National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for interrelated components consisting

  1. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  2. Mathematics in literature : modernist interrelations in novels by Thomas Pynchon, Hermann Broch, and Robert Musil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelhardt, Nina Malaika

    2012-11-27

    The focus of this thesis is on four novels’ illustrations of the parallels and interrelations between the foundational crisis of mathematics and the political, linguistic, and epistemological crises around the turn to ...

  3. New women, new technologies : the interrelation between gender and technology at the Victorian fin de siècle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanggren, Lena Elisabet

    2012-06-28

    This thesis treats the interrelation between gender and technology at the Victorian fin de siècle, focusing on the figure of the New Woman. It aims to offer a reexamination of this figure of early feminism in relation ...

  4. Skyscrapers and District Heating, an inter-related History 1876-1933.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Skyscrapers and District Heating, an inter-related History 1876-1933. Introduction: The aim, and an equally new urban infrastructure, district heating, both of witch were born in the north-east United example in Europe of skyscrapers and district heating planned together, at Villeurbanne near Lyons

  5. How do Design and Evaluation Interrelate in HCI Christine E. Wania, Michael E. Atwood, Katherine W. McCain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwood, Michael

    How do Design and Evaluation Interrelate in HCI Research? Christine E. Wania, Michael E. Atwood.mccain@ischool.drexel.edu ABSTRACT Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is defined by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI) as "a discipline concerned with the design

  6. 1 Computer Architecture hardware components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Computer Architecture hardware components programming environments 2 Getting Started January 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) Computer Architecture L-2 14 January 2015 1 / 23 #12;Computer Architecture Hardware & Software A computer system consists of 1 Hardware: physical components

  7. Linear Consistency Testing Yonatan Aumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    of Blum, Luby and Rubinfeld [?] to check the linear-consistency of three functions f1, f2, f3 mapping and check if f1(x) + f2(y) = f3(x + y). We analyze this test for two cases: (1) G and H are arbitrary the consistency of multiple functions. Given a triple of functions f1, f2, f3 : G H, we say that they are "linear

  8. Consistent Mesh Parameterizations Princeton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    that their parameterizations are consistent if they all use the same base domain, such as a low polygon-count head model¨oder Bell Labs + + + + + + + = Figure 1: When given a set of head models an obvious shape to compute of the tech- niques carry over to higher genus. Consider for example a set of head scans; we say

  9. Consistent 4-form fluxes for maximal supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godazgar, Hadi; Krueger, Olaf; Nicolai, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    We derive new ansaetze for the 4-form field strength of D=11 supergravity corresponding to uplifts of four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. In particular, the ansaetze directly yield the components of the 4-form field strength in terms of the scalars and vectors of the four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity---in this way they provide an explicit uplift of all four-dimensional consistent truncations of D=11 supergravity. The new ansaetze provide a substantially simpler method for uplifting d=4 flows compared to the previously available method using the 3-form and 6-form potential ansaetze. The ansatz for the Freund-Rubin term allows us to conjecture a `master formula' for the latter in terms of the scalar potential of d=4 gauged supergravity and its first derivative. We also resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the antisymmetry of the flux obtained from uplift ansaetze.

  10. Consistent 4-form fluxes for maximal supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadi Godazgar; Mahdi Godazgar; Olaf Krueger; Hermann Nicolai

    2015-07-28

    We derive new ansaetze for the 4-form field strength of D=11 supergravity corresponding to uplifts of four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. In particular, the ansaetze directly yield the components of the 4-form field strength in terms of the scalars and vectors of the four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity---in this way they provide an explicit uplift of all four-dimensional consistent truncations of D=11 supergravity. The new ansaetze provide a substantially simpler method for uplifting d=4 flows compared to the previously available method using the 3-form and 6-form potential ansaetze. The ansatz for the Freund-Rubin term allows us to conjecture a `master formula' for the latter in terms of the scalar potential of d=4 gauged supergravity and its first derivative. We also resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the antisymmetry of the flux obtained from uplift ansaetze.

  11. Qualitative reasoning about consistency in geographic information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckham, Matt

    Qualitative reasoning about consistency in geographic information Matt Duckham a,, Jenny Lingham b reasoning system for describing consistency between different geographic data sets. Consistency is closely related to issues of uncertainty and interoperability in geographic information, and the paper assesses

  12. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  13. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  14. Consistent nonlinear dynamics: identifying model inadequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    2004-03-09

    Empirical modelling often aims for the simplest model consistent with the data. A new technique is presented which quantifies the consistency of the model dynamics as a function of location in state space. As is well-known, traditional statistics of nonlinear models like root-mean-square (RMS) forecast error can prove misleading. Testing consistency is shown to overcome some of the deficiencies of RMS error, both within the perfect model scenario and when applied to data from several physical systems using previously published models. In particular, testing for consistent nonlinear dynamics provides insight towards (i) identifying when a delay reconstruction fails to be an embedding, (ii) allowing state dependent model selection and (iii) optimising local neighbourhood size. It also provides a more relevant (state dependent) threshold for identifying false nearest neighbours.

  15. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector ? 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  16. On the Consistency of Multiclass Classification Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewari, Ambuj

    On the Consistency of Multiclass Classification Methods Ambuj Tewari1 and Peter L. Bartlett2 1 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;144 A. Tewari and P.L. Bartlett guarantee that if the -risk of f

  17. Quantifying the consistency of scientific databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Šubelj, Lovro; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnaji?, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In the recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies.

  18. Instantaneous symmetrical components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salehfar, Hossein

    1984-01-01

    in faulted power systems, and to the study of the transient behavior of synchronous machines. iV Ky Family ACKNOWLEDGENENTS The author wishes Co express his sincere gracitude to his thesis advisor, Dr. A. K. Ayoub. Dr. Ayoub's guidance, encouragement... Three-Phase Systems XII. POWER SYSTEM TRANSIENT RESPONSE USING INSTANTANEOUS SYMMETRICAL COMPONENTS Nature of Short-Circuit currents Physical Interpretation of the Short- Circuit Phenomenon Use of Instantaneous Symmetrical Components Method I Lum...

  19. Style Consistent Classification of Isogenous Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    a basis for more accurate classification of a group (field) of digitized characters from the same sourceStyle Consistent Classification of Isogenous Patterns Prateek Sarkar, Member, IEEE Computer Society they share the same, albeit unknown, style. Style constrained classifiers achieve higher classification

  20. Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks Herbert Lee \\Lambda May 21, 1998 Abstract In this paper we show that the posterior distribution for feedforward neural networks is asymp neural networks for nonparametric regression in a Bayesian framework. Keywords: Bayesian statistics

  1. Web Services Need Consistency Giacomo Piccinelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    Web Services Need Consistency Giacomo Piccinelli Hewlett-Packard Laboratories Stoke Gifford Park.finkelstein|c.nentwich}@cs.ucl.ac.uk Abstract Web Services provide a powerful access channel to business capabilities. Inside the company can be streamlined and business opportunities extended. A major issue with the current Web Service

  2. A Generalization of Generalized Arc Consistency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackworth, Alan K.

    - binary classic constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs). Based on the Semiring CSP and Valued CSP such as fuzzy CSP, probabilistic CSP, max CSP, and weighted CSP. This extension is based on an idempotent satisfaction problem (CSP), local consistency can be char- acterized as deriving new constraints based on local

  3. Foundations of consistent couple stress theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali R. Hadjesfandiari; Gary F. Dargush

    2015-07-29

    In this paper, we examine the recently developed skew-symmetric couple stress theory and demonstrate its inner consistency, natural simplicity and fundamental connection to classical mechanics. This hopefully will help the scientific community to overcome any ambiguity and skepticism about this theory, especially the validity of the skew-symmetric character of the couple-stress tensor. We demonstrate that in a consistent continuum mechanics, the response of infinitesimal elements of matter at each point decomposes naturally into a rigid body portion, plus the relative translation and rotation of these elements at adjacent points of the continuum. This relative translation and rotation captures the deformation in terms of stretches and curvatures, respectively. As a result, the continuous displacement field and its corresponding rotation field are the primary variables, which remarkably is in complete alignment with rigid body mechanics, thus providing a unifying basis. For further clarification, we also examine the deviatoric symmetric couple stress theory that, in turn, provides more insight on the fundamental aspects of consistent continuum mechanics.

  4. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  5. Friction welded battery component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.K.; Zagrodnik, J.P.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a battery component for use in a flow battery containing fluid electrolyte. It comprises: first and second bond ribs disposed on opposite sides of and defining a channel and respective primary flash traps disposed adjacent the bond ribs opposite the channel.

  6. Self-consistent resonance in a plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangelos Chaliasos

    2005-10-14

    As an application of the solution of the equations of electromagnetic self-consistency in a plasma, found in a previous paper, the study of controlled thermo-nuclear fusion is undertaken. This study utilizes the resonance which can be developed in the plasma, as indicated by the above solution, and is based to an analysis of the underlying forced oscillation under friction. As a consequence, we find that, in this way, controlled thermonuclear fusion seems now to be feasible in principle. The treatment is rather elementary, and it may serve as a guide for more detailed calculations.

  7. The consistency test on the cosmic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Yan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new and robust method to test the consistency of the cosmic evolution given by a cosmological model. It is realized by comparing the combined quantity r_d^CMB/D_V^SN, which is derived from the comoving sound horizon r_d from cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements and the effective distance D_V derived from low-redshift Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data, with direct and independent r_d/D_V obtained by baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at median redshifts. We apply this test method for the LCDM and wCDM models, and investigate the consistency of the derived value of r_d/D_V from Planck 2015 and the SN Ia data sets of Union2.1 and JLA (z<1.5), and the r_d/D_V directly given by BAO data from six-degree-field galaxy survey (6dFGS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 Main Galaxy Survey (SDSS-DR7 MGS), DR11 of SDSS-III, WiggleZ and Ly-alpha forecast surveys from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Data (BOSS) DR-11 over 0.1

  8. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Trott

    2015-01-17

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables to consistently constrain the Standard Model EFT is only expected to grow with future LHC data, as more complex processes are studied.

  9. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables...

  10. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  11. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  12. Injection molded component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  13. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G. [and others

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  14. Identifying Strongly Connected Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plimpton, Steve

    platforms usually consist of distributed parallel #3; This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in these grids as well as an implementation and experimental results on shared and distributed memory machines. 1 enormous computational resources, if they are to be executed in practi- cal time. Such large computational

  15. Basis Token Consistency A Practical Mechanism for Strong Web Cache Consistency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    call \\Basis Token Consistency" or BTC; when im- plemented at the server, this mechanism allows any between the BTC algorithm and the use of the Time-To-Live (TTL) heuristic. #3; This research was supported

  16. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  17. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  18. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

  19. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  20. THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-15

    The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

  1. A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient viscous flow with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A consistent...

  2. Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data evaluations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear...

  3. Abstract--This work consists of two main components: (a) a longitudinal ethnographic study in Kyrgyzstan that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    study in Kyrgyzstan that demonstrates the importance of transportation resources in the developing world. Transportation is a very important shared resource; enabling efficient and effective use of such resources aids at their location. The paper discusses the system and early testing, as well as the development implications

  4. Multi-component assembly casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  5. Inheritance of chemical constituents in leachate from the seed coat of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and their interrelations with several seed characters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percy, Richard Greer

    1979-01-01

    and Phenotypic Correlations of Seed Traits LITERATURE CITED APPENDIX. 55 57 61 65 VITA 78 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE Harvest dates and meterological data. Model for analyses of variance within generations Model for analyses of variance within... on the basis of their performance in previous leachate in- vestigations. The OR-37-72 and SP37-16-70 strain. , were selected because of their high seed leachate ionic content. Lankart 57 was chosen be- cause of its consistently low seed leachate readings...

  6. Heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  7. Generalized contexts and consistent histories in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losada, Marcelo; Laura, Roberto

    2014-05-15

    We analyze a restriction of the theory of consistent histories by imposing that a valid description of a physical system must include quantum histories which satisfy the consistency conditions for all states. We prove that these conditions are equivalent to imposing the compatibility conditions of our formalism of generalized contexts. Moreover, we show that the theory of consistent histories with the consistency conditions for all states and the formalism of generalized context are equally useful representing expressions which involve properties at different times.

  8. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

  9. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  10. Automating component reuse and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

    2004-09-01

    framework for automating specification-based component retrieval and adaptation that has been successfully applied to synthesis of software for embedded and digital signal processing systems. Using specifications to abstractly represent implementations...

  11. Runtime Assignment of Reconfigurable Hardware Components for Image Processing Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meleis, Waleed

    Runtime Assignment of Reconfigurable Hardware Components for Image Processing Pipelines Heather balance the benefits and costs of using FPGAs. Image processing applications of- ten consist of a pipeline implementations of image processing algorithms for a given problem. The pipeline assignment problem chooses from

  12. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  13. Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome Journal of Moral form. What does it mean to say that rationality consists in responding correctly to reasons? Partly does not call for a response from you. Your punishment is the responsibility of the authorities

  14. Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database Rafail Ostrovsky UCLA@csail.mit.edu July 20, 2004 Abstract A consistent query protocol (CQP) allows a database owner to publish a very short string c which commits her and everybody else to a particular database D, so that any copy

  15. Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database #3; Rafail Ostrovsky asmith@csail.mit.edu July 20, 2004 Abstract A consistent query protocol (CQP) allows a database owner to publish a very short string c which commits her and everybody else to a particular database D, so that any

  16. Robust bearing estimation for 3-component stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLAASSEN,JOHN P.

    2000-02-01

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the inherent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, and finally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The algorithm was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. It demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted from these findings.

  17. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  18. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 – 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  19. Updated July 2014 PROGRAM COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    with a Student Affairs administrator and meet at least three times per semester. Students learn from mentors what in various activities. Learning occurs in different ways and through different avenues, therefore it is important to complete all of the following components: RETREATS are all day interactive activities focused

  20. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  1. Time consistency and risk averse dynamic decision models ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-02

    sistent models as we provide practitioners with an intuitive economic inter- pretation for the ... ning and financial engineering problems. Based on ... consistency is shown to be one basic requirement to get suitable optimal de- cisions, in ...

  2. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University “Lviv Polytechnic,” 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  4. Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

  5. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  6. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  7. Primary Components of Binomial Ideals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eser, Zekiye

    2014-07-11

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 v LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2.1 The graph G pIpBqq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 2.2 The graph of M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.3 Examples of band graphs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 2.4 A band graph with an infinite component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 2.5 The band graph G6pMq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 2.6 Slice graphs for IpBq ? xx4z ? y4, x7z ? y7y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.7 Slice...

  8. Stack Components Nancy L. Garland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /manufacturing · Durability · Electrode performance · Thermal and water management #12;Stack Component Targets 500 @ 0.75 VmA/cm2Performance on O2 400 @ 0.8 VmA/cm2Performance on H2 10$/kWCostMEA 5000hoursDurability 1000ppm-) · In collaboration with LANL (K. Weisbrod) and NREL (H. Wang) · Initial testing at General Motors indicates nitrided

  9. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005deermay.pdf More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and...

  10. Empirical Studies of Competition in Interrelated Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehn, Joseph Steven

    2015-01-01

    Inequalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Inequalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alternatives . . 99 Moment Inequalities for Estimation of

  11. Empirical Studies of Competition in Interrelated Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehn, Joseph Steven

    2015-01-01

    variables. The fixed costs of entry to a new market area new market will lead to the inclusion of the entry cost

  12. Empirical Studies of Competition in Interrelated Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehn, Joseph Steven

    2015-01-01

    would not have data on all the”bids” since some bidders didapplications where data on all the bids is not available anddata. These densities and distributions depend on all participants’ distribution of bids,

  13. Consistent Kaluza-Klein Truncations via Exceptional Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohm, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We present the generalized Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz for the full supersymmetric exceptional field theory in terms of group valued twist matrices subject to consistency equations. With this ansatz the field equations precisely reduce to those of lower-dimensional gauged supergravity parametrized by an embedding tensor. We explicitly construct a family of twist matrices as solutions of the consistency equations. They induce gauged supergravities with gauge groups SO(p,q) and CSO(p,q,r). Geometrically, they describe compactifications on internal spaces given by spheres and (warped) hyperboloides $H^{p,q}$, thus extending the applicability of generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions beyond homogeneous spaces. Together with the dictionary that relates exceptional field theory to D=11 and IIB supergravity, respectively, the construction defines an entire new family of consistent truncations of the original theories. These include not only compactifications on spheres of different dimensions (such as AdS$_5\\time...

  14. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr; Manfred Lindner; Kai Zuber

    2011-11-17

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited $0^+$ state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass.

  15. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technical University Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-01

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited 0{sup +} state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass .

  16. Remark on the Consistent Gauge Anomaly in Supersymmetric Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohshima, Y; Suzuki, H; Yasuta, H; Ohshima, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yasuta, Hirofumi

    1999-01-01

    We present a direct field theoretical calculation of the consistent gauge anomaly in the superfield formalism, on the basis of a definition of the effective action through the covariant gauge current. The scheme is conceptually and technically simple and the gauge covariance in intermediate steps reduces calculational labors considerably. The resultant superfield anomaly, being proportional to the anomaly $d^{abc}=\\tr T^a\\{T^b,T^c\\}$, is minimal even without supplementing any counterterms. Our anomaly coincides with the anomaly obtained by Marinkovi\\'c as the solution of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition.

  17. A Novel Method of Injection Molding Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a unique blend of powder injection molding feedstock materials in which only a small volume fraction of binder (< 8%) is required; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and a solid aromatic solvent. Because of the nature of the decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process.

  18. Show No Weakness: Sequentially Consistent Specifications of TSO Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotsman, Alexey

    Show No Weakness: Sequentially Consistent Specifications of TSO Libraries Alexey Gotsman1.g., for those that are data-race free (DRF). However, performance-critical libraries often violate, it is important for these libraries to protect their otherwise well-behaved clients from the weaker memory model

  19. Manipulator Control at Kinematic Singularities: A Dynamically Consistent Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mechanism [6]. These two models are the bases for implementing the control strategy for kinematicManipulator Control at Kinematic Singularities: A Dynamically Consistent Strategy Kyong-Sok Chang Abstract This paper presents a general strategy for manipu- lator control at kinematic singularities. When

  20. A static universe is consistent with type Ia supernovae observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David F. Crawford

    2015-04-18

    This paper considers the hypothesis that the universe is static and demonstrates that type Ia supernova observations which appear to provide strong support for time dilation (and thus for an expanding universe) are equally consistent with a static universe. It is shown that a property of the standard calibration method means that regardless of what redshift dependence the measured light curve widths may have the calibrated widths always have little or no redshift dependence. An important consideration is the Phillips relation, a correlation between the peak-luminosity and the width of type Ia supernovae. Using the Phillips relation the analysis of a recent compilation of type Ia supernova observations is re-examined and it is shown that these observations are fully consistent with a static universe. It is also argued that the photometric redshift relation and spectroscopic ages are fully consistent with a static universe. As a separate but related issue it is shown that in the static model the density distribution of type Ia supernovae as a function of redshift agrees with the observations. All the evidence shows that the hypothesis is consistent with a static universe.

  1. On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms M.H. Kahn M.S.Mackisack M.R.Osborne§ G and of related algorithms based on maximum likelihood is discussed as the number of observations n are obtained for the frequency estimation problem. However, the algorithms considered are all scaling dependent

  2. Lightweight Logging for Lazy Release Consistent Distributed Shared Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    Lightweight Logging for Lazy Release Consistent Distributed Shared Memory Manuel Costa, Paulo Guedes, Manuel Sequeira, Nuno Neves, Miguel Castro IST - INESC R. Alves Redol 9, 1000 Lisboa PORTUGAL algorithm for a DSM system based on lazy release Manuel Costa, Nuno Neves and Miguel Castro were supported

  3. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  4. Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

  5. A nuclear Frechet space consisting of C -functions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Dietmar

    A nuclear Fr´echet space consisting of C -functions and failing the bounded approximation property Dietmar Vogt Abstract An easy and transparent example is given of a nuclear Fre´echet space failing of Grothendieck whether every nuclear Fr´echet space has the bounded approximation property was open for quite

  6. Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: • Non-linear effects • Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections • Multi-isotope consistent assimilation • Consistency between differential and integral experiments

  7. Three-component gyrotropic metamaterial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tralle, Igor, E-mail: tralle@ur.edu.pl; Zi?ba, Pawe?; Pa?ko, Wioletta [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Theoretical Physics Department, University of Rzeszów, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszów (Poland)

    2014-06-21

    All of the proposed ever since designs of metamaterials are characterized by ever-increasing sophistication of fabrication methods. Here, a comparatively simple recipe for the fabrication of a metamaterial, which is both gyrotropic and of the simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, is proposed. The idea is to make a mixture of three ingredients, where one of them would be responsible for the negativity of ?, while the other two would be responsible for the negativity of ?. The first component of the mixture is the “swarm” of single-domain ferromagnetic nano-particles, immersed in a mixture of other two, silver and mercury cadmium telluride. By carrying out the computer simulations, the domains of gyromagnetic metamaterial exist, relative to all parameters characterizing the model, that is, the temperature, external magnetic field, parameters of nano-particles, and the fraction of cadmium in Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te-compound as well as relative concentrations of the mixture components are established.

  8. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (? = 1 (GW approximation), ?? from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ?E). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT.more »It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.« less

  9. ADAPTION OF NONSTANDARD PIPING COMPONENTS INTO PRESENT DAY SEISMIC CODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. T. Clark; M. J. Russell; R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

    2009-07-01

    With spiraling energy demand and flat energy supply, there is a need to extend the life of older nuclear reactors. This sometimes requires that existing systems be evaluated to present day seismic codes. Older reactors built in the 1960s and early 1970s often used fabricated piping components that were code compliant during their initial construction time period, but are outside the standard parameters of present-day piping codes. There are several approaches available to the analyst in evaluating these non-standard components to modern codes. The simplest approach is to use the flexibility factors and stress indices for similar standard components with the assumption that the non-standard component’s flexibility factors and stress indices will be very similar. This approach can require significant engineering judgment. A more rational approach available in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which is the subject of this paper, involves calculation of flexibility factors using finite element analysis of the non-standard component. Such analysis allows modeling of geometric and material nonlinearities. Flexibility factors based on these analyses are sensitive to the load magnitudes used in their calculation, load magnitudes that need to be consistent with those produced by the linear system analyses where the flexibility factors are applied. This can lead to iteration, since the magnitude of the loads produced by the linear system analysis depend on the magnitude of the flexibility factors. After the loading applied to the nonstandard component finite element model has been matched to loads produced by the associated linear system model, the component finite element model can then be used to evaluate the performance of the component under the loads with the nonlinear analysis provisions of the Code, should the load levels lead to calculated stresses in excess of Allowable stresses. This paper details the application of component-level finite element modeling to account for geometric and material nonlinear component behavior in a linear elastic piping system model. Note that this technique can be applied to the analysis of B31 piping systems.

  10. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Müller

    2006-11-12

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining, leading to reconsidering the motivation for the consistency condition.

  11. Non-trivial checks of novel consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin; Wang, Junpu E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-06-01

    Single-field perturbations satisfy an infinite number of consistency relations constraining the squeezed limit of correlation functions at each order in the soft momentum. These can be understood as Ward identities for an infinite set of residual global symmetries, or equivalently as Slavnov-Taylor identities for spatial diffeomorphisms. In this paper, we perform a number of novel, non-trivial checks of the identities in the context of single field inflationary models with arbitrary sound speed. We focus for concreteness on identities involving 3-point functions with a soft external mode, and consider all possible scalar and tensor combinations for the hard-momentum modes. In all these cases, we check the consistency relations up to and including cubic order in the soft momentum. For this purpose, we compute for the first time the 3-point functions involving 2 scalars and 1 tensor, as well as 2 tensors and 1 scalar, for arbitrary sound speed.

