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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling and simulation of the thermal and psychrometric transient response of all electric ships, internal compartments and cabinets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a general computational model for all electric ships and internal compartments (open and closed domains) that contain heat sources and sinks. A simplified physical model, which combines principles of classical thermodynamics and ... Keywords: relative humidity distribution, temperature distribution, thermal management

J. V. C. Vargas; J. C. Ordonez; R. Hovsapian

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Modeling and Simulation of the Thermal and Psychrometric Transient Response of All-Electric Ships, Internal Compartments and Cabinets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a general computational model for all-electric ships and internal compartments (open and closed domains) that contain heat sources and sinks. A simplified physical model, which combines principles of classical thermodynamics and heat transfer, ... Keywords: Thermal management, relative humidity distribution, temperature distribution

J.C. Ordonez; J.V.C. Vargas; R. Hovsapian

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Analysis of International Commodity Shipping Data and the Shipment of NORM to the United States  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Spreader Bar Radiation Detector project, PNNL analyzed US import data shipped through US ports collected over the 12 months of 2006 (over 4.5 million containers). Using these data, we extracted a variety of distributions that are of interest to modelers and developers of active and passive detection systems used to 'scan' IMCCs for potential contraband. This report expands on some of the analysis presented in an earlier report from LLNL, by investigation the foreign port distribution of commodities shipped to the US. The majority of containers shipped to the United States are 40 ft containers ({approx}70%); about 25% are 20 ft; and about 3.6% are 45 ft containers. A small fraction (<1%) of containers are of other more specialized sizes, and very few ports actually ship these unique size containers (a full distribution for all foreign ports is shown in Appendix A below). The primary foreign ports that ship the largest fraction of each container are shown in the table below. Given that 45 ft containers comprise 1 of out every 27 containers shipped to the US, and given the foreign ports from which they are shipped, they should not be ignored in screening; further testing and analysis of radiation measurements for national security with this size container is warranted. While a large amount of NORM is shipped in IMCCs, only a few specific commodities are shipped with enough frequency to present potential issues in screening IMCCs at ports. The majority of containers with NORM will contain fertilizers (5,700 containers), granite (59,000 containers), or ceramic (225,000 containers) materials. Fertilizers were generally shipping in either 20- or 40 ft containers with equal frequency. While granite is mostly shipped in 20 ft containers, ceramic materials can be shipped in either 20- or 40 ft containers. The size of container depended on the specific use of the ceramic or porcelain material. General construction ceramics (such as floor and roofing tiles) tend to be shipped in 20 ft containers. Consumer products made from ceramic materials (e.g., tableware, sinks, and toilets) are generally shipped in 40 ft containers. This distinct discrepancy is due in large part to the packaging of the commodity. Consumer products are generally shipped packed in a box loaded with Styrofoam or other packing material to protect the product from breakage. Construction ceramic materials are generally shipped in less packing material, many times consisting of only a cardboard or wooden box. Granite is almost always shipped in a 20 ft container, given its very high density.

Baciak, James E.; Ely, James H.; Schweppe, John E.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Robinson, Sean M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Shipping - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shipping Shipping To ship equipment to the BASE Facility, send it to the following address: To: Mike Johnson (3rd Party / No PO) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, Bldg 88 Berkeley, CA 94720 A few notes about our shipping process: -All equipment shipped to or from Berkeley Lab goes through our shipping and receiving facility, located in a different building. To ensure your equipment arrives in time for your run, plan on having delivered to the Lab two business days prior to when you actually need it. -All radioactive material MUST go through our rad shipping process. No radioactive material is permitted to enter or leave Berkeley Lab by any other means. We can not ship radioactive material to you unless you have a valid radioactive material license.

5

Composite Ship Track Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical and radiative properties of a composite ship track are described from the analysis of 131 ship–ship track correlation pairs collected during the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment. The significant variability of ship tracks around ...

P. A. Durkee; R. E. Chartier; A. Brown; E. J. Trehubenko; S. D. Rogerson; C. Skupniewicz; K. E. Nielsen; S. Platnick; M. D. King

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

RoboCrane Applications for Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 22 100' 50' Flying Carpet (Single Operator) for: Internal Wall Maintenance eg, Ship Ballast Tanks Roger Bostelman NIST 10/17/02 Page 23. ...

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

NIST Summer High School Intern Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer High School Intern Program (SHIP). SHIP is a NIST-wide summer intern program for students who will have finished ...

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ship Waves and Lee Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional internal trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid are shown to have dynamics analogous to surface ship waves on water of finite depth. Two models which allow for vertical trapping of wave ...

R. D. Sharman; M. G. Wurtele

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ASSIST: access controlled ship identification streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) requires a majority of cargo and passenger ships to use the Automatic Identification System (AIS) for navigation safety and traffic control. Distributing live AIS data on the Internet can offer a global view ...

Baljeet Malhotra; Wee-Juan Tan; Jianneng Cao; Thomas Kister; Stéphane Bressan; Kian-Lee Tan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Shipping and Receiving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shipping and Receiving Print Shipping and Receiving Print On this page: Transport Policy Shipping to the ALS Shipping from the ALS Shipping Hazardous Materials Contacts: ALS Shipping & Receiving (small packages) LBNL Shipping & Receiving (large packages requiring forklift truck) Building 7 Hours: M-F, 7:30 am-4:30 pm Telephone: 510 486 4494 Building 69 Hours: M-F, 7:00 am-3:30 pm Telephone: 510 486 4935 Fax: 510 486 5668 Transport Policy - Getting Your Samples and Equipment to and from the ALS All Lab personnel, including ALS staff and users, must follow the procedures detailed below for packing, labeling, and sending shipments to or from the ALS. These shipping procedures are required for: all materials and equipment brought to the ALS; items that are being returned for repairs or refunds to

11

NSLS Services | Shipping Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS Shipping Procedures For shipments arriving at the NSLS from other locations, please ship via Federal Express. If this is not possible, or if you have any questions, please...

12

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

13

Oceanic shipping soundscapes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping and wind are key sources in the oceanic soundscape that affects marine mammal habitats. A new method of forming such soundscapes is presented. Frequency and range dependent transmission losses are precomputed from a grid of virtual sources using fast ray computations (BELLHOP) on a specified number of radial lines. Each radial line samples the bathymetry along its bearing out to a given maximum range. A shipping soundscape is then estimated by assigning a source spectral density level (dB re 1 ? Pa2/Hz) and a shipping density (number of ships per unit area per unit time) to the various grid nodes. Such density values are obtained directly from ships carrying an automatic identification system (AIS) that transmit information such as ship type

Christian de Moustier; Michael Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bahamian ship graffiti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bahamian archipelago covers over 5,000 square miles of the Atlantic Ocean at the northwestern edge of the Caribbean Sea. In the Age of Sail, from the late 15th to early 20th centuries, these islands were on major sailing routes between the Caribbean, Central America, and Europe. Bahamians developed life-ways using their islands? location to their advantage. Archaeological evidence of the significance of shipping activity is quite lacking. This research aimed to help fill the void by documenting examples of ship graffiti throughout the Bahamas. Examples of ship graffiti were documented with photographs and tracings. The Bahamian examples all date to the 19th and 20th centuries, 100 years later than other examples from the Caribbean and North America. They are also unique in being incised into the stone surfaces of building walls, caves, stones on a hillside, even on a slate fragment. It is possible that ship graffiti were also engraved on wooden surfaces but these have not survived in the archaeological record. Images depict locally-built vessels such as sloops and schooners as well as larger, ocean-going vessels. Ship graffiti are at sites associated mainly with people of African heritage, another possible social grouping being persons of lower economic status. Graffiti details consistently indicate that the artists were familiar with ship construction and rigging. This analysis of ship graffiti gives some understanding of the significance of ships and shipping in the Bahamian economy.

Turner, Grace Sandrena Rosita

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Holistic ship design optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ship design is a complex endeavor requiring the successful coordination of many disciplines, of both technical and non-technical nature, and of individual experts to arrive at valuable design solutions. Inherently coupled with the design process is design ... Keywords: Enhanced survivability, Genetic algorithms, Holistic ship design, Minimization of resistance and wash, Multi-objective optimization

Apostolos Papanikolaou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Observations of Ship Tracks from Ship-Based Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ship-based measurements in June 1994 provided information about ship-track clouds and associated atmospheric environment observed from below cloud levels that provide a perspective different from satellite and aircraft measurements. Surface ...

W. Porch; R. Borys; P. Durkee; R. Gasparovic; W. Hooper; E. Hindman; K. Nielsen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Drizzle Suppression in Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although drizzle was a relatively infrequent occurrence during the Monterey Area Ship Track study, diverse measurements from several sources produced data signals consistent with a reduction in drizzle drops in stratus clouds affected by ship ...

Ronald J. Ferek; Timothy Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Scott Strader; Doug Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Kurt Nielsen; Andrew S. Ackerman; Yefim Kogan; Qingfu Liu; Bruce A. Albrecht; David Babb

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancements of droplet concentrations in clouds affected by four ships were fairly accurately predicted from ship emission factors and plume and background cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectra. Ship exhausts thus accounted for the increased ...

James G. Hudson; Timothy J. Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Scott R. Strader; Yonghong Xie; Seong Soo Yum

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Systems modeling for electric ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel and gas turbine electric ship propulsion are of current interest for several types of vessels that are important for commercial shipping and for the next generation of war ships. During the design process of a ...

Soultatis, Charalambos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Batteries Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials when shipped by air. Notify Shipping for any shipments that include lithium batteries. Note: If you need to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for use in a merchant marine ship is described. The reactor is of pressurized, light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements that are confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass. (AEC)

Sankovich, M.F.; Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Gestson, D.K.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NOAA Ship Oregon II NOAA Ship Oregon II supports the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after North Atlantic distant-water trawlers, designed for extended cruising range, versatility of exploring the world's deepest ocean, to smaller ships responsible for charting the shallow bays and inlets

24

Pig shipping container test sequence  

SciTech Connect

This test plan outlines testing of the integrity of the pig shipping container. It is divided into four sections: (1) drop test requirements; (2) test preparations; (3) perform drop test; and (4) post-test examination.

Adkins, H.E. Jr.

