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) systems, in which vehicle and infrastructure agents ... Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), incident detection, vehicle kinetics, vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII)

Yongchang Ma; Mashrur Chowdhury; Adel Sadek; Mansoureh Jeihani

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates  

SciTech Connect

This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Natural Gas Compressor Stations on the Interstate Pipeline Network:Developments Since 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report looks at the use of natural gas pipeline compressor stations on the interstate natural gas pipeline network that serves the lower 48 States. It examines the compression facilities added over the past 10 years and how the expansions have supported pipeline capacity growth intended to meet the increasing demand for natural gas.

Information Center

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation: executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A planning study was made for DOE on alternate fuels for non-highway transportation (aircraft, rail, marine, and pipeline). The study provides DOE with a recommendation of what alternate fuels may be of interest to non-highway transportation users from now through 2025 and recommends R and D needed to allow non-petroleum derived fuels to be used in non-highway transportation. In the near term (present-1985), there is unlikely to be any major change in the fuels used in any of the four modes of transportation except that the average quality of the marine fuel is likely to get worse. In the mid-term period (1985-2000), there will be a transition to non-petroleum fuels, based primarily on shale oil derived liquids assuming a shale oil industry is started during this time.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

1975-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's...

159

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #331: August 2, 2004 Off-Highway...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: August 2, 2004 Off-Highway Diesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 331: August 2, 2004 Off-Highway Diesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about...

160

Tradeoffs among Free-flow Speed, Capacity, Cost, and Environmental Footprint in Highway Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Highway Design Chen Feng Ng, California State University,in Highway Design Chen Feng Ng and Kenneth A. Small May 17,R42 Contacts: Chen Feng Ng (corresponding author) Department

Ng, Chen Feng; Small, Kenneth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New Hardware and Software Design of a Field-Deployable Real-Time Laser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement of True Travel Time on the Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time Laser-Based Prototype Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for MeasurementLaser-Based Non-Intrusive Detection System for Measurement

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Essays in labor economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My dissertation is a collection of three essays that consider various aspects of income inequality and the demand for skill. The first chapter uses the advent of the US Interstate Highway System to examine the effect of ...

Michaels, Guy, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A continuous bi-level model for the expansion of highway networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding new corridors to a highway network represents a multicriteria decision process in which a variety of social, environmental and economic factors must be evaluated and weighted for a large number of corridor alternatives. This paper proposes a new ... Keywords: Demand covering, Heuristics, Highway corridors location, Highway networks

Eusebio Angulo, Enrique Castillo, Ricardo García-Ródenas, Jesús Sánchez-Vizcaíno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A planning study was made for DOE on alternate fuels for non-highway transportation (aircraft, rail, marine, and pipeline). The study provides DOE with a recommendation of what alternate fuels may be of interest to non-highway transportation users from now through 2025 and recommends R and D needed to allow non-petroleum derived fuels to be used in non-highway transportation. Volume III contains all of the references for the data used in the preliminary screening and is presented in 4 subvolumes. Volume IIIA covers the background information on the various prime movers used in the non-highway transportation area, the physical property data, the fuel-prime mover interaction and a review of some alternate energy forms. Volume IIIB covers the economics of producing, tranporting, and distributing the various fuels. Volume IIIC is concerned with the environment issues in production and use of the fuels, the energy efficiency in use and production, the fuel logistics considerations, and the overall ratings and selection of the fuels and prime movers for the detailed evaluation. Volume IIID covers the demand-related issues.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the scalability problem of highway ad hoc network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vehicular Ad hoc Network in a highway is composed of high speed vehicles or nodes which induce fast topology changes in their configuration. In order to solve the connectivity and scalability problems of VANETs, we introduce the architecture of a Vehicular ...

Florent Kaisser; Véronique Včque

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Stakeholder perspectives on the Clean Air Interstate and the Clean Air Mercury Rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a follow-up to last month's detailed overviews of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR), this month EM presents perspectives on the two rules from representatives of a range of stakeholders, including EPA, the states, the regulated community, and the environmental community. Titles of the perspectives are: A Multipollutant Approach to Emissions Reductions; Clean Air Lessons from the Myth of Sisyphus; Reactions to EPA's Clean Air Interstate and Clean Air Mercury Rules; The Case for Coal Rank Subcategorization to Regulate Mercury Emissions; EPA's Mercury Rule: The Latest Delay Tactic; EPA's Mercury Rule: With Technology Today, We Can Do Better; STAPPA/ALAPCO's Perspectives on CAMR and CAIR. 16 refs.

C.V. Mathai; Jeffrey Holmstead; Michael Shore; Skiles Boyd; Vicky Sullivan; Dan Weiss; John Kinsman; Steve Lomax; Michael Rossler; David Steele; Greg Schaefer; Felice Stadler; David Foerter; William Becker [Arizona Public Services, Phoenix, AZ (US)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Interstate and intrastate incidence of Oklahoma's severance tax on natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two models, an intrastate model and an interstate model, are developed based on Shelton and Vogt's (1982) coal-severance tax model. Both models are based on a formal demand and supply framework which incorporated the most-important determinants of the demand for and the supply of natural gas. Two reduced-form equations derived from these models are estimated, using ordinary least-square techniques. About 91% of the Oklahoma severance-tax revenue collected from intrastate natural gas sales is paid by Oklahoma consumers; 9% is paid by producers and mineral-rights owners. Less than 9% of this portion of the tax may be exported. About 97% of the Oklahoma severance-tax revenue collected from interstate natural gas sales is paid by out-of-state consumers. Three percent of this tax revenue is paid by producers and mineral rights owners. Over 97% of this portion of the tax may be exported. Over one-half of the taxes collected in both markets may be exported to federal taxpayers through federal tax deductibility. Findings show a large portion of Oklahoma natural gas severance taxes levied on interstate sales may be exported. In this way, the severance tax meets the exportation criterion of a good tax.

Hsu, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Deterioration of Iowa Highway Concrete Pavements: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... system. Shale fragments show evidence of alkali-silica reactivity, but little significant cracking is present (Figure 29). No ...

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Natural Gas Compressor Stations on the Interstate Pipeline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

facilities, emergency shutdown systems, and an on-site computerized flow control and dispatch system that maintains the operational integrity of the ...

170

Moving Slot Concept for Automated Highway Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an entrance, the flow rate increases with fewer vehicles orentrances. Mean exit rates increase with p e . Mean releasethe mean release rate increases and the system throughout

Chin, Chi-nan; Hall, Randolph

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft Word - Old Highway Bridge_CX Memo_20120608.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Old Highway Bridge Property Funding Old Highway Bridge Property Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in land and associated buildings for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, or fish and wildlife management provided that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that could pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Twisp, Okanogan County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation (MSRF) to acquire approximately 22.1 acres of land and 1,455 feet of the Twisp

172

Microwave methods enable energy savings in restoration of highway pavements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot in place recycling of asphalt pavement by a method which utilizes microwave energy in combination with hot engine exhaust gases has been demonstrated to be technically and economically feasible. The process saves both energy and materials compared with conventional hot-mix recycling methods involving removal of old paving and reprocessing at hot-mix plants. Applications for microwave pavement heating include repair of cracks, joints between lanes and shoulders, wheel tracks, bridge decks, strip patching, and eventually in-place of full lanes of asphalt highways. The ability of microwave energy to heat pavements rapidly and fairly uniformly to depths of up to 6 inches make this new method uniquely suitable for repair and restoration of bridges, roads and highways, and also for the construction of new paved roads in places where hot-mix plants are not available.

Jeppson, M.R.; Smith, F.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Microwave methods enable energy savings in restoration of highway pavements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot in-place recycling of asphalt pavement by a method which utilizes microwave energy in combination with hot-engine exhaust gases has been demonstrated to be technically and economically feasible. The process saves both energy and materials compared with conventional hot-mix recycling methods involving removal of old paving and reprocessing at hot-mix plants. Applications for microwave pavement heating include repair of cracks, joints between lanes and shoulders, wheel tracks, bridge decks, strip patching, and eventually in-place recycling of full lanes of asphalt highways. The ability of microwave energy to heat pavements rapidly and fairly uniformly to depths of up to 6 inches make this new method uniquely suitable for repair and restoration of bridges, roads and highways, and also for the construction of new paved roads in places where hot-mix plants are not available.

Jeppson, M.R.; Smith, F.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gas main installed under a major four-lane highway  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and installation of a natural gas pipeline in Richmond, British Columbia. Because of problems with existing utility lines, pressure requirements, safety concerns, socio-economic interests, it was decided that the only alternative was down the center-line of the highway. The paper reviews the geologic site conditions which favored directional drilling operations along with the actual drilling equipment involved. It reviews the problems encountered and how such problems were overcome.

Tremblay, G.R. (BC Gas Utility Ltd., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Checklist for transition to new highway fuel(s).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation is vital to the U.S. economy and society. As such, U.S. Presidents have repeatedly stated that the nation needs to reduce dependence on petroleum, especially for the highway transportation sector. Throughout history, highway transportation fuel transitions have been completed successfully both in United States and abroad. Other attempts have failed, as described in Appendix A: Historical Highway Fuel Transitions. Planning for a transition is critical because the changes can affect our nation's ability to compete in the world market. A transition will take many years to complete. While it is tempting to make quick decisions about the new fuel(s) of choice, it is preferable and necessary to analyze all the pertinent criteria to ensure that correct decisions are made. Doing so will reduce the number of changes in highway fuel(s). Obviously, changes may become necessary because of occurrences such as significant technology breakthroughs or major world events. With any and all of the possible transitions to new fuel(s), the total replacement of gasoline and diesel fuels is not expected. These conventional fuels are envisioned to coexist with the new fuel(s) for decades, while the revised fuel and vehicle infrastructures are implemented. The transition process must analyze the needs of the primary 'players,' which consist of the customers, the government, the fuel industry, and the automotive industry. To maximize the probability of future successes, the prime considerations of these groups must be addressed. Section 2 presents a succinct outline of the Checklist. Section 3 provides a brief discussion about the groupings on the Checklist.

Risch, C.; Santini, D.J. (Energy Systems)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

Vesely, Charles John-Paul [Cummins Power Generation; Fuchs, Benjamin S. [Cummins Power Generation; Booten, Chuck W. [Protonex Technology, LLC

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

experts have started drawing att ention to the need to improve the system that transmits electricity from power plants to demand centers. Congestion on existing lines, increased...

178

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of system cost The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers rebates for solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, renewable biomass, and anaerobic digesters. Businesses and...

179

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Farm Equipment Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment, Ceiling Fan, Clothes Washers, CustomOthers pending approval, Dishwasher, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Heat recovery, Lighting,...

180

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light- Residential Renewable Energy Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers its electricity customers rebates for solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, and solar thermal water heating systems. Natural gas customers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Texas A&M Health Science Center, President's Office 8441 State Highway 47, Clinical Building 1, Suite 3100, Bryan, TX 77807  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M Health Science Center, President's Office 8441 State Highway 47, Clinical Building 1, Texas A&M Health Science Center and Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, The Texas A&M University System of the rationales for investigating a realignment of Texas A&M Health Science Center under the administration

Boas, Harold P.

182

Energy Star Concepts for Highway Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors of this report, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, have investigated the possible application of Energy Star ratings to passenger cars and light trucks. This study establishes a framework for formulating and evaluating Energy Star rating methods that is comprised of energy- and environmental-based metrics, potential vehicle classification systems, vehicle technology factors, and vehicle selection criteria. The study tests several concepts and Energy Star rating methods using model-year 2000 vehicle data--a spreadsheet model has been developed to facilitate these analyses. This study tests two primary types of rating systems: (1) an outcome-based system that rates vehicles based on fuel economy, GHG emissions, and oil use and (2) a technology-based system that rates vehicles based on the energy-saving technologies they use. Rating methods were evaluated based on their ability to select vehicles with high fuel economy, low GHG emissions, and low oil use while preserving a full range of service (size and acceleration) and body style choice. This study concludes that an Energy Star rating for passenger cars and light trucks is feasible and that several methods could be used to achieve reasonable tradeoffs between low energy use and emissions and diversity in size, performance, and body type. It also shows that methods that consider only fuel economy, GHG emissions, or oil use will not select a diverse mix of vehicles. Finally, analyses suggest that methods that encourage the use of technology only, may result in increases in acceleration power and weight rather than reductions in oil use and GHG emissions and improvements in fuel economy.

Greene, D.L.

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: August 2, 4: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #634:

184

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW GRR/Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-e - Permit to Construct Upon a State Highway ROW 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statute Chapter 264 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 102 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 105 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

185

Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. Sharing Success By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California. Ms. Stanfield’s practice focuses on the intersection between renewable energy regulation and environmental and land use law, with a particular focus on regulatory policy implementation, compliance and permitting processes. On behalf of IREC, Ms. Stanfield works to improve the efficiency and efficacy of the permitting process for distributed generation solar systems. She also is a leading voice for the improvement of interconnection standards and their interaction with the procurement and land use permitting processes in California. Contact Sky at

Sky Stanfield; Erica Schroeder; Thad Culley; Wiedman Llp; Wade Crowfoot; Carla Din; Gwen Rose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sliding Scale Contingencies for the Highway Construction Project Development Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Highway construction project development process, State Highway Agencies (SHA) prepare cost estimates for effective communication to stakeholders and for project cost control. Cost estimates prepared in the planning phase of project development typically in a time range of 10 to 20 years from project letting are characterized by a great deal of uncertainty due to low scope definition. SHAs typically include an amount as contingency in the project cost estimate to cover costs due to unidentified or unquantified risks during project development. However, most of the methods used by SHAs to apply contingency to projects lack consistency in definition and application. This leads to poor communication to stakeholders, project cost escalation and other project control issues due to inaccuracy of baseline cost estimates. This study developed a set of sliding scale contingencies for estimating contingency on highway projects taking into consideration the effect of major factors, such as project complexity that impacts contingency application. Expert opinion was sought through the use of the Delphi technique. Experimental techniques were not suitable for this study due to the exploratory nature of the problem and the lack of data to analyze using empirical methods. The Delphi method typically consists of a series of rounds called questionnaires. Twenty-three professionals with experience in risk assessment and cost estimating agreed to participate in the study. Email was the means of communication using an excel spreadsheet. The assessment was completed in three iterative rounds with controlled feedback to the participants on the panel at the end of each round. Sliding scale contingencies were developed for three levels of project complexity: noncomplex (minor), moderately complex, and most complex (major) projects. The sliding scale contingencies are presented as a final output of this study. This method of estimating contingency provides consistent rationale for estimating contingency. Risks are an inextricable part of the contingency estimating process. Estimators are encouraged to identify and document risks as justification for contingency values applied to a project.

Olumide, Adeniyi O.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR AN ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that ln conventlOnal power transformers .. However , se~eralpower per passenger car: 20 kW Source conductor current: 1000 A Core Material: Transformerpower. This is in contrast to situations in which a transformer

Bolger, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Clean air. Safe, congestion-free highways and transit systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;55 Sustainable Transportation Program High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) HFIR is one of the world's most powerful research reactors. HTML manages a beam- line at HFIR dedicated to the determination

189

Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles  

OEM Electric Vehicles OEM EV Manufacturers Plug-in; internal technology development Street / highway in-motion charging systems Federal / State / Local

190

ITS Hardware Maintenance Management Systems: White Paper for MORIP Pooled Fund Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an ITS hardware maintenance management system. It can aidBERKELEY ITS Hardware Maintenance Management Systems: WhiteHIGHWAYS ITS HARDWARE MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WHITE

Kuhn, Beverly T.; Durkop, Brooke R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/ESD/10-9 ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

192

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ...

193

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Links to U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Links Links About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Links to U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Information - The links below will either direct the user to a narrative describing the system, a pipeline system map, a FERC prescribed "Informational Postings" page, or a FERC Tariff Sheet. Pipeline Name Type of System Regions of Operations Acadian Gas Pipeline System Intrastate Southwest Algonquin Gas Transmission Co Interstate Northeast Alliance Pipeline Co Interstate Central, Midwest Anaconda Pipeline System Gathering Gulf of Mexico ANR Pipeline Co Interstate Midwest ANR Storage Co Interstate Midwest Arkansas Oklahoma Gas Co Intrastate Southwest Arkansas Western Pipeline Co Intrastate

194

GRR/Section 3-TX-c - Highway Right of Way Lease | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-TX-c - Highway Right of Way Lease 3-TX-c - Highway Right of Way Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-c - Highway Right of Way Lease 03TXCEncroachmentIssues.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Texas Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies 43 TAC 21.600 43 TAC 21.603 43 TAC 21.606 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03TXCEncroachmentIssues.pdf 03TXCEncroachmentIssues.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedure for obtaining a state highway asset lease in Texas. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) may lease any highway asset.