  12. A consistent formalism for the Thomas-Ehrman Level Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. He; A. St. J. Murphy

    2007-04-26

    Usage of the Thomas-Ehrman Level Displacement formalism has been examined. Mistakes and inconsistencies are found in several papers, being repeated in subsequent works. Here, we present a complete formalism with a consistent set of definitions. Full algorithms are made available, both as a {\\tt FORTRAN} source file and as a user-friendly Visual Basic executable tool, available for download on the World Wide Web.

  13. Microelectromechanical components in electrical metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manninen, Antti; Pesonen, Nadine; Oja, Aarne; Seppa, Heikki

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can offer a competitive alternative for conventional technology in electrical precision measurements. This article summarises recent work in development of MEMS solutions for electrical metrology. MEMS-based voltage references, RMS-to-DC converters, high frequency power sensors, and reference oscillators are discussed. The main principle of operation of the components is the balance between electrical forces and mechanical spring forces in micromachined silicon structures. In RMS sensors and RMS-to-DC converters, the quadratic voltage dependence of the force between plates of a moving-plate capacitor is utilised, and the operation of the MEMS voltage reference is based on the pull-in phenomenon of a moving-plate capacitor. Advantages of MEMS devices compared to more conventional solutions include small size, low power consumption, low price in mass production, and stability. The drift caused by electrostatic charging effects has turned out to be a major problem. This prob...

  14. Consistent Kaluza-Klein Truncations via Exceptional Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Hohm; Henning Samtleben

    2015-01-29

    We present the generalized Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz for the full supersymmetric exceptional field theory in terms of group valued twist matrices subject to consistency equations. With this ansatz the field equations precisely reduce to those of lower-dimensional gauged supergravity parametrized by an embedding tensor. We explicitly construct a family of twist matrices as solutions of the consistency equations. They induce gauged supergravities with gauge groups SO(p,q) and CSO(p,q,r). Geometrically, they describe compactifications on internal spaces given by spheres and (warped) hyperboloides $H^{p,q}$, thus extending the applicability of generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions beyond homogeneous spaces. Together with the dictionary that relates exceptional field theory to D=11 and IIB supergravity, respectively, the construction defines an entire new family of consistent truncations of the original theories. These include not only compactifications on spheres of different dimensions (such as AdS$_5\\times S^5$), but also various hyperboloid compactifications giving rise to a higher-dimensional embedding of supergravities with non-compact and non-semisimple gauge groups.

  15. Consistent Evolution with Different Time-Slicings in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cosgrove

    1996-02-20

    Rovelli's `` quantum mechanics without time'' motivates an intrinsically time-slicing independent picture of reduced phase space quantum gravity, which may be described as ``quantization after evolution''. Sufficient criteria for carrying out quantization after evolution are developed in terms of a general concept of the classical limit of quantum mechanics. If these criteria are satisfied then it is possible to have consistent unitary evolution of operators, with respect to an infinite parameter family of time-slicings (and probably all time-slicings), with the correct classical limit. The criteria are particularly amenable to study in (2+1)-dimensional gravity, where the reduced phase space is finite dimensional.

  16. A consistent quantum model for continuous photodetection processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. de Oliveira; S. S. Mizrahi; V. V. Dodonov

    2003-07-11

    We are modifying some aspects of the continuous photodetection theory, proposed by Srinivas and Davies [Optica Acta 28, 981 (1981)], which describes the non-unitary evolution of a quantum field state subjected to a continuous photocount measurement. In order to remedy inconsistencies that appear in their approach, we redefine the `annihilation' and `creation' operators that enter in the photocount superoperators. We show that this new approach not only still satisfies all the requirements for a consistent photocount theory according to Srinivas and Davies precepts, but also avoids some weird result appearing when previous definitions are used.

  17. A Consistent Firm Objective When Markets are Incomplete: Profit Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabarwal, Tarun

    2004-08-11

    Markets are Incomplete: Profit Maximization Abstract In economies with private firm ownership, when markets are incomplete, and firm sharehold- ers change over time, there is no broad agreement on what ought to be a firm’s objective. It is shown that ex...-post, profit maximization is consistent with shareholder preferences in such economies; that is, along the equilibrium path, in every period and state of the world, every coalition of a firm’s shareholders in that period and state approves a profit...

  18. Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Metallic Bipolar Plates · Carbon Foam for Fuel Cell Humidification · High Temperature Proton ExchangeFuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN Crossover Fuel Cell Stack Components #12;Barriers

  19. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  20. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiro Fujita; Ryo Namba; Yuichiro Tada; Naoyuki Takeda; Hiroyuki Tashiro

    2015-04-15

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton $\\phi$ through the characteristic term $\\phi F\\tilde F$, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. The EM field is subsequently amplified by parametric resonance during the period of inflaton oscillation. Once the thermal plasma is formed (reheating), the produced helical magnetic fields undergo a turbulent process called inverse cascade, which shifts their peak correlation scales from smaller to larger scales. We consistently take all these effects into account within the regime where the perturbation of $\\phi$ is negligible and obtain $B_{\\rm eff} \\sim 10^{-19}$G, indicating the necessity of additional mechanisms to accommodate the observations.

  1. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yamauchi; Keitaro Takahashi

    2015-10-06

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the precision level needed to confirm the consistency inequality even for $f_{\\rm NL}\\approx 0.9$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}\\approx 8$, though it is still hard for a single survey to confirm it when $f_{\\rm NL}\\lesssim 1.5$.

  2. Self-consistent Green's functions with three-body forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arianna Carbone

    2014-07-24

    The present thesis aims at studying the properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter from a Green's functions point of view, including two-body and three-body chiral forces. An extended self-consistent Green's function formalism is defined to consistently incorporate three-body forces in the many-body calculations. The effect of three-nucleon interactions is included via the construction of a dressed two-body density dependent force. This is obtained performing an average of the leading order three-body terms in the chiral effective field theory expansion. The dressed force corresponds to the use of an in-medium propagator in the average which takes into account the correlations characterizing the system at each stage of the many-body calculation. The total energy of the system is obtained by means of a modified Galitskii-Migdal-Koltun sumrule to correctly account for the effect of three-body forces. Microscopic as well as macroscopic properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter are analyzed in detailed.

  3. Surface Tension of Electrolyte Solutions: A Self-consistent Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomer Markovich; David Andelman; Rudi Podgornik

    2014-04-09

    We study the surface tension of electrolyte solutions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Employing field-theoretical methods and considering short-range interactions of anions with the surface, we expand the Helmholtz free energy to first-order in a loop expansion and calculate the excess surface tension. Our approach is self-consistent and yields an analytical prediction that reunites the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We obtain analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of concentrations for different salts using one fit parameter, reproducing the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.10.1029

  4. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Margaret [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schlichting, Hilke E., E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  5. Is scalar-tensor gravity consistent with polytropic stellar models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaisa Henttunen; Iiro Vilja

    2015-03-01

    We study the scalar field potential $V(\\phi)$ in the scalar-tensor gravity with self-consistent polytropic stellar configurations. Without choosing a particular potential, we numerically derive the potential inside various stellar objects. We restrict the potential to conform to general relativity or to $f(R)$ gravity inside and require the solution to arrive at SdS vacuum at the surface. The studied objects are required to obtain observationally valid masses and radii corresponding to solar type stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find that the resulting scalar-tensor potential $V(\\phi)$ for the numerically derived polytrope that conforms to general relativity, in each object class, is highly dependent on the matter configuration as well as on the vacuum requirement at the boundary. As a result, every stellar configuration arrives at a potential $V(\\phi)$ that is not consistent with the other stellar class potentials. Therefore, a general potential that conforms to all these polytropic stellar classes could not be found.

  6. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Brent F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Shihai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  7. NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Evelyn

    NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY Kalea Sebesta Department of Applied Mathematics, known as nucleation, in a two component metal alloy. The motivation behind this study is to use component metal alloys. These alloys are seen in material sciences; therefore, understanding

  8. Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

  9. Lamellar Diblock Copolymers on Rough Substrates: Self-consistent Field Theory Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingkun Man; Jiuzhou Tang; Pan Zhou; Dadong Yan; David Andelman

    2015-08-18

    We present numerical calculations of lamellar phases of di-block copolymers (BCP) confined between two surfaces, where the top surface is flat and the bottom one is corrugated. The corrugated substrate is assumed to have a single $q$-mode of lateral undulations with a wavenumber q_s and amplitude R. We focus on the effects of substrate roughness, parameterized by the dimensionless quantity, q_sR, on the relative stability between parallel and perpendicular orientations of the lamellar phase. The competition between film confinement, energy cost of elastic deformation and gain in surface energy induces a parallel-to-perpendicular transition of the BCP lamellae. Employing self-consistent field theory (SCFT), we study the critical substrate roughness value corresponding to this transition. The critical value increases as function of the surface preference towards one of the two BCP components, and as function of film thickness. But, it decreases with increasing values of the Flory-Huggins parameter. Our findings are equivalent to stating that the critical value decreases as the BCP molecular weight or the natural BCP periodicity increases. We further show that the rough substrate can overcome the formation of parallel lamellae in cases where the top surface has a preference towards one of the two BCP components. Our results are in good agreement with previous experiments, and highlight the physical conditions behind the perpendicular orientation of lamellar phases, as is desired in nanolithography and other industrial applications.

  10. Chaos detection tools: application to a self-consistent triaxial model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolás Maffione; Luciano Darriba; Pablo Cincotta; Claudia Giordano

    2012-12-13

    Together with the variational indicators of chaos, the spectral analysis methods have also achieved great popularity in the field of chaos detection. The former are based on the concept of local exponential divergence. The latter are based on the numerical analysis of some particular quantities of a single orbit, e.g. its frequency. In spite of having totally different conceptual bases, they are used for the very same goals such as, for instance, separating the chaotic and the regular component. In fact, we show herein that the variational indicators serve to distinguish both components of a Hamiltonian system in a more reliable fashion than a spectral analysis method does. We study two start spaces for different energy levels of a self-consistent triaxial stellar dynamical model by means of some selected variational indicators and a spectral analysis method. In order to select the appropriate tools for this paper, we extend previous studies where we make a comparison of several variational indicators on different scenarios. Herein, we compare the Average Power Law Exponent (APLE) and an alternative quantity given by the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Neary Orbits (MEGNO): the MEGNO's Slope Estimation of the largest Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (SElLCE). The spectral analysis method selected for the investigation is the Frequency Modified Fourier Transform (FMFT). Besides a comparative study of the APLE, the Fast Lyapunov Indicator (FLI), the Orthogonal Fast Lyapunov Indicator (OFLI) and the MEGNO/SElLCE, we show that the SElLCE could be an appropriate alternative to the MEGNO when studying large samples of initial conditions. The SElLCE separates the chaotic and the regular components reliably and identifies the different levels of chaoticity. We show that the FMFT is not as reliable as the SElLCE to describe clearly the chaotic domains in the experiments.

  11. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apolinário, Liliana; Milhano, Guilherme; Salgado, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest develop...

  12. Consistency of equations of motion in conformal frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2014-11-05

    Four dimensional scalar-tensor theory is considered within two conformal frames, the Jordan frame (JF) and the Einstein frame (EF). The actions for the theory are equivalent and equations of motion can be obtained from each action. It is found that the JF equations of motion, expressed in terms of EF variables, translate directly into and agree with the EF equations of motion obtained from the EF action, provided that certain simple consistency conditions are satisfied, which is always the case. The implication is that a solution set obtained in one conformal frame can be reliably translated into a solution set for the other frame, and therefore the two frames are, at least, mathematically equivalent.

  13. Unified Field Theory From Enlarged Transformation Group. The Consistent Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Pandres, Jr.; Edward L. Green

    2004-01-21

    A theory has been presented previously in which the geometrical structure of a real four-dimensional space time manifold is expressed by a real orthonormal tetrad, and the group of diffeomorphisms is replaced by a larger group. The group enlargement was accomplished by including those transformations to anholonomic coordinates under which conservation laws are covariant statements. Field equations have been obtained from a variational principle which is invariant under the larger group. These field equations imply the validity of the Einstein equations of general relativity with a stress-energy tensor that is just what one expects for the electroweak field and associated currents. In this paper, as a first step toward quantization, a consistent Hamiltonian for the theory is obtained. Some concluding remarks are given concerning the need for further development of the theory. These remarks include discussion of a possible method for extending the theory to include the strong interaction.

  14. Consistency among distance measurements: transparency, BAO scale and accelerated expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Avgoustidis; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2009-06-11

    We explore consistency among different distance measures, including Supernovae Type Ia data, measurements of the Hubble parameter, and determination of the Baryon acoustic oscillation scale. We present new constraints on the cosmic transparency combining $H(z)$ data together with the latest Supernova Type Ia data compilation. This combination, in the context of a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, improves current constraints by nearly an order of magnitude. We re-examine the recently reported tension between the Baryon acoustic oscillation scale and Supernovae data in light of possible deviations from transparency, concluding that the source of the discrepancy may most likely be found among systematic effects of the modelling of the low redshift data or a simple $\\sim 2-\\sigma$ statistical fluke, rather than in exotic physics. Finally, we attempt to draw model-independent conclusions about the recent accelerated expansion, determining the acceleration redshift to be $z_{acc}=0.35^{+0.20}_{-0.13}$ (1-$\\sigma$).

  15. Consistency condition for inflation from (broken) conformal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalm, Koenraad; Aalst, Ted van der [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands); Shiu, Gary, E-mail: kschalm@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: shiu@physics.wisc.edu, E-mail: vdaalst@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum, i.e. the three-point correlation function of primordial density fluctuations, in slow-roll inflation. It follows from the defining property of slow-roll inflation that primordial correlation functions inherit most of their structure from weakly broken de Sitter symmetries. Using holographic techniques borrowed from the AdS/CFT correspondence, the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum can be mapped to a set of stress-tensor Ward identities in a weakly broken 2+1-dimensional Euclidean CFT. We construct the consistency condition from these Ward identities using conformal perturbation theory. This requires a second order Ward identity and the use of the evolution equation. Our result also illustrates a subtle difference between conformal perturbation theory and the slow-roll expansion.

  16. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  17. Polarized CMB recovery with sparse component separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobin, Jerome; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology, and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting such information from microwave surveys requires disentangling between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which boils down to solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of CMB temperature anisotropies but quite rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to discriminate between the various components. More recent methods, which rather emphasize on the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimate of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, the present paper introduces a new component separation technique dubbed PolGMCA (Polarized Generalized Morphological Component Analysis), which r...

  18. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

  19. Hazard consistent structural demands and in-structure design response spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Carl J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Current analysis methodology for the Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities is specified in ASCE Standard 4. This methodology is based on the use of deterministic procedures with the intention that enough conservatism is included in the specified procedures to achieve an 80% probability of non-exceedance in the computed response of a Structure, System. or Component for given a mean seismic design input. Recently developed standards are aimed at achieving performance-based, risk consistent seismic designs that meet specified target performance goals. These design approaches rely upon accurately characterizing the probability (hazard) level of system demands due to seismic loads consistent with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses. This paper examines the adequacy of the deterministic SSI procedures described in ASCE 4-98 to achieve an 80th percentile of Non-Exceedance Probability (NEP) in structural demand, given a mean seismic input motion. The study demonstrates that the deterministic procedures provide computed in-structure response spectra that are near or greater than the target 80th percentile NEP for site profiles other than those resulting in high levels of radiation damping. The deterministic procedures do not appear to be as robust in predicting peak accelerations, which correlate to structural demands within the structure.

  20. Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-06-30

    The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

  1. A consistent approach to falsifying ?CDM with rare galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Ian; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-07-01

    We consider methods with which to answer the question ''is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for ?CDM?'' After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which ?CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the ''equivalent mass at redshift zero'' for a cluster — the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2? deviations from the ?CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.

  2. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liliana Apolinário; Néstor Armesto; Guilherme Milhano; Carlos A. Salgado

    2015-05-25

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest developments that address such unified description.

  3. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the...

  4. F-term uplifting via consistent D-terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Lalak; O. J. Eyton-Williams; R. Matyszkiewicz

    2007-02-13

    The issue of fine-tuning necessary to achieve satisfactory degree of hierarchy between moduli masses, the gravitino mass and the scale of the cosmological constant has been revisited in the context of supergravities with consistent D-terms. We have studied (extended) racetrack models where supersymmetry breaking and moduli stabilisation cannot be separated from each other. We show that even in such cases the realistic hierarchy can be achieved on the expense of a single fine-tuning. The presence of two condensates changes the role of the constant term in the superpotential, W_0, and solutions with small vacuum energy and large gravitino mass can be found even for very small values of W_0. Models where D-terms are allowed to vanish at finite vevs of moduli fields - denoted `cancellable' D-terms - and the ones where D-terms may vanish only at infinite vevs of some moduli - denoted `non-cancellable' - differ markedly in their properties. It turns out that the tuning with respect to the Planck scale required in the case of cancellable D-terms is much weaker than in the case of non-cancellable ones. We have shown that, against intuition, a vanishing D-term can trigger F-term uplifting of the vacuum energy due to the stringent constraint it imposes on vacuum expectation values of charged fields. Finally we note that our models only rely on two dimensionful parameters: M_P and W_0.

  5. Towards consistent Electroweak Precision Data constraints in the SMEFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laure Berthier; Michael Trott

    2015-05-06

    We discuss the impact of many previously neglected effects of higher dimensional operators when fitting to Electroweak Precision data (EWPD) in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). We calculate the general case of $2 \\rightarrow 2$ fermion scattering in the SMEFT to order $\\mathcal{O}(\\bar{v}_T^2/\\Lambda^2)$ valid on and off the $Z$ pole, in the massless fermion limit. We demonstrate that previously neglected corrections scale as $\\Gamma_Z M_Z/\\bar{v}_T^2$ in the partial widths extracted from measured cross sections at LEPI, compared to the leading effect of dimension six operators in anomalous $Z$ couplings. Further, constraints on leading effects of anomalous $Z$ couplings are also modified by neglected perturbative corrections and dimension eight operators. We perform a minimal EWPD fit to illustrate the size of the error these corrections induce, when bounding leading effects. These considerations relax bounds compared to a naive leading order analysis, and show that constraints that rise above the percent level are subject to substantial theoretical uncertanties. We also argue that renormalization group running global constraints expressed through $\\chi^2$ functions to a common scale, and then minimizing and performing a global fit of all data allows more consistent constraints to be obtained in the SMEFT.

  6. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonovi?, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ?CDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast ? and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale ?. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  8. ERUPTION OF A SOLAR FILAMENT CONSISTING OF TWO THREADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi Yi; Jiang Yunchun; Li Haidong; Hong Junchao; Zheng Ruisheng E-mail: jyc@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-10-10

    The trigger and driving mechanism for the eruption of a filament consisting of two dark threads was studied with unprecedented high cadence and resolution of He II 304 A observations made by the Atmospheric Imagining Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the observations made by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescope on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A). The filament was located at the periphery of the active region NOAA 11228 and erupted on 2011 June 6. At the onset of the eruption, a turbulent filament thread was found to be heated and to elongate in stride over a second one. After it rose slowly, most interestingly, the elongating thread was driven to contact and interact with the second one, and it then erupted with its southern leg being wrapped by a newly formed thread produced by the magnetic reconnection between fields carried by the two threads. Combining the observations from STEREO-A/EUVI and SDO/AIA 304 A images, the three-dimensional shape of the axis of the filament was obtained and it was found that only the southern leg of the eruptive filament underwent rotation. We suggest that the eruption was triggered by the reconnection of the turbulent filament thread and the surrounding magnetic field, and that it was mainly driven by the kink instability of the southern leg of the eruptive filament that possessed a more twisted field introduced by the reconnection-produced thread.

  9. Multi-wavelength constraints on the inflationary consistency relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Hadzhiyska, Boryana; Meyers, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We present the first attempt to use a combination of CMB, LIGO, and PPTA data to constrain both the tilt and the running of primordial tensor power spectrum through constraints on the gravitational wave energy density generated in the early universe. Combining measurements at different cosmological scales highlights how complementary data can be used to test the predictions of early universe models including the inflationary consistency relation. Current data prefers a slightly positive tilt ($n_t = 0.13^{+0.54}_{-0.75}$) and a negative running ($n_{t, {\\rm run}} < -0.25$) for the tensor power spectrum spectrum. Interestingly, the addition of direct gravitational wave detector data puts strong bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r < 0.2 $ since the large positive tensor tilt preferred by the Planck temperature power spectrum is no longer allowed. We comment on possible effects of a large positive tilt on the background expansion and show that depending on the assumptions regarding the UV cutoff ($k_{\\...

  10. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  11. Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher Information Technology@ise.gmu.edu ABSTRACT One goal of integration testing for object-oriented software is to ensure high object. It addresses methods for identifying the relevant actions of a test component to be integrated into the system

  12. The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology George Dimitoglou SOHO ESA/NASA Project Science Team EER/L3 Space Sciences Division #12;2 SOHO Archive Components n-tier architecture are many more #12;6 Technology Review #12;7 Statistics CDS 157,350 CELIAS 62,466 EIT 237,158 ERNE 7

  13. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models, a class of powerful by a neural net- work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  14. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography a potential oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models by a neural net­ work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  15. Call for Papers Optoelectronic Interconnects and Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    -speed detectors for OI component assembly; fully embedded components 3D optical routing and assembly connectors for III-V and Si photonics multi-channel device packaging thermal and structural modeling optical International Symposium on SPIE OPTO: Optoelectronic Materials, Devices and Applications 22-27 January 2011

  16. Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2011-07-05

    A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

  17. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  18. Hybrid solar lighting systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2007-06-12

    A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

  19. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  20. MHD-generator-component development. Quarterly report, July 1980-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The overall objectives of this program are twofold: to contribute, by appropriate systematic experimental and analytical investigations, to the engineering database necessary for the design and construction of MHD generators at CDIF-scale (50 MW/sub th/) and baseload scale (2000 MW/sub th/), and to design and fabricate specific hardware items to be tested at the CDIF site in Butte, Montana. The overall program consists of a series of inter-related tasks, described as follows: (1) perform experimental investigations related to MHD channel design and performance by testing existing channel hardware and by fabricating and testing new channel hardware; (2) perform experimental investigations related to MHD channel perform and lifetime, with the principal aim of systematically obtaining data on the prototype electrodes for the coal-fired, subsonic, long-duration CDIF Generator 1B3; (3) perform testing on channel loading and control utilizing the supersonic Reference Channel No. 4 and other appropriate channels and/or test modules, at magnetic fields to 4 T; (4) provide for facility operation and maintenance of the Mk VI and Mk VII test bays; (5) design and fabricate the following items of CDIF hardware: CDIF Generator 1B2, CDIF Generator 1B3, CDIF 1B Ash Injection Combustor (AIC), CDIF Generator 1A2, and diagonal current control and load consolidation for the 1A2, 1B2 and 1B3 generators; and (4) compare the performance and durability characteristics of coal-fired versus (Mk VI-type) AIC-fired supersonic channels, using existing facilities at the AERL Haverhill site. Progress is described. (WHK)

  1. NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman; Dane F. Wilson; Steven J. Pawel

    2007-09-01

    A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R&D decisions.