1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Containerized compressed natural gas shipping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last decades, the demand for energy is increasing. It is necessary to develop new ways to distribute the energy using economically feasible solutions. In this project an Ultra Large Container Ship is used that can ...

Skarvelis, Georgios V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Model Integrating Fleet Design and Ship Routing Problems for Coal Shipping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an integrated optimization model is developed to improve the efficiency of coal shipping. The objective is (1) to determine the types of ships and the number of each type, (2) to optimize the ship routing, therefore, to minimize the total ... Keywords: coal shipping, fleet design, ship routing, tabu search

Qingcheng Zeng; Zhongzhen Yang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shipping container for fissile material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

Crowder, H.E.

1984-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

NOAA's Ship Tracker | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA's Ship Tracker NOAA's Ship Tracker Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data NOAA's Ship Tracker Dataset Summary Description NOAA's Ship Tracker is a viewer tool developed by the NOS Special Projects Office (SPO) for the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (NOAA OMAO) which shows information about the location, present and past, of NOAA's ships. Ship location and the conditions where the ship was located are maintained on this site for one year. The NOAA fleet ranges from large oceanographic research vessels capable of exploring the world's deepest ocean, to smaller ships responsible for charting the shallow bays and inlets of the United States. The fleet supports a wide range of marine activities including fisheries research, nautical charting, and ocean and climate studies.

30

DEVELOPMENT OF THE H1700 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The H1700 Package is based on the DOE-EM Certified 9977 Packaging. The H1700 will be certified by the Packaging Certification Division of the National Nuclear Security Administration for the shipment of plutonium by air by the United Stated Military both within the United States and internationally. The H1700 is designed to ship radioactive contents in assemblies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) or arrangements of nested food-pack cans. The RTG containers are designed and tested to remain leaktight during transport, handling, and storage; however, their ability to remain leaktight during transport in the H1700 is not credited. This paper discusses the design and special operation of the H1700.

Abramczyk, G.; Loftin, B.; Mann, P.

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Lidar Observations of Ship Spray Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Monterey Area Ship Track experiment, which was designed to study ship-generated cloud tracks, ship-based measurements were made by a gyroscopically stabilized scanning lidar system. This paper focuses on the spray plume observed by ...

William P. Hooper; Jeffrey E. James

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Gamma motes for detection of radioactive materials in shipping containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping containers can be effectively monitored for radiological materials using gamma (and neutron) motes in distributed mesh networks. The mote platform is ideal for collecting data for integration into operational management systems required for efficiently and transparently monitoring international trade. Significant reductions in size and power requirements have been achieved for room-temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma detectors. Miniaturization of radio modules and microcontroller units are paving the way for low-power, deeply-embedded, wireless sensor distributed mesh networks.

Harold McHugh; William Quam; Stephan Weeks; Brendan Sever

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

True, W.R.

1998-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

Airship Measurements of Ship’s Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

37

Ship routing and scheduling with cargo coupling and synchronization constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and solve a planning problem faced by shipping companies operating in a special segment of tramp shipping called project shipping. Project shipping differs from other more traditional tramp segments because the ... Keywords: Path-flow, Ship routing and scheduling, Synchronization

Henrik Andersson; Jon M. Duesund; Kjetil Fagerholt

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An Assessment of Wave Observations from Ships in Southern Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of wind waves and swell from ship reports are investigated. Comparisons are made between estimates of wave parameters made from ships in southern oceans by calculating correlations as a function of ship separation, and analyzing the ...

A. K. Laing

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

40

Learning-based ship design optimization approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of computer applications in ship design, optimization, as a powerful approach, has been widely used in the design and analysis process. However, the running time, which often varies from several weeks to months in the current computing ... Keywords: Machine learning, Multi-objective optimization, Ship design, Structure analysis, Structure optimization

Hao Cui; Osman Turan; Philip Sayer

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Primitive Analysis of the Ship Tracking Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite images reveal tracks of enhanced solar reflectivity in low-level stratus clouds over the ocean that are known to be produced by the aerosols emitted from diesel-powered ships. The question arises: Can we track a ship from such images? A ...

J. R. Philip; J. W. Rottman

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

43

SNF shipping cask shielding analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan.

Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

International Coal Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As this report is being finalized in November 2007, international steam coal freight-on-board (FOB) prices are at levels not seen since 1980-1982, shipping rates are at unprecedented high levels, and currency fluctuations are altering the degree to which major individual countries are impacted. This report systematically examines the history of the international coal trade, the major exporting and importing countries, and the drivers behind how trade functions. In addition, the report examines in depth t...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

46

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

47

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Monterey Area Ship Track Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1994 the Monterey Area Ship Track (MAST) experiment was conducted off the coast of California to investigate the processes behind anthropogenic modification of cloud albedo. The motivation for the MAST experiment is described here, as ...

Philip A. Durkee; Kevin J. Noone; Robert T. Bluth

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Extracting Cultural Information from Ship Timber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is rooted in one general question: what can the wood from ships reveal about the people and cultures who built them? Shipwrecks are only the last chapter of a complex story, and while the last fifty years of nautical archaeology have managed to rewrite a number of these chapters, much of the information unrelated to a ship’s final voyage remains a mystery. However, portions of that mystery can be exposed by an examination of the timbers. An approach for the cultural investigation of ship timbers is presented and attempts are made to establish the most reliable information possible from the largely unheralded treasures of underwater excavations: timbers. By introducing the written record, iconographic record, and the social, economic, and political factors to the archaeological record a more complete analysis of the cultural implications of ship and boat timbers is possible. I test the effectiveness of the approach in three varied casestudies to demonstrate its limits and usefulness: ancient Egypt’s Middle Kingdom, the Mediterranean under Athenian influence, and Portugal and the Iberian Peninsula during the Discoveries. The results of these studies demonstrate how ship timbers can be studied in order to better understand the people who built the vessels.

Creasman, Pearce

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A multi-agent system for coordinating international shipping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving commercial cargo across the US-Mexico border is currently a complex, paper-based, error-prone process that incurs expensive inspections and delays at several ports of entry in the Southwestern US. Improved information handling will dramatically reduce border dwell time, variation in delivery time, and inventories, and will give better control of the shipment process. The Border Trade Facilitation System (BTFS) is an agent-based collaborative work environment that assists geographically distributed commercial and government users with transshipment of goods across the US-Mexico border. Software agents mediate the creation, validation and secure sharing of shipment information and regulatory documentation over the Internet, using the World Wide Web to interface with human actors. Agents are organized into Agencies. Each agency represents a commercial or government agency. Agents perform four specific functions on behalf of their user organizations: (1) agents with domain knowledge elicit commercial and regulatory information from human specialists through forms presented via web browsers; (2) agents mediate information from forms with diverse otologies, copying invariant data from one form to another thereby eliminating the need for duplicate data entry; (3) cohorts of distributed agents coordinate the work flow among the various information providers and they monitor overall progress of the documentation and the location of the shipment to ensure that all regulatory requirements are met prior to arrival at the border; (4) agents provide status information to human actors and attempt to influence them when problems are predicted.

Goldsmith, S.Y.; Phillips, L.R.; Spires, S.V.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Shipping and Receiving | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Employee Services » Facility Operations » Shipping Services » Employee Services » Facility Operations » Shipping and Receiving Shipping and Receiving Headquarters Receiving Services Information It is our responsibility to get your package to you as quickly as possibly. In order to accomplish this, we must first receive it. However, it is difficult to receive your package if it arrives without being properly addressed. When placing orders with commercial vendors, it is imperative that you let them know the addressees name, mail stop code, room number, location (Forrestal or Germantown) and the address. This information will allow us to receive your order and not reject it. It will also help if you would provide our office with a copy of your purchase order which will assist us in efficiently receiving your order and getting it to you.

52

Design and Criticality Considerations for 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. DOT specification 6M container, phased out in September 30, 2008 due to non-compliance with current requirements 10CFR71 regulation. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. These packages provide a high degree of single containment and comply with 10CFR71, Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10CFR20 (As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)). Allowed package contents were determined accounting for nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, and decay heat rate. The Criticality Safety Index (CSI) for the package is 1.0. The package utilizes passive cooling to maintain internal temperatures within limits. Radiation shielding analyses have established the contents for which the packages can be shipped under non-exclusive use in the Safe-Secure Trailer or under exclusive use. The packages are designed to ship radioactive contents in several configurations; Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), nested food-pack cans, site specific containers, and DOE-STD-3013 containers. Each shipping package includes a 35-gallon stainless steel outer drum, insulation, a drum liner, and a single containment vessel (CV). The 9977 includes a 6-inch ID CV while the 9978 includes a 5-inch ID CV. One inch of Fiberfrax{reg_sign} insulation is wrapped around and attached to the sides and bottom of the liner. The volume between the Fiberfrax{reg_sign} and the drum wall is filled with polyurethane foam. Top and bottom aluminum Load Distribution Fixtures (LDFs) within the drum liner cavity, above and below the CV, center the CV in the liner, stiffen the package radially, and distribute loads away from the CV. The 6CV fits directly into the LDFs while honeycomb spacers position the 5CV in the LDFs.

Reed, R; Biswas, D; Abramczyk, G

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Climatic Comparisons of Estimated and Measured Winds from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed records from twelve Ocean Weather Stations (OWS's) are compared to estimates from transient ships in the general vicinity of the on-station OWS position. Measured and estimated winds from transient ships within specified areas are also ...

Robert G. Quayle

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Emissions from Ships with respect to Their Effects on Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as “ship tracks.” Airborne measurements ...

Peter V. Hobbs; Timothy J. Garrett; Ronald J. Ferek; Scott R. Strader; Dean A. Hegg; Glendon M. Frick; William A. Hoppel; Richard F. Gasparovic; Lynn M. Russell; Douglas W. Johnson; Colin O’Dowd; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt E. Nielsen; George Innis

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Study of the Far Wake of a Large Ship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large dataset of high-resolution photographic images of far wakes of a volunteer observing ship (Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas) has been acquired under various meteorological conditions and ship operation modes. This work presents the ...

M. Gilman; A. Soloviev; H. Graber

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ship-Based Sun Photometer Measurements Using Microtops Sun Photometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of hand-held Microtops II sun photometers (built by Solar Light Inc.) on ship platforms is discussed. Their calibration, filter stability, and temperature effects are also described. It is found that under rough conditions, the ship ...