195

Toolkit for Public-Private Partnerships in Roads and Highways | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Toolkit for Public-Private Partnerships in Roads and Highways Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Toolkit for Public-Private Partnerships in Roads and Highways Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.ppiaf.org/ppiaf/sites/ppiaf.org/files/documents/toolkits/highwayst Cost: Free Toolkit for Public-Private Partnerships in Roads and Highways Screenshot References: Toolkit for Public-Private Partnerships in Roads and Highways[1] "The Toolkit for Public-Private Partnership in Roads and Highways is to

196

Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies  

SciTech Connect

In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

Brockbank, B.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance May 2002 Prepared by S. M. Chin O. Franzese D. L. Greene H. L. Hwang Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee R. C. Gibson The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

198

THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION GASOHOL CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 THE FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION GASOHOL CONSUMPTION ESTIMATION MODEL August 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

199

The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Directions: Interstate 80 to Hwy 113 north toward Woodland. From Hwy 113 take Hutchison Road exit and turn (east bound) on Hutchison Road.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2 3 4 5 Directions: Interstate 80 to Hwy 113 north toward Woodland. From Hwy 113 take Hutchison for options. Driving Directions Questions? Call the Bohart Museum at (530) 752-0493 *For drop-offs or limited

Hammock, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Overview of the design, construction, and operation of interstate liquid petroleum pipelines.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. liquid petroleum pipeline industry is large, diverse, and vital to the nation's economy. Comprised of approximately 200,000 miles of pipe in all fifty states, liquid petroleum pipelines carried more than 40 million barrels per day, or 4 trillion barrel-miles, of crude oil and refined products during 2001. That represents about 17% of all freight transported in the United States, yet the cost of doing so amounted to only 2% of the nation's freight bill. Approximately 66% of domestic petroleum transport (by ton-mile) occurs by pipeline, with marine movements accounting for 28% and rail and truck transport making up the balance. In 2004, the movement of crude petroleum by domestic federally regulated pipelines amounted to 599.6 billion tonmiles, while that of petroleum products amounted to 315.9 billion ton-miles (AOPL 2006). As an illustration of the low cost of pipeline transportation, the cost to move a barrel of gasoline from Houston, Texas, to New York Harbor is only 3 cents per gallon, which is a small fraction of the cost of gasoline to consumers. Pipelines may be small or large, up to 48 inches in diameter. Nearly all of the mainline pipe is buried, but other pipeline components such as pump stations are above ground. Some lines are as short as a mile, while others may extend 1,000 miles or more. Some are very simple, connecting a single source to a single destination, while others are very complex, having many sources, destinations, and interconnections. Many pipelines cross one or more state boundaries (interstate), while some are located within a single state (intrastate), and still others operate on the Outer Continental Shelf and may or may not extend into one or more states. U.S. pipelines are located in coastal plains, deserts, Arctic tundra, mountains, and more than a mile beneath the water's surface of the Gulf of Mexico (Rabinow 2004; AOPL 2006). The network of crude oil pipelines in the United States is extensive. There are approximately 55,000 miles of crude oil trunk lines (usually 8 to 24 inches in diameter) in the United States that connect regional markets. The United States also has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 miles of small gathering lines (usually 2 to 6 inches in diameter) located primarily in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Wyoming, with small systems in a number of other oil producing states. These small lines gather the oil from many wells, both onshore and offshore, and connect to larger trunk lines measuring 8 to 24 inches in diameter. There are approximately 95,000 miles of refined products pipelines nationwide. Refined products pipelines are found in almost every state in the United States, with the exception of some New England states. These refined product pipelines vary in size from relatively small, 8- to 12-inch-diameter lines, to up to 42 inches in diameter. The overview of pipeline design, installation, and operation provided in the following sections is only a cursory treatment. Readers interested in more detailed discussions are invited to consult the myriad engineering publications available that provide such details. The two primary publications on which the following discussions are based are: Oil and Gas Pipeline Fundamentals (Kennedy 1993) and the Pipeline Rules of Thumb Handbook (McAllister 2002). Both are recommended references for additional reading for those requiring additional details. Websites maintained by various pipeline operators also can provide much useful information, as well as links to other sources of information. In particular, the website maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) (http://www.eia.doe.gov) is recommended. An excellent bibliography on pipeline standards and practices, including special considerations for pipelines in Arctic climates, has been published jointly by librarians for the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (operators of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System [TAPS]) and the Geophysical Institute/International Arctic Research Center, both located in Fairbanks (Barboza and Trebelhorn 2001)

Pharris, T. C.; Kolpa, R. L.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand Natural Gas Highway Home > Groups > Clean and Renewable Energy Jessi3bl's picture Submitted by Jessi3bl(15) Member 16 December, 2012 - 19:18 clean energy Clean Energy Fuels energy Environment Fuel GE Innovation Partnerships Technology Innovation & Solutions Transportation Trucking GE, Clean Energy Fuels Partner to Expand 'Natural Gas Highway' GE and Clean Energy Fuels announced a collaboration to expand the infrastructure for natural gas transportation in the United States. The agreement supports Clean Energy's efforts in developing America's Natural Gas Highway, a fueling network that will enable trucks to operate on liquefied natural gas coast to coast and border to border. Clean Energy Fuels will initially purchase two ecomagination-qualified

203

Highway De-icing Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highway De-icing Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Highway De-icing Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Highway De-icing Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Highway De-icing Sector Geothermal energy Type Snowmelt Location Klamath Falls, Oregon Coordinates 42.224867°, -121.7816704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

204

Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application to Occupy or Perform Operations Upon a State Highway Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Unknown Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Document Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Application_to_Occupy_or_Perform_Operations_Upon_a_State_Highway&oldid=675630" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863281925

205

Alaska No 2 Diesel Adj Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska No 2 Diesel Adj Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ... Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil for On ...

206

Midwest (PADD 2) No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

207

U.S. No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 16,797,423:

208

Montana No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana No 2 Diesel Sales/Deliveries to On-Highway Consumers (Thousand Gallons) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's ...

209

Applying Safety Treatments To Rail-Highway At-Grade Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway-Rail Grade Crossings, Transportation Research Board,California Research Bureau,” the commission’s rail crossingRail Grade Crossing Incidents from 1994 to 200.3 Research

Cooper, Douglas L; Ragland, David R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

Hu, Shiyin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of a wildlife underpass on Vermont State Highway 289 in Essex, Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scharf, technicians for the Vermont Department of Fish andEVALUATION OF A WILDLIFE UNDERPASS ON VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY289 IN ESSEX, VERMONT John M. Austin and Larry Garland,

Austin, John M.; Garland, Larry

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process, methodology and assumptions for development of the 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings, a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in highway lodging properties over the energy-efficiency levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

Jiang, Wei; Gowri, Krishnan; Lane, Michael D.; Thornton, Brian A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Sublogarithmic Approximation for Highway and Tollbooth Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instance of the tollbooth problem consists of an undirected network and a collection of single-minded customers, each of which is interested in purchasing a fixed path subject to an individual budget constraint. The objective is to assign a per-unit price to each edge in a way that maximizes the collective revenue obtained from all customers. The revenue generated by any customer is equal to the overall price of the edges in her desired path, when this cost falls within her budget; otherwise, that customer will not purchase any edge. Our main result is a deterministic algorithm for the tollbooth problem on trees whose approximation ratio is O(log m / log log m), where m denotes the number of edges in the underlying graph. This finding improves on the currently best performance guarantees for trees, due to Elbassioni et al. (SAGT '09), as well as for paths (commonly known as the highway problem), due to Balcan and Blum (EC '06). An additional interesting consequence is a computational separation between tol...

Gamzu, Iftah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

Kass, M.D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Performance Analysis of the SensorNet's Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot Viewer at the Dorchester West Bound Interstate Weigh Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9-11 attacks, the United States has increased its focus on developing technologies designed to warn us in the event of another attack and to prevent these attacks from happening in the first place. The SensorNet research group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Computer Science and Engineering Division is participating in this effort by developing systems to give critical real-time information to federal, state, and local emergency response decision makers. SensorNet has approached this goal by putting together a system with several sensors and programs called the Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot project (SETCP). The SETCP utilizes interstate weigh stations not only to weigh the passing trucks but also to check for gamma and neutron radiation inside the truck without the aid of a human in close proximity. The system also collects additional data that help identify the truck (the truck's length, weight, license plate number, and photographs of the truck). The objective of this research work was to characterize and analyze the data collected from the South Carolina weigh station on I-26W and compare it with previous data analysis on the performance of the Tennessee weigh station on I-40E. The purpose was to find patterns in the trucks with radioactive alarms and, regional truck traffic, as well as to find patterns of inconsistency in the system (illogical length measurements of the truck, inaccurate readings and character recognition of the license plate). During a three-month period, radioactive alarms and traffic patterns were identified and characterized by grouping all of the data and making graphs and charts in Microsoft Excel to show the flow of traffic, the type of truck traffic, the number of alarms and other information. Inconsistence patterns were found by analyzing the data, looking for missing or illogical information, and determining how often it happens. The improvements of these inconsistencies were also analyzed after repairs were made to the system. Given the small number of radiation alarms detected, there were no clear patterns found. Further research has to be done in this area; also, the analysis period needs to be extended from three months to a year. For traffic flow patterns, it was found that the truck traffic was heaviest on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. The inconsistencies found and fixed in the system were the illogical length measurements and the inaccurate reading and character recognition of the license plate. During the summer of 2007, a Florida International University (FIU) student supported this research work under the direct supervision of Mr. David Hill at ORNL's Computer Science and Engineering Division. The 10-week student internship was supported by the DOE/FIU Science and Technology Workforce Initiative, an innovative program developed by the US Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and FIU's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) (authors)

Colon Mendoza, R.A.; Lagos, L.E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Hill, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Unintended effects of federal transportation policy: a look at the lifecycle costs of the interstate system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The federal surface transportation program in the United States stands at a crossroads. Short on money and lacking vision, the program is in need of reevaluation and reform. This thesis attempts to illustrate the current ...

Lukmann, Andrew T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geographic Information Systems RNL has a staff with extensive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ORNL's Capabilities · Facilities and infrastructure management tools for space, maintenance, security maintenance of a highway system? · What is the best timing and routing means for evacuating the population Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management

219

Simulated fuel economy and emissions performance during city and interstate driving for a heavy-duty hybrid truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare simulated fuel economy and emissions for both conventional and hybrid class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks operating over multiple urban and highway driving cycles. Both light and heavy freight loads were considered, and all simulations included full aftertreatment for NOx and particulate emissions controls. The aftertreatment components included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), urea-selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR), and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Our simulated hybrid powertrain was configured with a pre-transmission parallel drive, with a single electric motor between the clutch and gearbox. A conventional HD truck with equivalent diesel engine and aftertreatment was also simulated for comparison. Our results indicate that hybridization can significantly increase HD fuel economy and improve emissions control in city driving. However, there is less potential hybridization benefit for HD highway driving. A major factor behind the reduced hybridization benefit for highway driving is that there are fewer opportunities to utilize regenerative breaking. Our aftertreatment simulations indicate that opportunities for passive DPF regeneration are much greater for both hybrid and conventional trucks during highway driving due to higher sustained exhaust temperatures. When passive DPF regeneration is extensively utilized, the fuel penalty for particulate control is virtually eliminated, except for the 0.4%-0.9% fuel penalty associated with the slightly higher exhaust backpressure.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads on coastal highway bridges. This study focuses on developing a new scheme to estimate the extreme wave loads on bridges for designing purpose. In order to do this, a 2D wave velocity potential model (2D Model) is set up for the deterministic analysis of wave force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries. 2D Model has Laplace equation as general equation. The free surface boundary, incoming and outgoing wave boundary conditions are linearized, decomposed first, and then solved by the finite difference method. Maximum wave forces results calculated by the linear 2D Model are compared with results from CFD software Flow3D that is using Navier Stokes theory up to the 5th order; and 2D Model is validated by comparing results with experiment data. A case study is conducted for calculating extreme wave forces on I-10 Bridge across Escambia Bay, Florida during Hurricane Ivan in September 2004.SWAN model is adapted to investigate the parameters of wave heights and wave periods around bridge sites. SWAN model has the capability of predicting or hindcasting significant wave heights and wave periods as long as the domain and input parameters are given. The predicted significant wave heights are compared with measurements by Buoy Station 42039 and 42040 nearest to Escambia Bay. A new prediction equation of maximum uplift wave forces on bridge decks is developed in terms of wave height, wave period, water depth, bridge width, water clearance and over top water load. To develop the equations, the relationship is investigated between maximum uplift wave forces and wave parameters, water clearance, green water effects and bridge width. 2D Model is used for up to 1886 cases with difference parameters. Flow3D model is adopted to determine coefficients of water clearance and green water effects, which cannot be calculated by 2D Model.

Meng, Bo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Air quality impacts of highway construction and scheduling. Research report, September 1996--May 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to the state`s four urban areas currently designated as non-attainment areas, there is one maintenance area and four non-attainment areas. A large proportion of the state`s population resides within these nine urban areas. This project provides information to the Texas Department of Transportation on the impacts of highway construction on corridor and regional mobile source emissions inventories. The project also provides information on the additional construction costs incurred by highway contractors who are required to participate in ozone alert programs. This information will allow the Department to make more informed policy decisions on whether or not to include highway construction projects in ozone alert programs.

Perkinson, D.G.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Forecasting a state-specific demand for highway fuels: the case for Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

An econometric model is developed to predict the demand for highway fuels in Hawaii over the next 20 years. The stock of motor vehicles is separated into six classes, and the demand for new vehicles is estimated using seemingly unrelated regression. Average fuel efficiency for the entire fleet stock, gasoline price, per capita income, and per capita stock are used to estimate per capita vehicle-miles traveled. Highway fuel consumption is then calculated as the quotient of vehicle-miles traveled and average fleet fuel efficiency. The model performs well within and outside the historical sample period. A historical simulation is performed which shows what might have happened had gasoline prices not skyrocketed in the 1970s. Predictions of highway fuel consumption through the year 2000 under three different gasoline price scenarios are then made. 29 references, 3 figures, 9 tables.

Leung, P.; Vesenka, M.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline Systems  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems, 2008 (Ranked by system capacity) Pipeline Name Market Regions Served Primary Supply Regions States in Which Pipeline Operates Transported in 2007 (million dekatherm)1 System Capacity (MMcf/d) 2 System Mileage Columbia Gas Transmission Co. Northeast Southwest, Appalachia DE, PA, MD, KY, NC, NJ, NY, OH, VA, WV 1,849 9,350 10,365 Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co. Northeast, Southeast Southwest AL, GA, LA, MD, MS, NC, NY, SC, TX, VA, GM 2,670 8,466 10,450 Northern Natural Gas Co. Central, Midwest Southwest IA, IL, KS, NE, NM, OK, SD, TX, WI, GM 1,055 7,442 15,874 Texas Eastern Transmission Corp.

224

,"U.S. On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices" On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","W Diesel Prices - All Types",11,"Weekly","12/16/2013","3/21/1994" ,"Data 2","M Diesel Prices - All Types",11,"Monthly","11/2013","3/15/1994" ,"Data 3","W Diesel Prices-Low ",1,"Weekly","12/1/2008","2/5/2007" ,"Data 4","M Diesel Prices-Low ",1,"Monthly","12/2008","2/15/2007" ,"Data 5","W Diesel Prices-Ultra-Low",11,"Weekly","12/16/2013","2/5/2007"

225

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeast Region Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These interstate pipelines deliver natural gas to several intrastate natural gas pipelines and at least 50 local distribution companies in the region. In addition, they also serve large industrial concerns and, increasingly, natural gas fired electric power generation facilities.

226

Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation The nation's electricity system is regional in nature, because of the operation of the interconnected grids and the markets defined by them. Over the years, many regional organizations of utilities and governments have formed to manage and oversee these markets. Electric System Decision Making in Other Regions: A Preliminary Analysis Prepared for Western Interstate Energy Board Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation More Documents & Publications

227

Predicting Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy as a Function of Highway Speed  

SciTech Connect

The www.fueleconomy.gov website offers information such as window label fuel economy for city, highway, and combined driving for all U.S.-legal light-duty vehicles from 1984 to the present. The site is jointly maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and also offers a considerable amount of consumer information and advice pertaining to vehicle fuel economy and energy related issues. Included with advice pertaining to driving styles and habits is information concerning the trend that as highway cruising speed is increased, fuel economy will degrade. An effort was undertaken to quantify this conventional wisdom through analysis of dynamometer testing results for 74 vehicles at steady state speeds from 50 to 80 mph. Using this experimental data, several simple models were developed to predict individual vehicle fuel economy and its rate of change over the 50-80 mph speed range interval. The models presented require a minimal number of vehicle attributes. The simplest model requires only the EPA window label highway mpg value (based on the EPA specified estimation method for 2008 and beyond). The most complex of these simple model uses vehicle coast-down test coefficients (from testing prescribed by SAE Standard J2263) known as the vehicle Target Coefficients, and the raw fuel economy result from the federal highway test. Statistical comparisons of these models and discussions of their expected usefulness and limitations are offered.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in Hong Kong Y using jour Canadian linseed oil- based sealants on concrete specimens madejrom G30120 and G45120 Keywords: Unseed Oil, Concrete Surface Treatment, Salt Spray Resistance, Carbonation, Bond Strength, Ultra

229

MEASURING THE IMPACT OF ADDITIONAL RAIL TRAFFIC USING HIGHWAY & RAILROAD METRICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are then illustrated by simulating shared corridor operations with freight and passenger trains. TRANSPORTATION METRICS1 MEASURING THE IMPACT OF ADDITIONAL RAIL TRAFFIC USING HIGHWAY & RAILROAD METRICS Samuel L. Sogin of Illinois Urbana, IL, USA ABSTRACT Long term demand for freight movements in North America is expected

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

230

Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 18  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This eighteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of March 2007, and covers activities in the eighteenth project quarter, January 2007 – March 2007.