  2. Downhole component with a pressure equalization passageway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Reynolds, Jay T.; Breihan, James W.; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-08-22

    The present invention includes a downhole component adapted for transmitting downhole data. The downhole component includes a threaded end on a downhole component. The threaded end furthermore includes an interior region, and exterior region, and a mating surface wherein a cavity is formed. A data transmission element is disposed in the cavity and displaces a volume of the cavity. At least one passageway is formed in the threaded region between interior and exterior regions. The passageway is in fluid communication with both the interior and exterior regions and thereby relieves pressure build up of thread lubricant upon tool joint make up.

  3. Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

  4. About consistence between pi N Delta spin-3/2 gauge couplings and electromagnetic gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Badagnani; C. Barbero; A. Mariano

    2015-03-05

    We analyze the consistence between the recently proposed "spin 3/2 gauge" interaction for the Delta resonance with nucleons and pions, and the fundamental electromagnetic gauge invariance in any radiative amplitude. Chiral symmetric pion-derivative pi N Delta couplings can be substituted through a linear transformation to get Delta-derivative ones, which have the property of decoupling the 1/2 field components of the Delta propagator. Nevertheless, the electromagnetic gauge invariance introduced through minimal substitution in all derivatives, can only be fulfilled at a given order n without destroying the spin 3/2 one by dropping n+1 order terms within an effective field theory (EFT) framework with a defined power counting. In addition, we show that the Ward identity for the gamma Delta gamma vertex cannot be fulfilled with a trimmed 3/2 propagator, which should be necessary in order to keep the spin 3/2 gauge symmetry in the radiative case for the gamma Delta gamma amplitude. Finally, it is shown that radiative corrections of the spin 3/2 gauge strong vertexes at one loop, reintroduce the conventional interaction.

  5. Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

  6. Thermochemical nanolithography components, systems, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedo, Elisa; Marder, Seth R.; de Heer, Walt A.; Szoskiewicz, Robert J.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Jones, Simon C.; Okada, Takashi; Wang, Debin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Henderson, Clifford L.; Hua, Yueming

    2013-06-18

    Improved nanolithography components, systems, and methods are described herein. The systems and methods generally employ a resistively heated atomic force microscope tip to thermally induce a chemical change in a surface. In addition, certain polymeric compositions are also disclosed.

  7. Outsourcing the Design of Structural Building Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swearingin, Adam V.

    2008-05-16

    . This project contains an examination of the tasks associated with the design of structural building components. These tasks are evaluated to determine the feasibility of outsourcing any or all “core competencies” to a consultant which employs design...

  8. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  9. Principal Components Analysis for Binary Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seokho

    2010-07-14

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has been widely used as a statistical tool for the dimension reduction of multivariate data in various application areas and extensively studied in the long history of statistics. One of the limitations of PCA...

  10. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  11. SA3654 Component characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), was provided with production capability assurance program (PCAP) funding to develop, characterize, and qualify purchased product components for use on the PRESS-A program. The SA3654, N-Channel, Power MOSFET was identified as a component needing such activity to support PRESS-A. This report presents the characterization activities and results for the SA3654.

  12. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1996-01-16

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

  13. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

  14. Electrochemical components employing polysiloxane-derived binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2013-06-11

    A processed polysiloxane resin binder for use in electrochemical components and the method for fabricating components with the binder. The binder comprises processed polysiloxane resin that is partially oxidized and retains some of its methyl groups following partial oxidation. The binder is suitable for use in electrodes of various types, separators in electrochemical devices, primary lithium batteries, electrolytic capacitors, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells and sensors.

  15. Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

  16. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hengartner, Nick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon G [CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  17. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  18. Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  19. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Daly, Jeffery E. (Cypress, TX)

    2009-05-05

    A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

  20. Component technology for Stirling power converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieme, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.

  1. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  2. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  3. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  4. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  5. Self-consistent nonlinear kinetic simulations of the anomalous Doppler instability of suprathermal electrons in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, W. N. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Suprathermal tails in the distributions of electron velocities parallel to the magnetic field are found in many areas of plasma physics, from magnetic confinement fusion to solar system plasmas. Parallel electron kinetic energy can be transferred into plasma waves and perpendicular gyration energy of particles through the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI), provided that energetic electrons with parallel velocities v{sub ||}?(?+?{sub ce})/k{sub ||} are present; here ?{sub ce} denotes electron cyclotron frequency, ? the wave angular frequency, and k{sub ||} the component of wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present the first fully self-consistent relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the ADI, spanning the linear and nonlinear regimes of the ADI. We test the robustness of the analytical theory in the linear regime and follow the ADI through to the steady state. By directly evaluating the parallel and perpendicular dynamical contributions to j·E in the simulations, we follow the energy transfer between the excited waves and the bulk and tail electron populations for the first time. We find that the ratio ?{sub ce}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}) of energy transfer between parallel and perpendicular, obtained from linear analysis, does not apply when damping is fully included, when we find it to be ?{sub pe}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}); here ?{sub pe} denotes the electron plasma frequency. We also find that the ADI can arise beyond the previously expected range of plasma parameters, in particular when ?{sub ce}>?{sub pe}. The simulations also exhibit a spectral feature which may correspond to the observations of suprathermal narrowband emission at ?{sub pe} detected from low density tokamak plasmas.

  6. The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for High Performance Scientific Computing Jeremy G: (219) 631­9260 1 Introduction The Standard Template Library (STL) was released in 1995 and adopted by the tremendous success of the STL for general­purpose programming. What was not so obvious at the time, however

  7. Components of the Creep Strength of Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Components of the Creep Strength of Welds M. Murugananth and H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia Department://www.msm.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT Modern power plant steels and welding alloys, designed to resist creep deforma- tion at high in the sense that it covers all common ferritic steels and welding alloys of the type used in the construc

  8. Microwave heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2007-01-09

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  9. Fast Kernel-Based Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Fast Kernel-Based Independent Component Analysis Hao Shen , Stefanie Jegelka and Arthur Gretton instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). FastKICA (Fast HSIC-based Kernel ICA) is a new optimisation-based ICA algorithms, FastKICA is applicable to any twice differentiable kernel function. Experimental

  10. Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honavar, Vasant

    Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components Jyotishman PATHAK, Samik BASU, sbasu, honavar}@cs.iastate.edu Abstract. Web services are fast emerging as the technology of choice to an iterative and incremental technique for modeling composite Web services proposed by the authors. Keywords

  11. Principal component analysis within nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Al-Sayed

    2015-04-15

    The principal component analysis (PCA) of different parameters affecting collectivity of nuclei predicted to be candidate of the interacting boson model dynamical symmetries are performed. The results show that, the use of PCA within nuclear structure can give us a simple way to identify collectivity together with the parameters simultaneously affecting it.

  12. INTRODUCTION Structural components in the cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    INTRODUCTION PROTEINS · Structural components in the cell · Function that maintain the cellular metabolism · ~50% dry weight of an organism · Human cell: more than 10.000 different proteins #12: PROTEIN STRUCTURE " Chain SECONDARY STRUCTURE AAx " Chain AAy Hidrogen bridge bond #12;INTRODUCTION

  13. Injection Molding of Micron-scale Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Injection Molding of Micron-scale Components ver. 1 1ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © 2009 #12;Micro MoldingMicro Molding · EquipmentEquipment · BioMEMS sensorsEjEjEjector Cylinders Bottom Mold Half Top Mold Half Nozzle Ejector Cylinders Bottom Mold Half Top Mold Half Nozzle

  14. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  15. Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally Intermingled Rod-like Grains Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally...

  16. CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 June 29, 2011 Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement (HSS CRAD 45-12, Rev. 1)...

  17. Methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2014-08-19

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity, which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate, which may include microchannels or other features.

  18. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  19. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry.

  20. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve...

  1. Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  2. Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweight Valve Train Components Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  3. Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components. There is...

  4. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

  5. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-01-01

    of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with allTable 1. actuator air handler boiler chiller coil controllerattribute lists for the boiler and actuator components. A

  6. AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  7. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

  8. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vss033carlson2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components...

  9. Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2005-01-18

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  10. Expansive components in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Relano; J. E. Beckman

    2004-10-18

    We study the presence of low intensity high velocity components, which we have termed wing features in the integrated Halpha emission line profiles of the HII region populations of the spiral barred galaxies NGC 1530, NGC 3359 and NGC 6951. We find that more than a third of the HII region line profiles in each galaxy show these components. The highest fraction is obtained in the galaxy whose line profiles show the best S:N, which suggests that wing features of this type may well exist in most, if not all, HII region line profiles. Applying selection criteria to the wing features, we obtain a sample of HII regions with clearly defined high velocity components in their profiles. Deconvolution of a representative sample of the line profiles eliminates any doubt that the wing features could possibly be due to instrumental effects. We present an analysis of the high velocity low intensity features fitting them with Gaussian functions; the emission measures, central velocities and velocity dispersions for the red and blue features take similar values. We interpret the features as signatures of expanding shells inside the HII regions. Up to a shell radius of R(shell)~0.2R(reg), the stellar winds from the central ionizing stars appear to satisfy the energy and momentum requirements for the formation and driving the shell. Several examples of the most luminous HII regions show that the shells appear to have larger radii; in these cases additional mechanisms may well be needed to explain the kinetic energies and momenta of the shells.

  11. Remarks on the regularity criteria of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system in terms of two velocity field components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo [Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University, 401 Mathematical Sciences, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University, 401 Mathematical Sciences, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system and obtain its regularity criteria in terms of only two velocity vector field components eliminating the condition on the third component completely. The proof consists of a new decomposition of the four nonlinear terms of the system and estimating a component of the magnetic vector field in terms of the same component of the velocity vector field. This result may be seen as a component reduction result of many previous works [C. He and Z. Xin, “On the regularity of weak solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic equations,” J. Differ. Equ. 213(2), 234–254 (2005); Y. Zhou, “Remarks on regularities for the 3D MHD equations,” Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 12(5), 881–886 (2005)].

  12. Slicing behavior specification of components* Ondej Ser1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Database encapsulates accounts with prepaid internet connection. The Token component is a dynamically created entity

  13. Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis: Existence and Uniqueness Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvärinen, Aapo

    \\Lambda Corresponding author 1 #12; Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis: Existence and Uniqueness

  14. Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

  15. Review article Components manufacturing for solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components is given and the fabrication techniques of ceramic components Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); Components manufacturingReview article Components manufacturing for solid oxide fuel cells F. Tietz *, H.-P. Buchkremer, D

  16. Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, F.C.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-05-22

    A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes is described. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

  17. Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

  18. Method of making low work function component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Vance (Niskayuna, NY); Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Delmar, NY)

    2011-11-15

    A method for fabricating a component is disclosed. The method includes: providing a member having an effective work function of an initial value, disposing a sacrificial layer on a surface of the member, disposing a first agent within the member to obtain a predetermined concentration of the agent at said surface of the member, annealing the member, and removing the sacrificial layer to expose said surface of the member, wherein said surface has a post-process effective work function that is different from the initial value.

  19. Modeling the Phillips curve with unobserved components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew C

    is then nonstationary. However, writing the equation as #1;#25;t = #12;xt+"t makes it clear that what we have is not really a Phillips curve (though adding lags of xt and incorporating a unit root could retrieve the situation). On the other hand, a stationary model... -looking. The conditions under which a model with an expectational term reverts to (10) are derived below. The fact that the forecast function for a random walk component is constant simpli?es matters considerably. The reduced form of (10) is an ARMAX model in which #1;#25...

  20. Turbine engine component with cooling passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-01-17

    A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

  1. Communication adapter for use with a drilling component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Hall; Jr.; H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Bradford, Kline (Orem, UT); Rawle, Michael (Springville, UT)

    2007-04-03

    A communication adapter is disclosed that provides for removable attachment to a drilling component when the drilling component is not actively drilling and for communication with an integrated transmission system in the drilling component. The communication adapter comprises a data transmission coupler that facilitates communication between the drilling component and the adapter, a mechanical coupler that facilitates removable attachment of the adapter to the drilling component, and a data interface.

  2. Intelligent Component Monitoring for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefteri Tsoukalas

    2010-07-30

    Reliability and economy are two major concerns for a nuclear power generation system. Next generation nuclear power reactors are being developed to be more reliable and economic. An effective and efficient surveillance system can generously contribute toward this goal. Recent progress in computer systems and computational tools has made it necessary and possible to upgrade current surveillance/monitoring strategy for better performance. For example, intelligent computing techniques can be applied to develop algorithm that help people better understand the information collected from sensors and thus reduce human error to a new low level. Incidents incurred from human error in nuclear industry are not rare and have been proven costly. The goal of this project is to develop and test an intelligent prognostics methodology for predicting aging effects impacting long-term performance of nuclear components and systems. The approach is particularly suitable for predicting the performance of nuclear reactor systems which have low failure probabilities (e.g., less than 10-6 year-). Such components and systems are often perceived as peripheral to the reactor and are left somewhat unattended. That is, even when inspected, if they are not perceived to be causing some immediate problem, they may not be paid due attention. Attention to such systems normally involves long term monitoring and possibly reasoning with multiple features and evidence, requirements that are not best suited for humans.

  3. Consistent Treatment of Inter-and Intramolecular Polarization in Molecular Mechanics Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Consistent Treatment of Inter- and Intramolecular Polarization in Molecular Mechanics Calculations multipoles for an arbitrary static structure or conformation is given. With the help of the intramolecular

  4. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics This content will become...

  5. President Obama's National Network for Manufacturing Innovation consists of regional hubs that will accelerate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and carbon fiber composites that will allow components made from these materials to be recycled at the end clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. Another area of manufacturing that is poised

  6. Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

    2011-03-01

    A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

  7. Futuristic concepts in engines and components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This publication includes papers on two-stroke engines and components, Brayton Stirling and Otto Cycles, alternative cycles, advanced combustion, and other related topics. Contents include: Paving the way to controlled combustion engines (CCE); A new class of stratified-charge internal combustion engine; Internal combustion (IC) engine with minimum number of moving parts; New type of heat engine -- externally heated air engine; A porous media burner for reforming methanol for fuel cell powered electric vehicles; Using a Stirling engine simulation program as a regenerator design aid; In-cylinder regenerated engines; High speed electronic fuel injection for direct injected rotary engine; and The characteristics of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the side exhaust port rotary engine.

  8. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  9. Journal of Economic Theory 112 (2003) 353364 Time-consistent policies$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    2003-01-01

    restriction under which the time-consistent open-loop policy is stationary. We use examples to illustrate-loop policy rule, such as a linear income tax, is time consistent. This approach also identifies the (possibly [1,6]). A representative agent chooses a consumption trajectory cðtÞ in order to maximize the present

  10. Statistical Learning : stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of Empirical Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consis- tent, so that they may algorithm satisfying it and, (b) necessary and sufficient for generalization and consistency of ERM. Thus for general learning algorithms while subsuming the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. We discuss al

  11. Statistical Learning : CVEEEloo stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Risk Minimization (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consistent, so, (b) necessary and sufficient for con- sistency of ERM. Thus CVEEEloo stability is a weak form subsuming the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. We discuss alternative forms of stability

  12. Statistical Learning : LOO stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Risk Minimization (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consis- tent, (b) necessary and suffi- cient for consistency of ERM. Thus LOO stability is a weak form of stability the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. In particular, we conclude that a certain form of well

  13. PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajpoot, Nasir

    PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION Adam Bowen for light fields: a global method based on the idea of photo-consistency and a local method which employs. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the two methods as compared to other photo

  14. Incorporating self-consistently calculated mineral physics into thermochemical mantle convection simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    the material properties density, thermal expansivity, specific heat capacity, and seismic velocity is probably due to self-consistent plate tectonics and depth-dependent viscosity. In conclusion, this combined approach of mantle convection and self-consistently calculated mineral physics is a powerful and useful

  15. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4 Elekta Oy, Helsinki, Finland Abstract Ultra-low. (2013) Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

  16. Self-tuning Speculation for Maintaining the Consistency of Client-Cached Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Consistency (AACC), in a page server DBMS architecture with page-level consistency. The simulation results. Keywords--self-tuning speculation; parallel comminication; concurrency control; data-shipping DBMS I. INTRODUCTION Client/server DBMS architectures fall into two main categories, query-shipping and data

  17. Aalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liso, Vincenzo

    ., & Liso, V. (2013). Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell oxide fuel cell system and absorption heat pump Irene Albacete Cachorroa ,Iulia Maria DarabanaAalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel

  18. A new hybrid architecture consisting of highly mesoporous CNT/carbon nanofibers from starch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    A new hybrid architecture consisting of highly mesoporous CNT/carbon nanofibers from starch Yun the capacitance in electrochemical capacitors. This paper reports a new hybrid carbon nanofiber architecture successfully fabricated a new hybrid carbon architecture consisting of CNT reinforced-carbon nanofibers

  19. Consistency of the Geometric Brownian Motion Model of Stock Prices with Asymmetric Information.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    Consistency of the Geometric Brownian Motion Model of Stock Prices with Asymmetric Information on the microeconomic foundation of modern option pricing models. We develop a model of market agents' interactions, induced by heterogeneity of information, which is consistent with both modern option pricing models

  20. Relative energetics and structural properties of zirconia using a self-consistent tight-binding model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Relative energetics and structural properties of zirconia using a self-consistent tight We describe an empirical, self-consistent, orthogonal tight-binding model for zirconia, which allows orders the zero temperature energies of all zirconia polymorphs. The Zr-O matrix elements

  1. Page 1 of 2 80.3 Consistent Treatment of Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    Page 1 of 2 80.3 Consistent Treatment of Costs Policy Name: CONSISTENT TREATMENT OF COSTS October 2008 1. Policy Statement OMB Circular A21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions, section J, contains a list of items that are deemed unallowable as direct costs on federally sponsored

  2. Consistency, Availability, and Convergence Prince Mahajan, Lorenzo Alvisi, and Mike Dahlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlin, Michael D.

    Consistency, Availability, and Convergence Prince Mahajan, Lorenzo Alvisi, and Mike Dahlin identify fundamental tradeoffs among properties of consistency, availability, and convergence, and we close the gap between what is known to be impossible (i.e. CAP) and known systems that are highly-available

  3. ANALYSIS OF DUAL CONSISTENCY FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN DISCRETIZATIONS OF SOURCE TERMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    , and diffusion of turbulent eddy viscosity, and state derivative dependent source terms appear in both the k to a dual inconsistent scheme. A straightforward procedure for correcting this dual inconsistency-dimensional test problem confirm that the dual consistent and asymp- totically dual consistent schemes achieve

  4. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belotsky, K; Kouvaris, C; Laletin, M

    2015-01-01

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that th...

  5. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; C. Kouvaris; M. Laletin

    2015-08-12

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that there is a small range of parameter space that this scenario can be realised under certain conditions regarding the cosmic ray propagation and the final state radiation. This range of parameters fall inside the region where the current run of LHC can probe, and therefore it will soon be possible to either verify or exclude conclusively this model of dark matter.

  6. AR for the Masses: Building a Low-Cost Portable AR System from Off-the-Shelf Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chun-Fa

    to wear a head-mounted display (HMD). Its cost is low because the whole system consists of only two web of the head position. That is the main reason why we may build a low-cost head tracking system. 2 PreviousAR for the Masses: Building a Low-Cost Portable AR System from Off-the-Shelf Components Hsiang

  7. 2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone of Monochamus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone and identified as 2-(undecyloxy)-ethanol. In analyses by GC coupled to electroantennography the only consistent, Sweden, and China. 2-(Undecyl- oxy)-ethanol was attractive to both male and female M. sutor beetles

  8. Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-04-03

    A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

  9. Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

    2008-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

  10. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

  11. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  12. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-07-12

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

  13. The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    1 The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines Sarennah J.P. Longworth Newnham College of bolting together magnesium alloys components at temperatures around 100o C, such as those found in car

  14. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-04-29

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

  15. Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2005-01-01

    As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

  16. A Methodology of Component Integration and Xudong He2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    of behavioral observation developed in our previous work, this chapter proposes a formal model of component integration testing methods and a hierarchy of behavioral observation schemes suitable for component

  17. Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice, Strategy Supervisor #12;2 #12;Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number

  18. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain Network Performance Measures and Supplier and Component Importance Identification The Algorithm Numerical Examples

  19. How a major purchaser negotiated interrelated power contracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menning, J.L. [Northern Border Pipeline, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This article illustrates how electric power purchase terms, appropriate for the evolving electric environment, were negotiated with different utilities to serve an industrial load at multiple sites. Retail competition between alternate power suppliers is either nonexistent or strictly constrained today in the states where these facilities are located. However, as these states eventually follow the lead of others, this will change in the next several years. The article is written for those with the task of acquiring power in the emerging environment, particularly those with little or no experience in acquiring power in an environment allowing competitive access to multiple energy suppliers. It includes what each of the sides in the negotiations held as important; a summary of the key contract features; and a recap of how these features balance the conflicting desires of the parties allowing each side to achieve those goals they value most highly. Appended to the article is a reference list of questions an industrial purchaser may find helpful in negotiating electric service in the evolving electrical environment.

  20. Impact of Biodiesel on Fuel System Component Durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, B.

    2005-09-01

    A study of the effects of biodiesel blends on fuel system components and the physical characteristics of elastomer materials.

  1. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  2. Self-consistent computation of gamma-ray spectra due to proton-proton interactions in black hole systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bhattacharyya; N. Bhatt; R. Misra

    2006-06-07

    In the inner regions of an accretion disk around a black hole, relativistic protons can interact with ambient matter to produce electrons, positrons and $\\gamma$-rays. The resultant steady state electron and positron particle distributions are self-consistently computed taking into account Coulomb and Compton cooling, $e^-e^+$ pair production (due to $\\gamma-\\gamma$ annihilation) and pair annihilation. While earlier works used the diffusion approximation to obtain the particle distributions, here we solve a more general integro-differential equation that correctly takes into account the large change in particle energy that occur when the leptons Compton scatter off hard X-rays. Thus this formalism can also be applied to the hard state of black hole systems, where the dominant ambient photons are hard X-rays. The corresponding photon energy spectrum is calculated and compared with broadband data of black hole binaries in different spectral states. The results indicate that the $\\gamma$-ray spectra ($E > 0.8$ MeV) of both the soft and hard spectral states and the entire hard X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of the ultra-soft state, could be due to $p-p$ interactions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that there always exists in these systems a $\\gamma$-ray spectral component due to $p-p$ interactions which can contribute between 0.5 to 10% of the total bolometric luminosty. The model predicts that {\\it GLAST} would be able to detect black hole binaries and provide evidence for the presence of non-thermal protons which in turn would give insight into the energy dissipation process and jet formation in these systems.

  3. Component-based Car Detection in Street Scene Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Component-based Car Detection in Street Scene Images by Brian Leung Submitted to the Department by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;Component-based Car consider the task of building a component-based detector in a more difficult domain: cars in natural images

  4. Process for protecting bonded components from plating shorts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Bonde, Wayne L. (Pleasanton, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method which protects the region between a component and the substrate onto which the components is bonded using an electrically insulating fillet of photoresist. The fillet protects the regions from subsequent plating with metal and therefore shorting the plated conductors which run down the sides of the component and onto the substrate.

  5. A Component Selection Algorithm for HighPerformance Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    A Component Selection Algorithm for High­Performance Pipelines Smita Bakshi Daniel D. Gajski the critical paths. This report presents a cost­optimized algorithm for selecting components and pipelining Problem Statement and Definitions 9 5 Component Selection and Pipelining 10 5.1 An overview

  6. Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACS 2006 Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces Jonas Elmqvist compositional rules and derived safety interfaces for each component. The derivation of safety interfaces and the automatically generated interfaces. The component model uses reactive modules as the formal notation

  7. Building America Webinar: Standardized Retrofit Packages — What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will focus on specific Building America projects that have examined methods to consistently meet high levels of energy performance in existing homes, with a focus on retrofit packages that can be replicated across many homes.