John N. Porter; Mark Miller; Christophe Pietras; Craig Motell

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Shipping and Storage of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric motor predictive and preventive maintenance programs have been written and describe the best methodology for increasing motor reliability. However, many utilities have invested substantial resources into the procurement of spare motors. These motors are stored both onsite and off site (at vendor facilities). In addition, motors are being refurbished/reconditioned and must be shipped and possibly stored upon return.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers  

SciTech Connect

Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Technique for ship/wake detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

H1616 Shipping Container Radiographic Inspection Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HI616 shipping container is a certified type B(U) packaging used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship tritium in support of defense programs. During the 1997 recertification of the container, DOE became concerned about the possible cracking of the polyurethane foam in the overpacks of the 2300 containers currently in service. In response, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated a radiographic inspection program to determine if cracking of the foam was occurring in the H1616 overpacks. SNL developed the radiographic technique for inspecting the foam and contracted the Savannah River Site's Tritium Engineering division to inspect a representative sample of overpacks in service. This report details the development process and the results of all of the radiography performed both at SNL and Savannah River.

Tipton, D.G.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections 2012.09.22 - 2013.01.08 Site(s) MAG General Description The second ARM mobile facility has been configured to take advantage of ship-board deployments. At issue is how the motion at sea during these deployments affects the vertically-pointing cloud radars. Two radars of this type - the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) and the Marine W-band ARM Cloud Radar (MWACR) - are instruments used in ARM's first ship-based field campaign. Each of these radars requires post-processing to account for the ship's motion across the open ocean. The primary adjustments that must be

63

Shipping Data Generation for the Hunter Valley Coal Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2, 2013 ... These models require input data in the form of shipping stems, which are ... scenarios has been a time-consuming and daunting challenge.

64

MARITIME SHIPPING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: LAW OF THE SEAS, SEA LANES, AND SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P ETROLEUM • 47 ship-source oil pollution,” paper presentedin Control of Ship-Source Oil Pollution in Southeast Asiasafety and ship-source oil pol- lution in Northeast Asia

Calder, Kent; Fesharaki, Fereidun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fuzzy decision support system for ship lock control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a Decision Support System (DSS) for the management of ship locks that relies on fuzzy logic. It contains a brief overview of the history and the construction of locks and basic information related to fuzzy logic, ... Keywords: Decision support, Fuzzy control, SCADA, Ship lock

Vladimir Bugarski; Todor Ba?Kali?; Uroš Kuzmanov

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Directional Wave Spectra from a Swath Ship at Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE), the swath ship Frederick G. Creed was equipped with an array of wave staffs for the estimation of wave directional spectra. This paper reports on the first such estimates taken from a ship at ...

W. M. Drennan; M. A. Donelan; N. Madsen; K. B. Katsaros; E. A. Terray; C. N. Flagg

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Optimizing Ship Routing to Maximize Fleet Revenue at Danaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an innovative toolkit that Danaos Corporation developed and deployed to optimize ship routing. Operations Research In Ship MAnagement ORISMA provides a clear answer to the conventional dilemma of least-cost voyage versus faster ... Keywords: cargo transport optimization, dynamic programming, maritime routing, voyage planning

Takis Varelas; Sofia Archontaki; John Dimotikalis; Osman Turan; Iraklis Lazakis; Orestis Varelas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Shipping containers for small samples of high explosives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sizes of shipping containers for high explosives have been designed and tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The containers have been tested by detonating a powerful, HMX-based explosive in the containers. The containers were approved for shipping 70% of the minimum weight of explosive that could cause vessel failure.

Hildner, R.A.; Urizar, M.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ambient intelligence technologies in support of shipping markets' operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intelligent Maritime Environment (i-MARE) framework and technological platform we introduce in our paper conceptualize an innovative, collaborative and context-aware network business model for cargo shipping. The i-MARE framework considers ambient-intelligence ... Keywords: Agent technology, Ambient intelligence, Cargo shipping operations, Enterprise modelling, Web semantics

Maria A. Lambrou; Kay Endre Fjørtoft; Efstathios D. Sykas; Nikitas Nikitakos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the US Department of Energy established its ad hoc EV Battery Readiness Working Group to identify regulatory barriers to the commercialization of advanced EV battery technologies and facilitate the removal of these barriers. A Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) was formed to address the regulatory issues associated with the domestic and international shipment of these new battery technologies. The SSWG invites major industrial developers of advanced battery technologies to join as members and work closely with appropriate domestic and international regulatory authorities to develop suitable regulations and procedures for the safe transport of these new battery technologies. This paper describes the domestic and international regulatory processes for the transport of dangerous goods; reviews the status of shipping regulations for sodium-beta and lithium batteries; and delineates the lessons learned to date in this process. The sodium-beta battery family was the first category of advanced EV batteries to be addressed by the SSWG. It includes both sodium/sulfur and sodium/metal chloride batteries. Their efforts led to the establishment of a UN number (UN 3292) in the UN Recommendations, for cold cells and batteries, and establishment of a US Department of Transportation general exemption (DOT-E-10917) covering cold and hot batteries, as well as cold cells. The lessons learned for sodium-beta batteries, over the period of 1990--94, are now being applied to the development of regulations for shipping a new generation of lithium battery technologies (lithium-polymer and lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries).

Henriksen, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hammel, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Altemos, E.A. [Winston and Strawn, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Ship Towing Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towing Tank Towing Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Ship Towing Tank Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 100.0 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mapping Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 75.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable using LabView for regular or irregular waves

72

Status of shipping provisions for large lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the US Department of Energy (DOE) established its ad hoc Advanced Battery Readiness Working Group to identify regulatory barriers to the commercialization of advanced electric vehicle (EV) battery technologies and to facilitate the removal of these barriers. As one of three sub-working groups, the Shipping Sub-working Group (SSWG) was formed to address regulatory issues associated with the domestic and international transport of new battery technologies under development for EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) applications. The SSWG is currently working with DOT on a proposal, which is intended for submission and consideration at the July 1998 meeting of the UN Sub-Committee of Experts. It is their intent to secure full support for the revised proposal from both the German and French delegations prior to its submission. It is critical to obtain UN Sub-Committee approval in July 1998, so that the DOT proposal can be considered and approved by the UN Committee of Experts at their meeting in December 1998. The UN Committee of Experts meets only on even numbered years, so failure to secure their approval in December 1998 will cause a two-year delay in implementing international regulations for large EV and HEV lithium-ion and lithium-polymer batteries. Details of the DOT proposal are provided in this paper, including provisions that would relax the lithium and lithium-alloy mass restrictions in a general way, thereby providing a measure of relief for small cells and batteries.

Henriksen, G.L.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Shipping LNG: new regulations and the 1964-77 record  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 which was signed into U.S. law 10/17/78, and its various special requirements for LPG or LNG shipments entering U.S. ports: a major report from Poten and Partners Inc. on the safety record of liquefied gas ships, which shows that the cargoes remained unaffected despite incidents common to all shipping; the potential effects of U.S. requirements for segregated ballast and for fixed inert gas systems, especially for U.S. fleets of ships largely more than 15 years old; and the media furor over the docking of the LPG carrier Cavendis.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister and Transportation System for Shipping to the National Repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S.Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), has been chartered with the responsibility for developing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) standardized canisters and a transportation cask system for shipping DOE SNF to the national repository. The mandate for this development is outlined in the Memorandum of Agreement for Acceptance of Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste that states, “EM shall design and fabricate … DOE SNF canisters for shipment to RW.” (1) It also states, “EM shall be responsible for the design, NRC certification, and fabrication of the transportation cask system for DOE SNF canisters or bare DOE SNF in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71.” (2) In fulfillment of these requirements, the NSNFP has developed four SNF standardized canister configurations and has conceptually designed a versatile transportation cask system for shipping the canisters to the national repository.1 The standardized canister sizes were derived from the national repository waste package design for co-disposal of SNF with high-level waste (HLW). One SNF canister can be placed in the center of the waste package or one can be placed in one of five radial positions, replacing a HLW canister. The internal cavity of the transportation cask was derived using the same logic, matching the size of the internal cavity of the waste package. The size of the internal cavity for the transportation cask allows the shipment of multiple canister configurations with the application of a removable basket design. The standardized canisters have been designed to be loaded with DOE SNF, placed into interim storage, shipped to the national repository, and placed in a waste package without having to be reopened. Significant testing has been completed that clearly demonstrates that the standardized canisters can safely achieve their intended design goals. The transportation cask system will include all of the standard design features, with the addition of dual containment for the shipment of failed fuel. The transportation cask system will also meet the rigorous licensing requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ensure that the design and the methods of fabrication employed will result in a shipping cask that will safely contain the radioactive materials under all credible accident scenarios. The standardization of the SNF canisters and the versatile design of the transportation cask system will eliminate a proliferation of designs and simplify the operations at the user sites and the national repository.

Pincock, David Lynn; Morton, Dana Keith; Lengyel, Arpad Leslie

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (NDP-026C) Data graphic Data Files PDF graphic Original NDP-026C Documentation PDF...

76

Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge RFITS has enabled DOE ORO to establish a complex-wide initiative, supporting on-site electronic shipping and transportation of waste while utilizing industry best practices to develop and maintain a cost effective and sustainable logistics and inventory management system. Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge More Documents & Publications Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

77

Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge RFITS has enabled DOE ORO to establish a complex-wide initiative, supporting on-site electronic shipping and transportation of waste while utilizing industry best practices to develop and maintain a cost effective and sustainable logistics and inventory management system. Using Transportation Technology to Increase Efficiencies in Shipping: Real Life Experience in Oak Ridge More Documents & Publications Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

78

Hull-Mounted Sea Surface Temperatures from Ships of Opportunity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and deployment of an inexpensive hull temperature sensor and data logger system was undertaken for the purpose of improving the measurement of sea surface temperature (SST) by ship-of-opportunity merchant vessels. The resulting hull ...

W. J. Emery; K. Cherkauer; B. Shannon; R. W. Reynolds

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hydrostatic and intact stability analysis for a surface ship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ship's lines are designed such that they are fair. To the naval architect, fairness means that the lines exhibit a continuous second derivative. This is the definition of a spline. Before the advent of digital computers, ...