Tim Richter

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 13  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thirteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of December 2005, and covers activities in the thirteenth project quarter, October 2005 ? December 2005.

Tim Richter

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cost effective analysis of recycled products for use in highway construction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Over 4.5 billion of non-hazardous wastes are generated in the United States each year. Out of these wastes over 200 million tons of post consumer waste is generated. The disposal of post consumer waste is the responsibility of municipality and society. Four waste materials glass, plastic, rubber tires and paper and paperboard were selected for the detail study. A questionnaire survey was conducted for obtaining input from all state Department of Transportation (DOT) Recyclers and solid waste management facilities in the state of Ohio. Responses received from state DOT stated that they use various recycled materials in highway construction but do not conduct cost-effectiveness analysis of recycle waste materials. The cost of disposal of post consumer waste is increasing, which requires an alternate use for these waste materials. One possible use of these post consumer waste materials is in highway construction. An economic analysis is needed for their cost-effectiveness before using these materials in highway construction. Though these recycled waste materials are expensive compared to virgin material, consideration of the savings in terms of societal cost make these materials cost-effective and attractive to use in highway construction.

Gupta, J.D.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

234

Table 12. Interstate movements and movements across U.S. borders of natural gas by state, 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 12. Interstate movements and movements across U.S. borders of natural gas by state, 2012 (million cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Alabama Florida 0 1,246,541 -1,246,541 Georgia 0 1,714,216 -1,714,216 Gulf of Mexico 154,527 0 154,527 Mississippi 3,635,297 0 3,635,297 Tennessee 79,316 290,500 -211,184 Total 3,869,140 3,251,257 617,883 Alaska Japan 0 9,342 -9,342 Total 0 9,342 -9,342 Arizona California 83,992 951,872 -867,880 Mexico 2,546 46,385 -43,838 New Mexico 1,256,916

235

Table 12. Interstate movements and movements across U.S. borders of natural gas by state, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 12. Interstate movements and movements across U.S. borders of natural gas by state, 2011 (million cubic feet) See footnotes at end of table. Alabama Florida 0 1,167,184 -1,167,184 Georgia 0 1,665,731 -1,665,731 Gulf of Mexico 195,241 0 195,241 Mississippi 3,690,612 0 3,690,612 Tennessee 536 573,157 -572,621 Total 3,886,389 3,406,072 480,317 Alaska Japan 0 15,271 -15,271 China 0 1,127 -1,127 Total 0 16,398 -16,398 Arizona California 122,198 940,673 -818,475 Mexico 3,061

236

Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Analysis System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Analysis System Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Analysis System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Intelligent Transportation Systems Deployment Analysis System Agency/Company /Organization: Cambridge Systematics Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: idas.camsys.com/ Country: United States Northern America References: http://idas.camsys.com/ The ITS Deployment Analysis System (IDAS) is software developed by the Federal Highway Administration that can be used in planning for Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) deployments. State, regional, and local planners can use IDAS to estimate the benefits and costs of ITS investments - which are either alternatives to or enhancements of traditional highway

237

Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mitigating disturbance of migrating mule deer caused by cyclists and pedestrians at a highway underpass near Vail, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A HIGHWAY UNDERPASS NEAR VAIL, COLORADO Gregory E. Phillips,Way, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80525 William Alldredge, RFL82443 William W. Andree, Colorado Division of Wildlife, P.O.

Phillips,, Gregory E.; Alldredge, William; Andree, William W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Firm Racial Segregation and Affirmative Action in the Highway Construction Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper I document that highway construction firms in California, particularly those owned by Blacks and Asians, exhibit considerable racial segregation in that they are disproportionately located in zip codes with the greatest concentration of own-race residents. I find that segregated firms serve a larger market than minority-owned firms that are not segregated, and this effect is concentrated in Black-owned firms. I next exploit the segregation of firms to examine the effect of affirmative action on the success of minority-owned firms. Following the significant curtailment of affirmative action in California due to a direct statewide ballot initiative, the number of highway construction establishments located in zip codes with the highest concentrations of Black and Asian residents fell relative to the rest of the state, even conditional on the number of non-construction establishments. This suggests that affirmative action policies may play a role in the net survival rates of minority-owned firms.

Justin Marion

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodging Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodgings (AEDG-HL or the Guide), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in highway lodging properties over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-HL is the fifth in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

Jiang, Wei; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Gowri, Krishnan; McBride, M.; Liu, Bing

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A simulation tool for automated platooning in mixed highway scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated platooning is one of the most challenging fields in the domain of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Conceptually, platooning means creating clusters of vehicles which closely follow each other autonomously without action of the driver, ...

Michele Segata; Falko Dressler; Renato Lo Cigno; Mario Gerla

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Inc. is a world leader in the development and production of diesel engines for on-highway vehicles, off-highway industrial machines, and power generation units. Cummins Inc. diesel products cover a 50-3000 HP range. The power range for this project includes 174-750 HP to achieve EPA's Tier 3 emission levels of 4.0 NOx+NMHC gm/kW-hr and 0.2 PM gm/kWhr and Tier 4 Interim emission levels of 2.0 gm/kW-hr NOx and 0.02 gm/kW-hr PM. Cummins' anticipated product offerings for Tier 4 in this range include the following: QSB6.7, QSC8.3, QSL9, QSM11, QSX15, QSK19. (For reference, numerical values indicate engine displacement in liters, the letter designation ns indicate the product model). A summary of the EPA's mobile off-highway emissions requirements is given in Figure 1.

Jennifer Rumsey

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Identification of research and development needs in highway construction engineering and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten years have passed since the last assessment of research and development needs in highway construction engineering and management (CEM) and a new research program is necessary to indicate the direction and focus of future research. This study identified the critical issues in need of future research and development. The research program indicated topics in which future research will reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of CEM of transportation projects. Assessment and prioritization of research needs were conducted through a preliminary survey and the Delphi process. The Delphi process consisted of a series of three questionnaires called rounds. The first and second rounds surveyed highway industry professionals to rank and identify issues. The third round was employed to clarify specific problem areas, barriers to implementation, and gaps in knowledge. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, with aid from the third-round survey results, to investigate past research conducted on the most critical highway CEM issues identified by the Delphi respondents. Information that was gathered during the literature search was used to compose draft research problem statements and objectives for future research projects. The draft research problem statements were presented at a research panel meeting to validate the issues and objectives. Alterations were made to the issue statements from the recommended changes by the research panel. The revised research problem statements are the final products of this thesis project.

Damron, Andrew James

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessment of the energy impacts of improving highway-infrastructure materials  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has conducted a study to ascertain the relative importance of improved highway materials compared to vehicle energy consumption on US energy consumption. Energy savings through an improved highway infrastructure can occur in at least three ways. First, replacing aged and failing materials with improved and advanced materials can produce energy ``use`` savings. Second, advances in materials science can yield energy efficiency gains in the production of infrastructure materials. Third, using new or improved transportation-infrastructure materials that have longer service life reduces the energy expended in producing replacement materials and installing or repairing facilities. The Argonne study finds that energy savings from highway materials improvements are on the order of 0.1 {times} 10{sup 12} to 2.1 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. This savings is relatively small compared with energy savings from improvements in vehicle fuel economy. Several infrastructure improvement scenarios were examined, with results that were highly dependent on the assumptions. Reducing traffic congestion, particularly in high-traffic-volume locations, produces major energy savings compared with the other scenarios.

Stammer, R.E. Jr. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). School of Engineering; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIEConstructionUponAStateHighwayROW.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:02, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:02, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 14:00, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:00, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (35 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

246

Evaluation of sight distance as a criterion for prioritizing rail-highway intersections in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Priority or hazard indices are used by the states to rank their rail-highway intersections according to relative hazard to aid in locating crossings for treatment of conditions and/or improvements in warning devices. The Texas Priority Index has been effective over the years in identifying particularly hazardous rail-highway intersections based on high vehicle volumes, train volumes, and accident histories, and these crossings have been treated or improved. Many of the remaining crossings, however, are not well discriminated in terms of their need for improvement; many crossings have the same index number. The objective of this research was to evaluate sight distance as a criterion for prioritizing rail-highway intersections in Texas to help distinguish between the crossings with similar or identical priority index numbers. Accident and sight distance data were compiled and analyzed. A sight distance variable was incorporated into the current Texas Priority Index and evaluated for its effects on the overall ranking of the rail-highway intersections. A state hazard index was chosen from a state-of-the-practice review with which to compare the current and revised Texas Priority Indices. Finally, the effectiveness of each of the indices was predicted in terms of the distribution of priority index numbers and their ability to move the most potentially hazardous crossings up in the rankings. It was concluded from the accident analysis that sight distance contributed to more vehicle-train accidents than any other factor. Further, improvements to warning devices at passive crossings would effectively reduce the overall sight obstruction, reduce the number of train involved accidents, and thus, reduce the number of injuries and fatalities resulting from accidents at rail-highway intersections. It was concluded from the field data analysis that the Method 1 revised Texas Priority Index was the most effective index of the four priority indices evaluated in this thesis for ranking crossings in terms of exposure, accident history, sight distance, and protection type. The Method 1 revised index was effective at redistributing the individual index numbers in the rank and identifying crossings with restricted sight distance while conserving the significance of the exposure values.

Pecheux, Kelley Klaver

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Driver Behavior at Rail Crossings: Cost-Effective Improvements to Increase Driver Safety at Public At-Grade Rail-Highway Crossings in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 5.1. Potential Rail Crossing19 DRIVER DECISIONS AT RAIL CROSSINGS: A CONCEPTUALFigure 1: Ten Year U.S. and California Rail-Highway Crossing

Cooper, Douglas L.; Ragland, David R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ethanol fuel modification for highway vehicle use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of problems that might occur if ethanol were used as a blending stock or replacement for gasoline in present cars are identified and characterized as to the probability of occurrence. The severity of their consequences is contrasted to those found with methanol in a previous contract study. Possibilities for correcting several problems are reported. Some problems are responsive to fuel modifications but others require or are better dealt with by modification of vehicles and the bulk fuel distribution system. In general, problems with ethanol in blends with gasoline were found to be less severe than those with methanol. Phase separation on exposure to water appears to be the major problem with ethanol/gasoline blends. Another potentially serious problem with blends is the illict recovery of ethanol for beverage usage, or bootlegging, which might be discouraged by the use of select denaturants. Ethanol blends have somewhat greater tendency to vapor lock than base gasoline but less than methanol blends. Gasoline engines would require modification to operate on fuels consisting mostly of ethanol. If such modifications were made, cold starting would still be a major problem, more difficult with ethanol than methanol. Startability can be provided by adding gasoline or light hydrocarbons. Addition of gasoline also reduces the explosibility of ethanol vapor and furthermore acts as denaturant.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid gasoline-electric vehicles (HEVs), “plug-in” HEVs, and advanced batter y-powered electric vehicles—

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An improved methodology for multi-criteria assessment of highway sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of sustainability has been widely discussed in relation to human activity and scientific development in recent times. There is an increased awareness of the current and future ramifications of people’s everyday activities on the environment, and sustainable development aims to mitigate these impacts, as well as promote social equity and economic efficiency. A majority of research concerned with transportation sustainability addresses it at the policy-planning level, though there have been recent attempts at quantitatively evaluating it. These evaluations are mostly based on multicriteria decision making processes using performance measures. However, the methods and the performance measures developed are often not geared toward being practically implemented within a transportation agency’s regular planning activities. This research effort seeks to improve upon existing sustainability evaluation processes for highways by proposing a methodology that addresses sustainability within the regular transportation planning paradigm, rather than as a separate concern. A more scientific approach to the scaling of various performance measures, as well as the evaluation of current and future planning scenarios on a common basis provides for an improved multi-criteria evaluation method. A case study was conducted using the proposed methodology for a section of US Highway 281 in San Antonio, Texas. The evaluation model developed in this study provides the basis for further research into applying decision-making processes to improve transportation sustainability by addressing some of the inherent drawbacks of existing research on sustainability evaluation.

Ramani, Tara Lakshmi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental planning and assessment for highway vehicle use of alcohol fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is assisting the Office of Transportation Programs of the U.S. DOE in performing the required environmental planning and assessment for highway vehicle alcohol fuel commercialization in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In this presentation the process for planning and assessment is given, specific documents resulting from the process are explained. NEPA requires an environmental impact statement (EIS) for every major federal action that may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Three types of environmental documents record this process: the Environmental Development Plan (EDP), the Environmental Assessment (EA) and the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The transportation EDP describes the energy conserving technologies; identifies and ranks environmental concerns; outlines strategies to resolve the concerns on a priority basis; and proposes a research program to implement the strategies. This is done annually for the division. In addition, environmental codumentation is scheduled for each technology as it reaches different stages of development. One major document is the EA, prepared when it is not clear whether an EIS is necessary. The information to make such a decision is collected in one detailed assessment of the technology or program. An EIS may then be written if impacts are expected to be significant. An EA is being performed for alcohol (neat and blends) fuels for highway vehicles by ANL.

Bernard, III, M J; Bevilaqua, O M

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the reported work were: to apply the stoichiometric compression ignition (SCI) concept to a 9.0 liter diesel engine; to obtain engine-out NO{sub x} and PM exhaust emissions so that the engine can meet 2010 on-highway emission standards by applying a three-way catalyst for NO{sub x} control and a particulate filter for PM control; and to simulate an optimize the engine and air system to approach 50% thermal efficiency using variable valve actuation and electric turbo compounding. The work demonstrated that an advanced diesel engine can be operated at stoichiometric conditions with reasonable particulate and NOx emissions at full power and peak torque conditions; calculated that the SCI engine will operate at 42% brake thermal efficiency without advanced hardware, turbocompounding, or waste heat recovery; and determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (<8 kPa) when sufficient NO{sub 2} (>120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of an optimal impact energy absorber for highway crash cushions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a new and efficient method of absorbing a vehicle??s kinetic energy for highway safety crash cushions. A vehicle that makes a direct impact with a rigid highway structure traveling at highway speeds can be fatal for its occupants. Crash cushions are implemented on roadways in front of these rigid structures with the intent to ??soften?? the impact. The cushion will bring a vehicle to a stop at safe rates before it impacts the rigid structure. The energy absorbing component of the crash cushion must meet four main requirements. The cushion must reduce the vehicles speed at a rate that does not allow the occupant to impact the vehicle interior at velocities greater than 12 m/s. The cushion must then bring the vehicle to a complete stop with deceleration rates below 20 g??s. A crash cushion must satisfy these requirements for an 820 kg vehicle and a 2000 kg vehicle traveling at 100 km/hr. Advanced design methodologies were applied to enable multiple, innovative design concepts. These concepts made use of the deformation of steel in structural pipe, structural angle, and structural plate to reduce the velocity of a vehicle at a safe rate. Critical design parameters were identified which allowed for efficient and effective numerical experiments to be conducted. The data collected from these experiments were then validated when compared to physical test data. After the data had been collected, each of the designs was compared to one another in order to decide upon the best design. The design selected was the deforming plate concept which makes use of steel plate mounted in a fashion that created two arms that acted similar to two cantilever beams. A wedge was forced beneath these arms deforming them upward. This design is effective because the deformation can be easily controlled by the thickness of the plate, the moment arm created by the wedge, and the geometry of the wedge. Steel plate is a readily available material that requires minimal manufacturing for installation preparation making it cost-effective, and easy to install. In the event of impact with the cushion, new parts will be inexpensive and readily available. Being reusable, easy to repair and low in cost, the energy absorbing concept presented herein is a cost effective alternative to existing energy absorbing technology. Due to replaceable parts being readily available, repair time and cost will be reduced compared to other designs that require new parts to be fabricated for replacement. This will make for a competitive design.

Michalec, Christopher Ryan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System. U.S. DOE,May. EIA (2001a) U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Recent Trends andD.C. , May. EIA (2001b) U.S. Natural Gas Markets: Mid-Term

McCarthy, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 11, DOE/AL68080-TSR11  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This eleventh quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2005, and covers activities in the eleventh project quarter, April 2005-June 2005.

Tim Richter

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 19, DOE/AL68080-TSR19  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This nineteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2007, and covers activities in the nineteenth project quarter, April 2007 – June 2007.