  8. Near-infrared photodetector consisting of J-aggregating cyanine dye and metal oxide thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osedach, Timothy P.

    We demonstrate a near-infrared photodetector that consists of a thin film of the J-aggregating cyanine dye, U3, and transparent metal-oxide charge transport layers. The high absorption coefficient of the U3 film, combined ...

  9. Electron cyclotron microinstability in the foot of a perpendicular shock: A self-consistent PIC simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muschietti, L; Lembege, B

    2006-01-01

    shock: a self-consistent PIC simulation L. Muschietti a andand run particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of shocks withe?ectively two-dimensional. PIC simulations of perpendicular

  10. Multi-Graph Matching via Affinity Optimization with Graduated Consistency Regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Hongyuan

    infusing the consistency. We also propose two mechanisms to elicit the common inliers against outliers is applied to infus- ing multi-source sensor data [8]. Graphic analysis often requires to model objects

  11. Fully self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation using a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fully self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation using a plane-wave basis set This content will become publicly available on March 22, 2016 Prev Next Title: Fully...

  12. The consistency, the composition and the causality of the asynchronous flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serban E. Vlad

    2015-04-21

    Let $\\Phi:\\{0,1\\}^{n}\\longrightarrow\\{0,1\\}^{n}$. The asynchronous flows are (discrete time and real time) functions that result by iterating the coordinates $\\Phi_{i}$ independently on each other. The purpose of the paper is that of showing that the asynchronous flows fulfill the properties of consistency, composition and causality that define the dynamical systems. The origin of the problem consists in modelling the asynchronous circuits from the digital electrical engineering.

  13. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  14. Linear Consistency Testing Yonatan Aumann , Johan Hastad , Michael O. Rabin , and Madhu Sudan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    and Rubinfeld [8] to check the linear- consistency of three functions f1, f2, f3 mapping a finite Abelian group G to an Abelian group H: Pick x, y G uniformly and independently at random and check if f1(x) + f2 the consistency of multiple func- tions. Given a triple of functions f1, f2, f3 : G H, we say

  15. Tensor force effects and high-momentum components in the nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arianna Carbone; Artur Polls; Constança Providência; Arnau Rios; Isaac Vidaña

    2013-09-10

    We analyze microscopic many-body calculations of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. The calculations are performed in the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock and the Self-Consistent Green's Functions methods. Within Brueckner-Hartree-Fock, the Hellmann-Feynman theorem gives access to the kinetic energy contribution as well as the contributions of the different components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The tensor component gives the largest contribution to the symmetry energy. The decomposition of the symmetry energy in a kinetic part and a potential energy part provides physical insight on the correlated nature of the system, indicating that neutron matter is less correlated than symmetric nuclear matter. Within the Self-Consistent Green's Function approach, we compute the momentum distributions and we identify the effects of the high momentum components in the symmetry energy. The results are obtained for the realistic interaction Argonne V18 potential, supplemented by the Urbana IX three-body force in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations.

  16. Common independent components of the P3b, N400, and P600 ERP components to deviant linguistic events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppe, David Martin

    2007-01-01

    A componential analysis of the ERP elicited by novel eventsL. (1993). The reliability of ERP components in the auditoryPrincipal components analysis of ERP data. In T. C. Handy (

  17. Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radenski, Atanas

    Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Atanas Radenski Chapman University Department of Computer Science://www.chapman.edu/~radenski/ Abstract Software components can be implemented and distributed as collections of classes, then adapted

  18. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  19. Technical Program Maintaining Consistent Conditions over a Wide Range of Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    of Material Deposition Rates in Beam-Based Additive Manufacturing: Jack Beuth1; Shane Esola1; Raymond Walker2 consideration for additive manufacturing and repair applications in the aerospace industry. To be successful Effect of Process Parameters on Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Additively Manufactured Components in Ti-6Al-4

  20. A Case Study of Sedimentation of Charged Colloids: The Primitive Model and the Effective One-Component Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldemar Torres; Alejandro Cuetos; Marjolein Dijkstra; Rene van Roij

    2007-02-20

    Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium density profiles of suspensions of charge-stabilized colloids are calculated theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation, both for a one-component model of colloidal particles interacting through pairwise screened-Coulomb repulsions and for a three-component model of colloids, cations, and anions with unscreened-Coulomb interactions. We focus on a state point for which experimental measurements are available [C.P. Royall et al., J. Phys.: Cond. Matt. {\\bf 17}, 2315 (2005)]. Despite the apparently different picture that emerges from the one- and three-component model (repelling colloids pushing each other to high altitude in the former, versus a self-generated electric field that pushes the colloids up in the latter), we find similar colloidal density profiles for both models from theory as well as simulation, thereby suggesting that these pictures represent different view points of the same phenomenon. The sedimentation profiles obtained from an effective one-component model by MC simulations and theory, together with MC simulations of the multi-component primitive model are consistent among themselves, but differ quantitatively from the results of a theoretical multi-component description at the Poisson-Boltzmann level. We find that for small and moderate colloid charge the Poisson-Boltzmann theory gives profiles in excellent agreement with the effective one-component theory if a smaller effective charge is used. We attribute this discrepancy to the poor treatment of correlations in the Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

  1. A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2011-01-15

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  2. Self-consistent treatment of the self-energy in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. Gad; E. M. Darwish

    2003-10-30

    The influence of hole-hole propagation in addition to the conventional particle-particle propagation, on the energy per nucleon and the momentum distribution is investigated. The results are compared to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) calculations with a continuous choice and conventional choice for the single-particle spectrum. The Bethe-Goldstone equation has been solved using realistic $NN$ interactions. Also, the structure of nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter is evaluated. All the self-energies are calculated self-consistently. Starting from the BHF approximation without the usual angle-average approximation, the effects of hole-hole contributions and a self-consistent treatment within the framework of the Green function approach are investigated. Using the self-consistent self-energy, the hole and particle self-consistent spectral functions including the particle-particle and hole-hole ladder contributions in nuclear matter are calculated using realistic $NN$ interactions. We found that, the difference in binding energy between both results, i.e. BHF and self-consistent Green function, is not large. This explains why is the BHF ignored the 2h1p contribution.

  3. On testing and extending the inflationary consistency relation for tensor modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham Boyle; Kendrick M. Smith; Cora Dvorkin; Neil Turok

    2015-08-05

    If observations confirm BICEP2's claim of a tensor-scalar ratio $r\\approx 0.2$ on CMB scales, then the inflationary consistency relation $n_{t}=-r/8$ predicts a small negative value for the tensor spectral index $n_t$. We show that future CMB polarization experiments should be able to confirm this prediction at several sigma. We also show how to properly extend the consistency relation to solar system scales, where the primordial gravitational wave density $\\Omega_{gw}$ could be measured by proposed experiments such as the Big Bang Observer. This would provide a far more stringent test of the consistency relation and access much more detailed information about the early universe.

  4. Statistical dynamics of classical systems: A self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzetic, Douglas J. Wickham, Robert A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-06-28

    We develop a self-consistent field theory for particle dynamics by extremizing the functional integral representation of a microscopic Langevin equation with respect to the collective fields. Although our approach is general, here we formulate it in the context of polymer dynamics to highlight satisfying formal analogies with equilibrium self-consistent field theory. An exact treatment of the dynamics of a single chain in a mean force field emerges naturally via a functional Smoluchowski equation, while the time-dependent monomer density and mean force field are determined self-consistently. As a simple initial demonstration of the theory, leaving an application to polymer dynamics for future work, we examine the dynamics of trapped interacting Brownian particles. For binary particle mixtures, we observe the kinetics of phase separation.

  5. Self-Consistent RPA based on a Many-Body Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Jemai; Peter Schuck

    2010-11-23

    Self-Consistent RPA is extended in a way so that it is compatable with a variational ansatz for the ground state wave function as a fermionic many-body vacuum. Employing the usual equation of motion technique, we arrive at extended RPA equations of the Self Consistent RPA structure. In principle the Pauli principle is, therefore, fully respected. However, the correlation functions entering the RPA matrix can only be obtained from a systematic expansion in powers of some combinations of RPA amplitudes. We demonstrate for a model case that this expansion may converge rapidly.

  6. SM vacuum stability and the Weyl consistency conditions: Counting to three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krog, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how a new perturbative ordering may result from the structure of the Weyl anomaly. Respecting the abelian nature of the Weyl anomaly at the lowest order enforces the use of beta functions calculated to a different loop order for different types of couplings. These consistency conditions are found to be satisfied by the renormalization group equations of the standard model, and we perform an analysis of the vacuum stability of the Higgs potential respecting the consistency conditions and compare to the previous results. Hints toward unknown structure in the standard model renormalization group equations are found, although the vacuum stability results are in agreement with previous estimates.

  7. Temperature Fluctuation and an Expected Limit of Hubble Parameter in the Self-Consistent Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Morcos

    2004-12-08

    The temperature gradient of microwave background radiation (CMBR) is calculated in the Self Consistent Model. An expected values for Hubble parameter have been presented in two different cases. In the first case the temperature is treated as a function of time only, while in the other one the temperature depends on relaxation of isotropy condition in the self-consistent model and the assumption that the universe expands adiabatically. The COBE's or WMAP's fluctuations in temperature of CMBR may be used to predict a value for Hubble parameter.

  8. Consistent de Sitter String Vacua from Kahler Stabilization and D-term uplifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susha L. Parameswaran; Alexander Westphal

    2007-01-23

    In this note, we review our construction of de Sitter vacua in type IIB flux compactifications, in which moduli stabilization and D-term uplifting can be combined consistently with the supergravity constraints. Here, the closed string fluxes fix the dilaton and the complex structure moduli while perturbative quantum corrections to the K\\"ahler potential stabilize the volume Kahler modulus in an AdS_4-vacuum. Then, magnetized D7-branes provide consistent supersymmetric D-term uplifting towards dS_4. Based on hep-th/0602253.

  9. Self-consistent Green's functions calculation of the nucleon mean-free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rios; V. Soma

    2011-12-22

    The extension of Green's functions techniques to the complex energy plane provides access to fully dressed quasi-particle properties from a microscopic perspective. Using self-consistent ladder self-energies, we find both spectra and lifetimes of such quasi-particles in nuclear matter. With a consistent choice of the group velocity, the nucleon mean-free path can be computed. Our results indicate that, for energies above 50 MeV at densities close to saturation, a nucleon has a mean-free path of 4 to 5 femtometers.

  10. Fourier grid Hamiltonian multiconfigurational self-consistent-field: A method to calculate multidimensional hydrogen vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Fourier grid Hamiltonian multiconfigurational self-consistent-field: A method to calculate Received 10 May 2000; accepted 28 June 2000 The Fourier Grid Hamiltonian Multiconfigurational Self that are products of one-dimensional wavefunctions, with a Fourier grid method that represents the one

  11. Master of Science in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences Planet Earth consists of interacting systems -the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , physics, and environmental science, and supporting fields such as biology and chemistry. The EEPS programMaster of Science in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences Planet Earth consists activities. The Masters program in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences (EEPS) at Wichita State

  12. Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting of nonspherical ice particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting investigates the relationship between ice water content (IWC) and equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) at 94 GHz. Baum, and A. J. Heymsfield (2008), Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar

  13. A proposal for a UPC memory consistency model, v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelick, Katherine; Bonachea, Dan; Wallace, Charles

    2004-05-05

    The memory consistency model in a language defines the order in which the results of write operations maybe observed through read operations. The behavior of a UPC program may depend on the timing of accesses to shared variables, so a program defines a set of possible executions, rather than a single execution. The memory consistency model constrains the set of possible executions for a given program; the user may then rely on properties that are true of all of those executions. The memory consistency model is defined in terms of the read and write operations issued by each thread in naive translation of the code, i.e., without any code transformations by the compiler, with each thread issuing operations as defined by the abstract machine defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3. A UPC compiler or run time system may perform various code transformations to improve performance, so long as they are not visible to the programmer - i.e., provided the set of externally-visible behaviors (the input/output dynamics and volatile behavior defined in ISO C 5.1.2.3) from any execution of the transformed program are identical to those of the original program executing on the abstract machine and adhering to the consistency model defined in this document.

  14. A quick and efficient method for consistent initialization of battery models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    criterion on the other end that can ulti- mately satisfy all the required conditions in a battery unitA quick and efficient method for consistent initialization of battery models Vijayasekaran 2007 Available online 21 April 2007 Abstract Secondary batteries are usually modeled as a system

  15. New Loops! MiTeGen* 50MicroMountsTM consist of a thin microfabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    New Loops! MiTeGen* 50µMicroMountsTM consist of a thin microfabricated polyimide film attached to a solid non-magnetic stainless steel pin. The film is polyimide, which is used in Kapton® tape and is employed for X- ray transparent windows on X-ray beam lines. The film is curved by wrapping polyimide film

  16. Self-consistency tests of large-scale dynamics parameterizations for single-column modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edman, Jacob P.; Romps, David M.

    2015-03-18

    Large-scale dynamics parameterizations are tested numerically in cloud-resolving simulations, including a new version of the weak-pressure-gradient approximation (WPG) introduced by Edman and Romps (2014), the weak-temperature-gradient approximation (WTG), and a prior implementation of WPG. We perform a series of self-consistency tests with each large-scale dynamics parameterization, in which we compare the result of a cloud-resolving simulation coupled to WTG or WPG with an otherwise identical simulation with prescribed large-scale convergence. In self-consistency tests based on radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE; i.e., no large-scale convergence), we find that simulations either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to either WPG or WTG are self-consistent, butmore »WPG-coupled simulations exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior as the strength of the coupling to WPG is varied. We also perform self-consistency tests based on observed forcings from two observational campaigns: the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Summer 1995 IOP. In these tests, we show that the new version of WPG improves upon prior versions of WPG by eliminating a potentially troublesome gravity-wave resonance.« less

  17. Nanodiamond Analysis Methods Compared for Consistency. J. B. Lewis1,2 , D. Isheim4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floss, Christine

    Nanodiamond Analysis Methods Compared for Consistency. J. B. Lewis1,2 , D. Isheim4 , C. Floss1 introduced herein and used to analyze nine new detonation nanodiamond standards (DND) and three meteoritic nanodiamond residue sam- ples from the Allende DM separate (ADM). Experimental: A full description of specimen

  18. 1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkington, Scot R.

    1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec- trons trapped in the geomagnetic field. The dynamics of the belts are dictated by the global and local electric and mag- netic, A Review of ULF Interactions with Radiation Belt Electrons Scot R. Elkington Laboratory for Atmospheric

  19. A Design Study Comparing LWA Station Arrays Consisting of Thin Inverted-V Dipoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    design, the elements are packed relatively closely together, with uniform spacing. The elements. As will be shown in this memo, this leads to a design consisting of a relatively large number of elements which to arrays built from any other element design. · Only the co-polarized elements from each stand

  20. Improving Mobile Database Access Over Wide-Area Networks Without Degrading Consistency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyanarayanan, Mahadev "Satya"

    degrading consistency. Cedar exploits the disk storage and processing power of a mobile client to compensate to reduce data transmission volume from a data- base server. The reduction is achieved by using content Management]: Systems General Terms Design, Performance Keywords mobile database access, wireless networks

  1. Discrimination of MHC-derived odors by untrained mice is consistent with divergence in peptide-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Wayne

    Discrimination of MHC-derived odors by untrained mice is consistent with divergence in peptide their parental B6 haplotype after randomizing genomic background, despite discrimination of pure- bred B6 and bm1 strain odors. These combined results suggest that (i) there may be an MHC odor discrimination threshold

  2. Linear-scaling implementation of molecular electronic self-consistent field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    Linear-scaling implementation of molecular electronic self-consistent field theory Pawel Salek fitting of the electron density , LS-TRRH and TRDSM methods constitute the linear-scaling trust-region SCF; accepted 9 January 2007; published online 21 March 2007 A linear-scaling implementation of Hartree

  3. Caelus: Verifying the Consistency of Cloud Services with Battery-Powered Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie, David

    Caelus: Verifying the Consistency of Cloud Services with Battery-Powered Devices Beom Heyn Kim of Toronto Abstract-- Cloud storage services such as Amazon S3, DropBox, Google Drive and Microsoft One stored in the cloud all have shortcomings when used on battery-powered devices ­ they either require

  4. Nuclear Databases: National Resource Nuclear databases consists of carefully organized scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Databases: National Resource Nuclear databases consists of carefully organized scientific information that has been gathered over 50 years of low-energy nuclear physics research worldwide. These powerful databases have enormous value and they represent a genuine national resource. Six core nuclear

  5. to 150 GPa, consistent with the modulus values of large SWNT bundles (22). Al-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottet, Audrey

    to 150 GPa, consistent with the modulus values of large SWNT bundles (22). Al- though an individual to provide the optimum conditions for nanotube strand formation. The gas flow carried the strands down), assuming that the sample volume is constant, where D0 and Df are the original diameter and the real

  6. Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Self-consistent analysis of the hot spot dynamics for inertial confinement fusion capsules J. Sanz Hydrodynamic stability of inertial confinement fusion ICF capsules during the deceleration stage has been re October 2005; published online 11 November 2005 In the context of the French Laser-Mégajoule fusion

  7. Self-consistent anisotropic oscillator with cranked angular and vortex velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rosensteel

    1992-11-05

    The Kelvin circulation is the kinematical Hermitian observable that measures the true character of nuclear rotation. For the anisotropic oscillator, mean field solutions with fixed angular momentum and Kelvin circulation are derived in analytic form. The cranking Lagrange multipliers corresponding to the two constraints are the angular and vortex velocities. Self-consistent solutions are reported with a constraint to constant volume.

  8. Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope J February 2007; published 15 March 2007. [1] The double-crossing hypothesis posits that post- perovskite in Earth's deep mantle and the temperature of Earth's inner core boundary, we show that a post-perovskite

  9. Marks of Excellence Accounting students at MSU's College of Business consistently have one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Marks of Excellence · Accounting students at MSU's College of Business consistently have one of the highest CPA pass rates in the nation, according to the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy. · The success of MSU accounting students has attracted recruiters' attention. Each of the top public accounting

  10. The CRAC channel consists of a tetramer formed by Stim-induced dimerization of Orai dimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Ian

    LETTERS The CRAC channel consists of a tetramer formed by Stim-induced dimerization of Orai dimers terminus of Stim thus induces Orai dimers to dimerize, forming tetramers that constitute the Ca21-treated cells14 , whereas functional measurements of expressed tandem Orai multimers indicate a tetramer

  11. Root-n consistent density estimators of convolutions in weighted L1-norms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    Root-n consistent density estimators of convolutions in weighted L1-norms Anton Schick and Wolfgang. Anton Schick was supported by NSF Grant DMS 0405791. 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER-n rates in L1-spaces. It follows from Schick and Wefelmeyer (2004) that under appropriate conditions on f

  12. Root n consistent density estimators for sums of independent random variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    Root n consistent density estimators for sums of independent random variables Anton Schick > 1 independent and identically distributed random variables can be estimated at the Anton Schick was partially supported by NSF Grant DMS 0072174. 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER parametric rate n

  13. A more consistent method for extracting and amplifying DNA from bee wings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A more consistent method for extracting and amplifying DNA from bee wings Elaine M. GOULD, Michelle for genotyping certain behavioural traits required for breeding. One method is to use wing clippings. However reaction (PCR) amplification. Here, we describe an improved method for extracting DNA from bee wings using

  14. Mission Definition The temporary housing mission consists of the placement of manufactured housing units at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 Mission Definition The temporary housing mission consists of the placement of manufactured housing units at individual home sites, existing mobile home parks or newly designed and constructed properties. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Housing Planning Response Teams (PRT) may also be tasked

  15. Generating Pedestrian Trajectories Consistent with the Fundamental Diagram based on Physiological and Psychological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    1 Generating Pedestrian Trajectories Consistent with the Fundamental Diagram based on Physiological Pedestrian crowds often have been modeled as many-particle system including microscopic multi-agent simulators. One of the key challenges is to unearth governing principles that can model pedestrian movement

  16. A Quasi Lower Bound on the Consistency Strength Sy-David Friedman, Peter Holy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Local Club Condensation, Acceptability, Large Cardinals. The authors wish to thank the Austrian Research Condensation be acceptable: Theorem 2 Local Club Condensation and Acceptability are simultaneously consistent containing very large cardinals. The main technical result needed is the compatibility of Local Club

  17. TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST PAINT · Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or water of application and durability. · Cheaper paint generally contains more solvents than more expensive paint-based). · Oil-based (solvent-/polyurethane-based, also known as alkyd paint). · Natural (eg. mineral paint

  18. CSPs and complexity An instance of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) consists of a set of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    CSPs and complexity An instance of the constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) consists of a set to the variables in a way so that all constraints are (simultaneously) satisfied. The general CSP is NP-complete. However, when the CSP is restricted to a fixed constraint language (a set of allowed constraint

  19. (Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalmau, Victor

    (Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability Hubie Chen 1 and V#19. The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) can be formu- lated as the problem of deciding, given a pair (A; B) of relational struc- tures, whether or not there is a homomorphism from A to B. Although the CSP is in general

  20. A Generalization of Generalized Arc Consistency: From Constraint Satisfaction to Constraint-Based Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackworth, Alan K.

    -binary classic con- straint satisfaction problems (CSPs). Based on the Semiring CSP and Valued CSP frameworks CSP, probabilistic CSP, max CSP, and weighted CSP. This extension is based on an idempotent satisfaction problem (CSP), local consistency can be characterized as deriving new constraints based on local

  1. Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B Steve Schneider refinement in the context of CSP B. Our motivation to include this notion of refinement within the CSP B to change the events of a CSP process and the B machines when refining a system. Notions of refinement based

  2. Channel cracks in a hermetic coating consisting of organic and inorganic layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Channel cracks in a hermetic coating consisting of organic and inorganic layers Nicolas Cordero 2007 Flexible electronic devices often require hermetic coatings that can withstand applied strains. This letter calculates the critical strains for various configurations of channel cracks in a coating

  3. ConSens: Consistency-Sensitive Opportunistic Data Access in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Sunho

    . Typically, the explosive growth in applications running on the smart cell phone (i.e., App2 ) has fueled applications' diverse consistency requirements, called ConSens, where a user can flexibly set its own networks. I. INTRODUCTION Due to recent technological advances in high-speed wireless network, mobility

  4. Abstract--Researchers have hypothesized that animal locomotory patterns seen are consistent with the resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    -645-3875). showed that humans, and by extension all animals, maintain resonance during walking and running [1, 2Abstract-- Researchers have hypothesized that animal locomotory patterns seen are consistent employed virtual prototyping with a capable musculoskeletal simulation model to study the same hypothesis

  5. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies-sensor/multi-platform approach to water and energy cycle prediction is demonstrated in an effort to understand the variability to an improved understanding of water and energy cycles within the NAME region and providing a novel framework

  6. Geophysical Prospecting 37,753-770, 1989 SUGGESTIONS FOR A CONSISTENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophysical Prospecting 37,753-770, 1989 SUGGESTIONS FOR A CONSISTENT TERMINOLOGY FOR SEISMIC for seismic anisotropy. Geophys- ical Prospecting 37,753-770. Seismic anisotropy is an unfamiliar concept reporting seismic anisotropy more readily comprehensible to the non- specialist. This not a manual

  7. Hybrid solar collector using nonimaging optics and photovoltaic components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Pablo G. B. , “Nonimaging optics”. Academic Press, 2005. [7]Pablo G. B. , “Nonimaging optics”. Academic Press, 2005. [7]Using Nonimaging Optics and Photovoltaic Components Roland

  8. Energy Department Announces $20 Million to Develop Advanced Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy costs and improve their competitiveness. WBG components-which control or convert electrical energy into usable power-can operate at higher temperatures, voltages, and...