Jahnke, Joshua James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A decision making framework for cruise ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a new decision making framework for initial cruise ship design. Through review of effectiveness analysis and multi-criteria decision making, a uniform philosophy is created to articulate a framework ...

Katsoufis, George P. (George Paraskevas)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ADAPTING A CERTIFIED SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For years shipping packages have been used to store radioactive materials at many DOE sites. Recently, the K-Area Material Storage facility at the Savannah River Site became interested in and approved the Model 9977 Shipping Package for use as a storage package. In order to allow the 9977 to be stored in the facility, there were a number of evaluations and modifications that were required. There were additional suggested modifications to improve the performance of the package as a storage container that were discussed but not incorporated in the design that is currently in use. This paper will discuss the design being utilized for shipping and storage, suggested modifications that have improved the storage configuration but were not used, as well as modifications that have merit for future adaptations for both the 9977 and for other shipping packages to be used as storage packages.

Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE FABRICATION PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model 9975 Shipping Package is the latest in a series (9965, 9968, etc.) of radioactive material shipping packages that have been the mainstay for shipping radioactive materials for several years. The double containment vessels are relatively simple designs using pipe and pipe cap in conjunction with the Chalfont closure to provide a leak-tight vessel. The fabrication appears simple in nature, but the history of fabrication tells us there are pitfalls in the different fabrication methods and sequences. This paper will review the problems that have arisen during fabrication and precautions that should be taken to meet specifications and tolerances. The problems and precautions can also be applied to the Models 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages.

May, C; Allen Smith, A

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Combustion Organic Aerosol as Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been sampled in marine stratiform clouds to identify the contribution of anthropogenic combustion emissions in activation of aerosol to cloud droplets. The Monterey Area Ship Track experiment provided ...

Lynn M. Russell; Kevin J. Noone; Ronald J. Ferek; Robert A. Pockalny; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radioactive-materials shipping-cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprises (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, M.S.; Davis, J.H.; Williams, D.A.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

Decisionmetrices : dynamic structural estimation of shipping investment decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation develops structural models for analyzing shipping investment decisions, namely ordering, scrapping and lay-up decisions in the tanker industry. We develop models, based on a microeconomic specification, ...

Dikos, George

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Understanding current environmental issues and their impact on ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is intended to provide recommendations for ship owners and operators on how to prepare for new engine emissions regulations that will be progressively more stringent than current regulations. To provide these ...

Harman, John (John Michael)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Rainfall Measurement on Ship Revisited: The 1997 PACS TEPPS Cruise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fifteen rain measurement instruments were deployed on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ship Ronald H. Brown during the 1997 Pan American Climate Studies (PACS) Tropical Eastern Pacific Process Study (TEPPS). To examine ...

Sandra E. Yuter; Wendy S. Parker

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The IMET (Improved Meteorology) Ship and Buoy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently developed IMET (improved meteorology) system for ships and buoys and the key elements of the program that led to its development are described. The system improves the ability to measure mean meteorological variables, including wind ...

David S. Hosom; Robert A. Weller; Richard E. Payne; Kenneth E. Prada

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation into the feasibility of alternative plutonium shipping forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated for the Department of Energy by the Battelle Memorial Institute, is conducting a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the feasibility of altering current plutonium shipping forms to reduce or eliminate the airborne dispersibility of PuO/sub 2/ which might occur during a shipping accident. Plutonium used for fuel fabrication is currently shipped as a PuO/sub 2/ powder with a significant fraction in the respirable size range. If the high-strength container is breached due to stresses imposed during a transportation accident, the PuO/sub 2/ powder could be subject to airborne dispersion. The available information indicated that a potential accident involving fire accompanied by crush/impact forces would lead to failure of current surface shipping containers (no assumptions were made on the possibility of such a severe accident). Criteria were defined for an alternate shipping form to mitigate the effects of such an accident. Candidate techniques and materials were evaluated as alternate shipping forms by a task team consisting of personnel from PNL and Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO). At this time, the most promising candidate for an alternate plutonium shipping form appears to be pressing PuO/sub 2/ into unsintered (green) pellets. These green pellets satisfy the criteria for a less dispersible form without requiring significant process changes. Discussions of all candidates considered are contained in a series of appendices. Recommendations for further investigations of the applicability of green pellets as an alternate shipping form are given, including the need for a cost-benefit study.

Mishima, J.; Lindsey, C.G.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New facility boosts Lab's ability to ship transuranic waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab's ability to ship transuranic waste Lab's ability to ship transuranic waste New facility boosts Lab's ability to ship transuranic waste Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos accelerate the shipment of transuranic waste stored in large boxes at Technical Area 54. February 9, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email "375 Box Line" facility to allow workers to repackage radioactive items stored in large boxes LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 9, 2012-Construction has begun on a new facility that will help Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerate the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste stored in large boxes at Technical Area 54, Area G. The new "375 Box Line" facility will allow the Laboratory to repackage

92

LANL sets waste shipping record for fourth consecutive year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Sets Waste Shipping Record LANL Sets Waste Shipping Record Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit LANL sets waste shipping record for fourth consecutive year The Laboratory has transported more than 1,000 shipments to WIPP since that facility opened in 1999. September 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Our goal this fiscal year is 184 shipments, and we are on track to surpass that by a substantial margin. For the fourth consecutive year, Los Alamos National Laboratory's Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program sent a record number of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M. for permanent storage. The Laboratory's 172nd shipment of TRU waste this year left Los Alamos

93

NGL (natural gas liquids) shipping and terminals. [Japan, Europe, USA  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the world LPG market covers the need for a world-wide planning organization to develop that market; the shortage of ships between 1000 and 20,000 cu m capacity and the excess of large ships (> 50,000 cu m capacity); the status of the Japanese and European LPG markets; the failure of the U.S. LPG market to develop as expected; and the need for the U.S. to keep its gas for the future by putting a very high price at the well head, to build terminals and ships so as to minimize the effect of LPG and LNG imports on the balance-of-payment deficit; and the availability of LPG from nearby sources (Venezuela, Mexico, the North Sea, and Algeria).

Boudet, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Paducah Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition Paducah Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The first five-car section of demolition debris from the C-340 Metals Plant leaves July 15 from the Paducah site. The first five-car section of demolition debris from the C-340 Metals Plant leaves July 15 from the Paducah site. A P&L locomotive travels near Woodville Road, south of the Paducah site, with the waste shipment in tow. A P&L locomotive travels near Woodville Road, south of the Paducah site, with the waste shipment in tow. The first five-car section of demolition debris from the C-340 Metals Plant leaves July 15 from the Paducah site. A P&L locomotive travels near Woodville Road, south of the Paducah site, with the waste shipment in tow.

95

Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

Russian Tall Ship to Search for Missing Tsunami Debris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hafner’s meeting with Captain Sviridenko of the Russian Tall Ship STS Pallada to be on the look-?out for any debris from Japan's tsunami, Hafner was interviewed by KITV4 about any knowldedge of the whereabouts of the debris. To help in efforts to track the debris, the scientists need to validate their models ' projections of the debris field and are asking ships in the North Pacific to report to them on what they see, and if possible take samples. Click here to listen to interview. Websites to see projected tsunami debris paths For the original animation from the statistical model, please visit:

Nikolai Maximenko; Jan Hafner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjørn Sødal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Factors Affecting Ship and Buoy Data Quality: A Data Assimilation Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ship and buoy reports of wind, air pressure, temperature, humidity, and sea temperature for 2007 and 2008 have been compared with values from the operational Met Office global numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. Ship reports have been ...

Bruce Ingleby

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A Case Study of Ship Track Formation in a Polluted Marine Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study of the effects of ship emissions on the microphysical, radiative, and chemical properties of polluted marine boundary layer clouds is presented. Two ship tracks are discussed in detail. In situ measurements of cloud drop size ...

Kevin J. Noone; Doug W. Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Ronald J. Ferek; Tim Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt Nielsen; Elisabeth Öström; Colin O’Dowd; Michael H. Smith; Lynn M. Russell; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld; Lieve De Bock; René E. Van Grieken; James G. Hudson; Ian Brooks; Richard F. Gasparovic; Robert A. Pockalny

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

LHA(R): Amphibious Assault Ships For The 21st Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amphibious assault ships such as the current LHA and LHD classes are an essential element of the country's ability to exert influence anywhere in the world. The current amphibious assault ships represent the most capable ...

Bebermeyer, Robert

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A simulation approach to the evaluation of operational costs and performance in liner shipping operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation model of the operation of a liner shipping network that considers multiple service routes and schedules. The objective is to evaluate the operational costs and performance associated with liner shipping, as well as the ...

Aldo A. McLean; William E. Biles

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Case Study of Ships Forming and Not Forming Tracks in Moderately Polluted Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of anthropogenic particulate emissions from ships on the radiative, microphysical, and chemical properties of moderately polluted marine stratiform clouds are examined. A case study of two ships in the same air mass is presented where ...

Kevin J. Noone; Elisabeth Öström; Ronald J. Ferek; Tim Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Doug W. Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Lynn M. Russell; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld; Colin D. O’Dowd; Michael H. Smith; Philip A. Durkee; Kurt Nielsen; James G. Hudson; Robert A. Pockalny; Lieve De Bock; René E. Van Grieken; Richard F. Gasparovic; Ian Brooks

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Accuracy of Voluntary Observing Ships' Meteorological Observations-Results of the VSOP-NA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the Voluntary Observing Ships Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), the layout, meteorological instrumentation, and observing practices of 45 voluntary observing ships (VOS) operating in the North Atlantic were ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor; Bruce S. Truscott; John S. Hopkins

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

An evaluation of web site services in liner shipping in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research steps include questionnaire design and research methods are ... of the questionnaire, personal interviews with shipping practitioners, and a.