Tim Richter

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of the mobility impacts of proposed ramp metering and merge control systems : an Interstate 35 case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing demand on freeway facilities is a major challenge facing urban areas in the United States and throughout the world. Active Traffic Management (ATM) strategies… (more)

DeGaspari, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance: Phase 2 November 2004 Prepared by S. M. Chin O. Franzese D. L. Greene H. L. Hwang Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee R. C. Gibson The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Highway vehicle electric drive in the United States : 2009 status and issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of electric drive technology in the United States as of early 2010 is documented. Rapidly evolving electric drive technologies discussed include hybrid electric vehicles, multiple types of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles. Recent trends for hybrids are quantified. Various plug-in vehicles entering the market in the near term are examined. The technical and economic requirements for electric drive to more broadly succeed in a wider range of highway vehicle applications are described, and implications for the most promising new markets are provided. Federal and selected state government policy measures promoting and preparing for electric drive are discussed. Taking these into account, judgment on areas where increased Clean Cities funds might be most productively focused over the next five years are provided. In closing, the request by Clean Cities for opinion on the broad range of research needs providing near-term support to electric drive is fulfilled.

Santini, D. J.; Energy Systems

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Set of Comparable Carbon Footprints for Highway Travel in Metropolitan America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the development of a set of carbon dioxide emissions estimates for highway travel by automobile, truck, bus and other public transit vehicle movements within the nation s 100 largest metropolitan areas, in calendar year 2005. Considerable variability is found to exist across metropolitan areas when these greenhouse gas emissions are measured on a per capita and a per gross metropolitan product (GMP) basis. Least square regression modeling shows a relationship between emissions per capita and per GMP with truck traffic share, transit share, employment density, population dispersion within the metro area, and GMP per capita. As a result many of the nation s largest metropolitan areas tend to have lower CO2 emissions per capita and per GMP than smaller and more recently developed metro areas.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

2000 TMS Fall Meeting: General Travel Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The greater St. Louis area is easily reached via the four major interstate highways (70-44-55-64), the Lambert St. Louis International Airport, and Amtrak trains.

264

Clean Air Interstate Rule: Changes and Modeling in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On December 23, 2008, the D.C. Circuit Court remanded but did not vacate CAIR, overriding its previous decision on February 8, 2008, to remand and vacate CAIR. The December decision, which is reflected in AEO2010, allows CAIR to remain in effect, providing time for the EPA to modify the rule in order to address objections raised by the Court in its earlier decision. A similar rule, referred to as the CAMR, which was to set up a cap-and-trade system for reducing mercury emissions by approximately 70 percent, is not represented in the AEO2010 projections, because it was vacated by the D.C. Circuit Court in February 2008.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Automated Highway System Field Operational Tests For The State Of California: Potential Sites, Configurations And Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is included in the 1998 STIP, and the cost is estimatedas part of the 1996 STIP. The I-5 North Improvement ProjectSanta Fe Springs in the 1996 STIP. Truck lanes are proposed

Hall, Randolph W.; Thakker, Viral; Horan, Thomas A.; Glazer, Jesse; Hoene, Chris

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nominal o Field excitation, DC volts XBL 786-9048 Figure 13.JL- ..L. _ Induced volts per turn XBL 786-9054 Figuresystem efficiency vs induced volts per turn in coupling with

Bolger, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the pole was 18°C. 1/2 inch plywood 0.75 mm steel sheet \\the pickup resting in the plywood tray that was used forremoving the pickup from the plywood tray and resting it on

Bolger, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the push direction. Plywood wing walls hor. LVDT Vert.hor. LVDT Actuator 5 – hor. Plywood wing walls Figure 3.3.backfill. Side panels of plywood were erected to simulate

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Geotech. Engrg. ASCE, 120(8), 1307-1323. Gadre, A. andJ. Geotech. & Geoenv. Engrg. ASCE, 124(11), 1128-1138. Goel,Geotech. & Geoenv. Engrg. ASCE, 127(2), 0185-0192. Narain,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

Cobble, C.

1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage  

SciTech Connect

The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

Cobble, C.

1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

Consolidated Air Mobility Planning System (CAMPS): An Air Mobility Planning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the initial development of CAMPS was concluded and primary maintenance responsibility was turned over for Transportation Analysis (CTA) Research Areas Aviation Safety Air Traffic Management Analysis Data, Statistical Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management

273

Intelligent Transportation Systems - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligent Transportation Systems Intelligent Transportation Systems The Center for Transportation Analysis does specialty research and development in intelligent transportation systems. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are part of the national strategy for improving the operational safety, efficiency, and security of our nation's highways. Since the early 1990s, ITS has been the umbrella under which significant efforts have been conducted in research, development, testing, deployment and integration of advanced technologies to improve the measures of effectiveness of our national highway network. These measures include level of congestion, the number of accidents and fatalities, delay, throughput, access to transportation, and fuel efficiency. A transportation future that includes ITS will involve a significant improvement in these

274

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Central Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Central Region Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Central Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Exports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-two interstate and at least thirteen intrastate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operate in the Central Region (Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). Twelve interstate natural gas pipeline systems enter the region from the south and east while four enter from the north carrying Canadian supplies. The average utilization rates on those shipping Canadian natural gas tend to be higher than those carrying domestic supplies.

275

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

276

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

277

Biomass as a feedstock for highway vehicle fuels: a resource and availability survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study was initiated because of the recognized need to compile a concise description of biomass as an energy base for liquid transportation fuels (namely alcohols) for highway vehicles. The aim is to provide a brief familiarization of biomass-related terminology to those with limited technical background and to present a summary assessment of the potential that biomass can provide as a resource base for liquid transportation fuels. Biomass may play a significant role in supplying liquid fuels for transportation (indeed, for other sectors, as well), however, there are fundamental limitations imposed by the size of the biomass, resource, production and distribution economics, and the difficulty of ensuring sustained availability for an extended period of time. Bioconversion is one of a number of developing energy options that individually, may make relatively small contributions but in the aggregate, are likely to be significant. Thus, research and development related to fuels from biomass and their utilization continue to be major areas of activity sponsored by the Department of Energy.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Appendix A - Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A - ACRONYMS A - ACRONYMS AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials CNG Compressed Natural Gases CVO Commercial Vehicle Operation DOE Department of Energy DOT Department of Transportation E85 85% Ethanol, 15% Gasoline EPA Environmental Protection Agency ExFIRS Excise Files Information Retrieval System ExSTARS Excise Summary Terminal Activity Reporting System FHWA Federal Highway Administration FTA Federation of Tax Administrators GAO General Accounting Office HTF Highway Trust Fund IFTA International Fuel Tax Agreement IM Interstate Maintenance IRS Internal Revenue Service LNG Liquid Natural Gases LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gases M85 85% Methanol, 15% Gasoline MTBE Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether NHS National Highway System ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory STP Surface Transportation Program

279

VISION Model : description of model used to estimate the impact of highway vehicle technologies and fuels on energy use and carbon emissions to 2050.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The VISION model has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts to 2050 of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicle technologies and alternative fuels. DOE supports research of advanced transportation technologies (including fuels) and is frequently asked to provide estimates of the potential impacts of successful market penetration of these technologies, sometimes on a relatively quick-turnaround basis. VISION is a spreadsheet model in Microsoft Excel that can be used to respond rapidly to quick-turnaround requests, as well as for longer-term analyses. It uses vehicle survival and age-dependent usage characteristics to project total light and heavy vehicle stock, total vehicle miles of travel (VMT), and total energy use by technology and fuel type by year, given market penetration and vehicle energy efficiency assumptions developed exogenously. Total carbon emissions for on-highway vehicles by year are also estimated because life-cycle carbon coefficients for various fuels are included in VISION. VISION is not a substitute for the transportation component of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS incorporates a consumer choice model to project market penetration of advanced vehicles and alternative fuels. The projections are made within the context of the entire U.S. economy. However, the NEMS model is difficult to use on a quick-turnaround basis and only makes projections to 2025. VISION complements NEMS with its relative ''user-friendliness'' and by extending the time frame of potential analysis. VISION has been used for a wide variety of purposes. For illustration, we have listed some of its most recent and current uses in Table 1.1. Figures 1.1-1.3 illustrate the results of some of those runs. These graphs are not actual model output, but they are based on model results. The main body of this report describes VISION's methodology and data sources. The methodology and data sources used in the light- and heavy-vehicle portions of the model are discussed separately. Some suggestions for future improvements to the model are made. Appendix A provides instructions on how to run the VISION model. Appendix B describes the procedure for updating the model with the latest EIA Annual Energy Outlook (AEO).

Singh, M.; Vyas, A.; Steiner, E.

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Identification of potential strategies, methods, and tools for improving cost estimating practices for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project cost escalation is a major problem for State Highway Agencies (SHA). This problem is evident in cost estimating procedures that may not promote consistency and accuracy of costs over the project development process. The research proposes that a relationship exists between applying good estimating practices and minimizing cost escalation from the initial planning estimate to the engineer??s estimate at final design. The objective of this research is to develop a preliminary list of strategies, methods, and tools for project cost estimation practices aimed at achieving greater consistency and accuracy between the project development phases. A literature review was conducted that assisted in identifying factors that lead to the cost escalation of projects. The information from the literature was used to discover the core estimating assumptions that are the root causes behind cost escalation and lack of project estimate consistency and accuracy. After the cost escalation factors were determined, interviews with SHAs were conducted that lead to identifying unique and/or innovative approaches that will aid the SHAs in overcoming the cost escalation factors. The main methodology used to develop a potential list of strategies, methods, and tools was first focused on linking strategies to causes of cost escalation. Global strategies were identified by means of this approach. Methods and tools that would likely be effective in implementing the strategies are therefore directed at mitigating root causes of estimate problems in a focused approach. The strategies, methods, and tools are aligned with the project development phase where they would be implemented. Thus, a preliminary list of strategies, methods, and tools is provided in this study.

Donnell, Kelly Elaine

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720ďż˝ Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 ďż˝ the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle ďż˝ Fueling Infrastructure of the ďż˝ Interstate Clean Transportation ďż˝ Corridor Project ďż˝ April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates ďż˝ Santa Monica, California ďż˝ NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation

282

1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 Transmission Chapter DRAFT- September 18, 2008 NOTE: The purpose of this document is to seed discussion at the September 25-26, 2008 meeting of the DOE Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). It does not represent the views of all members of the DOE EAC. Dissents received by publication of this draft document are included at the end. 1. NATIONAL GOAL: A ROBUST INTERSTATE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION NETWORK THAT ENABLES OUR ELECTRICITY FUTURE The United States needs a national vision and policy to develop a robust interstate electric transmission system analogous to that of President Dwight Eisenhower when he enabled the development of a national interstate highway system over 50 years ago. Broad-scale planning historically has not been used for electric transmission because meeting larger, national needs

283

Projections of highway vehicle population, energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions in India through 2040.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents projections of motor vehicles, oil demand, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions for India through the year 2040. The populations of highway vehicles and two-wheelers are projected under three different scenarios on the basis of economic growth and average household size in India. The results show that by 2040, the number of highway vehicles in India would be 206-309 million. The oil demand projections for the Indian transportation sector are based on a set of nine scenarios arising out of three vehicle-growth and three fuel-economy scenarios. The combined effects of vehicle-growth and fuel-economy scenarios, together with the change in annual vehicle usage, result in a projected demand in 2040 by the transportation sector in India of 404-719 million metric tons (8.5-15.1 million barrels per day). The corresponding annual CO{sub 2} emissions are projected to be 1.2-2.2 billion metric tons.

Arora, S.; Vyas, A.; Johnson, L.; Energy Systems

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fuzzy logic system for variable message signs in Kuala Lumpur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent Transportation Systems refer to a wide variety of advanced and emerging technology applications designed mainly to reduce traffic congestion and emissions, and to improve highway efficiency, safety, and convenience. Variable message signs ... Keywords: fuzzy controller, fuzzy logic, intelligent transportation systems, variable message signs

Arash Moradkhani Roshandeh; Majid Joshani; Othman Che Puan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Survey of Recent Results in Networked Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVITED P A P E R A Survey of Recent Results in Networked Control Systems When sensors recent results on estimation, analysis, and controller synthesis for NCSs. The results surveyed address over the Internet [17], [19], [59], and automated highway systems and unmanned aerial vehicles [57

Schenato, Luca

287

RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7At 7At a z'/a tlYr'/ ORNL/RASA-85/ 42 RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR Accesr to thc inlormalion in thlt rcport is limitcd to tho!. indacatod on the di3tribution lilt and to oopartmont ot Encrgy lnd Oeplrtmcnt of Enorgy Contracton vd' This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U nited States Government. N€ither the U nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied' or assum€s any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness' or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not inf ringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

288

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

289

Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

Hitchcock, David

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development of a right-of-way cost estimation and cost estimate management process framework for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escalation of right-of-way (ROW) costs have been shown to be a prime contributor to project cost escalation in the highway industry. Two problems contribute to ROW cost escalation: 1) the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process generally lacks structure and definition as compared to other areas of cost estimation; and 2) there is a lack of integration and communication between those responsible for ROW cost estimating and those responsible for general project cost estimating. The research for this thesis was preceded by a literature review to establish the basis for the study. Data collection was completed through interviews of seven state highway agencies (SHAs) and two local public agencies (LPAs). The findings of the research are presented in a set of ROW flowcharts which document the steps, inputs, and outputs of the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process. Three ROW cost estimates and a cost management process take place throughout project development. An effort was made from the onset of the research to relate the ROW cost estimating and cost estimate management process to the first four project development phases (planning, programming. preliminary design, and final design). There are five flowcharts produced as a result of this research: 1) an agency-level flowchart showing all cost estimates and the interaction of ROW with the project development process; 2) a conceptual ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during planning; 3) a baseline ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during programming; 4) an update ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during preliminary design to include a cost estimate management loop; and 5) a ROW cost management flowchart which depicts the required steps during final design. Although selected SHA contacts provided input following the development of the flowcharts, the flowcharts were only validated to a limited extent due to time and budget constraints. These flowcharts attempt to address the two contributing problems to ROW cost escalation by providing structure to the ROW cost estimation process and by developing the ROW process flowcharts linked to the project development process. Based on the input provided by SHA contacts, the flowcharts appear to have the potential to provide guidance to SHAs in improving the accuracy of ROW cost estimates through addressing these two problems.

Lucas, Matthew Allen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Highway 407Highway 407 Matt Morioka,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Excellence Silver Award - Service Delivery (2008) The Canadian Council for Public-Private Partnerships Council for Public-Private Partnerships #12;THANK YOUTHANK YOU #12;

Prevedouros, Panos D.

292

Testing and Evaluation of Robust Fault Detection and Identification for a Fault Tolerant Automated Highway System: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report Robert H. Chen, Hok K. Ng, Jason L. Speyer, D. Lewis4209 Robert H. Chen, Hok K. Ng, Jason L. Speyer and D. Lewis4209 Robert H. Chen, Hok K. Ng, Jason L. Speyer and D. Lewis

Chen, Robert H.; Ng, Hok K.; Speyer, Jason L.; Mingori, D. Lewis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE ADVANCED SENSING TECHNOLOGIES AND ADVANCED REPAIR MATERIALS FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE: WATER SYSTEMS, DAMS, LEVEES, BRIDGES, ROADS, AND HIGHWAYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology (NIST) was established for the purpose of assisting U.S. businesses and institutions of higher education or other organizations, such as national laboratories and nonprofit research institutions, to support, promote, and accelerate innovation in the United States through highrisk, high-reward research in areas of Critical National Need (CNN). Areas of Critical National Need are those areas that justify government attention because the magnitude of the problem is large and societal challenges that can be overcome with technology are not being sufficiently addressed. TIP seeks to support accelerating high-risk, transformative research targeted to address key societal challenges. Funding selections will be merit-based, and may be provided to industry (small and medium-sized businesses), universities, and consortia. The primary mechanism for this support is cost-shared cooperative agreements awarded on the basis of merit competitions.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Full Scale Cyclic Large Deflection Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part I: Drilled Shaft Foundations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.K. (2003). “Teaching B-Splines Is Not Difficult! ,” SIGCSE127 Figure 5.4. B-splines fitted to curvature strains for5.17. Curvature and moment B-spline fits; differentiation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Full Scale Cyclic Large Deflection Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part I: Drilled Shaft Foundations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms - Working Stressfoundation piles for offshore platforms. Only the second set

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Full Scale Cyclic Large Deflection Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part I: Drilled Shaft Foundations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Columns. ” J. Struct. Div. , ASCE, 108(ST4), 929-950. Reese,J. Geotech. and Geoenv. Eng. , ASCE, 132(10), 1262-1271.J. Geotech. and Geoenv. Eng. , ASCE 132(10), 1272-1283.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Highway Electrification And Automation Technologies - Regional Impacts Analysis Project: Phase Iii: Impacts Analysis Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ross Industries, Inc. (1991c). P Electric Vehicle Project -Industries, Inc. (1991b). Plava Vista: Roadwav Powered Electric Vehicleelectric vehicles. Such develop- ments would necessitate provision of complete production systems that would integrate local industries,

Scag; Path

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hi h Fi 101Hi h Fi 101Highway Finance 101:Highway Finance 101: Where Does the Money Come From?Where Does the Money Come From?Where Does the Money Come From?Where Does the Money Come From?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revenue Sources State Motor Fuels TaxesFuels Taxes Federal Motor Fuels Taxes State Highway Fund Vehicle State Taxes Gasoline 20 0 cents per gallon yy Gasoline 20.0 cents per gallon Diesel 20.0 cents per gallon Federal Taxes Gasoline 18.4 cents per gallonp g Diesel 22.4 cents per gallon Total Fuel Tax Paid

299

Hybrid fuels for highway transportation. Second annual technical progress report for the period 1 June 1979-1 June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program has been developed to investigate the potential of hybrid fuels for use in highway transportation. Hybrids are fuels derived from combinations of readily available energetic non-conventional materials with petroleum. They are generally formulated as solutions, emulsions, or slurries. The underlying objective of the program is to reduce the use of petroleum-derived fuels and/or to minimize the processing requirements of the finished hybrid fuels. During the first year of the program, extensive work was done on the development and testing of water and alcohol emulsions and alcohol solutions. In the second year, the emphasis was placed on the development and testing of hybrid fuel slurries. Components evaluated included carbohydrates and various forms of carbon. It was concluded that, of the slurries tested, the carbon (coke, carbon black, etc.) slurries have the most potential for development into finished fuels. The efforts during the third year will concentrate on advancing the development of the slurries (especially the carbon slurries) to the same point as the solutions and emulsions. This work will include examination of the mechanical difficulties, the stability problems, and the combustion phenomena observed when using slurries in heat engines.