  9. Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alloy Engine Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

  10. Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement, June 29, 2011...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Enforcement and Oversight Criteria Review and Approach Document Subject: Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities, and...

  11. EM Removes Radioactive Components from Former Reactor at Oak...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contractor employees who worked on the project to remove irradiated components from a reactor pool gather to watch the transport of the shipment offsite for disposition. Employees...

  12. Interaction and heat exchange in two-component relativistic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst Trojan; George V. Vlasov

    2011-08-12

    A model of two-component relativistic fluid is considered, and the thermal nature of coupling between the fluid constituents is outlined. This thermal coupling is responsible for non-ideality of the fluid composite where the components are not fully independent. The interaction between particles is reflected only in the equation of state of each component, but it deals nothing with the coupling between the fluid components and does not influence the hydrodynamic motion. A general form of two-fluid decomposition is formulated for arbitrary interacting system.

  13. Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, J.

    2012-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

  14. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    preserving occupant comfort. deer12chen.pdf More Documents & Publications Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on...

  15. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop distributed HVAC components to supplement the central HVAC system to reduce the energy required by current compressed gas air conditioners by at least one-third....

  16. Rethinking components: From hardware and software to systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2007-01-01

    and C. Syperski, Software Ecosystem: Understanding anComponents: From Hardware and Software to Systems [7] D.BThe flexible factory,[ Software Development Mag. , Nov. 12,

  17. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  18. Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) Component Evaluation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LEESS; COMPONENT EVALUATION; LITHIUM ION; CAPACITORS; Transportation Alternate hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) energy storage systems (ESS) such as lithium-ion capacitors (LICs)...

  19. New Austenitic Stainless Steels for Exhaust Components (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland. merit08maziasz9112.pdf More Documents & Publications CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components Vehicle Technologies Office...

  20. Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean...

  1. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE)...

  2. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC...

  3. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vss033carlson2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric...

  4. A Man's Face in the Sky Instead of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf, Daniel

    2012-05-31

    This is Daniel Rolf's thesis. It consists of short, interrelated fictions that work together as a whole.

  5. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Arm, J; Hunter, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  6. Pyroshock simulation for satellite components using a tunable resonant fixture - phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davie, N.T.; Bateman, V.I.

    1997-04-01

    Aerospace components are often subjected to pyroshock events during flight and deployment, and must be qualified to this frequently severe environment. Laboratory simulation of pyroshock using a mechanically excited resonant fixture, has gained favor at Sandia for testing small (<8 inch cube) weapon components. With this method, each different shock environment required a different resonant fixture that was designed such that it`s response matched the environment. In Phase 1 (SAND92-2135) of this research, a new test method was developed which eliminated the need to have a different resonant fixture for each test requirement. This was accomplished by means of a tunable resonant fixture that has a response which is adjustable over a wide frequency range. The adjustment of the fixture`s response is done in a simple and deterministic way. This report covers Phase 2 of this research, in which several ideas were explored to extend the Phase 1 results to a larger scale. The test apparatus developed in Phase 1 was capable of testing components with up to a 10 inches x 10 inches base. The goal of the Phase 2 research was to produce an apparatus capable of testing components with up to a 20 inches x 20 inches mounting base. This size capability would allow the testing of most satellite and missile components which frequently consist of large electronic boxes. Several methods to attain this goal were examined, including scaling up the Phase 1 apparatus. Only one of these proved capable of meeting the Phase 2 goals. This report covers all details from concept through fabrication and testing of this Phase 2 apparatus.

  7. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH)

    1994-08-09

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements.

  8. Component-based General-purpose Operating System Martin Decky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Component-based General-purpose Operating System Martin Deck´y Charles University, Faculty to apply this programming and design paradigm in the domain of general-purpose operating systems. This paper analyzes several nice properties of component systems which might be beneficial in operating

  9. ALSEP Array E Component Non-Operating Vibration Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ALSEP Array E Component Non-Operating Vibration Specifications INO. ATM-964 1 REV. NO. OF 6 IPAGE DATE 2/2/71 This memorandum defines the non-operating vibration specifications for the ALSEP Array E experiments and other major subsystems. : #12;NO. R"EV. NO. ALSEP Array E Component Non-Operating Vibration

  10. Response of Plasma Facing Components to Various Transient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Response of Plasma Facing Components to Various Transient Events in Tokamak Devices: Serious Symposium on "Edge Plasma and Surface Component Interactions in Steady State Magnetic Fusion Devices" NIFS;3 Magnetic Fusion Activities #12;4 Magnetic Fusion (ITER) work at Argonne Be first wall Carbon high heat flux

  11. Component Tools: Application and Integration of Formal Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kindler, Ekkart

    Component Tools: Application and Integration of Formal Methods Ekkart Kindler, Vladimir Rubin, and they are supported by different and, in many cases, incompatible tools. Therefore, most applications of formal would have many benefits. The Component Tools project aims at easing the application and the inte

  12. A Denotational Model for Component-Based Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    A Denotational Model for Component-Based Risk Analysis Gyrd Brændeland1,2, , Atle Refsdal2 by traditional risk analysis methods. This paper ad- dresses this problem from a theoretical perspective by proposing a deno- tational model for component-based risk analysis. In order to model the probabilistic

  13. ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    ARCHITECTURE AND MAIN HARDWARE COMPONENTS OF THE FEL CONTROL SYSTEM E.N. Dementiev, V.R. Kozak, E general structure and listing the main features and hardware of individual components. Comparative as the reasons for choosing certain standards. Main issues of the future development of the control system

  14. Defining Change Management Properties for Component Interoperability Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, R. F.

    1 Defining Change Management Properties for Component Interoperability Assessment T. Gamble R In this paper, we leverage software architecture analysis techniques to codify change management properties is to extend component-based systems analysis to include change management concerns so that clearer designs

  15. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  16. Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    1 Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining Bruno AGARD Département de - 1527, USA andrew-kusiak@uiowa.edu ABSTRACT Data mining offers tools for extracting knowledge from databases. This paper discusses applications of data mining in standardization of components, products

  17. System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1993-11-23

    A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system. 5 figures.

  18. System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reifman, Jaques (Lisle, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system.

  19. "Load Management Systems for Component-based Middleware"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, John

    "Load Management Systems for Component-based Middleware" Octavian Ciuhandu, B.E. Masters Management Services Characteristics . . . . . 26 3.3.2 Load Management Services Classification . . . . . . 28 3.3.3 Load Management Services Requirements . . . . . 30 3.3.4 Load Management Services Components

  20. Component-Level Demonstration of a Microfabricated Atomic Frequency Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    size and lower power dissipation. In particular, atomic clocks based on coherent population trappingComponent-Level Demonstration of a Microfabricated Atomic Frequency Reference V. Gerginov, S component-level functionality of the three critical subsystems for a miniature atomic clock based

  1. Upcoming H2USA Workshop: Hydrogen Fueling Station Component Listings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    H2USA will host an online workshop about hydrogen fueling station component listings on April 22 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This workshop will focus on the need for components for hydrogen fueling stations to be listed by Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories (NRTLs).

  2. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification on the paper: Li, D., Nagurney, A., 2015. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Background and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain

  3. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  4. Self-consistent quasiparticle model for 2, 3, and (2+1) flavor QGP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannur, Vishnu M. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala-673 635 (India)

    2008-10-15

    The quasiparticle model of quark gluon plasma is the statistical mechanics of noninteracting particles with medium dependent mass related to plasma frequency, which is proposed to describe the thermodynamics of the medium itself. At the relativistic limit, the plasma frequency depends on the number density and temperature. The number density is a thermodynamic quantity of the medium which in turn depends on plasma frequency. Hence, one needs to solve this problem self-consistently instead of using perturbative expressions for plasma frequency. Here we carry out such self-consistent calculations using our recently developed new formulations of the quasiparticle model. By adjusting a single parameter for each system, a remarkably good fit to results of lattice simulation of quantum chromodynamics is obtained for 2, 3, and (2+1) flavor quark gluon plasma systems, first, with zero chemical potential. Then, it is extended to systems with finite chemical potential and fits very well to the lattice results without any new parameter.

  5. Consistent Modified Gravity Analysis of Anisotropic Galaxy Clustering Using BOSS DR11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yong-Seon; Linder, Eric; Koyama, Kazuya; Sabiu, Cristiano G; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bernardeau, Francis; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Okumura, Teppei

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the clustering of cosmic large scale structure using a consistent modified gravity perturbation theory, accounting for anisotropic effects along and transverse to the line of sight. The growth factor has a particular scale dependence in f(R) gravity and we fit for the shape parameter f_{R0} simultaneously with the distance and the large scale (general relativity) limit of the growth function. Using more than 690,000 galaxies in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 11, we find no evidence for extra scale dependence, with the 95\\% confidence upper limit |f_{R0}| <8 \\times 10^{-4}. Future clustering data, such as from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, can use this consistent methodology to impose tighter constraints.

  6. Direct versus indirect detection in mSUGRA with self-consistent halo models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Edsjo; Mia Schelke; Piero Ullio

    2004-05-21

    We perform a detailed analysis of the detection prospects of neutralino dark matter in the mSUGRA framework. We focus on models with a thermal relic density, estimated with high accuracy using the DarkSUSY package, in the range favored by current precision cosmological measurements. Direct and indirect detection rates are computed implementing two models for the dark matter halo, tracing opposite regimes for the phase of baryon infall, with fully consistent density profiles and velocity distribution functions. This has allowed, for the first time, a fully consistent comparison between direct and indirect detection prospects. We discuss all relevant regimes in the mSUGRA parameter space, underlining relevant effects, and providing the basis for extending the discussion to alternative frameworks. In general, we find that direct detection and searches for antideuterons in the cosmic rays seems to be the most promising ways to search for neutralinos in these scenarios.

  7. Paths of Consistent and Inconsistent Status Information and the Induction of Relevance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Joseph; Wagner, David G

    2015-08-15

    and Inconsistent Status Information and the Induction of Relevance.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Paths of Consistent and Inconsistent Status Information and the * Induction of Relevance Joseph Berger David G. Wagner Stanford..., James and Hawkins, 1958; Strodtbeck and Mann, 1956; Katz, Goldston and Benjamin, 1958; Katz and Benjamin, 1960.) Through a coordinated program of research and theory (Berger, Cohen and Zelditch, 1966; Berger, Conner and Fisek, 1974), a detailed...

  8. Self-consistent crystalline condensate in chiral Gross-Neveu and Bogoliubov-de Gennes systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokce Basar; Gerald V. Dunne

    2008-05-28

    We derive a new exact self-consistent crystalline condensate in the 1+1 dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model. This also yields a new exact crystalline solution for the one dimensional Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and the Eilenberger equation of semiclassical superconductivity. We show that the functional gap equation can be reduced to a solvable nonlinear equation, and discuss implications for the temperature-chemical potential phase diagram.

  9. Third minima in thorium and uranium isotopes in a self-consistent theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. McDonnell; W. Nazarewicz; J. A. Sheikh

    2013-05-23

    Background: Deep third minima have been predicted in some non-self-consistent models to impact fission pathways of thorium and uranium isotopes. These predictions have guided the interpretation of resonances seen experimentally. On the other hand, self-consistent calculations consistently predict very shallow potential-energy surfaces in the third minimum region. Purpose: We investigate the interpretation of third-minimum configurations in terms of dimolecular states. We study the isentropic potential-energy surfaces of selected even-even thorium and uranium isotopes at several excitation energies. In order to understand the driving effects behind the presence of third minima, we study the interplay between pairing and shell effects. Methods: We use the finite-temperature superfluid nuclear density functional theory. We consider a traditional functional, SkM*, and a recent functional, UNEDF1, optimized for fission studies. Results: We predict very shallow or no third minima in the potential-energy surfaces of 232Th and 232U. In Th and U isotopes with N=136 and 138, the third minima are deeper. We show that the reflection-asymmetric configurations around the third minimum can be associated with dimolecular states involving the spherical doubly magic 132Sn and a lighter deformed Zr or Mo fragment. The potential-energy surfaces for 228,232Th and 232U at several excitation energies are presented. Conclusions: We show that the neutron shell effect that governs the existence of the dimolecular states around the third minimum is consistent with the spherical-to-deformed shape transition in the Zr and Mo isotopes around N=58. We demonstrate that the thermal reduction of pairing and enhancement of shell effects at small excitation energies help to develop deeper third minima. At large excitation energies, shell effects are washed out and third minima disappear altogether.

  10. Self-consistent quasiparticle model results for ultrarelativistic electron-positron thermodynamic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannur, Vishnu M. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala-673 635 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Relativistic plasma with two charge species and radiation at thermodynamic equilibrium is a general system of interest in astrophysics and high-energy physics. We develop a self-consistent quasiparticle model for such a system to take account of the collective behavior of plasma, and thermodynamic properties are derived. It is applied to the ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma and compared with previous results.

  11. New wind input term consistent with experimental, theoretical and numerical considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. E. Zakharov; D. Resio; A. Pushkarev

    2012-12-05

    We offer a new method for determining the wind source term for energy and momentum fluxes transfer from the atmosphere to the wind-driven sea. This new source-term formulation is based on extensive analysis of experimental data collected at different sites around the world. It is shown that this new wind source term to be consistent both with numerical solution of exact equation for resonant four-wave interactions and available experimental data.

  12. BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAuditsDepartmentj.BETOBILIWG: Consistent

  13. A simplified model for thermal-wave cavity self-consistent measurement of thermal diffusivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jun, E-mail: jun.shen@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca; Zhou, Jianqin; Gu, Caikang [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council Canada, 4250 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1W5 (Canada)] [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council Canada, 4250 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1W5 (Canada); Neill, Stuart [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-9, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)] [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-9, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Michaelian, Kirk H.; Fairbridge, Craig [CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada, One Oil Drive Patch, Devon, Alberta T9G 1A8 (Canada)] [CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada, One Oil Drive Patch, Devon, Alberta T9G 1A8 (Canada); Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Baesso, Mauro L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, Maringá, Paraná 87020-900 (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, Maringá, Paraná 87020-900 (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    A simplified theoretical model was developed for the thermal-wave cavity (TWC) technique in this study. This model takes thermal radiation into account and can be employed for absolute measurements of the thermal diffusivity of gas and liquid samples without any knowledge of geometrical and thermal parameters of the components of the TWC. Using this model and cavity-length scans, thermal diffusivities of air and distilled water were accurately and precisely measured as (2.191 ± 0.004) × 10{sup ?5} and (1.427 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?7} m{sup 2}?s{sup ?1}, respectively, in very good agreement with accepted literature values.

  14. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l ?< 50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  15. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  16. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  17. GRB 081029: A GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH A MULTI-COMPONENT AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sakamoto, Takanori; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Schady, Patricia; Mao, Jirong; Covino, Stefano; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Chincarini, Guido; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Cobb, Bethany E.

    2012-01-20

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3 m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to {approx}100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A-16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray-burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray-burst jets are complex and will require detailed modeling to fully understand them.

  18. Examining the consistency relations describing the three-point functions involving tensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: sreenath@physics.iitm.ac.in, E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} characterizing the scalar bi-spectrum can be expressed in terms of the scalar spectral index in the squeezed limit, a property that is referred to as the consistency relation. In contrast to the scalar bi-spectrum, the three-point cross-correlations involving scalars and tensors and the tensor bi-spectrum have not received adequate attention, which can be largely attributed to the fact that the tensors had remained undetected at the level of the power spectrum until very recently. The detection of the imprints of the primordial tensor perturbations by BICEP2 and its indication of a rather high tensor-to-scalar ratio, if confirmed, can open up a new window for understanding the tensor perturbations, not only at the level of the power spectrum, but also in the realm of non-Gaussianities. In this work, we consider the consistency relations associated with the three-point cross-correlations involving scalars and tensors as well as the tensor bi-spectrum in inflationary models driven by a single, canonical, scalar field. Characterizing the cross-correlations in terms of the dimensionless non-Gaussianity parameters C{sub NL}{sup R} and C{sub NL}{sup ?} that we had introduced earlier, we express the consistency relations governing the cross-correlations as relations between these non-Gaussianity parameters and the scalar or tensor spectral indices, in a fashion similar to that of the purely scalar case. We also discuss the corresponding relation for the non-Gaussianity parameter h{sub NL} used to describe the tensor bi-spectrum. We analytically establish these consistency relations explicitly in the following two situations: a simple example involving a specific case of power law inflation and a non-trivial scenario in the so-called Starobinsky model that is governed by a linear potential with a sharp change in its slope. We also numerically verify the consistency relations in three types of inflationary models that permit deviations from slow roll and lead to scalar power spectra with features which typically result in an improved fit to the data than the more conventional, nearly scale invariant, spectra. We close with a summary of the results we have obtained.

  19. Energy Release Component (ERC) Fact Sheet The Energy Release Component (ERC) is a calculated output of the National Fire Danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS). The ERC is a number related to the available energy (BTU) per unit area (square foot) within the flaming front at the head of a fire. The ERC is consideredEnergy Release Component (ERC) Fact Sheet The Energy Release Component (ERC) is a calculated output

  20. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoller, Roger E.; Barashev, Alexander V.; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  1. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voldrich, W. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components' gas-pressure sinterable Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  2. NREL's Building Component Library for Use with Energy Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Building Component Library (BCL) is the U.S. Department of Energy’s comprehensive online searchable library of energy modeling building blocks and descriptive metadata. Novice users and seasoned practitioners can use the freely available and uniquely identifiable components to create energy models and cite the sources of input data, which will increase the credibility and reproducibility of their simulations. The BCL contains components which are the building blocks of an energy model. They can represent physical characteristics of the building such as roofs, walls, and windows, or can refer to related operational information such as occupancy and equipment schedules and weather information. Each component is identified through a set of attributes that are specific to its type, as well as other metadata such as provenance information and associated files. The BCL also contains energy conservation measures (ECM), referred to as measures, which describe a change to a building and its associated model. For the BCL, this description attempts to define a measure for reproducible application, either to compare it to a baseline model, to estimate potential energy savings, or to examine the effects of a particular implementation. The BCL currently contains more than 30,000 components and measures. A faceted search mechanism has been implemented on the BCL that allows users to filter through the search results using various facets. Facet categories include component and measure types, data source, and energy modeling software type. All attributes of a component or measure can also be used to filter the results.

  3. Quantal self-consistent cranking model for monopole excitations in even-even light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gulshani

    2014-10-24

    In this article, we derive a quantal self-consistent time-reversal invariant parameter-free cranking model for isoscalar monopole excitation coupled to intrinsic motion in even-even light nuclei. The model uses a wavefunction that is a product of monopole and intrinsic wavefunctions and a constrained variational method to derive, from a many-particle Schrodinger equation, a pair of coupled self-consistent cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the monopole and intrinsic systems. The monopole co-ordinate used is the trace of the quadrupole tensor and hence describes the overall deformation of the nucleus. The monopole and intrinsic wavefunctions are coupled to each other by the two cranking equations and their associated parameters and by two constraints imposed on the intrinsic system. For an isotropic Nilsson shell model and an effective residual two-body interaction, the two coupled cranking equations are solved in the Tamm Dancoff approximation. The strength of the interaction is determined from a Hartree-Fock self-consistency argument. The excitation energy of the first excited state is determined and found to agree closely with those observed in the nuclei He-4, Be-8, C-12, O-16 , Ne-20, Mg-24, and Si-28. The variation of the model parameters are explained. In particular, it is found that the monopole excitation energy as a function of the mass number undergoes an increase whenever the nucleons begin to occupy a new sub-shell state with non-zero orbital angular momentum as a consequence of suppressing or constraining the resulting spurious monopole excitation in the intrinsic system.

  4. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsventoukh, M. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than those obtained with the simplest MHD description.

  5. The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

  6. Alfven-wave particle interaction in finite-dimensional self-consistent field model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padhye, N.; Horton, W.

    1998-10-09

    A low-dimensional Hamiltonian model is derived for the acceleration of ions in finite amplitude Alfven waves in a finite pressure plasma sheet. The reduced low-dimensional wave-particle Hamiltonian is useful for describing the reaction of the accelerated ions on the wave amplitudes and phases through the self-consistent fields within the envelope approximation. As an example, the authors show for a single Alfven wave in the central plasma sheet of the Earth`s geotail, modeled by the linear pinch geometry called the Harris sheet, the time variation of the wave amplitude during the acceleration of fast protons.

  7. On the self-consistence of electrodynamics in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Klippert; V. A. De Lorenci; M. Novello; J. M. Salim

    2002-03-27

    The issue of a self-consistent solution of Maxwell-Einstein equations achieves a very simple form when all quantum effects are neglected but a weak vacuum polarization due to an external magnetic field is taken into account. From a semi-classical point of view this means to deal with an appropriate limit of the one-loop effective Lagrangian for electrodynamics. When the corresponding stress-energy tensor is considered as a source of the gravitational field a surprisingly bouncing behavior is obtained. The present toy model leads to important new features which should have taken place in the early universe.

  8. Properties of hadronic systems according to the non-extensive self-consistent thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppman, A.

    2014-11-11

    The non-extensive self-consistent theory describing the thermodynamics of hadronic systems at high temperatures is used to derive some thermodynamical quantities, as pressure, entropy, speed of sound and trace-anomaly. The calculations are free of fitting parameters, and the results are compared to lattice QCD calculations, showing a good agreement between theory and data up to temperatures around 175 MeV. Above this temperature the effects of a singularity in the partition function at T{sub o} = 192 MeV results in a divergent behaviour in respect with the lattice calculation.

  9. Long-range correlations in finite nuclei: comparison of two self-consistent treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Dewulf; D. Van Neck; L. Van Daele; M. Waroquier

    1997-01-29

    Long-range correlations, which are partially responsible for the observed fragmentation and depletion of low-lying single-particle strength, are studied in the Green's function formalism. The self-energy is expanded up to second order in the residual interaction. We compare two methods of implementing self-consistency in the solution of the Dyson equation beyond Hartree-Fock, for the case of the 16O nucleus. It is found that the energy-bin method and the BAGEL method lead to globally equivalent results. In both methods the final single-particle strength functions are characterized by exponential tails at energies far from the Fermi level.

  10. Self-consistent Green's function calculation of 16O at small missing energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barbieri; W. H. Dickhoff

    2004-10-19

    Calculations of the one-hole spectral function of 16O for small missing energies are reviewed. The self-consistent Green's function approach is employed together with the Faddeev equations technique in order to study the coupling of both particle-particle and particle-hole phonons to the single-particle motion. The results indicate that the characteristics of hole fragmentation are related to the low-lying states of 16O and an improvement of the description of this spectrum, beyond the random phase approximation, is required to understand the experimental strength distribution. A first calculation in this direction that accounts for two-phonon states is discussed.