105

BALLISTICS TESTING OF THE 9977 SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive materials are stored in a variety of locations throughout the DOE complex. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), materials are stored within dedicated facilities. Each of those facilities has a documented safety analysis (DSA) that describes accidents that the facility and the materials within it may encounter. Facilities at the SRS are planning on utilizing the certified Model 9977 Shipping Package as a long term storage package and one of these facilities required ballistics testing. Specifically, in order to meet the facility DSA, the radioactive materials (RAM) must be contained within the storage package after impact by a .223 caliber round. In order to qualify the Model 9977 Shipping Package for storage in this location, the package had to be tested under these conditions. Over the past two years, the Model 9977 Shipping Package has been subjected to a series of ballistics tests. The purpose of the testing was to determine if the 9977 would be suitable for use as a storage package at a Savannah River Site facility. The facility requirements are that the package must not release any of its contents following the impact in its most vulnerable location by a .223 caliber round. A package, assembled to meet all of the design requirements for a certified 9977 shipping configuration and using simulated contents, was tested at the Savannah River Site in March of 2011. The testing was completed and the package was examined. The results of the testing and examination are presented in this paper.

Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Koenig, R.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

Structural analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper identifies the active forces and moments in a closure bolt of a shipping cask. It examines the interactions of these forces/moments and suggest simplified methods for their analysis. The paper also evaluates the role that the forces and moments play in the structure integrity of the closure bolt and recommends stress limits and desirable practices to ensure its integrity.

Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

SHIPPING AND ALIGNMENT FOR THE SNS CRYOMODULE* T. Whitlatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a similar (CEBAF ¼) cryomodule with accelerometers during a road test of approximately 300 miles. A modal understand the shipping environment, a road test using an existing CEBAF ¼ cryomodule was performed. The CEBAF ¼ cryomodule cavity is aligned and supported by similar attachment rods as used in the SNS design

108

Newport News Shipbuilding Company Interview re Ship Design Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not physical arrangement or its visualization, but the CFD analyses of hull/powerplant combinations (10 minutes vessels for foreign sale Landing craft Repair work Complex nuclear overhauls 4. Overview of the Ship Design Process 4.1. Coordinate system: Distance from bow or stern, measured in frame number, and distance

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

109

Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

Bucholz, James A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimum Ship Routing and It's Implementation on the Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimum Ship Routing can be defined as "The selection of an optimum track for a transoceanic crossing by the application of long-range predictions of wind, waves and currents to the knowledge of how the routed vessel reacts to these variables". Generally, ...

Heeyong Lee; Gilyoung Kong; Sihwa Kim; Cholseong Kim; Jaechul Lee

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ships' Logbooks and “The Year Without a Summer”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather data extracted from the logbooks of 227 ships of opportunity are used to document the -state of the global climate system in the summer of 1816 (“The Year Without a Summer”). Additional land-based data, some never before used, supplement ...

Michael Chenoweth

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Applying advanced simulation in early stage unconventional ship design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed description of the first, or global, optimization stage of two-stage hydrodynamic optimization framework for high-speed vessels is presented. A key feature of the framework is the application of advanced simulation in the early phases of design ... Keywords: early-stage design, high-speed vessel, optimization, ship design, surrogate model

Matthew Collette; Woei-Min Lin; Jun Li

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DESIGN OF MTR FUEL-ELEMENT-SOURCE SHIPPING CASK FOR RAILWAY MOBILE IRRADIATION FACILITY. Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The gamma -radiation field from a battery of 10 MTR spent fuel elements was calculated and a special shipping cask designed to contain the 10 elements. An internal watercooled tank in the cask holds the 10 elements in the vertical position. Two external air-cooled, finned-tube heat exchangers control the water temperature. The sides of the cask open to convert the cask to a radiation source without changing the position of the elements. A unique feature of the design is a device for closing the sides of the cask by gravity in the event of accident or power failure. This provides a ''fail-safe'' safety feature. (auth)

Brownell, L.E.; Patterson, J.; Purohit, S.N.

1957-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Employment of wireless sensor networks for full-scale ship application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, basic experiments regarding the wireless sensor network were conducted on a 3,000-ton-class training ship as the first step in applying the ubiquitous technology to a real ship. Various application fields of the technology in terms of ... Keywords: WSN (wireless sensor network), monitoring, ship, ubiquitous, zigbee

Bu-Geun Paik; Seong-Rak Cho; Beom-Jin Park; Dongkon Lee; Jong-Hwui Yun; Byung-Dueg Bae

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ship  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

New Mexico New Mexico Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Disposal Site Community Information Sheet 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site Data Validation Package-March 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling Final Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for Remediation at the Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Site Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Shiprock Disposal Site, Shiprock, New Mexico Internal Links Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) Reports Webpage

116

Microsoft Word - SSRL_LCLS_User_Shipping_Request_Form_nonhaz_1-25-2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Hazardous Material) Non-Hazardous Material) Will this be shipped to a location outside of the U.S.? No ___ Yes ___ If yes, user must complete Power of Attorney and certify concurrence with terms and conditions. Confirm with Cathy Knotts or Lisa Dunn that this has been completed. _______ * It can take several days to process shipping requests through SLAC. Missing or insufficient information will delay shipments further. * Hazardous Materials Shipments must be declared on the Hazardous Material Shipping Form and must be approved by ES&H representative. Your Name: _____________________________ Phone: __________Email: _______________ Date:_______ Proposal #: ________ Spokesperson/PI: _______________________________________________________ Ship to (If being shipped to an intermediary, list all recipients):

117

TRI State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Waste to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tri-State Motor Transit to Resume Tri-State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., January 19, 2001 - Tri-State Motor Transit will resume shipping waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) January 22, transporting transuranic waste from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to WIPP. This will be the first shipment by Tri-State Motor Transit (TSMT) to WIPP since the November 21 incident in which drivers hauling waste from INEEL to WIPP failed to make the turn off from I-25 onto U.S. 285, deviating from the designated transportation route by 27 miles. The New Mexico State Police noticed the route deviation and contacted the TRANSCOM Control Center (TCC) in Albuquerque to verify that the shipment was off course. The TCC confirmed the route deviation using their tracking system and notified the drivers, via

118

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

119

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Ship Bottom, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.642897°, -74.1804159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.642897,"lon":-74.1804159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Shipping Preparations and Storage of Turbine and Generator Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are replacing major components in their units and are becoming increasingly concerned with shipping as well as long- and short-term storage of these replacement components, which arrive on site for immediate use or as backup in case of emergency. The choice of storage location depends on space availability, site security, environment, tracking and accessibility of stored equipment, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) requirements, and component inspection or maintenance requirements duri...

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of SRS 9971 shipping package  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation is requested to revise the criticality evaluation used to generate Chapter 6 (Criticality Evaluation) of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for shipment Of UO{sub 3} product from the Uranium Solidification Facility (USF) in the SRS 9971 shipping package. The pertinent document requesting this evaluation is included as Attachment I. The results of the evaluation are given in Attachment II which is written as Chapter 6 of a NRC format SARP.

Vescovi, P.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A document review to characterize Atomic International SNAP fuels shipped to INEL 1966--1973  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a document search and review study to obtain information on the spent fuels for the following six Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) reactor cores now stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL): SNAP-2 Experimental Reactor, SNAP-2 Development Reactor, SNAP-10A Ground Test Reactor, SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor, SNAP-8 Development Reactor, and Shield Test Reactor. The report also covers documentation on SNAP fuel materials from four in-pile materials tests: NAA-82-1, NAA-115-2, NAA-117-1, and NAA-121. Pieces of these fuel materials are also stored at INEL as part of the SNAP fuel shipments.

Wahnschaffe, S.D.; Lords, R.E. [eds.; Kneff, D.W.; Nagel, W.E.; Pearlman, H.; Schaubert, V.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Challenges in computer applications for ship and floating structure design and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a review on the key research areas in the design and analysis of ships and floating structures. The major areas of computer application are identified in several stages of ship/floating structure design and analysis with the principal ... Keywords: Boundary element method, Computational fluid dynamics, Computer applications, Computer-aided ship and floating structure design, Finite element analysis, Hydrodynamics, Production, Structures

R. Sharma; Tae-wan Kim; Richard Lee Storch; Hans (J. J. ) Hopman; Stein Ove Erikstad

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MARITIME SHIPPING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: LAW OF THE SEAS, SEA LANES, AND SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

invest- ment in new refinery capacity, particularly inproduct by the imports of refinery feed- stock. A partialsourced from the new refineries within Asia. Drewry Shipping

Calder, Kent; Fesharaki, Fereidun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

U.S. Navy ships food service divisions: moderning inventory management .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Navy's current inventory management procedures for receipt, inventory, stowage, and issue of provisions onboard ships have remained relatively unchanged for decades. Culinary Specialists are… (more)

James, Robert J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

Results from the 9975 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility from 10 years to 15 years. This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout this extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The current 10 year storage life was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to extend the qualification of the 9975 shipping packages for 2 years for shipping plus 10 years for storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the surveillance program began. KAMS is a zero-release facility that depends upon containment by the 9975 to meet design basis storage requirements. Therefore, to confirm the continued integrity of the 9975 packages while stored in KAMS, a 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program was implemented alongside the DOE required Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) for 3013 plutonium-bearing containers. The 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program performs field surveillance as well as accelerated aging tests to ensure any degradation due to aging, to the extent that could affect packaging performance, is detected in advance of such degradation occurring in the field. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. As such the primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton(reg.sign) GLT containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex(reg.sign) fiberboard thermal insulation at bounding conditions of radiation and elevated temperatures. Other materials of construction, however, are also discussed.

Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.; Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

PWR Fuel Shipping Limits & RNP Core Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Fuel Transportation Experience Steven Edwards, Progress Energy September 21, 2005 2 Discussion Topics Progress Energy Transportation History Success Factors Shipment Security Dedicated Trains Emergency Response Public Communication/Participation Summary 3 Brunswick Harris Crystal River Robinson Progress Energy Nuclear Plants 4 Spent Fuel Management Strategy Maintain operating reserve at all nuclear units Spent fuel shipping program to reduce inventories at Brunswick and Robinson Maximize use of Harris spent fuel pools 5 Transportation Experience 191 shipments 1,000 MTU transported 4,541 spent fuel assemblies transported 6 Transportation Experience First Shipment - 1977 Active spent fuel transportation program since 1989 12 to 15 shipments per year

129

Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), conducted in June 1992, was designed with the broad goal of improving the dynamical, radiative, and microphysical models of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. This goal was pursued by combining measurements from a number of different platforms including aircraft,

130

Modeling and simulation of electric ships' power system components and their interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of propulsion motors, generators, gas turbines, and power converters are used to determine weights and volumes, evaluate designs, and predict performance of power system components for all-electric navy ships. The finite element analysis method ... Keywords: electric ships, permanent magnet generators, power rectifiers, propulsion motors

A. Ouroua; J. R. Jackson; J. H. Beno; R. C. Thompson; E. Schroeder

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Accuracy of Humidity Measurement on Ships: Consideration of Solar Radiation Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of heating due to solar radiation on measurements of humidity obtained from ships is examined. Variations in wet- and dry-bulb temperature measured on each side of a research ship are shown to correlate with solar radiation. However, ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Short Sea Shipping, intermodality and parameters influencing pricing policies: the Mediterranean case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Short Sea Shipping (SSS) market is strongly diversified, due to the variety of cargoes, vessel types and capacity, and segmented due to the existence of many national and peripheral submarkets. It is observed that prices differ considerably among ... Keywords: Intermodality, Pricing of transport services, Short Sea Shipping, Transportation costs

Monica Grosso; Ana-Rita Lynce; Anne Silla; Georgios K. Vaggelas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Exploring the use of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) to develop systems architectures in naval ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Navy designs and operates the most technologically advanced ships in the world. These ships incorporate the latest in weapons technology, phased array antennas, composite structures, signature reduction, survivability, ...

Tepper, Nadia A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Improving Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Accuracy with Wide-Area Differential GPS and Adaptive Smoothing of Ship Velocity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate ship velocity is important for determining absolute currents from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements. In this paper, the authors describe the application of two methods to improve the quality of ship velocity ...

Stephen D. Pierce; John A. Barth; Robert L. Smith

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Internal Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Internal Communication Process Document Number: P-009 Rev 11_0303 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 09_0902 Modified process to better fit current practice. 10_0831 Added verbiage to clarify process. Added initiation phrase to process steps. 11_0303 Added QAM to the last step and made minor editorial updates. P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose

136

Quantifying the impact of inland transport times on container fleet sizing in liner shipping services with uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Container fleet sizing is a key issue in liner shipping industry. Although container shipping is an intermodal transport system, inland container movements are often beyond the control of shipping lines. It is vital to understand how the inland transport ... Keywords: Container fleet sizing, Empty container repositioning, Genetic algorithms, Golden section, Intermodal, Simulated annealing, Stochastic

Jing-Xin Dong; Dong-Ping Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Structuring ship design project approval mechanism towards installation of operator-system interfaces via fuzzy axiomatic design principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing the verification of primary design projects for ship machinery systems is one of the crucial stages in ship building processes. In particular, the design of operator-system interfaces such as remote controls, displays, alarms, workstations, ... Keywords: Axiomatic design, Fuzzy logic, Information axiom, Multiple criteria decision-making, Ship machinery installation, User-oriented design

Selcuk Cebi; Metin Celik; Cengiz Kahraman

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Microsoft Word - ShippingInstructionsRev3.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/8/2013 Rev3 7/8/2013 Rev3 BROOKHAVEN SCIENCE ASSOCIATES, LLC SHIPPING AND LABELING INSTRUCTIONS FOR ALL DELIVERIES TO BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY 1. Delivery Location Unless otherwise noted on the Purchase Order/Contract, all deliveries shall be addressed to 98 Rochester Street, Upton, New York 11973. 2. Delivery Hours All deliveries must arrive at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)between the hours of 8:00 am and 11:30 am or from 12:30 pm to 4:00 pm EST, Monday through Friday. Exceptions must contact the Traffic Office (see contact information below). 3. Special Notification of Delivery Due to weight, size, and/or volume parameters of the end item(s) requiring special material handling/rigging by BSA personnel; advanced notice of delivery of 3 business days minimum

139

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

140

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Radioluminescent emergency egress lighting for US Navy surface ships  

SciTech Connect

This very limited study examines only one of a number of shipboard applications to which (RL) might be applied. A detailed analysis is needed to fully explore the potential for use of state-of-the-art RL systems in the Navy. A more comprehensive study is highly recommended. It was also not possible to assess the implications of emerging RL technologies such as solid matrix light development and advanced gas techniques; it is strongly recommended that continued research level efforts do this. Nonetheless, for the emergency egress application, enough conclusive evidence was developed and critical questions answered to indicate that the RL option using current technology can economically improve emergency egress and crew safety significantly on Navy ships. 18 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Adrian, D.K.; Pusey, H.C.; Jensen, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The Bulk Tritium Shipping Package was designed by Savannah River National Laboratory. This package will be used to transport tritium. As part of the requirements for certification, the package must be shown to meet the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). The conditions include a sequential 30-foot drop event, 30-foot dynamic crush event, and a 40-inch puncture event. Finite Element analyses were performed to support and expand upon prototype testing. Cases similar to the tests were evaluated. Additional temperatures and orientations were also examined to determine their impact on the results. The peak stress on the package was shown to be acceptable. In addition, the strain on the outer drum as well as the inner containment boundary was shown to be acceptable. In conjunction with the prototype tests, the package was shown to meet its confinement requirements.

Jordan, J.

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Furnace characterization for horizontal shipping container thermal testing  

SciTech Connect

In order to perform regulatory thermal tests required by 10 CFR 71.73(c)(3) on the newly designed Horizontal Shipping Container (HSC), it was necessary to find a company involved in the business of heat treating who was willing to allow their furnace to be used for these tests. Of the companies responding to a request for interest, Lindberg Heat Treating Company`s Solon, Ohio, facility was found to be the best available vendor for this activity. Their furnace was instrumented and characterized such that these tests could be performed in a manner that would conform to the specifications contained in 10 CFR 71. It was found that Lindberg`s furnace was usable for this task, and recommendations concerning the use of this furnace for the above stated purpose are made herein.

Feldman, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Software requirements definition Shipping Cask Analysis System (SCANS)  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff reviews the technical adequacy of applications for certification of designs of shipping casks for spent nuclear fuel. In order to confirm an acceptable design, the NRC staff may perform independent calculations. The current NRC procedure for confirming cask design analyses is laborious and tedious. Most of the work is currently done by hand or through the use of a remote computer network. The time required to certify a cask can be long. The review process may vary somewhat with the engineer doing the reviewing. Similarly, the documentation on the results of the review can also vary with the reviewer. To increase the efficiency of this certification process, LLNL was requested to design and write an integrated set of user-oriented, interactive computer programs for a personal microcomputer. The system is known as the NRC Shipping Cask Analysis System (SCANS). The computer codes and the software system supporting these codes are being developed and maintained for the NRC by LLNL. The objective of this system is generally to lessen the time and effort needed to review an application. Additionally, an objective of the system is to assure standardized methods and documentation of the confirmatory analyses used in the review of these cask designs. A software system should be designed based on NRC-defined requirements contained in a requirements document. The requirements document is a statement of a project's wants and needs as the users and implementers jointly understand them. The requirements document states the desired end products (i.e. WHAT's) of the project, not HOW the project provides them. This document describes the wants and needs for the SCANS system. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Johnson, G.L.; Serbin, R.

1985-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-02168  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-02028 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1. Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-02168. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Two conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer, and (2) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance Program Authority was notified of these conditions and will document the findings by surveillance report. All other observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes.

Daugherty, W.

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-03431  

SciTech Connect

Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-03431. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. All observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. Except for modest corrosion of the lead shield (which is typical of these packages following several years service), no evidence of a degraded condition was found in this package. The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the KArea Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-03431 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1.

Daugherty, W.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Greenpeace International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report 2 nd edition 2011 japan energy scenario“will we look into the eyes of our children and confess that we had the opportunity, but lacked the courage? that we had the technology, but lacked the vision?” Greenpeace International,

Energy Council; Erec Arthouros Zervos; Sven Teske; Junichi Sato; Hisayo Takada; Image Rice Fields In Kamikatsu; Wolfram Krewitt Dr. Thomas; Sydney Jay Rutovitz; Nicky Ison; Iida Hironao Matsubara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Risk analysis of shipping plutonium pits and mixed oxide fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the end of the cold war, there no longer seems to be a credible threat of war between nuclear superpowers, with its possible consequence of billions of fatalities. However, the residue of the cold war, most notably the now excess weapons plutonium, has been identified as the source of a number of potential catastrophes. For example, just a single crude nuclear weapon in the hands of a terrorist organization or rogue state and detonated in even a medium-sized city could lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths. For this reason, the ultimate disposition of this excess plutonium has been identified as a national priority. The process of carrying out this disposition itself carries some risks, and even though any conceivable consequences clearly will be much smaller in magnitude than those cited above, U.S. federal law (the National Environmental Protection Act) mandates that such risks must be analyzed. The ability to carry out one type of such an analysis is demonstrated in this thesis. Specifically, one possible option that has been identified for disposition of excess U.S. weapons plutonium is the transformation into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, that then would be used as fuel in a commercial nuclear power plant. Any such process will involve the transportation of the MOX fuel from the MOX fuel fabrication facility to the nuclear power plant, and possibly transportation of the plutonium from a storage site to the fuel fabrication facility. This thesis is intended to demonstrate the capability to analyze the risks associated with such transportation campaigns. The primary tool used for these analyses was RADTRAN, a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories for evaluating risk associated with the transportation of radioactive materials. Two sample scenarios were explored relative to the transformation of plutonium pits to MOX fuel. First, the pits would be converted to MOX fuel at a fuel fabrication facility located either at the Pantex Plant or the Savannah River Site (SRS), and then the MOX fuel would be ultimately shipped to a final destination of a commercial power plant, the Palo Verde Generating Station in Arizona. For the scenario of placing the MOX fuel fabrication facility at SRS, pits would need to be shipped from Pantex to SRS and then the MOX fuel would be shipped to Palo Verde. The total number of expected fatalities over a 25 year campaign duration for this scenario would be 1.06, with 0. 1 73 fatalities resulting from latent cancer fatalities due to radiation exposure and 0.89 resulting from traffic accidents. For the placement of the MOX fuel fabrication facility at Pantex, only the MOX fuel would need to be transported from one facility to another, in this case from Pantex to Palo Verde. The total fatalities for this scenario over 25 years would be 0.413, resulting from 5.29 x 10-2 latent cancer fatalities and 0.36 traffic accident fatalities. The maximum exposed individual along any of the three routes would receive 1.0 X 10-5 rem per year or 0.25 mrem over 25 years.