Ryan, T.W.; Likos, W.; Moses, C.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interstate Natural Gas Pipelines (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute confers upon the Utilities Board the authority to act as an agent of the federal government in determining pipeline company compliance with federal standards within the boundaries of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FURANS) 1200 °C 2000 °C 70 °C Quench Degassing channel Gasifier Waste carries dioxins, furans Total destruction Waste Throughput [Mg/h] GasifierGrossLoad[MW] 13 MJ/kg14 MJ/kg THERMOSELECTTHERMOSELECT ­ GASIFIER

Columbia University

302

Biometric Quality Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3. Interstate Photo System (IPS) Enhancements • (Mugshots with Scars, Marks, & Tatoos) 4. Disposition Reporting Improvements (DRI) ...

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links. Overview Twenty-six interstate and at ...

304

Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Market Trends 2009, 2010, Interstate Renewable EnergyMarket-Trends-Report- 2010_7-27-10_web1.pdf Solar Energy

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Missouri State Highway Patrol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tubes containing formamide must not be autoclaved ... moves sample from the sample tube into the ... The software will flag any discrepancies between ...

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

OpenEI - highway  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm1990 en DOT rate and revenues summary to 1995 http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode148

The data included in this submission is United...

307

Highway Electrification And Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

83 amp-hours of battery capacity (about one-seventh of itsincorporates a new, lower-capacity battery, together withcapacity of the vehicle’ onboard energy storage s device (battery).

Shladover, Steven E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hybrid Radiator-Cooling System  

Technology Development & Commercialization Current Challenges Coolant radiators in highway trucks are designed to transfer maximum heat at a ...

309

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Region Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving any region (see Table below). Slightly more than half the capacity entering the region is on natural gas pipeline systems that carry natural gas from the Rocky Mountain area and the Permian and San Juan basins. These latter systems enter the region at the New Mexico-Arizona and Nevada-Utah State lines. The rest of the capacity arrives on natural gas pipelines that access Canadian natural gas at the Idaho and Washington State border crossings with British Columbia, Canada.

310

Railroad accident report: Head-on collision between Iowa Interstate Railroad Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East with release of hazardous materials near Altoona, Iowa, on July 30, 1988. Irregular report  

SciTech Connect

About 11:40 a.m. central daylight saving time on July 30, 1988, Iowa Interstate Railroad Ltd. (IAIS) freight trains Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East collided head on within the yard limits of Altoona, Iowa, about 10 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa. All 5 locomotive units from both trains; 11 cars of Extra 406 East; and 3 cars, including two tank cars containing denatured alcohol, of Extra 470 West derailed. The denatured alcohol, which was released through the pressure relief valves and the manway domes of the two derailed tank cars, was ignited by the fire resulting from the collision of the locomotives. Both crew members of Extra 470 West were fatally injured; the two crew members of Extra 406 East were only slightly injured. The estimated damage (including lading) as a result of this accident exceeded $1 million. The major safety issues in the accident include operational methods employed by the IAIS, training and selection of train and engine personnel, supervisory oversight by the IAIS, design of closure fittings on hazardous materials rail tanks, and oversight of regional railroads by the Federal Railroad Administration.

Not Available

1989-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESD/04-1 ESD/04-1 VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050 Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

312

SYSTEM DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RECENT DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM COMPUTER UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This operating year marks an upgrade to the computer system charged with control and data acquisition for neutral beam injection system's heating at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, funded by the US Department of Energy and operated by General Atomics (GA). This upgrade represents the third and latest major revision to a system which has been in service over twenty years. The first control and data acquisition computers were four 16 bit mini computers running a proprietary operating system. Each of the four controlled two ion source over dedicated CAMAC highway. In a 1995 upgrade, the system evolved to be two 32 bit Motorola mini-computers running a version of UNIX. Each computer controlled four ion sources with two CAMAC highways per CPU. This latest upgrade builds on this same logical organization, but makes significant advances in cost, maintainability, and the degree to which the system is open to future modification. The new control and data acquisition system is formed of two 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 based PC's, running the LINUX operating system. Each PC drives two CAMAC serial highways using a combination of Kinetic Systems PCI standard CAMAC Hardware Drivers and a low-level software driver written in-house expressly for this device. This paper discusses the overall system design and implementation detail, describing actual operating experience for the initial six months of operation.

PHILLIPS,J.C; PENAFLOR,B.G; PHAM,N.Q; PIGLOWSKI,D.A

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) User's Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportation Routing Analysis Geographic Information System (TRAGIS) model is used to calculate highway, rail, or waterway routes within the United States. TRAGIS is a client-server application with the user interface and map data files residing on the user's personal computer and the routing engine and network data files on a network server. The user's manual provides documentation on installation and the use of the many features of the model.

Johnson, PE

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7, DOE/AL68080-TSR07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis and results show hybrid system weight and efficiency affect productivity and fuel usage. Analysis shows equivalent hybrid benefits for adjacent size classes of mine truck. Preparations are ongoing for full power test. The battery cycling test protocol was modified.

Lembit Salasoo

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Developing usable and robust mixed reality systems requires unique human–computer interaction techniques and customized hardware systems. The design of the hardware is directed by the requirements of the rich 3D interactions that can be performed using immersive mobile MR systems. Geometry modeling and capture, navigational annotations, visualizations, and training simulations are all enhanced using augmented computer graphics. We present the design guidelines that have led us through 10 years of evolving mobile outdoor MR hardware systems.

Benjamin Avery; Ross T. Smith; Wayne Piekarski; Bruce H. Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation than air or HSR, but the opportunities to recover some of these social coststransportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,transportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994. Vaca, Erin. Intercity Rail Ridership Forecasting andImplementation of High-Speed Rail in California. UniversityOffice. Intercity Passenger Rail: Financial and Operating

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Assessment of the Applicability of Cooperative Vehicle-Highway Automation Systems to Bus Transit and Intermodal Freight: Case Study Feasibility Analyses in the Metropolitan Chicago Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avenue from Austin to Michigan, Pavement markings, LastCenter, Navy Pier, North Michigan Avenue, State Street, thes. It would extend from Michigan Avenue to Clinton Street,

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gallon) ($ millions) MOTOR FUEL TAX Gasoline tax Diesel fuelExcise taxes Gasoline Gasohol Diesel Special Motor fuelsand tax credits) Diesel powered vehicle rebate Diesel fuel used in buses Diesel fuel-other Special motor fuel Gasohol Gasoline

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sector sector NSTB November 2008 Hank Kenchington - Program Manager Office of Electricity of Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector * 2,000,000 Miles of Oil Pipelines * 1,300,000 Miles of Gas Pipelines * 2,000 Petroleum Terminals * ~1,000,000 Wells * Extensive Ports, Refineries, Transportation, and LNG Facilities * 160,000 Miles of Electrical Transmission lines * ~17,000 Generators; 985,000 Megawatts (net summer capacity) * Over 3,100 Electric Utilities, with 131 million customers Refinery Locations, Crude and Product Pipelines Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil & Gas LNG Import Facilities (Reactivation underway) Legend Interstate Pipelines Intrastate and Other Pipelines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... interstate pipeline companies rely heavily on underground storage to facilitate load balancing and system ... costs. "Open Access ... independent operators ...

322

Energy Information Administration - Natural Gas Glossary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System 143 Glossary Abandonment: Regulatory permission to ...

323

Corporate Realignments and Investments in the Interstate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Monthly October 1999 viii no longer were sellers of natural gas, the revised rate design allowed them to ...

324

Competitive interstate taxation of western coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the potential market power of western states in setting coal severance taxes. An attempt to determine the emphasis placed by the western states on the development of their coal resources is also made. Three market structures are analyzed. One involves a western regional cartel, setting taxes collectively. The other cases are noncooperative tax equilibria with Montana and Wyoming competing against each other. We study the effects on these equilibria of changes in each region's relative emphasis on development of coal resources vs tax revenue. The welfare impacts of these tax setting policies are also addressed. The analysis is based on an activity analysis of US coal markets. The results show that the taxes associated with the noncooperative competitive tax equilibria are close to present tax levels. Additionally, we conclude that western states currently are quite efficient extractors of economic rent from coal produced within their boundaries, in terms of welfare loss per dollar of tax revenue collected. 2 figures.

Kolstad, C.D.; Wolak, F.A. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Interstate Bank Building Fire Los Angeles 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Special emphasis is given to burning rate of building furnishings, smoke layer temperature, layer level, oxygen consumption, combustion efficiency ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Federal Highway Administration Exploratory Advanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Leverage NIST knowledge and capabilities in task analysis, perception, autonomous ... The scenario calls for the use of color camera information ...

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Durability of Highway Concrete Pavements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ASR affects the shale and an occasional quartz sand grain in the fine aggregate, but is not deemed to be a significant cause of the deterioration. ...

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

Farmer, J C

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Feasibility of a driver performance data acquisition system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) envisions many future situations in which the effectiveness and consequences of new intelligent vehicle-highway systems technologies will need to be studied in actual production vehicles. Such studies will enable evaluations in vehicles which are familiar to drivers. These studies would be future enhanced by the availability of an instrumentation package that can be easily installed in these vehicles to enable specific vehicle configurations of interest to be evaluated, thereby increasing the variety of vehicle options that are available for study. Ideally, an approach is needed that would allow data collection from a variety of vehicle models and types, and would address the issue of driver familiarity. Such an approach is embodied in the concept of a driver performance data acquisition system that could be installed in a wide range of vehicles within a relatively short period of time. As a universally adaptable system, it would provide researchers with the ability to manually input data as well as directly record information on driver, vehicle, roadway, and environmental parameters. Furthermore, it would enable the measurement of driver performance in the driver`s own vehicle, thereby ensuring vehicle familiarity. In addition, it would be possible to measure driver performance in relation to any vehicle design characteristic at relatively little expense and effort, and would make it easy to update existing models of driver/vehicle behavior to reflect performance characteristics in vehicles of current manufacture.

Carter, R.J.; Spelt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goodman, M.J. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Crash Avoidance Research

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.8 Active Solar Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Number of Installations 6,873 7,718 Source(s): Sherwood, Larry. Interstate Renewable Energy Council. Personal Communication. Febuary, 13, 2012. 1256.7 2150.0 9,576 14,597 18,970...

331

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Southwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southwest Region Overview | Export Transportation | Intrastate | Connection to Gulf of Mexico | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Most of the major onshore interstate natural gas pipeline companies (see Table below) operating in the Southwest Region (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) are primarily exporters of the region's natural gas production to other parts of the country and Mexico, while an extensive Gulf of Mexico and intrastate natural gas pipeline network is the main conduit for deliveries within the region. More than 56,000 miles of natural gas pipeline on more than 66 intrastate natural gas pipeline systems (including offshore-to-onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico pipelines) deliver natural gas to the region's local natural gas distribution companies and municipalities and to the many large industrial and electric power facilities located in the region.

332

Wind Energy Systems Technology LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Technology LLC Systems Technology LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wind Energy Systems Technology LLC Name Wind Energy Systems Technology LLC Address 17350 State Highway 249 Place Houston, Texas Zip 78701 Sector Wind energy Product Offshore wind project development, EPC contracting, distributed wind generation (hybrid) Website http://www.windenergypartners. Coordinates 29.957211°, -95.541563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.957211,"lon":-95.541563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Steven Chu, Secretary Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 28, 2011 October 28, 2011 RE: Recommendations on U. S. Grid Security _________________________________________________________________________ Introduction The US economy and life as we know it are becoming much more dependent on electricity and it is a fundamental responsibility of government to ensure our national security. Certainly, 100% security cannot be guaranteed or afforded, but the grid can be hardened in smart ways over time as the electric industry replaces aging assets and deploys new assets. As we have built national security into the interstate highway system over time, we should do the same for the grid. Short, aggressive time lines are not recommended so as not to unduly burden consumers. The electric industry has performed admirably to restore the grid for hurricanes and other

334

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Navy (Lead Agency) the Navy (Lead Agency) Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Department of Energy (Cooperating Agency) - DOE/EIS-0251 Prepared in accordance with: National Environmental Policy Act Section 102 (2) (C) FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR A CONTAINER SYSTEM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF NAVAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL Contact: William Knoll Department of the Navy Code NAVSEA 08U 2531 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, VA 22242-5160 Telephone Number: 703-602-8229 Abstract: This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination. It supersedes the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel dated May 1996.

335

NREL: Learning - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video (Text Version) Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems Video (Text Version) This is the text version for the Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems video. The video opens with an image of a dark red flower, trembling in the breeze. It pulls out to a shot of grass-covered hills. Finally, it turns to an image of a truck driving down a highway. (Voiceover) It is one of our greatest challenges: to steer the future of transportation in a more secure, sustainable direction. The video follows a presentation given outside the NREL campus. Several people are sitting outside in rows of chairs, listening to NREL's Director speak from behind a podium. Dan Arvizu, NREL Director: "Today we launch the NREL vehicle test fleet." The video fades in to an image of researchers walking through a parking lot

336

Transportation Routing Analysis Georgraphic Information System (WebTRAGIS) User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1980s, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed two transportation routing models: HIGHWAY, which predicts truck transportation routes, and INTERLINE, which predicts rail transportation routes. Both of these models have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) community for a variety of routing needs over the years. One of the primary uses of the models has been to determine population-density information, which is used as input for risk assessment with the RADTRAN model, which is available on the TRANSNET computer system. During the recent years, advances in the development of geographic information systems (GISs) have resulted in increased demands from the user community for a GIS version of the ORNL routing models. In April 1994, the DOE Transportation Management Division (EM-261) held a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session with transportation routing experts and users of the HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models. As a result of the session, the development of a new GIS routing model, Transportation Routing Analysis GIS (TRAGIS), was initiated. TRAGIS is a user-friendly, GIS-based transportation and analysis computer model. The older HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models are useful to calculate routes, but they cannot display a graphic of the calculated route. Consequently, many users have experienced difficulty determining the proper node for facilities and have been confused by or have misinterpreted the text-based listing from the older routing models. Some of the primary reasons for the development of TRAGIS are (a) to improve the ease of selecting locations for routing, (b) to graphically display the calculated route, and (c) to provide for additional geographic analysis of the route.

Michelhaugh, R.D.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Systems, 2008 (Ranked by system capacity) Pipeline Name Market Regions Served Primary...

338

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. (Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada)); Dzieciuch, M. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. [Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada); Dzieciuch, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel, Chesapeake, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 4725 W. Military Highway, Chesapeake, Virginia, is presented. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately four (4) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. As called for in the proposal to DOE, the success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel, Chesapeake, Virginia. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 4725 W. Military Highway, Chesapeake, Virginia, is presented. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately four (4) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. As called for in the proposal to DOE, the success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

EIA - Daily Report 9/29/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

49.51. Gasoline (c/gal ... of its interstate natural gas transmission systems located in the Gulf Coast area and identified minimal damage from Hurricane ...

343

Agenda for San Francisco Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Cooperative Greg Peiper, Director, Transmission Systems Operations Center, Xcel Energy Manny Rahman, Manager, Transmission Interstate Planning, AEP 4:00 - 4:30 pm...

344

Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model for delivery system component costs and performance: Components Model Delivery scenario model for Urban and Rural Interstate markets and demand levels (Mkt....

345

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tools related to the electric power  industry and its 2003.   American Electric Power.  Interstate transmission by  Means  of  Enhanced  Electric  Power  Systems  Control: 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind, and solar thermal water heating systems. Natural gas customers qualify for the solar thermal water heating reward. October 16, 2013 Alliant Energy Interstate Power and...

347

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind, and solar thermal water heating systems. Natural gas customers qualify for the solar thermal water heating reward. July 12, 2013 Alliant Energy Interstate Power and...