  11. Consistent treatment of hydrophobicity in protein lattice models accounts for cold denaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dijk, Erik; Knowles, Tuomas; Frenkel, Daan; Abeln, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavourable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  12. Consistent treatment of hydrophobicity in protein lattice models accounts for cold denaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik van Dijk; Patrick Varilly; Tuomas Knowles; Daan Frenkel; Sanne Abeln

    2015-11-25

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavourable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  13. Comment on: "On the consistency of solutions of the space fractional Schrödinger equation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Hawkins; J. M. Schwarz

    2012-10-04

    In [J. Math. Phys. 53, 042105 (2012)], Bay{\\i}n claims to prove the consistency of the purported piece-wise solutions to the fractional Schr\\"odinger equation for an infinite square well. However, his calculation uses standard contour integral techniques despite the absence of an analytic integrand. The correct calculation is presented and supports our earlier work proving that the purported piece-wise solutions do not solve the fractional Schr\\"odinger equation for an infinite square well [M. Jeng, S.-L.-Y. Xu, E. Hawkins, and J. M. Schwarz, J. Math. Phys. 51, 062102 (2010)].

  14. Testing the Self-Consistency of MOND With Three-Dimensional Galaxy Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Stubbs; Arti Garg

    2005-12-02

    We propose a technique to test the idea that non-standard dynamics, rather than dark matter halos, might be responsible for the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies. In the absence of non-luminous matter, a galactic disk's rotational velocity and its vertical velocity dispersion can be used jointly to test the self-consistency of the galaxy's dynamics. A specific illustrative example, using recent measurements of the disk kinematics of M33, shows this to be a promising approach to assess the viability of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND).

  15. Some exploitations of the self-consistent QRPA approach with the Gogny force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peru, S.; Martini, M.; Dupuis, M.

    2012-10-20

    Fully consistent axially-symmetric-deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations have been performed with the D1S Gogny force. Giant resonances in exotic nuclei as well as in deformed Mg and Si isotopes have been studied. Dipole responses have been calculated in Ne isotopes and N=16 isotones to study the existence of soft dipole modes in exotic nuclei. The same formalism has been used to describe multipole responses up to octupole in the deformed and heavy nucleus {sup 238}U. Low energy spectroscopy of nickel isotopes has been studied, revealing 0{sup +} states which display a particular structure.

  16. Balance of Plant System Analysis and Component Design of Turbo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sets consist of a pair of turbinecompressor sets (high pressure and low pressure turbines with same-shaft compressor) and a power turbine coupled with a synchronous generator....

  17. An Active Data-aware Cache Consistency Protocol for Highly-Scalable Data-Shipping DBMS Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    An Active Data-aware Cache Consistency Protocol for Highly-Scalable Data-Shipping DBMS overhead for maintaining client directory consistency. We implement ADCC in a page server DBMS architecture. Keywords active control; cache consistency; parallel communication; data- shipping; DBMS 1.INTRODUCTION

  18. Road Map for Studies to Produce Consistent and High Performance SRF Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; John F. O’Hanlon

    2007-06-20

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator structures made from high purity niobium are becoming the technological choice for a large number of future accelerators and energy recovery LINAC’s (ERL). Most of the presently planned accelerators and ERL requirements will be met with some effort by the current SRF technology where accelerating gradients of about 20 MV/m can be produced on a routine basis with an acceptable yield. However, the XFEL at DESY and the planned ILC require acceleration gradients more than 28 MV/m and 35 MV/m respectively. At the recent ILC meeting at Snowmass (2005) concern was expressed regarding the wide spread in the achieved accelerator gradients and the relatively low yields. For obtaining accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m in SRF accelerator structures consistently, a deeper understanding of the causes for the spread has to be gained and advances have to be made in many scientific and high technology fields, including materials, surface and vacuum sciences, application of reliable processes and procedures, which provide contamination –free surfaces and avoid recontamination and cryogenics related technologies. In this contribution a road map for studies needed to produce consistent and high performance SRF accelerator structures from the needed materials development to clean and non-recontaminating processes and procedures will be presented.

  19. Correlations in Nuclei: Self-Consistent Treatment and the BAGEL Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Müther; L. D. Skouras

    1993-03-29

    An approach is presented which allows a self-consistent description of the fragmentation of single-particle strength for nucleons in finite nuclei employing the Greens function formalism. The self-energy to be considered in the Dyson equation for the single-particle Greens function contains all terms of first (Hartree-Fock) and second order in the residual interaction. It is demonstrated that the fragmentation of the single-particle strength originating from the terms of second order can efficiently be described in terms of the so-called BAGEL approximation. Employing this approximation the self-energy can be evaluated in a self-consistent way, i.e. the correlations contained in the Greens function are taken into account for the evaluation of the self-energy. As an example this scheme is applied to the nucleus $^{16}O$, using a realistic nucleon nucleon interaction. The effects of the correlations on the occupation probabilities and the binding energy are evaluated.

  20. Self-consistent Green's function method for nuclei and nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Dickhoff; C. Barbieri

    2004-02-11

    Recent results obtained by applying the method of self-consistent Green's functions to nuclei and nuclear matter are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the description of experimental data obtained from the (e,e'p) and (e,e'2N) reactions that determine one and two-nucleon removal probabilities in nuclei since the corresponding amplitudes are directly related to the imaginary parts of the single-particle and two-particle propagators. For this reason and the fact that these amplitudes can now be calculated with the inclusion of all the relevant physical processes, it is useful to explore the efficacy of the method of self-consistent Green's functions in describing these experimental data. Results for both finite nuclei and nuclear matter are discussed with particular emphasis on clarifying the role of short-range correlations in determining various experimental quantities. The important role of long-range correlations in determining the structure of low-energy correlations is also documented. For a complete understanding of nuclear phenomena it is therefore essential to include both types of physical correlations. We demonstrate that recent experimental results for these reactions combined with the reported theoretical calculations yield a very clear understanding of the properties of {\\em all} protons in the nucleus. We propose that this knowledge of the properties of constituent fermions in a correlated many-body system is a unique feature of nuclear physics.

  1. Status and Opportunities for Improving the Consistency of Technical Reference Manuals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, Tina; Velonis, Aquila; Haeri, Hossein; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2012-05-01

    Across the United States, energy-efficiency program administrators rely on Technical Reference Manuals (TRMs) as sources for calculations and deemed savings values for specific, well-defined efficiency measures. TRMs play an important part in energy efficiency program planning by providing a common and consistent source for calculation of ex ante and often ex post savings. They thus help reduce energy-efficiency resource acquisition costs by obviating the need for extensive measurement and verification and lower performance risk for program administrators and implementation contractors. This paper considers the benefits of establishing region-wide or national TRMs and considers the challenges of such undertaking due to the difficulties in comparing energy savings across jurisdictions. We argue that greater consistency across TRMs in the approaches used to determine deemed savings values, with more transparency about assumptions, would allow better comparisons in savings estimates across jurisdictions as well as improve confidence in reported efficiency measure savings. To support this thesis, we review approaches for the calculation of savings for select measures in TRMs currently in use in 17 jurisdictions. The review reveals differences in the saving methodologies, technical assumptions, and input variables used for estimating deemed savings values. These differences are described and their implications are summarized, using four, common energy-efficiency measures as examples. Recommendations are then offered for establishing a uniform approach for determining deemed savings values.

  2. A Self Consistent Multiprocessor Space Charge Algorithm that is Almost Embarrassingly Parallel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Nissen, B. Erdelyi, S.L. Manikonda

    2012-07-01

    We present a space charge code that is self consistent, massively parallelizeable, and requires very little communication between computer nodes; making the calculation almost embarrassingly parallel. This method is implemented in the code COSY Infinity where the differential algebras used in this code are important to the algorithm's proper functioning. The method works by calculating the self consistent space charge distribution using the statistical moments of the test particles, and converting them into polynomial series coefficients. These coefficients are combined with differential algebraic integrals to form the potential, and electric fields. The result is a map which contains the effects of space charge. This method allows for massive parallelization since its statistics based solver doesn't require any binning of particles, and only requires a vector containing the partial sums of the statistical moments for the different nodes to be passed. All other calculations are done independently. The resulting maps can be used to analyze the system using normal form analysis, as well as advance particles in numbers and at speeds that were previously impossible.

  3. ThermoElectric Transport Properties of a Chain of Quantum Dots with Self-Consistent Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe A. Jacquet

    2009-02-13

    We introduce a model for charge and heat transport based on the Landauer-Buttiker scattering approach. The system consists of a chain of $N$ quantum dots, each of them being coupled to a particle reservoir. Additionally, the left and right ends of the chain are coupled to two particle reservoirs. All these reservoirs are independent and can be described by any of the standard physical distributions: Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein. In the linear response regime, and under some assumptions, we first describe the general transport properties of the system. Then we impose the self-consistency condition, i.e. we fix the boundary values (T_L,\\mu_L) and (T_R,mu_R), and adjust the parameters (T_i,mu_i), for i = 1,...,N, so that the net average electric and heat currents into all the intermediate reservoirs vanish. This condition leads to expressions for the temperature and chemical potential profiles along the system, which turn out to be independent of the distribution describing the reservoirs. We also determine the average electric and heat currents flowing through the system and present some numerical results, using random matrix theory, showing that these currents are typically governed by Ohm and Fourier laws.

  4. WHAT GOVERNS THE BULK VELOCITY OF THE JET COMPONENTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai Bo; Cao Xinwu; Gu Minfeng E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-11-10

    We use a sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with measured black hole masses to explore the jet formation mechanisms in these sources. Based on Koenigl's inhomogeneous jet model, the jet parameters, such as the bulk motion Lorentz factor, magnetic field strength, and electron density in the jet, can be estimated with the very long baseline interferometry and X-ray data.. We find a significant correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample, while no significant correlation is present between the bulk Lorentz factor and the Eddington ratio. The massive black holes will be spun up through accretion, as the black holes acquire mass and angular momentum simultaneously through accretion. Recent investigation indeed suggested that most supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies have on average higher spins than the black holes in spiral galaxies, where random, small accretion episodes (e.g., tidally disrupted stars, accretion of molecular clouds) might have played a more important role. If this is true, then the correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components found in this work implies that the motion velocity of the jet components is probably governed by the black hole spin. No correlation is found between the magnetic field strength at 10R {sub S} (R {sub S} = 2GM/c {sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius) in the jets and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample. This is consistent with the black hole spin scenario, i.e., the faster moving jets are magnetically accelerated by the magnetic fields threading the horizon of more rapidly rotating black holes. The results imply that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism may dominate over the Blandford-Payne mechanism for the jet acceleration, at least in these radio-loud AGNs.

  5. Architecture for an Automated Management Instrumentation of Component Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture for an Automated Management Instrumentation of Component Based Applications Rainer management cannot provide this kind of user­oriented information. At present, only instrumentation techniques are suited to provide the required information. On the other hand instrumentation techniques cause

  6. Architecture for an Automated Management Instrumentation of Component Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture for an Automated Management Instrumentation of Component Based Applications Rainer management cannot provide this kind of user-oriented information. At present, only instrumentation techniques are suited to provide the required information. On the other hand instrumentation techniques cause

  7. System and method for detecting cells or components thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Porter, Marc D. (Ames, IA); Lipert, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Doyle, Robert T. (Ames, IA); Grubisha, Desiree S. (Corona, CA); Rahman, Salma (Ames, IA)

    2009-01-06

    A system and method for detecting a detectably labeled cell or component thereof in a sample comprising one or more cells or components thereof, at least one cell or component thereof of which is detectably labeled with at least two detectable labels. In one embodiment, the method comprises: (i) introducing the sample into one or more flow cells of a flow cytometer, (ii) irradiating the sample with one or more light sources that are absorbed by the at least two detectable labels, the absorption of which is to be detected, and (iii) detecting simultaneously the absorption of light by the at least two detectable labels on the detectably labeled cell or component thereof with an array of photomultiplier tubes, which are operably linked to two or more filters that selectively transmit detectable emissions from the at least two detectable labels.

  8. Microgrid Fault Protection Based on Symmetrical and Differential Current Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microgrid Fault Protection Based on Symmetrical and Differential Current Components Prepared.........................................................................................8 2. AEP CERTS MICROGRID .........................................................................9 ........................................................................67 #12;3 Index of Figures Figure 1: Schematic representation of the AEP CERTS microgrid

  9. Seismic ruggedness of aged electrical components: Final report (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic tests on new and aged components have shown that, for many types of commonly used nuclear plant electrical components, deterioration due to aging does not significantly affect the ability of the components to function during and after a seismic event. This was demonstrated for capacitors, circuit breakers, contactors (motor starters), control station assemblies, electronic alarms, electronics, fuses, fuse blocks, inductors, meters, motors, pressure transmitters, power supplies, relays, RTDs, solenoid valves, terminal blocks, time delay relays, transformers and switches. A few switch types (limit, pressure and rotary) were observed to be more prone to contact chatter in an aged condition than in an unaged condition. However, the ability of these devices to switch during and after shaking was not affected by aging. These results can be referenced to eliminate the cost of aging prior to seismic qualification testing for many types of electrical components.

  10. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  11. Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Green Functions for the Radial Electric Component of the Monopole Wake Field in a Round Resistive Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Green Functions for the Radial...

  12. MIT boathouse proposal : a study of referential components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paturzo, Paul John

    1993-01-01

    The guiding proposition of this thesis is that components in a place can equal more than the sum of their parts. Through interactions among a range of sizes, the physical elements in a design are perceived as defining ...

  13. The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Parhys L

    2011-01-01

    Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

  14. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  15. Structural Thermomechanical Models for Shape Memory Alloy Components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Ashwin

    2014-04-18

    Thermally responsive shape memory alloys (SMA) demonstrate interesting properties like shape memory effect (SME) and superelasticity (SE). SMA components in the form of wires, springs and beams typically exhibit complex, nonlinear hysteretic...

  16. 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 Principal Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seehafer, Norbert

    s3 PCA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 -2 -1 0 1 2 Principal Components s1 PCA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 -2 -1 0 1 2 s2 PCA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 -2 -1 0 1 2 s3 ICA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 -2 -1 0 1 2 s2 ICA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 -2 -1 0 1 2 Independent Components s1 ICA 0 1000 2000 3000

  17. Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment of municipal solid waste components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundeen, Joseph Eric

    1991-01-01

    AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) PRETREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS A Thesis by JOSEPH ERIC LUNDEEN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering AMMONIA FIBER EXPLOSION (AFEX) PRETREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS A Thesis Joseph Eric Lundeen Approved as to style and content by: Mark Hol pie ( tte R. W...

  18. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

  19. Rayleigh wave filter for three-component seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidi, Syed Ali Asif

    1991-01-01

    RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M Lrniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject: Geophysics RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Approved as to style and content by: Steven . Harder air of Committee) Joel S. Watkins (Member) Ronald M. Brimhall (1...

  20. Quality Assurance Program Application for the Component Test Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanin L. Austad

    2009-06-01

    This paper documents the application of quality requirements to Component Test Capability (CTC) Project activities for each CTC alternative. Four alternatives are considered for quality program application: do nothing, vendor testing, existing testing facility modification, and Component Test Facility. It also describes the advantages and disadvantages of using the existing Next Generation Nuclear Plant Quality Program Plan with CTC modifications versus a stand-alone CTC Quality Program Plan.

  1. NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

    2009-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

  2. Method for the continuous processing of hermetic fiber optic components and the resultant fiber optic-to-metal components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.

    1994-08-09

    Hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components and method for making hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components by assembling and fixturing elements comprising a metal shell, a glass preform, and a metal-coated fiber optic into desired relative positions and then sealing said fixtured elements preferably using a continuous heating process is disclosed. The resultant hermetic fiber optic-to-metal components exhibit high hermeticity and durability despite the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion among the various elements. 3 figs.

  3. Transverse stability of relativistic two-component jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Meliani; R. Keppens

    2007-09-24

    Context: Astrophysical jets from various sources seem to be stratified, with a fast inner jet and a slower outer jet. As it is likely that the launching mechanism for each component is different, their interface will develop differential rotation, while the outer jet radius represents a second interface where disruptions may occur. Aims: We explore the stability of stratified, rotating, relativistic two-component jets, in turn embedded in static interstellar medium. Methods: In a grid-adaptive relativistic hydrodynamic simulation with the AMRVAC code, the non-linear azimuthal stability of two-component relativistic jets is investigated. We simulate until multiple inner jet rotations have been completed. Results: We find evidence for the development of an extended shear flow layer between the two jet components, resulting from the growth of a body mode in the inner jet, Kelvin-Helmholtz surface modes at their original interface, and their nonlinear interaction. Both wave modes are excited by acoustic waves which are reflected between the symmetry axis and the interface of the two jet components. Their interaction induces the growth of near stationary, counterrotating vortices at the outer edge of the shear flow layer. The presence of a heavy external jet allows to slow down their further development, and maintain a collimated flow. At the outer jet boundary, small-scale Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities develop, without disrupting the jet configuration. Conclusion: We demonstrate that the cross-section of two-component relativistic jets, with a heavy, cold outer jet, is non-linearly stable.

  4. A magnetohydrodynamic model of the M87 jet. II. Self-consistent quad-shock jet model for optical relativistic motions and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Masanori

    2014-04-20

    We describe a new paradigm for understanding both relativistic motions and particle acceleration in the M87 jet: a magnetically dominated relativistic flow that naturally produces four relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks (forward/reverse fast and slow modes). We apply this model to a set of optical super- and subluminal motions discovered by Biretta and coworkers with the Hubble Space Telescope during 1994-1998. The model concept consists of ejection of a single relativistic Poynting jet, which possesses a coherent helical (poloidal + toroidal) magnetic component, at the remarkably flaring point HST-1. We are able to reproduce quantitatively proper motions of components seen in the optical observations of HST-1 with the same model we used previously to describe similar features in radio very long baseline interferometry observations in 2005-2006. This indicates that the quad relativistic MHD shock model can be applied generally to recurring pairs of super/subluminal knots ejected from the upstream edge of the HST-1 complex as observed from radio to optical wavelengths, with forward/reverse fast-mode MHD shocks then responsible for observed moving features. Moreover, we identify such intrinsic properties as the shock compression ratio, degree of magnetization, and magnetic obliquity and show that they are suitable to mediate diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic particles via the first-order Fermi process. We suggest that relativistic MHD shocks in Poynting-flux-dominated helical jets may play a role in explaining observed emission and proper motions in many active galactic nuclei.

  5. THIRD COMPONENT SEARCH AND ABUNDANCES OF THE VERY DUSTY SHORT-PERIOD BINARY BD +20 Degree-Sign 307

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Cordero, Maria J.; Galicher, Raphael; Zuckerman, B.; Melis, Carl; Weinberger, Alycia J. E-mail: majocord@indiana.edu E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu

    2012-04-10

    We have obtained near-infrared adaptive optics imaging and collected additional radial velocity observations to search for a third component in the extremely dusty short-period binary system BD +20 Degree-Sign 307. Our image shows no evidence for a third component at separations greater than 19 AU. Our four seasons of radial velocities have a constant center-of-mass velocity and are consistent with the systemic velocities determined at two earlier epochs. Thus, the radial velocities also provide no support for a third component. Unfortunately, the separation domains covered by our imaging and radial velocity results do not overlap. Thus, we examined the parameters for possible orbits of a third component that could have been missed by our current observations. With our velocities we determined improved circular orbital elements for the 3.4 day double-lined binary. We also performed a spectroscopic abundance analysis of the short-period binary components and conclude that the stars are a mid- and a late-F dwarf. We find that the iron abundances of both components, [Fe/H] = 0.15, are somewhat greater than the solar value and comparable to that of stars in the Hyades. Despite the similarity of the binary components, the lithium abundances of the two stars are very unequal. The primary has log {epsilon} (Li) = 2.72, while in the secondary log {epsilon} (Li) {<=}1.46, which corresponds to a difference of at least a factor of 18. The very disparate lithium abundances in very similar stars make it impossible to ascribe a single age to them. While the system is likely at least 1 Gyr old, it may well be as old as the Sun.

  6. Non-perturbative and self-consistent models of neutron stars in R-squared gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Staykov, Kalin V. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kalin.v.staikov@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper we investigate non-perturbatively and self-consistently the structure of neutron stars in R-squared gravity by simultaneously solving the interior and exterior problem. The mass-radius relations are obtained for several equations of state and for wide range of the R-squared gravity parameter a. Even though the deviation from general relativity for nonzero values of a can be large, they are still comparable with the variations due to different modern realistic equations of state. That is why the current observations of the neutron star masses and radii alone can not put constraints on the value of the parameter a. We also compare our results with those obtained within the perturbative method and we discuss the differences between them.

  7. Experimental motivation and empirical consistency in minimal no-collapse quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maximilian Schlosshauer

    2006-01-15

    We analyze three important experimental domains (SQUIDs, molecular interferometry, and Bose-Einstein condensation) as well as quantum-biophysical studies of the neuronal apparatus to argue that (i) the universal validity of unitary dynamics and the superposition principle has been confirmed far into the mesoscopic and macroscopic realm in all experiments conducted thus far; (ii) all observed "restrictions" can be correctly and completely accounted for by taking into account environmental decoherence effects; (iii) no positive experimental evidence exists for physical state-vector collapse; (iv) the perception of single "outcomes" is likely to be explainable through decoherence effects in the neuronal apparatus. We also discuss recent progress in the understanding of the emergence of quantum probabilities and the objectification of observables. We conclude that it is not only viable, but moreover compelling to regard a minimal no-collapse quantum theory as a leading candidate for a physically motivated and empirically consistent interpretation of quantum mechanics.

  8. Self-Consistent Multiscale Theory of Internal Wave, Mean-Flow Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holm, D.D.; Aceves, A.; Allen, J.S.; Alber, M.; Camassa, R.; Cendra, H.; Chen, S.; Duan, J.; Fabijonas, B.; Foias, C.; Fringer, O.; Gent, P.R.; Jordan, R.; Kouranbaeva, S.; Kovacic, G.; Levermore, C.D.; Lythe, G.; Lifschitz, A.; Marsden, J.E.; Margolin, L.; Newberger, P.; Olson, E.; Ratiu, T.; Shkoller, S.; Timofeyev, I.; Titi, E.S.; Wynn, S.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The research reported here produced new effective ways to solve multiscale problems in nonlinear fluid dynamics, such as turbulent flow and global ocean circulation. This was accomplished by first developing new methods for averaging over random or rapidly varying phases in nonlinear systems at multiple scales. We then used these methods to derive new equations for analyzing the mean behavior of fluctuation processes coupled self consistently to nonlinear fluid dynamics. This project extends a technology base relevant to a variety of multiscale problems in fluid dynamics of interest to the Laboratory and applies this technology to those problems. The project's theoretical and mathematical developments also help advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of complex behavior in fluid dynamical systems with strong spatial and temporal internal variability.

  9. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Jordan M

    2015-01-01

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically-reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the Chemical Master Equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete Chemical Master Equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the Chemical Langevin Equation or Low Noise Approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the Chemical Master Equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the Chemical Master Equation.

  10. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Many single molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors th...

  11. Physically consistent simulation of mesoscale chemical kinetics: The non-negative FIS-{alpha} method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana, Saswati, E-mail: saswatid@rishi.serc.iisc.ernet.in [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Raha, Soumyendu, E-mail: raha@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-10-01

    Biochemical pathways involving chemical kinetics in medium concentrations (i.e., at mesoscale) of the reacting molecules can be approximated as chemical Langevin equations (CLE) systems. We address the physically consistent non-negative simulation of the CLE sample paths as well as the issue of non-Lipschitz diffusion coefficients when a species approaches depletion and any stiffness due to faster reactions. The non-negative Fully Implicit Stochastic {alpha} (FIS {alpha}) method in which stopped reaction channels due to depleted reactants are deleted until a reactant concentration rises again, for non-negativity preservation and in which a positive definite Jacobian is maintained to deal with possible stiffness, is proposed and analysed. The method is illustrated with the computation of active Protein Kinase C response in the Protein Kinase C pathway.