Caldwell, Amy Baker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1121-2008 Change Notice No.1 October 2013 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy- technical-standards-program ii Change Notice 1. Internal Dosimetry DOE-STD-1121-2008 Page/Section Change Throughout Change: airborne contamination To: airborne radioactivity Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.1-1999 To: HPS N 13.1-2011 Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.6-1999 To: HPS N 13,.6-2010 Section 1.5, p. 4 Delete: HPS N 13.14-1994, Internal Dosimetry Programs for

150

Safety analysis report for packaging for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TRA Type 1 Shipping Container and TRA Type 2 Shipping Capsule  

SciTech Connect

The TRA Type I Shipping Container and TRA Type II Shipping Capsule were designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as special form containers for the transport of non-fissile radioisotopes and fissile radioisotopes in exempt quantities. The Type I container measures 0.75 in. outside diameter and 3.000 in long. The Type II capsule is 0.495 in. outside diameter 2.000 in. long. The container and capsule were tested and evaluated to determine their compliance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173, which governs packages for special form radioactive material. This report is based upon those tests and evaluations. The results of those tests and evaluations demonstrate the container and capsule are in full compliance with the special form shipping container regulations of 49 CFR 173.

Havlovick, B.J.

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago More Documents & Publications Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup

152

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago More Documents & Publications Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup

153

An Analytical Model of Heating Errors in Marine Air Temperatures from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine air temperature reports from ships can contain significant biases due to the solar heating of the instruments and their surroundings. However, there have been very few attempts to derive corrections. The biases can reverse the sign of the ...

David I. Berry; Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Applying lean manufacturing initiatives to naval ship repair centers : implementation and lessons learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Navy is under pressure to reduce the cost of fleet maintenance in order to redirect funds for the construction of new ships and submarines. The Navy looks to private industry for process improvement ideas ...

Murphy, Brian P. (Brian Patrick), 1963-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

MARITIME SHIPPING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: LAW OF THE SEAS, SEA LANES, AND SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of issues (e.g. , land-source pollution) that are sometimesboth ship and land-based sources of pollution, minimizationland-based activities form the main source of marine pollution.

Calder, Kent; Fesharaki, Fereidun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hanford Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped Four Months Ahead of Schedule Hanford Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped Four Months Ahead of Schedule June 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford surpassed a Tri-Party Agreement Milestone by four months in shipping 1,000 cubic meters of transuranic waste off the Hanford Site in route to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico before September 30, 2011. The milestone for shipping waste was met in May 2011. Since the shipments began in 2000, 620 shipments have left the Hanford Site, a total of 4,137 cubic meters of transuranic waste. Milestones for

157

Development of an early stage ship design tool for rapid modeling in Paramarine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In early-stage ship design, it is helpful to perform preliminary design and analysis on many configurations to assist in developing and narrowing the trade space. This process is further complicated with the increasing ...

Thurkins, Eric J., Jr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Projection of fractures in ships for the evaluation of fatigue resistant designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cracks in ships have been of great concern to the maritime industry for a very long time. The problem is controlled by improving design, minimizing operating stresses and through regular inspections and repairs. The big ...

Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Multi-Factor Model of Correlated Commodity - Forward Curves for Crude Oil and Shipping Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An arbitrage free multi-factor model is developed of the correlated forward curves of the crude oil, gasoline, heating oil and tanker shipping markets. Futures contracts trading on public exchanges are used as the primary ...

Ellefsen, Per Einar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling and simulation of an all electric ship in random seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Masters thesis, conducted in support of the All Electric Ship (AES) early design effort, presents two computational programs for analysis and simulation: a full-scale, end-to-end AES simulator and an analytical ...

Schmitt, Kyle (Kyle P.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ship-Based Observations of the Diurnal Cycle of Southeast Pacific Marine Stratocumulus Clouds and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal cycle of marine stratocumulus in cloud-topped boundary layers is examined using ship-based meteorological data obtained during the 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx). The high temporal and ...

Casey D. Burleyson; Simon P. de Szoeke; Sandra E. Yuter; Matt Wilbanks; W. Alan Brewer

162

Comparing Ship-Track Droplet Sizes Inferred from Terra and Aqua MODIS Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study of ship tracks, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements from late-morning (Terra) and early-afternoon (Aqua) Earth Observing System platforms are analyzed in five separate geographically distributed cases ...

Burcu Kabatas; W. Paul Menzel; Ata Bilgili; Liam E. Gumley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A Study of Wind Stress Determination Methods from a Ship and an Offshore Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between surface wind stress measurements obtained by the inertial-dissipation and direct covariance methods on a stable offshore tower and by the inertial-dissipation and bulk methods on a ship. The shipboard inertial-...

Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; James B. Edson

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Role of Background Cloud Microphysics in the Radiative Formation of Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the extent to which the contrast brightness of ship tracks, that is, the relative change in observed solar reflectance, in visible and near-infrared imagery can be explained by the microphysics of the background cloud in ...

S. Platnick; P. A. Durkee; K. Nielsen; J. P. Taylor; S.-C. Tsay; M. D. King; R. J. Ferek; P. V. Hobbs; J. W. Rottman

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ship-of-Opportunity Monitoring of the Chilean Fjords Using the Pocket FerryBox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from two field campaigns in the Chilean fjords region are presented to demonstrate the benefits and limitations of the “pocket FerryBox” for monitoring from ships of opportunity. The October 2009 (spring) campaign covered the region of the ...

Christopher M. Aiken; Wilhelm Petersen; Friedhelm Schroeder; Martina Gehrung; Paola A Ramírez von Holle

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simulation of a DC to DC power conversion module for the all-electric ship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of electric ships requires a tool to evaluate the relative merits of different electrical power distribution configurations; the MIT end-to-end simulator [1] is just such a tool. This paper models one module to ...

Gray, Weston L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Correction for the Errors in Ship Reports of Light Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The errors in ship wind reports of light winds tend to significantly bias their mean. This occurs because wind speed is a scalar quantity that is constrained to zero or positive values. Therefore, observations tend to overestimate the light winds ...

Barry B. Hinton; Donald P. Wylie

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Three-Dimensional Imaging of the High Sea-State Wave Field Encompassing Ship Slamming Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding and modeling ship wave slamming necessitates characterizing the surface wave field that results in slamming events. Shipboard measurements of the incoming wave field were made during sea trials of the twin-hull Sea Fighter (FSF-1), ...

A. Brandt; J. L. Mann; S. E. Rennie; A. P. Herzog; T. B. Criss

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Research on simulation of ship electric propulsion system with flywheel energy storage system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheel energy storage has been widely used to improve the ground electric power quality. This paper designed a flywheel energy storage device to improve ship electric propulsion system power grid quality. The practical mathematical models of flywheel ...

Chunling Xie; Conghui Zhang; Jen-Yuan James Chang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Average Seasonal Variation of the Atlantic Equatorial Currents from Historical Ship Drifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface currents in the tropical Atlantic were studied using historical ship-drift data. These are the only available data capable of resolving the long-term seasonal fluctuations of currents over a broad geographical region. The North Equatorial ...

P. L. Richardson; T. K. McKee

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hanford Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped Four Months Ahead of Schedule Hanford Surpasses Transuranic Waste Milestone: 1,000 Cubic Meters Shipped Four Months Ahead of Schedule June 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford surpassed a Tri-Party Agreement Milestone by four months in shipping 1,000 cubic meters of transuranic waste off the Hanford Site in route to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico before September 30, 2011. The milestone for shipping waste was met in May 2011. Since the shipments began in 2000, 620 shipments have left the Hanford Site, a total of 4,137 cubic meters of transuranic waste. Milestones for

172

Problems in the Use of Ship Observations for the Study of Interdecadal Climate Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of sea surface temperature (SST) and air temperature (AT) for 1870–1969 based an ship observations over the Pacific are examined. The familiar signals of interannual variability in the equatorial and northeast Pacific are evident. ...

Peter B. Wright

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

LEVERAGING AGING MATERIALS DATA TO SUPPORT EXTENSION OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING PACKAGES SERVICE LIFE  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear material inventories are increasingly being transferred to interim storage locations where they may reside for extended periods of time. Use of a shipping package to store nuclear materials after the transfer has become more common for a variety of reasons. Shipping packages are robust and have a qualified pedigree for performance in normal operation and accident conditions but are only certified over an approved transportation window. The continued use of shipping packages to contain nuclear material during interim storage will result in reduced overall costs and reduced exposure to workers. However, the shipping package materials of construction must maintain integrity as specified by the safety basis of the storage facility throughout the storage period, which is typically well beyond the certified transportation window. In many ways, the certification processes required for interim storage of nuclear materials in shipping packages is similar to life extension programs required for dry cask storage systems for commercial nuclear fuels. The storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask storage systems is federally-regulated, and over 1500 individual dry casks have been in successful service up to 20 years in the US. The uncertainty in final disposition will likely require extended storage of this fuel well beyond initial license periods and perhaps multiple re-licenses may be needed. Thus, both the shipping packages and the dry cask storage systems require materials integrity assessments and assurance of continued satisfactory materials performance over times not considered in the original evaluation processes. Test programs for the shipping packages have been established to obtain aging data on materials of construction to demonstrate continued system integrity. The collective data may be coupled with similar data for the dry cask storage systems and used to support extending the service life of shipping packages in both transportation and storage.

Dunn, K. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, S. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Daugherty, W. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Sindelar, R. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Skidmore, E. [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Dose Rates from Plutonium Metal and Beryllium Metal in a 9975 Shipping Container  

SciTech Connect

A parametric study was performed of the radiation dose rates that might be produced if plutonium metal and beryllium metal were shipped in the 9975 shipping package. These materials consist of heterogeneous combinations plutonium metal and beryllium. The plutonium metal content varies up to 4.4 kilograms while the beryllium metal varies up to 4 kilograms. This paper presents the results of that study.

Nathan, S.J.