348

Hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems for transportation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system that is fueled directly by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The performance was simulated using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The results indicate that, at the design point for a 50-kW PEFC system, the system efficiency is above 50%. The efficiency improves at partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the voltage-current characteristic curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and, eventually, the fuel cell. The results also indicate that the PEFC system can start rapidly from ambient temperatures. Depending on the specific weight of the fuel cell (1.6 kg/kW in this case), the system takes up to 180s to reach its design operating conditions. The PEFC system has been evaluated for three mid-size vehicles: the 1995 Chrysler Sedan, the near-term Ford AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, and the future P2000 vehicle. The results show that the PEFC system can meet the demands of the Federal Urban Driving Schedule and the Highway driving cycles, for both warm and cold start-up conditions. The results also indicate that the P2000 vehicle can meet the fuel economy goal of 80 miles per gallon of gasoline (equivalent).

Ahluwalia, R.; Doss, E.D.; Kumar, R.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

349

Idling - cruising the fuel inefficiency highway.  

SciTech Connect

What is the purpose of idling? The scale of idling can be small, as when parents idle their vehicles while waiting for their children outside of school, or it can be large, as when ocean liners are in port. In many cases, the primary purpose for idling is to control the temperature of a passenger or freight compartment. Large line-haul trucks idle overnight to keep fuel and the engine warm, for the resting driver's comfort, to mask out noises and smells, and for safety. In addition, all classes of trucks idle during the workday at ports and terminals, busy delivery sites, border crossings, and other work sites. They may be idling to enable slow movement in a queue (creep idling) or to provide other services. Bus drivers also idle their vehicles while they wait for passengers and to warm up in the morning. Even locomotive engines are idled so they start, for hotel load, to keep the battery charged, to keep the toilet water from freezing, and for air brakes, or because the operator idles out of habit. Although this document focuses on long-haul trucks, much of the information applies to other vehicles as well. The impacts of idling are substantial, with as much as 6 billion gallons of fuel burned unnecessarily each year in the United States at a cost of over $20 billion. The extra hours of engine operation also cost the owners money for more frequent maintenance and overhauls. In addition, idling vehicles emit particulates (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). These emissions, along with noise from idling vehicles, have led to many local and state restrictions on idling. Two main factors have combined to create a surge of interest in idling reduction (IR): (1) Increasing restrictions on idling for heavy vehicles and (2) The price of diesel fuel. Because stakeholders focus their efforts on improving different factors (air quality, fuel economy, noise level), they do not necessarily agree on the most advantageous technological alternatives to implement. In addition, although many equipment manufacturers have tried to educate customers and government agencies, they often provide conflicting claims about the comparative merits of different devices. This makes it difficult for truck owners to choose the right equipment for their needs. In this study, we present the first comparison of IR technologies with each other and with idling on the basis of both costs and full fuel-cycle emissions, for different locations, fuel prices, and idling patterns. The preferences described are for the technologies that reduce total emissions the most and cost truck owners the least. We also discuss how regulatory issues and legislation affect IR, what financial incentives help to promote IR, and how outreach and education approaches can be adopted to reduce the need to idle. Finally, we offer a prediction of how future research and development (R&D), regulations, and citizen involvement can help to improve fuel economy and clean the air.

Gaines, L.; Levinson, T. (Energy Systems); (DOE)

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Deterioration of Iowa Highway Concrete Pavements: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Coarse aggregate is a crushed limestone and the sand is a blend of quartz, feldspar, and shale. Occasional cracking related ...

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

UTC Power Corporation 195 Governor's Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Business Finance The UTC Power Advantage Strained Utility Grid, unreliable power · Significant Energy/7 Power and Heating Demand Supermarkets Hospitals Hotels Bio-tech/Industrial Bottling Educational Institutions Mixed Use Utilities #12;Paul J. Rescsanski, Manager, Business Finance Flexible fuel cell

352

Manual on Subsurface Investigations National Highway Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AT THE SCHWARZE PUMPE POWER STATION IN GERMANY ..................................................... 56 FIGURE 7-5. THE DOE CARBON SEQUESTRATION PROGRAM ROADMAP FROM 2012 TO 2022 ...................... 68 FIGURE 8-6. DOE result in cost increases rather than decreases). A number of R&D programs emphasize the need for lower

Mayne, Paul W.

353

Shoreline monitoring program on the Upper Texas Coast utilizing a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to shoreline erosion, approximately seventeen miles of Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County Texas, have been repeatedly destroyed by storms and rebuilt. This thesis describes a shoreline monitoring program developed to obtain a comprehensive data set that will be used to define the coastal erosion problem and assist in the reconstruction of the roadway. An improved survey system similar to a concept developed by Beach et al. (1996) was designed and constructed for this project. This thesis discusses the improved survey system design and testing. The nearshore system utilizes a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS) mounted on a personal watercraft and integrated with a survey quality echo sounder. The nearshore system was tested by repeating transects in the nearshore. The repeatability of the profiles demonstrated a standard deviation of 6.2 cm from the mean absolute difference of 8.0 cm. The beach survey utilizes RTK-DGPS equipment carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The maximum expected error for the beach survey is approximately []4 cm. The system is an accurate, mobile and efficient method to obtain beach profiles. Additional accuracy may be obtained by integrating a motion sensor and CTD profiler. The survey data are processed using commercially available software packages and programs developed for this project. The processed data is integrated and stored in a geographic information system (GIS). The data collected exemplify morphological features indicative of erosion due to overwash. This is consistent with visual observations and numerical model results provided by Howard (1999). The shoreline movement since 1996 is consistent with historical data and is related to storm events. The current research has provided a survey system capable of performing fast, accurate surveys in the nearshore and a baseline data set. The survey system is fully operational and will be instrumental in the ongoing research related to the Highway 87 reconstruction project. The baseline data set, together with sediment analyses data and water level predictions, provides the foundation from which further investigations will be conducted and will provide information that can be used for the design of the new highway.

Wamsley, Ty V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Michigan Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

942,159 1,135,780 1,042,778 1,495,917 1,355,745 1,516,628 1,452,628 1,306,417 1,384,456 2000's 1,409,122 1,737,786 1,593,684 1,845,900 1,840,621 1,751,926 1,726,790 1,748,816...

355

Connecticut Natural Gas Interstate Receipts (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

342,482 383,598 2000's 427,221 369,145 401,453 390,760 392,087 429,895 454,051 491,456 461,815 487,054 2010's 558,082 606,521 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA ...

356

Rhode Island Natural Gas Interstate Deliveries (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-8 Year-9 1980's 111,986 1990's 103,518 110,202 132,486 96,034 125,766 151,700 136,456 123,040 106,096 84,335 2000's 83,200 78,416 75,321 104,882 75,750 82,314 100,658...

357

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Heaters, Windows, Whole House Fans, Room Air Conditioners, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility...

358

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmable Thermostats, Refrigerators, Water Heaters, Windows, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility...

359

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Refrigeration Equipment, Food Service Equipment, Room Air Conditioners, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heaters, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes...

360

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1, 2001. Renters need owner's prior approval (Alliant Energy can contact owner). A Home Energy Audit must be completed before new insulation is installed. Maximum Incentive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are available for windowssashes, programmable thermostats, water heaters, furnaces, boilers, and custom measures. Heating incentives vary by the efficiency of the installed...

362

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Construction: 600-3500home Home Energy Audit: Free Boilers: 150 or 400 depending on AFUE Furnaces: 250 or 400 depending on AFUE Programmable...

363

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat pumps, Lighting, Programmable Thermostats, Refrigerators, Water Heaters, Windows, Room Air Conditioners, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Appliance Recycling, Home Energy...

364

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chillers, Doors, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Programmable Thermostats, Water Heaters, Windows, Tankless Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

365

Corporate Realignments and Investments in the Interstate Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

local natural gas sales and distribution services. ... "Consolidated Natural Gas Announces Amended Merger Agreement with Dominion Resources" (May 11, 1999).

366

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residences, farms or ag-related businesses are eligible if Alliant Energy supplies the electricity or natural gas on a retail rate basis for the applicable technology. Interest...

367

Interstate Receipts of Natural Gas (Annual Supply & Disposition...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View...

368

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermostats: 25 Tank Water Heater: 50 Heat Pump Water Heater: 100 CeilingFoundationWall Insulation: 70% of total installation cost up to 750 CaulkingWeather Stripping: 70%...

369

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient New Construction: 600-3500home Home Energy Audit: Free CFLs: 50% of cost LED Bulbs: 10 Light Fixtures or Fan: 20unit Water Heaters: 50 Programmable Thermostat: 25...

370

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Farm Energy Audit: Free Automatic Milker Takeoffs: 5cow Dairy Scroll Compressor: 250 Heat...

371

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Solar PV: 1.25kWh x estimated first year output Standard Solar PV: 0.75kWh x estimated...

372

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program Info State...

373

P-3 P -6 P-8 From Interstate 270  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Morris University Center (MUC) 9. Art and Design (AD) & Art and Design West (ADW) 10. Religious Center University Park 38. Library Storage Facility (LS) 39. Swimming Pool (SW) 40. Heating & Refrigeration Plant

Song, Myung-Sin

374

Distributional implications of reducing interstate energy price differences  

SciTech Connect

A model of state residential energy consumption for electricity, natural gas, and petroleum examines scenarios which reflect the response to a reduction in regional price differences attributable to deregulation. The results indicate that natural gas deregulation will benefit eastern and northwestern consumers at the expense of middle and western consumers. The deregulation of bulk electric power also benefits the east coast, but rising electricity prices would outweigh any benefits for the northwest. In contrast, electricity producers in the west have the most to gain from deregulation of bulk power transmissions because of the opportunities of a national market. A deregulated environment will likely have less dramatic distributional consequences from future energy price shocks, while increased fuel competition will probably limit price movements in any one fuel. 3 figures, 5 tables.

Schmidt, R.H.; Gunther, J.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Savings Homes Vehicles Building Design Manufacturing National Security & Safety Energy Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science &...

376

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate See program web site Program...

377

Colorado's Prospects for Interstate Commerce in Renewable Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by WestConnect and NREL. The consulting firm Black & Veatch conducted much of the analysis for WGA. NREL's Debra Lew and Michael Milligan provided crucial guidance on WWSIS,...

378

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: 100 Refrigerator Replacement: 50 Dishwasher Replacement: 20 Freezer: 25 Room Air Conditioner: 25 Water Heater: 50 Electric...

379

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Business and Farm...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of either the estimated first year output in kilowatt hours (kWh) or the optimal annual energy usage of the facility in kWh as follows: Standard PV: The lesser of estimated first...

380

Clean Air Interstate Rule (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CAIR is a cap-and-trade program promulgated by the EPA in 2005, covering 28 eastern U.S. States and the District of Columbia [29]. It was designed to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in order to help States meet their National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) and to further emissions reductions already achieved through the Acid Rain Program and the NOx State Implementation Plan call program. The rule was set to commence in 2009 for seasonal and annual NOx emissions and in 2010 for SO2 emissions.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Residential Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Solar PV: 1.25kWh x estimated first year output Standard Solar PV: 0.75kWh x estimated...

382

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Attic and Wall Insulation: 1000 Program Information Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate...

383

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Maximum Rebate CaulkingWeather Stripping: 200 CeilingFoundationWall Insulation: 750 Program Information Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount...

384

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

150 or 400 Programmable Thermostat: 25 WindowsSash: 20 Custom: Based on Annual Energy Dollar Savings Equipment Requirements Boilers (< 300,000 Btu): AFUE 85% Furnaces (<...

385

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amount New Construction: Varies, see program web site Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings Food Service Equipment: 200 - 500 Commercial Refrigeration Equipment: 75...

386

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Custom: Based on Annual Dollar Energy Savings New Construction: 0.60 - 1.90Therm, plus modeling and design assistance...

387

Knowledge-based system for design of signalized intersections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For an efficient traffic operation in intelligent highway systems, traffic signals need to respond to the changes in roadway and traffic demand. The phasing and timing of traffic signals requires the use of heuristic rules of thumb to determine what phases are needed and how the green time should be assigned to them. Because of the need for judgmental knowledge in solving this problem, this study has used knowledge-based expert-system technology to develop a system for the phasing and signal timing (PHAST) of an isolated intersection. PHAST takes intersection geometry and traffic volume as input and generates appropriate phase plan, cycle length, and green time for each phase. The phase plan and signal timing change when intersection geometry or traffic demand changes. This paper describes the intended system functionality, the system architecture, the knowledge used to phase and time an intersection, the implementation of the system, and system verification. PHAST's performance was validated using phase plans and timings of several intersections.

Linkenheld, J.S. (Triton Consulting Engineers, Ltd., Schaumburg, IL (US)); Benekohal, R.F. (Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (US)); Garrett, J.H. Jr. (Dept. of Civil Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Integrated Hydrogen and Intelligent Transportation Systems Evaluation for the California Department of Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Florida Energy Office, Hydrogen Programs Manager, June 27.Agency (2005a). California Hydrogen Blueprint Plan: Volume1 Final Report,” California Hydrogen Highway Network, May.

Lipman, Timothy; Shaheen, Susan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ORNL light-duty vehicles PC system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data system, designed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), monitors information on every light-duty vehicle (automobiles and light-duty trucks) sold in the United States since model year 1976. The data are specified in two days. One way is on a model basis (i.e, engine and transmission combinations) and includes data on city, highway, and combined fuel economies; engine size; drive-train; fuel type (gasoline or diesel); interior volume; body type; and other vehicle attributes. The other way is on a make basis (e.g., Ford Escort, Oldsmobile 98) and includes data on sales; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) size class; the sales-weighted fuel economy; sales-weighted interior volume; sales-weighted engine displacement (cid); curb weight; and other attributes. A unique identification number is assigned to a specific vehicle category. This identification number contains information on the manufacturer, the location of the manufacturer (domestic or import), and the sponsorship of the vehicle (domestic or import). Fuel economies, model year sales and various vehicle characteristics for every make of the 164 million light-duty vehicles sold in the US since model year 1976 can be obtained from this data system. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Hu, P.S.; Patterson, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.8 Active Solar Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2007 differs from total estimate in Table 6.3.9. Sherwood, Larry. Interstate Renewable Energy Council. Personal Communication. July, 2008. 150.1 55.0 205.1 469.9 282.0 751.9 67.4...

391

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Southeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Southeast Region Overview | Transportation to Atlantic & Gulf States | Gulf of Mexico Transportation Corridor | Transportation to the Northern Tier | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty-three interstate, and at least eight intrastate, natural gas pipeline companies operate within the Southeast Region (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee). Fifteen of the twenty-one interstate natural gas pipelines originate in the Southwest Region and receive most of their supplies from the Gulf of Mexico or from the States of Texas and/or Louisiana.

392

Open space system study for the Dacca metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open space facilities proposed in the Master Plan for Dacca, 1960, based on zoning by land subdivision, although inadequate in terms of population needs, were never realized -- partly due to their turnover to other land hungry urban developments. A comprehensive step to solve the problem of open space needs for present and future Decca was sought through an ecological approach. The search was for land of intrinsic open space value to be developed with compatible land uses to arrive at a system of multiple values. The map of Dacca published by the geological survey of Pakistan and supporting reference material was analysed for an understanding of the city's various features -- water and wetland, settlement pattern, climate, community, transportation and vegetation. The analytical facts were synthesized to socio-cultural image study, road system study, end finally, open space system study. These studies are based on existing and future physical, socio-cultural growth patterns. It was found out that the rivers, canals, wetlands encircling Dacca could "be the median of an open space system developed with the compatible land use of flood and erosion control, drainage, water supply, agriculture, water transportation and recreation. The system incorporates existing parks, open spaces, and historic value nodes, proposes pedestrian shopping malls, pedestrian, levels in highways, and, reserves spaces for institution and housing expansion.