  12. Can thermal inflation be consistent with baryogenesis in gauge-mediated SUSY breaking models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayakawa, Taku; Yamada, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Thermal inflation is an attractive idea to dilute cosmic density of unwanted particles such as moduli fields which cause cosmological difficulties. However, it also dilutes preexisting baryon asymmetry and some viable baryogenesis is necessary for a cosmologically consistent scenario. We investigate whether the Affleck-Dine mechanism can produce baryon asymmetry enough to survive after the dilution in gauge-mediated SUSY breaking models. Flat directions except for $LH_u$ flat direction cannot provide such huge baryon number because of Q-ball formation. We show that although the $LH_u$ flat direction is special in terms of having $\\mu$-term which prevents Q-ball formation, it cannot explain the observed baryon asymmetry either.

  13. Large tensor mode, field range bound and consistency in generalized G-inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunimitsu, Taro; Watanabe, Yuki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    We systematically show that in potential driven generalized G-inflation models, quantum corrections coming from new physics at the strong coupling scale can be avoided, while producing observable tensor modes. The effective action can be approximated by the tree level action, and as a result, these models are internally consistent, despite the fact that we introduced new mass scales below the energy scale of inflation. Although observable tensor modes are produced with sub-strong coupling scale field excursions, this is not an evasion of the Lyth bound, since the models include higher-derivative non-canonical kinetic terms, and effective rescaling of the field would result in super-Planckian field excursions. We argue that the enhanced kinetic term of the inflaton screens the interactions with other fields, keeping the system weakly coupled during inflation.

  14. Polygonal web representation for higher order correlation functions of consistent polygonal Markov fields in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Schreiber

    2009-05-02

    We consider polygonal Markov fields originally introduced by Arak and Surgailis (1982,1989). Our attention is focused on fields with nodes of order two, which can be regarded as continuum ensembles of non-intersecting contours in the plane, sharing a number of salient features with the two-dimensional Ising model. The purpose of this paper is to establish an explicit stochastic representation for the higher-order correlation functions of polygonal Markov fields in their consistency regime. The representation is given in terms of the so-called crop functionals (defined by a Moebius-type formula) of polygonal webs which arise in a graphical construction dual to that giving rise to polygonal fields. The proof of our representation formula goes by constructing a martingale interpolation between the correlation functions of polygonal fields and crop functionals of polygonal webs.

  15. Macro-particle FEL model with self-consistent spontaneous radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous radiation plays an important role in SASE FELs and storage ring FELs operating in giant pulse mode. It defines the correlation function of the FEL radiation as well as its many spectral features. Simulations of these systems using randomly distributed macro-particles with charge much higher that of a single electron create the problem of anomalously strong spontaneous radiation, limiting the capabilities of many FEL codes. In this paper we present a self-consistent macro-particle model which provided statistically exact simulation of multi-mode, multi-harmonic and multi-frequency short-wavelength 3-D FELs including the high power and saturation effects. The use of macro-particle clones allows both spontaneous and induced radiation to be treated in the same fashion. Simulations using this model do not require a seed and provide complete temporal and spatial structure of the FEL optical field.

  16. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  17. Quantum Chemistry, and Eclectic Mix: From Silicon Carbide to Size Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamie Marie Rintelman

    2004-12-19

    Chemistry is a field of great breadth and variety. It is this diversity that makes for both an interesting and challenging field. My interests have spanned three major areas of theoretical chemistry: applications, method development, and method evaluation. The topics presented in this thesis are as follows: (1) a multi-reference study of the geometries and relative energies of four atom silicon carbide clusters in the gas phase; (2) the reaction of acetylene on the Si(100)-(2x1) surface; (3) an improvement to the Effective Fragment Potential (EFP) solvent model to enable the study of reactions in both aqueous and nonaqueous solution; and (4) an evaluation of the size consistency of Multireference Perturbation Theory (MRPT). In the following section, the author briefly discusses two topics central to, and present throughout, this thesis: Multi-reference methods and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) methods.

  18. Pairing within the self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang, N Dinh

    2008-01-01

    An approach to pairing in finite nuclei at nonzero temperature is proposed, which incorporates the effects due to the quasiparticle-number fluctuation (QNF) around Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) mean field and dynamic coupling to quasiparticle-pair vibrations within the self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (SCQRPA). The numerical calculations of pairing gap, total energy, and heat capacity were carried out within a doubly folded multilevel model as well as realistic nuclei $^{56}$Fe and $^{120}$Sn. The results obtained show that, under the effect of QNF, in the region of moderate and strong couplings, the sharp transition between the superconducting and normal phases is smoothed out, resulting in a thermal pairing gap, which does not collapse at the BCS critical temperature, but has a tail, which extends to high temperature. The dynamic coupling of quasiparticles to SCQRPA vibrations significantly improves the agreement with the results of exact calculations and those obtained within the ...

  19. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  20. Community consistency determines the stability transition window of power-grid nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heetae; Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01

    The synchrony of electric power systems is important in order to maintain stable electricity supply. Recently, the measure basin stability was introduced to quantify a node's ability to recover its synchronization when perturbed. In this work, we focus on how basin stability depends on the coupling strength between nodes. We use the Chilean power grid as a case study. In general, the basin stability goes from zero to one as the coupling strength increases. However, this transition does happen for the same values for different nodes. By understanding the transition for individual nodes, we can further characterize their role in the power-transmission dynamics. We find that nodes with an exceptionally large transition window also have a low community consistency. In other words, they are hard to classify into one community when applying a community detection algorithm to the network. This also gives an efficient way to identify nodes with a long transition window (which is a computationally time-consuming task)...

  1. Independent Component Analysis of Microarray Data in the Study of Endometrial (Brief Title: Independent Component Analysis for Gene Arrays)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreil, David

    (Brief Title: Independent Component Analysis for Gene Arrays) Samir A. Saidi1 , Cathrine M. Holland4 of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB1 1QP, UK Corresponding author: Samir A Saidi University Department of Obstetrics

  2. On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2012-11-01

    We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

  3. Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

    1986-10-01

    There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

  4. Language interoperability for high-performance parallel scientific components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, N; Kohn, S; Smolinski, B

    1999-05-18

    With the increasing complexity and interdisciplinary nature of scientific applications, code reuse is becoming increasingly important in scientific computing. One method for facilitating code reuse is the use of components technologies, which have been used widely in industry. However, components have only recently worked their way into scientific computing. Language interoperability is an important underlying technology for these component architectures. In this paper, we present an approach to language interoperability for a high-performance parallel, component architecture being developed by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) group. Our approach is based on Interface Definition Language (IDL) techniques. We have developed a Scientific Interface Definition Language (SIDL), as well as bindings to C and Fortran. We have also developed a SIDL compiler and run-time library support for reference counting, reflection, object management, and exception handling (Babel). Results from using Babel to call a standard numerical solver library (written in C) from C and Fortran show that the cost of using Babel is minimal, where as the savings in development time and the benefits of object-oriented development support for C and Fortran far outweigh the costs.

  5. The Consistent Kinetics Porosity (CKP) Model: A Theory for the Mechanical Behavior of Moderately Porous Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-11-01

    A theory is developed for the response of moderately porous solids (no more than {approximately}20% void space) to high-strain-rate deformations. The model is consistent because each feature is incorporated in a manner that is mathematically compatible with the other features. Unlike simple p-{alpha} models, the onset of pore collapse depends on the amount of shear present. The user-specifiable yield function depends on pressure, effective shear stress, and porosity. The elastic part of the strain rate is linearly related to the stress rate, with nonlinear corrections from changes in the elastic moduli due to pore collapse. Plastically incompressible flow of the matrix material allows pore collapse and an associated macroscopic plastic volume change. The plastic strain rate due to pore collapse/growth is taken normal to the yield surface. If phase transformation and/or pore nucleation are simultaneously occurring, the inelastic strain rate will be non-normal to the yield surface. To permit hardening, the yield stress of matrix material is treated as an internal state variable. Changes in porosity and matrix yield stress naturally cause the yield surface to evolve. The stress, porosity, and all other state variables vary in a consistent manner so that the stress remains on the yield surface throughout any quasistatic interval of plastic deformation. Dynamic loading allows the stress to exceed the yield surface via an overstress ordinary differential equation that is solved in closed form for better numerical accuracy. The part of the stress rate that causes no plastic work (i.e-, the part that has a zero inner product with the stress deviator and the identity tensor) is given by the projection of the elastic stressrate orthogonal to the span of the stress deviator and the identity tensor.The model, which has been numerically implemented in MIG format, has been exercised under a wide array of extremal loading and unloading paths. As will be discussed in a companion sequel report, the CKP model is capable of closely matching plate impact measurements for porous materials.

  6. Consistent satellite XCO2 retrievals from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT using the BESD algorithm

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heymann, J.; Reuter, M.; Hilker, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.; Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Deutscher, N. M.; et al

    2015-02-13

    Consistent and accurate long-term data sets of global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) are required for carbon cycle and climate related research. However, global data sets based on satellite observations may suffer from inconsistencies originating from the use of products derived from different satellites as needed to cover a long enough time period. One reason for inconsistencies can be the use of different retrieval algorithms. We address this potential issue by applying the same algorithm, the Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS (BESD) algorithm, to different satellite instruments, SCIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT (March 2002–April 2012) and TANSO-FTS on-board GOSAT (launched in Januarymore »2009), to retrieve XCO2, the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of CO2. BESD has been initially developed for SCIAMACHY XCO2 retrievals. Here, we present the first detailed assessment of the new GOSAT BESD XCO2 product. GOSAT BESD XCO2 is a product generated and delivered to the MACC project for assimilation into ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). We describe the modifications of the BESD algorithm needed in order to retrieve XCO2 from GOSAT and present detailed comparisons with ground-based observations of XCO2 from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). We discuss detailed comparison results between all three XCO2 data sets (SCIAMACHY, GOSAT and TCCON). The comparison results demonstrate the good consistency between the SCIAMACHY and the GOSAT XCO2. For example, we found a mean difference for daily averages of ?0.60 ± 1.56 ppm (mean difference ± standard deviation) for GOSAT-SCIAMACHY (linear correlation coefficient r = 0.82), ?0.34 ± 1.37 ppm (r = 0.86) for GOSAT-TCCON and 0.10 ± 1.79 ppm (r = 0.75) for SCIAMACHY-TCCON. The remaining differences between GOSAT and SCIAMACHY are likely due to non-perfect collocation (±2 h, 10° × 10° around TCCON sites), i.e., the observed air masses are not exactly identical, but likely also due to a still non-perfect BESD retrieval algorithm, which will be continuously improved in the future. Our overarching goal is to generate a satellite-derived XCO2 data set appropriate for climate and carbon cycle research covering the longest possible time period. We therefore also plan to extend the existing SCIAMACHY and GOSAT data set discussed here by using also data from other missions (e.g., OCO-2, GOSAT-2, CarbonSat) in the future.« less

  7. flray Transport in Type Ia In order to solve the rate equations in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, Peter

    in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include the effects of non­thermal ionization. In Type Ia supernovae the non

  8. Principal component analysis of the reionization history from Planck 2015 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Wei-Ming; Cai, Rong-Gen

    2015-01-01

    The simple assumption of an instantaneous reionization of the Universe may bias estimates of cosmological parameters. In this paper a model-independent principal component method for the reionization history is applied to give constraints on the cosmological parameters from recent Planck 2015 data. We find that the Universe are not completely reionized at redshifts $z \\ge 8.5$ at 95% CL. Both the reionization optical depth and the matter fluctuation amplitude are higher than but consistent with those obtained in the standard instantaneous reionization scheme. The high estimated value of the matter fluctuation amplitude strengthens the tension between Planck CMB observations and some astrophysical data, such as cluster counts and weak lensing. The tension can significantly be relieved if the neutrino masses are allowed to vary. Thanks to a high scalar spectral index, the low-scale spontaneously broken SUSY inflationary model can fit the data well, which is marginally disfavored at 95% CL in the Planck analysis...

  9. Thermospheric tides at equinox: Simulations with coupled composition and auroral forcings. 1. Diurnal component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (USA)); Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Thermospheric tidal components calculated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermospheric general circulation model have been revised by including the effects of self-consistent composition couplings and auroral processes. Calculations are presented for equinox conditions at solar cycle minimum and maximum. The diurnal neutral winds and perturbation temperatures predicted by the model are compared with radar observations and the MSIS-86 model at low, mid, and high latitudes. Sensitivity tests indicate that the feedback between composition and dynamics affects the diurnal tidal temperature amplitudes up to 50% and the diurnal winds by about 15%. The calculated phases are within an hour of uncoupled composition calculations. Auroral processes dominate the diurnal waves at high latitudes, where the wind amplitudes may be double or triple those calculated for solar forcing only. The high-latitude energy and momentum sources must be included in the model formulations in order to reproduce observations of the September 1984 Equinox Transition Study exospheric temperatures.

  10. Two Stellar Components in the Halo of the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Carollo; T. C. Beers; Y. S. Lee; M. Chiba; J. E. Norris; R. Wilhelm; T. Sivarani; B. Marsteller; J. A. Munn; C. A. L. Bailer-Jones; P. Re Fiorentin; D. G. York

    2007-12-16

    The halo of the Milky Way provides unique elemental abundance and kinematic information on the first objects to form in the Universe, which can be used to tightly constrain models of galaxy formation and evolution. Although the halo was once considered a single component, evidence for its dichotomy has slowly emerged in recent years from inspection of small samples of halo objects. Here we show that the halo is indeed clearly divisible into two broadly overlapping structural components -- an inner and an outer halo -- that exhibit different spatial density profiles, stellar orbits and stellar metallicities (abundances of elements heavier than helium). The inner halo has a modest net prograde rotation, whereas the outer halo exhibits a net retrograde rotation and a peak metallicity one-third that of the inner halo. These properties indicate that the individual halo components probably formed in fundamentally different ways, through successive dissipational (inner) and dissipationless (outer) mergers and tidal disruption of proto-Galactic clumps.

  11. Method for producing hard-surfaced tools and machine components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHargue, Carl J. (Farragut, TN)

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention comprises a method for producing tools and machine components having superhard crystalline-ceramic work surfaces. Broadly, the method comprises two steps: A tool or machine component having a ceramic near-surface region is mounted in ion-implantation apparatus. The region then is implanted with metal ions to form, in the region, a metastable alloy of the ions and said ceramic. The region containing the alloy is characterized by a significant increase in hardness properties, such as microhardness, fracture-toughness, and/or scratch-resistance. The resulting improved article has good thermal stability at temperatures characteristic of typical tool and machine-component uses. The method is relatively simple and reproducible.

  12. Method for producing hard-surfaced tools and machine components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHargue, C.J.

    1981-10-21

    In one aspect, the invention comprises a method for producing tools and machine components having superhard crystalline-ceramic work surfaces. Broadly, the method comprises two steps: a tool or machine component having a ceramic near-surface region is mounted in ion-implantation apparatus. The region then is implanted with metal ions to form, in the region, a metastable alloy of the ions and said ceramic. The region containing the alloy is characterized by a significant increase in hardness properties, such as microhardness, fracture-toughness, and/or scratch-resistance. The resulting improved article has good thermal stability at temperatures characteristic of typical tool and machine-component uses. The method is relatively simple and reproducible.

  13. Method for protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

    2001-07-03

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  14. The carbon component of the UK power price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kris Voorspools

    2006-08-01

    CO{sub 2} emissions trading is in full swing in Europe and is already having an impact on the price of power in the UK. If EU allowances (EUAs) trade at euro 20/t-CO{sub 2}, the EUA component in the power price is estimated to be slightly < euro 10/MW.h. In the case of UK power for delivery 1 year ahead, this is {approximately} 10% of the market price of power. The introduction of a carbon components into the UK power prices took place along before the 'official' start of ETS in 2005. Analysis of historical data of the price of power, gas, coal and EUAs shows that the first trace of a CO{sub 2} component in UK power dates back to August 2003, shortly after EUAs first started to trade. In April 2004, CO{sub 2} was fully integrated into the UK power price. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM); Payne, Jason A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ottesen, Cory W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  16. Evaluation of systems and components for hybrid optical firing sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landry, M.J.; Rupert, J.W.; Mittas, A.

    1989-06-01

    High-energy density light appears to be a unique energy form that may be used to enhance the nuclear safety of weapon systems. Hybrid optical firing sets (HOFS) utilize the weak-link/strong-link exclusion region concept for nuclear safety; this method is similar to present systems, but uses light to transmit power across the exclusion region barrier. This report describes the assembling, operating, and testing of fourteen HOFS. These firing sets were required to charge a capacitor-discharge unit to 2.0 and 2.5 kV (100 mJ) in less than 1 s. First, we describe the components, the measurement techniques used to evaluate the components, and the different characteristics of the measured components. Second, we describe the HOFS studied, the setups used for evaluating them, and the resulting characteristics. Third, we make recommendations for improving the overall performance and suggest the best HOFS for packaging. 36 refs., 145 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  18. A self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Cameron P M; Naylor, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young (solar neighbourhood based on homogeneous fitting of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones using the tau^2 maximum-likelihood fitting statistic of Naylor & Jeffries in the M_V, V-J colour-magnitude diagram. The final adopted ages for the groups are: 149+51-19 Myr for the AB Dor moving group, 24+/-3 Myr for the {\\beta} Pic moving group (BPMG), 45+11-7 Myr for the Carina association, 42+6-4 Myr for the Columba association, 11+/-3 Myr for the {\\eta} Cha cluster, 45+/-4 Myr for the Tucana-Horologium moving group (Tuc-Hor), 10+/-3 Myr for the TW Hya association, and 22+4-3 Myr for the 32 Ori group. At this stage we are uncomfortable assigning a final, unambiguous age to the Argus association as our membership list for the association appears to suffer from a high level of contamination, and therefore it remains unclear whether these stars represent a single population of co...

  19. SELF-CONSISTENT ION CYCLOTRON ANISOTROPY-BETA RELATION FOR SOLAR WIND PROTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C. E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-20

    We derive a set of self-consistent marginally stable states for a system of ion-cyclotron waves propagating parallel to the large-scale magnetic field through a homogeneous proton-electron plasma. The proton distributions and the wave dispersions are related through the condition that no further ion-cyclotron resonant particle scattering or wave growth/damping may take place. The thermal anisotropy of the protons in these states therefore defines the threshold value for triggering the proton-cyclotron anisotropy instability. A number of recent papers have noted that the anisotropy of solar wind protons at 1 AU does not seem to be limited by the proton-cyclotron anisotropy threshold, even at low plasma beta. However, this puzzle seems to be due solely to the estimation of this anisotropy threshold under the assumption that the protons have a bi-Maxwellian distribution. We note that bi-Maxwellian distributions are never marginally stable to the resonant cyclotron interaction, so these estimates do not represent physically valid thresholds. The threshold anisotropies obtained from our marginally stable states are much larger, as a function of proton parallel beta, than the bi-Maxwellian estimates, and we show that the measured data remains below these more rigorous thresholds. Thus, the results of this paper resolve the apparent contradiction presented by the solar wind anisotropy observations at 1 AU: the bi-Maxwellian anisotropies are not rigorous thresholds, and so do not limit the proton distributions in the solar wind.

  20. The Quark Propagator in the NJL Model in a self-consistent 1/Nc Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Müller; Michael Buballa; Jochen Wambach

    2010-05-04

    The quark propagator is calculated in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model in a self-consistent 1/Nc-expansion at next-to-leading order. The calculations are carried out iteratively in Euclidean space. The chiral quark condensate and its dependence on temperature and chemical potential is calculated directly and compared with the mean-field results. In the chiral limit, we find a second-order phase transition at finite temperature and zero chemical potential, in agreement with universality arguments. At zero temperature and finite chemical potential, the phase transition is first order. In comparison with the mean-field results, the critical temperature and chemical potential are slightly reduced. We determine spectral functions from the Euclidean propagators by employing the Maximum-Entropy-Method (MEM). Thereby quark and meson masses are estimated and decay channels identified. For testing this method, we also apply it to evaluate perturbative spectral functions, which can be calculated directly in Minkowski space. In most cases we find that MEM is able to reproduce the rough features of the spectral functions, but not the details.

  1. Is there a "most perfect fluid" consistent with quantum field theory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2007-03-05

    It was recently conjectured that the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density, $ \\eta/ s$, for any fluid always exceeds $\\hbar/(4 \\pi k_B)$. This conjecture was motivated by quantum field theoretic results obtained via the AdS/CFT correspondence and from empirical data with real fluids. A theoretical counterexample to this bound can be constructed from a nonrelativistic gas by increasing the number of species in the fluid while keeping the dynamics essentially independent of the species type. The question of whether the underlying structure of relativistic quantum field theory generically inhibits the realization of such a system and thereby preserves the possibility of a universal bound is considered here. Using rather conservative assumptions, it is shown here that a metastable gas of heavy mesons in a particular controlled regime of QCD provides a realization of the counterexample and is consistent with a well-defined underlying relativistic quantum field theory. Thus, quantum field theory appears to impose no lower bound on $\\eta/s$, at least for metastable fluids.

  2. On the consistency of QCBED structure factor measurements for TiO2 (Rutile)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Jian -Min; Friis, Jesper; Spence, John C. H.

    2003-09-16

    The same Bragg reflection in TiO2 from twelve different CBED patterns (from different crystals, orientations and thicknesses) are analysed quantitatively in order to evaluate the consistency of the QCBED method for bond-charge mapping. The standard deviation in the resulting distribution of derived X-ray structure factors is found to be an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional X-ray work, and the standard error (0.026% for FX(110)) is slightly better than obtained by the X-ray Pendellosung method applied to silicon. This is sufficiently accuracy to distinguish between atomic, covalent and ionic models of bonding. We describe the importance of extractingmore »experimental parameters from CCD camera characterization, and of surface oxidation and crystal shape. Thus, the current experiments show that the QCBED method is now a robust and powerful tool for low order structure factor measurement, which does not suffer from the large extinction (multiple scattering) errors which occur in inorganic X-ray crystallography, and may be applied to nanocrystals. Our results will be used to understand the role of d electrons in the chemical bonding of TiO2.« less

  3. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Redlich, Matthias [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  4. On the consistency of universally non-minimally coupled $f(R,T,R_{??}T^{??})$ theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismael Ayuso; Jose Beltran Jimenez; Alvaro de la Cruz Dombriz

    2015-05-14

    We discuss the consistency of a recently proposed class of theories described by an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar, the trace of the energy-momentum tensor and the contraction of the Ricci tensor with the energy-momentum tensor. We briefly discuss the limitations of including the energy-momentum tensor in the action, as it is a non fundamental quantity, but a quantity that should be derived from the action. The fact that theories containing non-linear contractions of the Ricci tensor usually leads to the presence of pathologies associated with higher-order equations of motion will be shown to constrain the stability of this class of theories. We provide a general framework and show that the conformal mode for these theories generally has higher-order equations of motion and that non-minimal couplings to the matter fields usually lead to higher-order equations of motion. In order to illustrate such limitations we explicitly study the cases of a canonical scalar field, a K-essence field and a massive vector field. Whereas for the scalar field cases it is possible to find healthy theories, for the vector field case the presence of instabilities is unavoidable.

  5. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  6. Universal consistent truncation for 6d/7d gauge/gravity duals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilleas Passias; Andrea Rota; Alessandro Tomasiello

    2015-06-17

    Recently, AdS_7 solutions of IIA supergravity have been classified; there are infinitely many of them, whose expression is known analytically, and with internal space of S^3 topology. Their field theory duals are six-dimensional (1,0) SCFT's. In this paper we show that for each of these AdS_7 solutions there exists a consistent truncation from massive IIA supergravity to minimal gauged supergravity in seven dimensions. This theory has an SU(2) gauge group, and a single scalar, whose value is related to a certain distortion of the internal S^3. This explains the universality observed in recent work on AdS_5 and AdS_4 solutions dual to compactifications of the (1,0) SCFT_6's. Thanks to previous work on the minimal gauged supergravity, the truncation also implies the existence of holographic RG-flows connecting those solutions to the AdS_7 vacuum, as well as new classes of IIA AdS_3 solutions.

  7. Universal consistent truncation for 6d/7d gauge/gravity duals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passias, Achilleas; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, AdS_7 solutions of IIA supergravity have been classified; there are infinitely many of them, whose expression is known analytically, and with internal space of S^3 topology. Their field theory duals are six-dimensional (1,0) SCFT's. In this paper we show that for each of these AdS_7 solutions there exists a consistent truncation from massive IIA supergravity to minimal gauged supergravity in seven dimensions. This theory has an SU(2) gauge group, and a single scalar, whose value is related to a certain distortion of the internal S^3. This explains the universality observed in recent work on AdS_5 and AdS_4 solutions dual to compactifications of the (1,0) SCFT_6's. Thanks to previous work on the minimal gauged supergravity, the truncation also implies the existence of holographic RG-flows connecting those solutions to the AdS_7 vacuum, as well as new classes of IIA AdS_3 solutions.

  8. On the Consistency of QCBED Structure Factor Measurements for TiO2 (Rutile)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Jian-Min; Friis, Jesper; Spence, John C.H.

    2003-09-16

    The same Bragg reflection in TiO2 from twelve different CBED patterns (from different crystals, orientations and thicknesses) are analysed quantitatively in order to evaluate the consistency of the QCBED method for bond-charge mapping. The standard deviation in the resulting distribution of derived X-ray structure factors is found to be an order of magnitude smaller than that in conventional X-ray work , and the standard error (0.026% for FX(110)) is slightly better than obtained by the X-ray Pendellosung method applied to silicon. This is sufficiently accuracy to distinguish between atomic, covalent and ionic models of bonding. We describe the importance of extracting experimental parameters from CCD camera characterization, and of surface oxidation and crystal shape. The current experiments show that the QCBED method is now a robust and powerful tool for low order structure factor measurement, which does not suffer from the large extinction (multiple scattering) errors which occur in inorganic X-ray crystallography, and may be applied to nanocrystals. Our results will be used to understand the role of d electrons in the chemical bonding of TiO2.

  9. Cosmic ray electrons, positrons and the synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardo, Giuseppe Di [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evoli, Carmelo [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Gaggero, Daniele [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, I-56100 Siena (Italy); Maccione, Luca, E-mail: giuseppe.dibernardo@physics.gu.se, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: dgaggero@sissa.it, E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it, E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ?< 1GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4GeV the e{sup ?} source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index ? 2.5. Below 4GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height z{sub t} of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z{sub t} ?< 2kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  10. Community consistency determines the stability transition window of power-grid nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heetae Kim; Sang Hoon Lee; Petter Holme

    2015-04-28

    The synchrony of electric power systems is important in order to maintain stable electricity supply. Recently, the measure basin stability was introduced to quantify a node's ability to recover its synchronization when perturbed. In this work, we focus on how basin stability depends on the coupling strength between nodes. We use the Chilean power grid as a case study. In general, basin stability goes from zero to one as coupling strength increases. However, this transition does not happen at the same value for different nodes. By understanding the transition for individual nodes, we can further characterize their role in the power-transmission dynamics. We find that nodes with an exceptionally large transition window also have a low community consistency. In other words, they are hard to classify to one community when applying a community detection algorithm. This also gives an efficient way to identify nodes with a long transition window (which is computationally time consuming). Finally, to corroborate these results, we present a stylized example network with prescribed community structures that captures the mentioned characteristics of basin stability transition and recreates our observations.

  11. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson III, George R. ); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin ); Freerks, Robert L. )

    2013-01-15

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

  12. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  13. Method for separating disparate components in a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides a method of separating a mixed component waste stream in a centrifugal separator. The mixed component waste stream is introduced into the separator and is centrifugally separated within a spinning rotor. A dual vortex separation occurs due to the phase density differences, with the phases exiting the rotor distinct from one another. In a preferred embodiment, aqueous solutions of organics can be separated with up to 100% efficiency. The relatively more dense water phase is centrifugally separated through a radially outer aperture in the separator, while the relatively less dense organic phase is separated through a radially inner aperture.

  14. Safety culture assessment based on PSA-defined critical components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Kozuh, M.

    1994-12-31

    With the suggested guide-words approach connected to the critical components, a different viewpoint on nuclear safety attitudes is defined. This enables the identification, judgment, and improvement of the most vulnerable places in the plant. Any potential overlap in the duties and areas where a clear division of responsibilities is needed is thus revealed. Also, the need for communication between different groups becomes evident. It is known that anyone who neglects the communication of component status by assuming everybody knows it can cause a serious problem. Safety culture is reached when such assumptions are absent from day-to-day operations.

  15. Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, Harold R. (Vernon, CT); Breault, Richard D. (Coventry, CT)

    1993-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

  16. The divergent wind component in data sparse tropical wind fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Bruce Alan

    1985-01-01

    THE DIVERGENT WIND COMPONENT IN DATA SPARSE TROPICAL WIND FIELDS A Thesis by BRUCE ALAN SNYDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology THE DIVERGENT WIND COMPONENT IN DATA SPARSE TROPICAL WIND FIELDS A Thesis by BRUCE ALAN SNYDER Approved as to style and content by: James P. McGuirk (Co-Chairman) Aylmer IL Thompson (Co-Chairman) W. Homer...

  17. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  18. Component failures that lead to reactor scrams. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Lim, E. Y.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the operating experience scram data compiled from 35 operating US light water reactors (LWRs) to identify the principal components/systems related to reactor scrams. The data base utilized to identify the scram causes is developed from a EPRI-utility sponsored survey conducted by SAI coupled with recent data from the USNRC Gray Books. The reactor population considered in this evaluation is limited to 23 PWRs and 12 BWRs because of the limited scope of the program. The population includes all the US NSSS vendors. It is judged that this population accurately characterizes the component-related scrams in LWRs over the first 10 years of plant operation.

  19. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT B COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-01-19

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Therefore, the objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit B glass and perform additional testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and for additional performance testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The glass was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. The leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. The leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to identify the formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. Characterization of the glass prior to testing revealed that some undissolved plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The undissolved particles had a disk-like morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar disk-like PuO{sub 2} phases were observed in previous LaBS glass testing at PNNL. In that work, researchers concluded that plutonium formed with this morphology as a result of the leaching process. It was more likely that the presence of the plutonium oxide crystals in the PNNL testing was a result of glass fabrication. A series of PCTs were conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water. The PCT-Method A (PCT-A) was conducted to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT-A test has a strict protocol and is designed to specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of a nuclear waste glass have been consistently controlled during production and, thus, meet the repository acceptance requirements. The PCT-A results on the Pu containing LaBS Frit B glass showed that the glass was very durable with a normalized elemental release value for boron of approximately 0.02 g/L. This boron release value was better than two orders of magnitude better from a boron release standpoint than the current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The boron release value for EA glass is 16.7 g/L.

  20. Quiescent X-ray emission from Cen X-4: a variable thermal component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cackett, Edward M; Miller, Jon M; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-01-01

    The nearby neutron star low-mass X-ray binary, Cen X-4, has been in a quiescent state since its last outburst in 1979. Typically, quiescent emission from these objects consists of thermal emission (presumably from the neutron star surface) with an additional hard power-law tail of unknown nature. Variability has been observed during quiescence in Cen X-4 on both timescales as short as hundreds of seconds and as long as years. However, the nature of this variability is still unknown. Early observations seemed to show it was all due to a variable hard X-ray tail. Here, we present new and archival observations that contradict this. The most recent Suzaku observation of Cen X-4 finds it in a historically low state, a factor of 4.4 fainter than the brightest quiescent observation. As the spectrum during the brightest observation was comprised of approximately 60% from the thermal component and 40% from the power-law component, such a large change cannot be explained by just power-law variability. Spectral fits wit...

  1. Spatial consistency of Chinook salmon redd distribution within and among years in the Cowlitz River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, Katherine J.; Torgersen, Christian; Henning, Julie; Murray, Christopher J.

    2013-04-28

    We investigated the spawning patterns of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha on the lower Cowlitz River, Washington (USA) using a unique set of fine- and coarse-scale 35 temporal and spatial data collected during bi-weekly aerial surveys conducted in 1991-2009 (500 m to 28 km resolution) and 2008-2009 (100-500 m resolution). Redd locations were mapped from a helicopter during 2008 and 2009 with a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) synchronized with in-flight audio recordings. We examined spatial patterns of Chinook salmon redd reoccupation among and within years in relation to segment-scale geomorphic features. Chinook salmon spawned in the same sections each year with little variation among years. On a coarse scale, five years (1993, 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2009) were compared for reoccupation. Redd locations were highly correlated among years resulting in a minimum correlation coefficient of 0.90 (adjusted P = 0.002). Comparisons on a fine scale (500 m) between 2008 and 2009 also revealed a high degree of consistency among redd locations (P < 0.001). On a finer temporal scale, we observed that salmon spawned in the same sections during the first and last week (2008: P < 0.02; and 2009: P < 0.001). Redds were clustered in both 2008 and 2009 (P < 0.001). Regression analysis with a generalized linear model at the 500-m scale indicated that river kilometer and channel bifurcation were positively associated with redd density, whereas sinuosity was negatively associated with redd density. Collecting data on specific redd locations with a GPS during aerial surveys was logistically feasible and cost effective and greatly enhanced the spatial precision of Chinook salmon spawning surveys.

  2. Is Modified Gravity Required by Observations? An Empirical Consistency Test of Dark Energy Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng Wang; Lam Hui; Morgan May; Zoltan Haiman

    2007-10-16

    We apply the technique of parameter-splitting to existing cosmological data sets, to check for a generic failure of dark energy models. Given a dark energy parameter, such as the energy density Omega_Lambda or equation of state w, we split it into two meta-parameters with one controlling geometrical distances, and the other controlling the growth of structure. Observational data spanning Type Ia Supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), galaxy clustering, and weak gravitational lensing statistics are fit without requiring the two meta-parameters to be equal. This technique checks for inconsistency between different data sets, as well as for internal inconsistency within any one data set (e.g., CMB or lensing statistics) that is sensitive to both geometry and growth. We find that the cosmological constant model is consistent with current data. Theories of modified gravity generally predict a relation between growth and geometry that is different from that of general relativity. Parameter-splitting can be viewed as a crude way to parametrize the space of such theories. Our analysis of current data already appears to put sharp limits on these theories: assuming a flat universe, current data constrain the difference Omega_Lambda(geom) - Omega_Lambda(grow) to be -0.0044 +/- 0.0058 (68% C.L.); allowing the equation of state w to vary, the difference w(geom) - w(grow) is constrained to be 0.37 +/- 0.37 (68% C.L.). Interestingly, the region w(grow) > w(geom), which should be generically favored by theories that slow structure formation relative to general relativity, is quite restricted by data already. We find w(grow) < -0.80 at 2 sigma. As an example, the best-fit flat Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model approximated by our parametrization lies beyond the 3 sigma contour for constraints from all the data sets.

  3. Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E. Stadnik, Yu. S.; Lysoivan, A. I.; Korovin, V. B.

    2013-11-15

    A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations for the particle and energy balance and boundary conditions for Maxwell’s equations. The equation of charged particle balance takes into account the influx of particles due to ionization and their loss via diffusion and convection. The equation of electron energy balance takes into account the RF heating power source, as well as energy losses due to the excitation and electron-impact ionization of gas atoms, energy exchange via Coulomb collisions, and plasma heat conduction. The deposited RF power is calculated by solving the boundary problem for Maxwell’s equations. When describing the dissipation of the energy of the RF field, collisional absorption and Landau damping are taken into account. At each time step, Maxwell’s equations are solved for the current profiles of the plasma density and plasma temperature. The calculations are performed for a cylindrical plasma. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and homogeneous along the plasma column. The system of balance equations is solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Maxwell’s equations are solved in a one-dimensional approximation by using the Fourier transformation along the azimuthal and longitudinal coordinates. Results of simulations of RF plasma generation in the Uragan-2M stellarator by using a frame antenna operating at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency are presented. The calculations show that the slow wave generated by the antenna is efficiently absorbed at the periphery of the plasma column, due to which only a small fraction of the input power reaches the confinement region. As a result, the temperature on the axis of the plasma column remains low, whereas at the periphery it is substantially higher. This leads to strong absorption of the RF field at the periphery via the Landau mechanism.

  4. The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

    2010-02-01

    Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

  5. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  6. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, ?, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1) materials sensing and monitoring; (2) physics-based materials and damage evolution modeling; and (3) remaining life estimation by integrating sensing, modeling and uncertainty.

  7. Linear-scaling implementation of molecular response theory in self-consistent field electronic-structure theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    Linear-scaling implementation of molecular response theory in self-consistent field electronic 2007 A linear-scaling implementation of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham self-consistent field theories on a nonredundant exponential parametrization of the one-electron density matrix in the atomic-orbital basis

  8. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence 17 (1996) 37-83 Consistency, redundancy, and implied equalities in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Harvey J.

    1996-01-01

    Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence 17 (1996) 37-83 Consistency, redundancy interests in artificial intelligence have recently produced new results. One question is that of consistency by Charnes and Cooper [I01 and the monograph by Glover et al. [41]). They have also arisen in artificial

  9. Lead Content of Brass Plumbing Components J Barry Maynard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    Lead Content of Brass Plumbing Components J Barry Maynard University of Cincinnati 2008 Water are leaded brass and hence comprise a potential source of Pb in compliance testing under the Lead and Copper be marketed as "lead free". In true no-lead brasses, Bi and Se are used in place of Pb (http

  10. Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

  11. On two-component equations for zero mass particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm I. Fushchych; A. L. Grishchenko

    2002-06-12

    The paper presents a detailed theoretical-group analysis of three types of two-component equations of motion which describe the particle with zero mass and spin 1/2. There are studied P-, T- and C-propertias of the equations obtained.

  12. Analytical chemistry methods for metallic core components: Revision March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of alloys used to fabricate core components. These alloys are 302, 308, 316, 316-Ti, and 321 stainless steels and 600 and 718 Inconels and they may include other 300-series stainless steels.

  13. Component-Based Abstraction and Refinement , Xiuli Sun2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Fei

    , is a powerful state space reduction algorithm and accomplishes verification of a property on a system, ABV, model checking, and compo- sitional reasoning in system verification, the following challenges in component-based hardware/software co-verification of embedded systems. Case studies have shown

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF AUTOMOTIVE VALVE TRAIN COMPONENTS WITH IMPLICT FILTERING \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filtering, Mechanical Systems, Automotive Valve Trains AMS subject classifications. 65K05, 65K10, 65L05, 65YOPTIMIZATION OF AUTOMOTIVE VALVE TRAIN COMPONENTS WITH IMPLICT FILTERING \\Lambda T. D. CHOI y , O identification and optimization in automotive valve train design. We extend our previous work by using a more

  15. Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine diagnostics G Portobello Street, Sheffield S1 4DP, UK EMail: gopi@dcs.shef.ac.uk Abstract The vibration signatures of combining neural nets in majority voting systems. 1 Introduction Vibrations in a reciprocating internal

  16. System Development Using the Integrating Component Architectures Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payton, Jamie

    this method the Integrating Component Architectures Process (ICAP). 2 LIFE CYCLES The Rational Unified Process [5] and the MBASE life cycle [1] both provide a method to systematically build high quality software, a project plan is developed, and risks are resolved. The Lifecycle Architecture (LCA) requirements should

  17. The Generic Graph Component Library Dr. Dobb's Journal September 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    by Jeremy G. Siek and Andrew Lumsdaine). The most important aspect of designing the library was to defineThe Generic Graph Component Library Dr. Dobb's Journal September 2000 Generic programming for graph.nd.edu, and lumsg@lsc.nd.edu, respectively. The Standard Template Library has established a solid foundation

  18. Component-based risk analysis Doctoral Dissertation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    Component-based risk analysis Doctoral Dissertation by Gyrd Brændeland Submitted to the Faculty. In conventional risk analysis the parts of the environment that are relevant for estimating the risk-level are often included as part of the target of analysis. Furthermore, in existing risk analysis methods [3, 30

  19. Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components Patrick D@sandia.gov Abstract--Effective evaluation and prediction of photovoltaic performance loss due to soiling requires types. I. INTRODUCTION Soiling is a significant source of energy loss in photovoltaic (PV) systems [1

  20. Identication of Major Water-Soluble Fluorescent Components of Some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other dissolved hydrocarbons are ubiquitous contaminants of seawater the pattern of ¯uorescent contaminants in water to be used as ®ngerprints of speci®c types of contaminationIdenti®cation of Major Water-Soluble Fluorescent Components of Some Petrochemicals M. GRONER, A. R

  1. FIRE Plasma Facing Components Pre-Conceptual Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. #12FIRE Plasma Facing Components Pre-Conceptual Design Michael Ulrickson Presented at Fusion Summer rate required for He removal ­ Fusion burn rate 1 x 1020/s (200 MW) ­ He fraction in the divertor 0

  2. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF JAVA COMPONENT-ORIENTED DISTRIBUTED APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, John

    relevant projects. OrWell [3] is a monitoring environment for CORBA distributed applications, which uses attached to the existing objects. In addition, it is not clear whether the monitoring environmentPERFORMANCE MONITORING OF JAVA COMPONENT-ORIENTED DISTRIBUTED APPLICATIONS Adrian Mos, John Murphy

  3. Apparatus for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2008-04-15

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  4. Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-08-03

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  5. Performance Monitoring of MPC Based on Dynamic Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Performance Monitoring of MPC Based on Dynamic Principal Component Analysis Xue Min Tian Gong Quan Center of China MCC20 Group Co., Ltd., Shanghai 201900, China (E-mail: chen9028@163.com). School for performance monitoring of constrained multi-variable model predictive control (MPC) systems. In the proposed

  6. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-07-01

    The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) object data model of buildings is being developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI). The aim is to support data sharing and exchange in the building and construction industry across the life-cycle of a building. This paper describes a number of aspects of a major extension of the HVAC part of the IFC data model. First is the introduction of a more generic approach for handling HVAC components. This includes type information, which corresponds to catalog data, occurrence information, which defines item-specific attributes such as location and connectivity, and performance history information, which documents the actual performance of the component instance over time. Other IFC model enhancements include an extension of the connectivity model used to specify how components forming a system can be traversed and the introduction of time-based data streams. This paper includes examples of models of particular types of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with all attributes included in the definitions. The paper concludes by describing the on-going process of model testing, implementation and integration into the complete IFC model and how the model can be used by software developers to support interoperability between HVAC-oriented design and analysis tools.

  7. Two-component equations modelling water waves with constant vorticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Escher; David Henry; Boris Kolev; Tony Lyons

    2014-09-30

    In this paper we derive a two-component system of nonlinear equations which model two-dimensional shallow water waves with constant vorticity. Then we prove well-posedness of this equation using a geometrical framework which allows us to recast this equation as a geodesic flow on an infinite dimensional manifold. Finally, we provide a criteria for global existence.

  8. Principal Component Analysis for Fault Detection and Structure Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Principal Component Analysis for Fault Detection and Structure Health Monitoring Nicolas Stoffels structure to ensure its health monitoring. The proposed approach is based on the PCA algorithm. Once PCA promptly and precisely [5]. FDI is also important in SHM (Structure Health Monitoring) because of aging

  9. Sparse Component Analysis: a New Tool for Data Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    Sparse Component Analysis: a New Tool for Data Mining Pando Georgiev1 , Fabian Theis2 , Andrzej,hova}@bsp.brain.riken.go.jp Summary. In many practical problems for data mining the data X under consid- eration (given as (m × N Separation, cluster- ing. 1 Introduction Data mining techniques can be divided into the following classes [3

  10. Controller Patterns for Component-based Reactive Control Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Kung-Kiu

    Controller Patterns for Component-based Reactive Control Software Systems Petr Stepán, Kung-Kiu Lau Organization]: Special-Purpose and Application-Based Systems--Process control systems; D.2.2 [Software of the device they are embedded in, hence we call them reactive control systems. The general schema

  11. Independent Component Analysis for Music Similarity Computation , Peter Knees1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmer, Gerhard

    a musically meaningful counterpart, but are merely measures of basic physical properties of the audio signal. Furthermore, most of these algorithms do not take into ac- count the temporal development of the audio signal of our approach, Independent Component Analysis (ICA) de- composes an audio signal into individual parts

  12. Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper with FormalCheck Annette Bunker properties of a VCI-compliant PCI 2.1 bus wrapper model in the formal verification tool, FormalCheck. Though a wrapper that takes VCI transactions as input and generate PCI 2.1 [Gro95] transactions as output, await

  13. Verifying a Virtual Component Interfacebased PCI Bus Wrapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface­based PCI Bus Wrapper with FormalCheck Annette Bunker properties of a VCI­compliant PCI 2.1 bus wrapper model in the formal verification tool, FormalCheck. Though a wrapper that takes VCI transactions as input and generate PCI 2.1 [Gro95] transactions as output, await

  14. NHLBI Workshop Summaries Resident Cellular Components of the Human Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelhardt, John F.

    NHLBI Workshop Summaries Resident Cellular Components of the Human Lung Current Knowledge and Goals, Maryland; 5 Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health and Cell Biology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; 11 Developmental Lung Biology Research

  15. Lamello: Passive Acoustic Sensing for Tangible Input Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Björn

    schemes, and audio analysis. We demonstrate 3D printed Lamello-powered buttons, sliders, and dials. Author Keywords 3D Printing; Sound; Tangible Interaction ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 User Interfaces: Components can be fabricated from a single material (e.g., 3D printed ABS plastic), and "wiring" only

  16. A Tutorial on Principal Component Analysis Jonathon Shlens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Kevin K.

    A Tutorial on Principal Component Analysis Jonathon Shlens Center for Neural Science, New York) is a standard tool in mod- ern data analysis - in diverse fields from neuroscience to com- puter graphics a foundation for approaching the fields of machine learning and dimensional reduction. The discussion

  17. Tracing Cattle Breeds with Principal Components Analysis Ancestry Informative SNPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paschou, Peristera

    Tracing Cattle Breeds with Principal Components Analysis Ancestry Informative SNPs Jamey Lewis1 that can be used to trace the breed of unknown cattle samples. Taking advantage of the power of Principal the origin of individual cattle. In doing so, we present a thorough examination of population genetic

  18. An Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture

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    Security Infrastructure (GSI) [1] is widely accepted as the standard for authentication on the Grid for security. Desired characteristics of Grid security include: · The ability to verify the identityAn Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture Lavanya Ramakrishnan1 , Helen

  19. MODELLING AND SIMULATIONS OF MULTI-COMPONENT LIPID MEMBRANES AND

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    WANG AND QIANG DU Abstract. In this paper, phase field models are developed for multi-component vesicle to simulate the deformation of membranes under the elastic bending energy and the line tension energy been theoretically modeled by minimizing an energy with contributions of the bending resistance

  20. Improving the Security of Android Inter-Component Communication

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    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Improving the Security of Android Inter-Component Communication Adam Cozzette, Kathryn Lingel 91711 The Aerospace Corporation El Segundo, CA Abstract--In the Android operating system, each undesired behavior. We prevented these exploits by modifying Android's Intent handling behavior to err