Rab, Wajeda Jafar

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An Optimization Framework for Driver Feedback Systems  

SciTech Connect

Modern vehicles have sophisticated electronic control units that can control engine operation with discretion to balance fuel economy, emissions, and power. These control units are designed for specific driving conditions (e.g., different speed profiles for highway and city driving). However, individual driving styles are different and rarely match the specific driving conditions for which the units were designed. In the research reported here, we investigate driving-style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy and construct an optimization framework to optimize individual driving styles with respect to these driving factors. In this context, we construct a set of polynomial metamodels to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. Then, we compare the optimized driving styles to the original driving styles and evaluate the effectiveness of the optimization framework. Finally, we use this proposed framework to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in response to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL; Aguilar, Juan P. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details  

SciTech Connect

Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J. [Infrastructure Technology Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Hopwood, T. [Kentucky Transportation Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Highway Electrification And Automation Technologies - Regional Impacts Analysis Project: Phase II: Scenario For Advanced Highway Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industries, Inc. (1991a). Playa Vista: Roadway Powered Electric VehicleIndustries, Inc. (1991b). Playa Vista: Roadway Powered Electric Vehicle

Scag; Path

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Light Rail System Safety Improvements Using ITS Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1975b. * Cox, J. J. Road-Rail Protection Audible WarningInfluencing Safety at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings. NationalWalmsley, D.A (1 992) Light Rail Accidents in Europe and

Chira-chavala, Ted; Coifman, Ben; Empey, Dan; Hansen, Mark; Lechner, Ed; Porter, Chris

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Light Rail System Safety Improvements Using ITS Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail Grade Crossings. National Cooperative Highway ResearchRail Protection Audible Warning Effectiveness. Proceedings, Australian Road ResearchRail Accidents in Europe and North America. Transport and Road Research

Chira-chavala, Ted; Coifman, Ben; Empey, Dan; Hansen, Mark; Lechner, Ed; Porter, Chris

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Clean Energy-Environment Tech Forum The Electricity Grid: Implications for State Clean Energy Policies Background and Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State clean energy programs can be influenced by the design and operation of the U.S. transmission system. As a result, states have a strong interest in the system, even though they do not have a direct responsibility for the operation of the system. This background document provides some basic information about how the electricity transmission system operates, how it is designed and regulated, and the interrelationship between the operation and reliability of the electricity grid and state clean energy policies and programs. I. Electricity Grid Basics: How does the Transmission system work? Transmission lines are the interstate highway of the electricity delivery system. They carry high voltage power (138 kilovolts (kV) and above) from power plants over long distances to substations. There are more than 150,000 miles of interconnected transmission lines across the country and additional transmission that connects the U.S. to power plants and load centers in Canada and Mexico. Once the power reaches the substation, it is “stepped down ” in voltage and delivered to customers through the distribution network. Some basic physical properties of electricity influence the design and operation of the transmission system:

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

FEG2006_BODY_FINAL_05_18_06_FINAL.pmd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hwy ... MPG on Highway Test Procedure HP ... Horsepower LB ... Lean Burn Fuel System LR ... Long Ratio Gearbox M ... Manual...

400

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Shih-Miao Chin - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Transportation Decision Support Systems National Intermodal Bottlenecks Evaluation Tool (IBET) Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity Study (TLC) Estimating International...

402

Evaluation of the 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid Syneregy Drive System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and American automotive manufacturers General Motors, Ford, and DaimlerChrysler began a five-year, cost-shared partnership in 1993. Currently, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) research and development is conducted by DOE through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program. The mission of the FCVT program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies. Program activities include research, development, demonstration, testing, technology validation, and technology transfer. These activities are aimed at developing technologies that can be domestically produced in a clean and cost-competitive manner. Under the FCVT program, support is provided through a three-phase approach [1] which is intended to: • Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry’s recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; • Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and • Determine how well the components and subassemblies work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed in this area will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric, electric, and fuel-cell-powered vehicles.

Burress, T.A.; Coomer, C.L.; Campbell, S.L.; Seiber, L.E.; Marlino, L.D.; Staunton, R.H.; Cunningham, J.P.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

NONE

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Investigation of the feasibility of a dual mode electric transportation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is reported which explores the feasibility of a highway transportation system that electromagnetically transfers energy to vehicles from powered roadways for high-speed or long-range travel, and uses energy stored in the vehicles for other travel. The energy coupling between roadway and vehicle is functionally similar to a transformer. The roadway energy source is imbedded flush with the roadway surface. When vehicle's energy pickups are suspended over the source, energy is magnetically coupled through the clearance gap between source and pickup. Analyses and modeling indicated that adequate power can be efficiently coupled by the system. The economics of the system appear to be favorable, and no implementational problems were identified that would make the system impractical. In addition to the engineering development of the power system, including performance verification with prototype hardware, continuing efforts should further address the effects of stray magnetic fields, the compatibility of the system with existing automobiles, electrical safety, and the process of transition from the use of existing automobiles.

Bolger, J.G.; Kirsten, F.A.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of 2005 Honda Accord Hybrid Electric Drive System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program officially began in 1993 as a five-year, cost-shared partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and American auto manufacturers: General Motors, Ford, and Daimler Chrysler. Currently, HEV research and development is conducted by DOE through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program. The mission of the FCVT program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies. Program activities include research, development, demonstration, testing, technology validation, and technology transfer. These activities are aimed at developing technologies that can be domestically produced in a clean and cost-competitive manner. The vehicle systems technologies subprogram, which is one of four subprograms under the FCVT program, supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR through a three-phase approach [1] intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subassemblies work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the vehicle systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric, plug-in electric, and fuel-cell-powered vehicles.

Staunton, R.H.; Burress, T.A.; Marlino, L.D.

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Ross Complex) 1/16/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2003 16, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-117- (Ross Complex) Paul Martin TFHV/CSB2 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex Location: The Ross Complex is located at 5411 NE Highway 99, Vancouver, Clark County, Washington in the BPA Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking

407

Bridge and Roadway Frost. Occurrence and Prediction by Use of an Expert System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of the characteristics of frost occurrences on bridges and roadways derived from questionnaires completed by highway maintenance personnel and analysis of more than 4000 frost observations in Iowa reveal that bridge frost occurs up to 58 ...

Eugene S. Takle

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TACO-DTN: A Time-Aware COntent-based dissemination system for Delay Tolerant Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Content dissemination applications are becoming more and more popular on fixed infrastructure: in this paper we introduce TACO-DTN, a content dissemination system which, by virtue of being time-aware in terms of subscriptions and events, is appropriate for delay tolerant networks, where a number of nodes act as infostations, enjoying some form of connectivity to the backbone, and other nodes are mobile devices, reachable sometimes only through intermittent connectivity of carriers. Examples of applications benefiting from such a system could be travel information dissemination systems in large cities (exploiting infostations at bus stops) or on highways, advertisements dissemination at specific times, and information dissemination to remote villages. The approach is based on a novel concept of temporal utility of subscriptions and events. The temporal utility is used to govern the routing of the events to the right infostation (i.e., the one reached by the interested subscribers at the right time), avoiding unnecessary information transfer on slow links and the buffer management, in case buffer limitations are an issue. We give a description of our protocol and discuss its validation through simulation.

Mirco Musolesi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

410

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Accession No. 4. Title and Subtitle Impacts of Energy Developments on the Texas Transportation System Infrastructure 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas’s energy sector has a critical impact—historically and currently—on both the state economy and the Texas transportation system. The state’s various transportation modes, including rail, highways, pipelines, and ports, form a system that supports the energy sector in a number of ways. Examples include the (a) movement of various components during the construction and implementation of the energy source (e.g., wind turbines and solar farms), (b) provision of enabling infrastructure (e.g., transmission lines), and (c) movement of the intermediate and final products in some energy supply chains (e.g., low sulfur mid-west coal by Class 1 unit trains to the major coal burning plants in Texas). It is thus critical that TxDOT develop a better understanding of the current and future impacts of the energy sector on Texas’s transportation system, as well as quantify these impacts to ensure both adequate maintenance and its future sustainability. 17. Key Words Texas transportation system, energy, supply chains, wind turbines, solar farms, transmission lines, coal, oil, natural gas, environmental. 19. Security Classif. (of report)

A Prozzi; Sergey Grebenschikov; Ambarish Banerjee; Jorge Prozzi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Preliminary definition of the DOE/OCRWM transportation operating system: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper is based on the report ''Preliminary Definition of the Transportation Operations System'' and presents a summary of the preliminary definition of transportation operations activities for the cask shipment cycle, commencing with the dispatch of an empty cask, to loading and unloading of cask contents, and preparation of the empty cask for redispatch. It first presents a high-level description of the transportation cycle and then further describes each of the major activities in greater detail. For simplicity of presentation, the highway mode of transport is most often used to describe activities. The reader should keep in mind that the use of other modes will slightly alter the activities and possibly the sequences. Major activities and functions of the system are organized into a first cut of how they could be allocated to specific facilities. The reader should keep in mind that the assignment of functions and the aggregation of these into specific facilities are tasks which have yet to be performed. This paper simply presents a first look at possible groupings of the functions on a facility basis. 12 figs.

Rawl, R.R.; Kline, S.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

Nelson, S.C.

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Design of Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of square feet of mechanically stabilized earth retaining wall are constructed annually in the United States. When used in highway fill applications in conjunction with bridges, these MSE walls are typically constructed with a roadside barrier system supported on the edge of the wall. This barrier system generally consists of a traffic barrier or bridge rail placed on a continuous footing or structural slab. The footing is intended to reduce the influence of barrier impact loads on the retaining wall system by distributing the load over a wide area and to provide stability for the barrier against sliding or overturning. The proper design of the roadside barrier, the structural slab, and the MSE wall system requires a good understanding of relevant failure modes, how barrier impact loads are transferred into the wall system, and the magnitude and distribution of these loads. In this study, a procedure is developed that provides guidance for designing: 1. the barrier-moment slab, 2. the wall reinforcement, and 3. the wall panels. These design guidelines are developed in terms of AASHTO LRFD procedures. The research approach consisted of engineering analyses, finite element analyses, static load tests, full-scale dynamic impact tests, and a full-scale vehicle crash test. It was concluded that a 44.5 kN (10 kips) equivalent static load is appropriate for the stability design of the barrier-moment slab system. This will result in much more economical design than systems developed using the 240 kN (54 kips) load that some user agencies are using. Design loads for the wall reinforcement and wall panels are also presented.

Kim, Kang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Project 322  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9302 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 301-371-3584 pjohns@erols.com Sequestration INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEMS FOR MONITORING AND VERIFYING CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS...

416

Development of Pavement Performance Models by Combining Experimental and Field Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS © ASCE / MARCH 2004 / 21 HighwayINFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS © ASCE / MARCH 2004 Prozzi, J. A. ,must be ?led with the ASCE Managing Editor. The manuscript

Prozzi, J A; Madanat, S M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

No. 2 Diesel Sales for On-Highway Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

39,801,744 37,528,464 34,147,806 35,582,625 36,160,308 36,343,072 39,801,744 37,528,464 34,147,806 35,582,625 36,160,308 36,343,072 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 11,739,455 10,763,333 9,929,426 10,367,337 10,332,863 10,257,620 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 1,123,563 1,062,422 1,044,171 1,052,933 1,064,679 1,063,943 1984-2012 Connecticut 303,570 292,688 266,121 267,948 271,070 266,474 1984-2012 Maine 181,010 180,284 176,004 178,774 176,241 173,717 1984-2012 Massachusetts 402,629 375,414 399,575 394,967 410,375 418,613 1984-2012 New Hampshire 97,695 97,837 92,882 93,381 91,778 91,143 1984-2012 Rhode Island 73,882 55,826 55,684 59,220 57,035 54,666 1984-2012 Vermont 64,777 60,373 53,905 58,643 58,180 59,330 1984-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 4,232,345 3,956,845 3,629,109 3,796,971 3,883,499 3,898,410

418

Service Life Prediction Based on Sorptivity for Highway ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the specimens from the Rhode Is,land DOT. ... Manual for TMY2s: Typical Meteorological Years, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, June ...

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

No. 2 Diesel Sales for On-Highway Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 4,232,345: 3,956,845: 3,629,109: 3,796,971: 3,883,499: 3,898,410: 1984-2012: Delaware: 66,271: ... Washington: 697,898: ...

420

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Off-Highway Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 226,685: 252,027: 186,785: 187,163: 213,795: 208,407: 1984-2012: Delaware: 3,149: 3,210: ... Washington: 81,488: 83,550: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vibration-based structural health monitoring of highway bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) method (Brincker et al.and well-separated modes FDD / CMIF Damping estimate biasedStochastic Subspace Identification; FDD: Frequency Domain

Guan, Hong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Off-Highway Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1A) 92,754 113,790 81,453 102,263 102,751 75,212 1984-2012 Connecticut 21,159 19,948 14,456 16,124 16,435 10,683 1984-2012 Maine 12,193 15,262 14,483 15,495 16,622 18,373...

423

Weekly Retail On-Highway Diesel Prices Schedule  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data for: Alternate Release Date Release Day Holiday; January 17, 2011: January 18, 2011: Tuesday: Martin Luther King Jr. February 21, 2011: February 22, 2011

424

Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

832 3.822 3.844 3.883 3.879 3.871 1994-2013 832 3.822 3.844 3.883 3.879 3.871 1994-2013 East Coast (PADD1) 3.855 3.841 3.870 3.906 3.912 3.915 1994-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 3.991 3.981 4.003 4.040 4.066 4.064 1997-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.903 3.890 3.919 3.949 3.972 3.977 1997-2013 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 3.793 3.779 3.808 3.848 3.837 3.840 1997-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 3.798 3.794 3.829 3.879 3.870 3.852 1994-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 3.752 3.745 3.753 3.780 3.773 3.766 1994-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 3.836 3.836 3.837 3.858 3.851 3.852 1994-2013 West Coast (PADD 5) 3.976 3.954 3.954 3.998 3.993 3.982 1994-2013 West Coast less California 3.881 3.872 3.872 3.929 3.906 3.884 2011-2013 States California 4.055 4.022 4.023 4.056 4.066 4.066 1995

425

A simulation tool for automated platooning in mixed highway scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated platooning is one of the most challenging fields in the domain of ITS. Conceptually, platooning means creating clusters of vehicles which closely follow each other autonomously without action of the driver, neither for accelerating, nor for ... Keywords: cooperative adaptive cruise control, platooning, simulation, vehicular networks

Michele Segata; Falko Dressler; Renato Lo Cigno; Mario Gerla

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Managing Constructibility Reviews to Reduce Highway Project Durations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- creases costs. Research confirms that schedule compression has led to increases in project cost CII 1989 in project cost provided certain tech- niques are applied during project development and especially dur- ing to have the highest potential to reduce project duration without increasing total project cost. Project

Ford, David N.

427

Bayouth & Koopman 1 Functional Evolution of an Automated Highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alleviating the vehicle-traffic congestion and improving opera- tions management in support of public safety) applications to improve the driving safety and support networking services among moving vehicles. Making best the consolidated safety messages to the neighboring CHs. Also, the CH vehicle controls channel

Koopman, Philip

428

STATE OF CALIFORNIA GRAY DAVIS, Governor CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

95818 June 13, 2003 Ms. Jessie H. Roberson Assistant Secretary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Dear Ms. Roberson 95814-5512 #12;Ms. Roberson June 11, 2003 Page 2 that DOE "will consult with affected states for the use

429

Optimizing Highway Transportation at the United States Postal Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (STC) network is a transportation network that consolidates mail .... facilities, and it is therefore possible (and almost always the case) that a single facility .... this input data is obtained from the available USPS information. ... to running the optimization model, it is necessary to transform the initial data into the data sets.

430

Road to the hydrogen highway | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 - 9:49am | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Photo used with permission of Toyota Motor Corporation. Toyota plans to sell hydrogen-powered cars by 2015. To reach that...

431

Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) 3.911: 3.907: 3.871: 3.850: 3.873: 3 ... EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types ...

432

Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation: technical section  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eighteen different alternative fuels were considered in the preliminary screening, from three basic resource bases. Coal can be used to provide 13 of the fuels; oil shale was the source for three of the fuels; and biomass provided the resource base for two fuels not provided from coal. In the case of biomass, six different fuels were considered. Nuclear power and direct solar radiation were also considered. The eight prime movers that were considered in the preliminary screening are boiler/steam turbine; open and closed cycle gas turbines; low and medium speed diesels; spark ignited and stratified charge Otto cycles; electric motor; Stirling engine; free piston; and fuel cell/electric motor. Modes of transport considered are pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft. Section 2 gives the overall summary and conclusions, the future outlook for each mode of transportation, and the R and D suggestions by mode of transportation. Section 3 covers the preliminary screening phase and includes a summary of the data base used. Section 4 presents the methodology used to select the fuels and prime movers for the detailed study. Sections 5 through 8 cover the detailed evaluation of the pipeline, marine, railroad, and aircraft modes of transportation. Section 9 covers the demand related issues.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy efficient navigation management for hybrid electric vehicles on highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) are gaining popularity due to their economical efficiency as well as their contribution to environmental preservation. PHEVs allow the driver to use exclusively electric power for 30-50 miles of driving, and switch ... Keywords: formal model, navigation plan, plug-in hybrid vehicle

Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman, Qi Duan, Ehab Al-Shaer

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

California's Highway Funding Apportionment Formula: Geographic Redistribution Among Counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revenues from gasoline taxes and other motor vehicle relatedtaxes from motor fuel distributors before the gasoline is

Lem, Lewison Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Financing West Virginia's Highways: Challenges and Opportunities1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................17 6.0 Motor Fuel Excise Tax: Options ............................................................................................................ 25 7.0 Sales/Privilege Tax: Options) ....................................................................................................................................................... 38 Figure A2 Weekly U.S. Regular Retail Gasoline Prices (Cents per Gallon

Mohaghegh, Shahab

436

Highway travel and fuel comsumption from 1970 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The change in fuel price and availability (1970-80) has had a profound impact on the way and the extent of travel. Within the decade there were two precipitous increases in fuel price among a posture of steadily rising energy costs. In response to these price increases, a number of public policies were enacted. For instance, the 55-mph speed limit was imposed in 1974. At the end of that same year, the Federal Energy Administration and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) were formulated to prescribe certain conservation guidelines for states to follow in formulating their own programs. Specifically, EPCA established a program for the development of plans designed for the promotion of energy conservation and a reduction of the energy demand growth rate. Parallel to the conservation measures are technological improvements in vehicle fuel consumption. EPCA mandated that automobile manufacturers achieve fuel efficiency incrementally through 1985 to reach an average fuel economy of 27.5 mpg. This article reviews the historical impact of these factors from 1970 through 1980. Its objective is to observe the relative significance of each of these energy-saving alternatives on the growth rate of travel and fuel use. This historical perspective is particularly interesting since it presents the before-and-after effects of two ''crises'' occurring during this 10-year period. 1 figure, 10 tables.

Chan, Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

What We've Learned About Highway Congestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delay. Second, if a ramp metering policy holds back incomingwill be avoided altogether. Call such a ramp-metering policyan Ideal Metering Policy or IMP. Although IMP may impose

Varaiya, Pravin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Industrial waste in highway construction K. Aravind1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-base material, bulk-fill, recycling [2] Colliery spoil Coal mining Bulk-fill [2] Spent oil shale Petrochemical

Das, Animesh

439

Safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicles traveling on various tunnels and bridges in New York City. The study considered those hazards arising from the release of fuel from CNG vehicles ranging in size from a passenger sedan to a full size 53 passenger bus. The approach used was to compare the fuel hazard of CNG vehicles to the fuel hazard of gasoline vehicles. The risk was assessed by estimating the frequency of occurrence and the severity of the hazard. The methodology was a combination of analyzing accident data, performing a diffusion analysis of the gas released in the tunnel and determining the consequences of ignition. Diffusion analysis was performed using the TEMPEST code for various accident scenarios resulting in CNG release inside the Holland Tunnel. The study concluded that the overall hazard of CNG vehicles transiting a ventilated tunnel is less than the hazard from a comparable gasoline fueled vehicle. 134 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

Shaaban, S.H.; Zuzovsky, M.; Anigstein, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Colorado No 2 Diesel Off-Highway Other (Thousand Gallons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 9,771: 741: 273: 501: 4,400: 443: 1990's: 791: 429: 287: 1,891: 848: 920: 1,760 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Structural Characterization of Modern Highway Overcrossings - Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / JUNE 2004 / 859 Roesset,groups. ’’ Pile founda- tions, ASCE, New York. Seed, H. B. ,860 / JOURNAL OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / JUNE 2004

Zhang, Jian; Makris, Nicos; Delis, Tim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EIA-888 ON-HIGHWAY DIESEL FUEL PRICE SURVEY INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION . Washington, D. C. 20585. ... violations which may result in a temporary restraining order or a

443

Use of recycled materials in highway construction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of this study were to examine: (1) the types of recycled materials that are appropriate and feasible as alternative paving materials, such as glass and tires; and (2) the types of recycled materials, such as mixed-plastics and compost, that can be utilized in all types of transportation applications other than pavements. Seven key products are investigated: (1) tires, (2) glass, (3) asphalt concrete, (4) fly ash, (5) compost, (6) mixed plastics, and (7) aluminum sign stock. Performance and cost data for rubber-asphalt pavements is documented for both in-state and nationwide applications. The national experience with the use of waste glass as an additive to asphalt concrete and its use in unbound base materials is also highlighted. Programs for experimental use of recycled materials are outlined. Recommendations for staffing and program changes to deal with recycling issues are also discussed.

Swearingen, D.L.; Jackson, N.C.; Anderson, K.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Estimation of Highway Maintenance Marginal Cost under Multiple Maintenance Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

funded by 5th Framework RTD Programme. ITS, University of1.1, Funded by 5th Framework RTD Programme. ITS, University

Anani, Shadi B.; Madanat, Samer M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in figure 3. Maintenance Activity Best Management PracticesOlympic Region Maintenance Program on management recommen-If a maintenance activity is not exempt, Best Management

O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Federal Highway Administration Long-Term Bridge Performance Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management #12;LTBP Program Approach ·! Detailed inspection, periodic evaluation and monitoring utilizing ·! 3 to 4 months to kick off and instrument each bridge ·! 2 weeks for visual inspection and NDE ·! 3 ·! Accessibility to many LTBP team members ·! U.S Route 15 over I-66 Haymarket, VA ·! Constructed in 1979

Minnesota, University of

447

Evaluation of a highway improvement project on Florida key deer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation, Environmental Management Office, Miami, FLs District Environmental Management Office in Miami, where

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Photovoltaic system in system LABI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is prepared a new model marked as DE10 to extens the system LABI. It is a photovoltaic system. Utilizing of model is into the field of university studying and as a pilot test system for all extern experts. A special parts of model are measurement ... Keywords: automation, measurement, photovoltaic system, sun energy

Hruska Frantisek

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Systems File Systems File Systems For a general description of the different file systems available on PDSF please see Eliza File Systems and Other File Systems. Below is a summary of how STAR uses the various systems: /common The STAR software is installed on /common. For 32sl44 it is under /common/star/star44 and for sl53 it is under /common/star/star53. In both cases the software consists primarily of a STAR-specific ROOT installation on which releases of the STAR libraries are built as shown on the Local STAR Libraries page. /eliza3, /eliza6, /eliza9, /eliza14, /eliza15, /eliza17 STAR has space on 6 elizas as shown in the table below. File System star space (TB) use eliza3 39 production eliza6 9 production eliza9 39 production eliza14 34 production, user space under /eliza14/star/pwg

451

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

453

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

454

Notice of Availability of the Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement Supplement (DOE/EIS-0317) (January 10, 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 7 / Friday, January 10, 2003 / Notices authorized to administer the NPDES Program incur a burden of 92,033 hours annually. Dated: January 6, 2003. James A. Hanlon, Director, Office of Wastewater Management. [FR Doc. 03-516 Filed 1-9-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560-50-P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-6636-6] Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability Responsible Agency: Office of Federal Activities, General Information (202) 564-7167 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. Weekly receipt of Environmental Impact Statements Filed December 30, 2002 Through January 03, 2003 Pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.9. EIS No. 030000, DRAFT EIS, FHW, TX, TX-121 Highway from Interstate Highway 30 to Farm-to-Market 1187 (FM 1187) in Forth Worth,

455

AEP Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avoid costs of retrofitting systems to support secure access •Produced by the Yankee Group http://www.yankeegroup.com Page 25. ...

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

P.T. (Perry) Jones - Research Staff - Center for Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

testing and test development Green Racing Working Group Marine propulsion integration E85 Flex Fuel System Design and Release Vehicle Structures testing and off-highway mobility...

457

Ho-Ling Hwang - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support Systems Motor Fuel Consumption Models National Intermodal Bottlenecks Evaluation Tool (IBET) Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity Study (TLC) Estimating International...

458

Investigation in to ramp queues vs. freeway queues on ramp metered freeways.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Freeways and highways form an integral part of any road network system demanding significant quantities of resources to plan and construct. During times of congestion… (more)

Lim, David Eng Chung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Automated-Manual Transitions: Human Capabilities and Adaptive Cruise Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSIT AND HIGHWAYS Automated-Manual Transitions: HumanOF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Automated-Manual Transitions: HumanSuch systems will supplant manual controls during certain

Barton, Joseph E.; Cohn, Theodore E.; Nguyen, Khoi M.; Nguyen, Tieuvi; Toyofuku, Natsuko

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Research Areas - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data, Statistical Analysis and Geo-Spatial Information Tools Defense Transportation Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Analytical performance of direct-hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a stand-alone polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system directly fueled by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The study was carried out using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The systems code includes models for the various PEFC components and is applicable for steady-state and transient situations. At the design point the system efficiency is above 50% for a 50-kW system. The efficiency improves under partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the V-I polarization curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and eventually the fuel cell. The system performance suffers at lower temperatures, as the V-I characteristic curve for the fuel cell shifts downward because of the increased ohmic losses. The results of the transient analysis indicate that the hydrogen-fueled PEFC system can start rather rapidly, within seconds from ambient conditions. However, the warm-up time constant to reach the design operating temperatures is about 180 s. It is important during this period for the coolant to bypass the system radiator until the coolant temperature approaches the design temperature for the fuel cell. The systems analysis code has been applied to two mid-size vehicles: the near-term Ford AIV Sable and the future P2000 vehicle. The results of this study show that the PEFC system in these vehicles can respond well to the demands of the FUDS and Highway driving cycles, with both warm and cold starting conditions. The results also show that the fuel-cell AIV Sable vehicle has impressive gains in fuel economy over that of the internal combustion engine vehicle. However, this vehicle will not be able to meet the PNGV goal of 80 mpg. On the other hand, the P2000 vehicle approaches this goal with variable efficiency of the compressor and expander. It is expected to exceed that goal by a big margin, if the efficiency of the compressor and expander can be maintained constant (at 0.8) over the power range of the fuel cell system.

Doss, E. D.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

462

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Coal and Power Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting Systems Feed Systems Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting...

463

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

464

On death ground : why weak states resist great powers explaining coercion failure in asymmetric interstate conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Great Powers often adopt coercive strategies, threatening or using limited force to convince weak states to comply with their demands. While coercive strategies have succeeded in just over half of asymmetric crises since ...

Haun, Phil M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Emergent conflict behavior : strategic interstate bargaining as an n-player ABM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

announces annexation of Bosnia Herzegovina CUP temporarilythe annexation of Bosnia Herzegovina, which had been anto its annexation of Bosnia Herzegovina, Alexander Isvolski,

Culyba, Mark

466

Become One In A Million: Partnership Updates -- Million Solar Roofs and Interstate Renewable Energy Council  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Million Solar Roofs Partnership Update is an annual report from all the Partnership and Partners who participate in the Million Solar Roofs Initiative.

Not Available

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Emergent conflict behavior : strategic interstate bargaining as an n-player ABM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cooperation: Agent-Based Models of Competition anddissertation introduces an agent based model driven by thedissertation introduces an agent based model to explain why

Culyba, Mark

468

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light- Business and Farm Renewable Energy Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alliant Energy Renewable Cash-Back Rewards program offers rebates for solar photovoltaics (PV), wind, renewable biomass, and anaerobic digesters. Businesses and farms that are Alliant Energy...

469

Implementation of the waste and reclaimed materials evaluation system. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of waste materials are generated in the United States every year. Due to societal and environmental concerns many states have enacted legislation to promote their use in highway construction projects. The standard approach to charcterize these materials has been to evaluate them in technical laboratory studies which is not appropriate because these materials do not match natural aggregate in technical quality and may still have a high societal, environmental and economic value. A Waste and Reclaimed Materials (WRM) evaluation process has already been developed which takes into account such factors. This WRM Evaluation process is carried out before detailed technical and economic studies are done to develop specifications for their use. The determinination of their utilization potential is based on technical, economic, societal and environmental aspects. An initial screening process is also incorporated which is used to discard WRMs which clearly displays a low utilization potential. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) from decision analysis theory is used to assign weights to the four evaluation sub-systems and the respective attributes based on their importance. Implementation of this systems was carried out after the system was verified by detailed laboratory studies and economic analysis. All the available WRMs were subjected to this evaluation method and were ranked from the highest utilization potential to the lowest. The selected top three WRMs, reclaimed asphalt, Portland cement concrete pavement, and electric arc furnace slag, were subjected to detailed laboratory and economic analyses to determine their viability and to develop specifications for their use in roadhouse construction. The WRM evaluation process, laboratory studies, and the implementation package are presented in the report.

Saeed, A.; Hudson, W.R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

471

Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A photovoltaic (PV), or solar electric system, is made up of several photovoltaic solar cells. An individual PV cell is usually small, typically producing about 1 or 2 watts of power. To boost the...

472

Type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of type systems has emerged as one of the most active areas of research in programming languages, with applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compiler implementation, and security. This chapter discusses the ...

Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Battery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

474

Systems Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

Graham, R.L.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

475

NETL: Gasification - Systems Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Analyses Gasification Systems Systems Analyses Go to the NETL Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technology & CostPerformance Studies NETL...

476

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

477

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

478

ARAC system  

SciTech Connect

In spite of the remarkable safety record of the nuclear industry as a whole, recent public concern over the potential impact of the industry's accelerated growth has prompted ERDA to expand its emergency response procedures. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, ARAC, is a computer communications system designed to enhance the existing emergency response capability of ERDA nuclear facilities. ARAC will add at least two new functions to this capability: centralized, real-time data acquisition and storage, and simulation of the long range atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. To perform these functions, ARAC employs four major sub-systems or facilities: the site facility, the central facility, the global weather center and the regional model. The system has been under development for the past two years at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California. (auth)

Kelly, M.F.; Wyman, R.H.

1975-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

479

BAE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information fusion system designs require sensor and resource management (SM) for effective and efficient data collection, processing, and dissemination. Common Level 4 fusion sensor management (or process refinement) inter-relations with target tracking and identification (Level 1 fusion) have been detailed in the literature. At the ISIF Fusion Conference, a panel discussion was held to examine the contemporary issues and challenges pertaining to the interaction between SM and situation and threat assessment (Level 2/3 fusion). This summarizes the key tenants of the invited panel experts. The common themes were: 1) Addressing the user in system control, 2) Determining a standard set of metrics,

Erik Blasch; John Salerno; Ivan Kadar; Ken Hintz; J. Biermann; Chee Chong; Subrata Das

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interstate highway system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009. Interstate Renewable EnergyU.S. Solar Market Trends 2009. Interstate Renewable Energy

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED Platinum View the NREL Press Release. NREL's multistory Energy Systems Integration...

483

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

484

Burner systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner system particularly useful for downhole deployment includes a tubular combustion chamber unit housed within a tubular coolant jacket assembly. The combustion chamber unit includes a monolithic tube of refractory material whose inner surface defines the combustion zone. A metal reinforcing sleeve surrounds and extends the length of the refractory tube. The inner surface of the coolant jacket assembly and outer surface of the combustion chamber unit are dimensioned so that those surfaces are close to one another in standby condition so that the combustion chamber unit has limited freedom to expand with that expansion being stabilized by the coolant jacket assembly so that compression forces in the refractory tube do not exceed about one-half the safe compressive stress of the material; and the materials of the combustion chamber unit are selected to establish thermal gradient parameters across the combustion chamber unit to maintain the refractory tube in compression during combustion system start up and cool down sequences.

Doherty, Brian J. (Marblehead, MA)

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

485

CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

1962-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Integrated System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Window System Our research activities in the field of high performance windows have led us to conclude that even by using high performance insulating glass units, low conductivity frames, and warm edge spacers, there are still untapped sources for improving energy efficiency in the design and use of residential windows. While such high performance windows are a dramatic improvement over conventional units, they do not reduce conductive losses through wall framing around the window, offer guarantees against excessive wall/window infiltration nor do they adapt to the daily and seasonal potentials for night insulation and summer shading. To meet this need, we have been working on the design, development, and prototyping of Integrated Window Systems (IWS) since 1993. Integrated Window Systems are a form of panelized construction where the wall panel includes an operable or fixed window sash, recessed night insulation, integral solar shading, and is built in a factory setting in order to minimize thermal short circuits and infiltration at joints. IWSs can be built in modular lengths to facilitate their installation with conventional wood frame stick construction or other forms of panelized construction.

489

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Glazing systems in the US are commonly designed with a 1/2 " (12.7 mm) gap. The optimal gap width depends on many factors, such as gas fill (air, argon, krypton), the use of Low-e coatings, the environmental conditions (temperature difference across the window), and the calculation standard used. NFRC standard conditions are -18 C (-0.4 F) outside, and 21 C (69.8 F) inside. The calculation standard used in the US is based on the ISO 15099 standard. European standard conditions are 0 C (32 F) outside, and 20 C (68 F) inside. The calculation standard is based on the EN 673 standard. A number of common glazing configurations both with and without Low-e coatings, and with a variety of gas fills were evaluated using both the North American NFRC standard and the European EN 673 standard. All results were calculated using WINDOW 6.3 from LBNL. All IGU's (Insulated Glazing Units) have a standard height of 1 meter.

490

Braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, D.U.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

491

Components of systems software for parallel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems software for clusters and other parallel systems affects multiple types of users. End users interact with it to submit and interact with application jobs and to avail themselves of scalable system tools. Systems administrators interact with it ...

Ewing Lusk

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Feasibility of developing a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research: Technical tasks. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase, multi-year research program entitled ``development of a portable driver performance data acquisition system for human factors research`` was recently completed. The primary objective of the project was to develop a portable data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) that will allow drive performance data to be collected using a large variety of vehicle types and that would be capable of being installed on a given vehicle type within a relatively short-time frame. During phase 1 a feasibility study for designing and fabricating DASCAR was conducted. In phase 2 of the research DASCAR was actually developed and validated. This technical memorandum documents the results from the feasibility study. It is subdivided into three volumes. Volume one (this report) addresses the last five items in the phase 1 research and the first issue in the second phase of the project. Volumes two and three present the related appendices, and the design specifications developed for DASCAR respectively. The six tasks were oriented toward: id