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

DYNA3D analysis of the DT-20 shipping container  

SciTech Connect

A DYNA3D model of the DT-20 shipping container was constructed. Impact onto a rigid steel surface at a velocity of 44 ft/sec (30 foot gravity drop) was studied. The orientation of most interest was a side-drop, but end and corner drops were also studied briefly. The assembly for the baseline side impact contained a 150 lb. payload. During this drop, the outer drum sustains plastic strains of up to 0.15, with most the deformation near the rim. The plywood/Celotex packing is crushed about 3 inches. The inner sealed can sees significant stresses, but barely reaches the onset of yielding in some local areas. Based on hand calculations, the bolts joining the can halves could see stresses near 50 ksi. It is felt that overall, the container should survive this drop. However, detailed modeling of the rim closure and the center bolted joint was not possible due to time constraints. Furthermore, better material models and properties are needed for the Celotex, plywood, and honeycomb in particular. 39 figs., 1 tab.

Logan, R.W.; Lovejoy, S.C.

1991-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ship Waves in the Lee of Isolated Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, linear steady-state model, which has been designed for the purpose of simulating the internal wave field which is forced by stratified flow over topography, is described in the present paper. The model directly assimilates ...

Angele Simard; W. R. Peltier

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

Daugherty, W.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS Signed by Secretary Spencer Abraham January 2001-December 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS Joint Statement of ntent between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and The Ministry of Energy and Mines of the Republic ofPeru on Cooperation in the Field of Energy -Tab 1 Fifth Hemispheric Energy Ministers Meeting Mexico City, Mexico - March 9, 2001. Mexico Declaration - Energy: A Crucial Factor for Integration and Sustainable Development in the Hemisphere - Tab 2 Extension of the Agreement for Energy Cooperation between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and the Secretariat ofEnergy of the United Mexican States, and its Four Annexes - Tab3 Implementing Agreement between the Department ofEnergy of the United States ofAmerica and the

179

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly

180

International Price List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

International International Price List New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Prices and Certificates Ordering Information Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Prices and Certificates International Price List Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page NOTE: These costs reflect pricing for CRMs shipped to non-U.S. addresses. Prices for CRMs shipped to U.S. addresses can be found on the Domestic Price List. Larger quantities or configurations of some Reference Materials are available upon request. Contact usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov or telephone (630)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Truck and rail charges for shipping spent fuel and nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed techniques for calculating estimates of nuclear-waste shipping costs and compiled a listing of representative data that facilitate incorporation of reference shipping costs into varius logistics analyses. The formulas that were developed can be used to estimate costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel or nuclear waste by either legal-weight truck or general-freight rail. The basic data for this study were obtained from tariffs of a truck carrier licensed to serve the 48 contiguous states and from various rail freight tariff guides. Also, current transportation regulations as issued by the US Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were investigated. The costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear waste, as addressed by the tariff guides, are based on a complex set of conditions involving the shipment origin, route, destination, weight, size, and volume and the frequency of shipments, existing competition, and the length of contracts. While the complexity of these conditions is an important factor in arriving at a ''correct'' cost, deregulation of the transportation industry means that costs are much more subject to negotiation and, thus, the actual fee that will be charged will not be determined until a shipping contract is actually signed. This study is designed to provide the baseline data necessary for making comparisons of the estimated costs of shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear wastes by truck and rail transportation modes. The scope of the work presented in this document is limited to the costs incurred for shipping, and does not include packaging, cask purchase/lease costs, or local fees placed on shipments of radioactive materials.

McNair, G.W.; Cole, B.M.; Cross, R.E.; Votaw, E.F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Estimates of fire environments in ship holds containing radioactive material packages  

SciTech Connect

Fire environments that occur on cargo ships differ significantly from the fire environments found in land transport. Cargo ships typically carry a large amount of flammable fuel for propulsion and shipboard power, and may transport large quantities of flammable cargo. As a result, sea mode transport accident records contain instances of long lasting and intense fires. Since Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) casks are not carried on tankers with large flammable cargoes, most of these dramatic, long burning fires are not relevant threats, and transport studies must concentrate on those fires that are most likely to occur. By regulation, INF casks must be separated from flammable cargoes by a fire-resistant, liquid-tight partition. This makes a fire in an adjacent ship hold the most likely fire threat. The large size of a cargo ship relative to any spent nuclear fuel casks on board, however, may permit a severe, long lasting fire to occur with little or no thermal impact on the casks. Although some flammable materials such as shipping boxes or container floors may exist in the same hold with the cask, the amount of fuel available may not provide a significant threat to the massive transport casks used for radioactive materials. This shipboard fire situation differs significantly from the regulatory conditions specified in 10 CFR 71 for a fully engulfing pool fire. To learn more about the differences, a series of simple thermal analyses has been completed to estimate cask behavior in likely marine and land thermal accident situations. While the calculations are based on several conservative assumptions, and are only preliminary, they illustrate that casks are likely to heat much more slowly in shipboard hold fires than in an open pool fire. The calculations also reinforce the basic regulatory concept that for radioactive materials, the shipping cask, not the ship, is the primary protection barrier to consider.

Koski, J.A.; Cole, J.K.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Dynamic analysis of floating quay and container ship for container loading and offloading operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A floating quay container terminal is used for loading or unloading from container ships from both sides of a floating quay. The side-by-side Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) offloading operation from floating terminals to LNG carriers is very similar to that from super-container ships to floating quay-walls. The hydrodynamic interaction effects among a fixed quay, container ship and floating quay, which are parallel to one another, are investigated. The three body side-by-side arrangement is compared with the individual freely floating body in the absence/presence of the fixed quay to identify the interaction effects. Hydrodynamic coefficients of the interacting bodies are obtained using a three dimensional constant panel method, WAMIT. Using a vessel-lines coupled dynamic analysis computer program WINPOST, the relative motion between floating quay and container ship is simulated in time domain. It is assumed in the present study that the floating quay is positioned by a dolphin mooring system. This analysis provides the relative motion among container ship, fixed and floating quay to ascertain that container loading and offloading can be performed in the severe wave condition without any problem.

Kumar, Brajesh

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A West Valley Demonstration Project Milestone - Achieving Certification to Ship Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has successfully pretreated and vitrified nearly all of the 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste that was generated at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. Low-level waste (LLW) generated during the course of the cleanup effort now requires disposal. Currently the WVDP only ships Class A LLW for off-site disposal. It has been shipping Class A wastes to Envirocare of Utah, Inc. since 1997. However, the WVDP may also have a future need to ship Class B and Class C waste, which Envirocare is not currently authorized to accept. The Nevada Test Site (NTS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, can accept all three waste classifications. The WVDP set a goal to receive certification to begin shipping Class A wastes to NTS by 2001. Formal certification/approval was granted by the DOE Nevada Operations Office on July 12, 2001. This paper discusses how the WVDP contractor, West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), completed the activities required to achieve NTS certification in 2001 to ship waste to its facility. The information and lessons learned provided are significant because the WVDP is the only new generator receiving certification based on an NTS audit in January 2001 that resulted in no findings and only two observations--a rating that is unparalleled in the DOE Complex.

Jackson, J. P.; Pastor, R. S.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

Anderson, Michael G. [MOTA Corporation: 3410 Sunset Boulevard, West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21-2008 21-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1121-2008 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. 2. Constructive comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy (HS-11) U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

187

LANL Sets Waste Shipping Record for Fourth Consecutive Year: Lab has sent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sets Waste Shipping Record for Fourth Consecutive Year: Lab Sets Waste Shipping Record for Fourth Consecutive Year: Lab has sent 172 shipments so far this year; aiming for 200 by September 30 LANL Sets Waste Shipping Record for Fourth Consecutive Year: Lab has sent 172 shipments so far this year; aiming for 200 by September 30 August 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Los Alamos National Laboratory has set another record for shipments of transuranic waste in a single fiscal year. Here, the Lab’s 172nd shipment leaves the Lab on Aug. 2, headed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Los Alamos National Laboratory has set another record for shipments of transuranic waste in a single fiscal year. Here, the Lab's 172nd shipment leaves the Lab on Aug. 2, headed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - For the fourth consecutive year, Los Alamos National

188

Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., June 3, 2009 - Cleanup of the nation's defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste has reached an important milestone. Today, the first shipment of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico arrived safely at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the southeast corner of the state. "Shipping this waste to WIPP is important for our national cleanup mission, but this event is especially important for New Mexicans," said DOE Carlsbad Field Office Manager Dave Moody. "It's great to see progress being made right here in our own state." WIPP's mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related

189

Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the Carlsbad plant, which is scheduled to undergo facility maintenance through mid-January. November 25, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

190

Team China Transforms Shipping Containers into a Solar-Powered House |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team China Transforms Shipping Containers into a Solar-Powered Team China Transforms Shipping Containers into a Solar-Powered House Team China Transforms Shipping Containers into a Solar-Powered House June 16, 2011 - 3:31pm Addthis Team China's Y Container design model | Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream Team China's Y Container design model | Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In honor of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon -- which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive -- we are profiling each of the 20 teams participating in the competition. Design aesthetics, engineering, marketing appeal -- these are just a few of

191

Western Empire: the deep water wreck of a mid-nineteenth century wooden sailing ship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study of Western Empire is split into two distinct parts: (1) historical research of the life of the vessel, relying on primary documents; and (2) analysis of the deep water survey data. The first part concentrates on the historical documents that constitute the history of Western Empire. The second part begins with a review of the tools and procedures used in performing the deep water survey. An analysis of the information that can be taken from such a study will follow, and it concludes with suggestions for remotely operated vehicle operators when performing an on-the-fly survey of shipwrecks in deep water. The official ship logs, crew agreements, and contemporary newspaper articles are used to recreate the life of Western Empire and shed light on a period in which wooden sailing ships were being displaced by iron ships and steam power.

Levin, Joshua Aaron

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) a microcomputer-based analysis system for shipping cask design review: User`s manual to Version 3a. Volume 1, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for evaluating safety analysis reports on spent fuel shipping casks. SCANS is an easy-to-use system that calculates the global response to impact loads, pressure loads and thermal conditions, providing reviewers with an independent check on analyses submitted by licensees. SCANS is based on microcomputers compatible with the IBM-PC family of computers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, cask analysis programs, and output display programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests. Analysis options are based on regulatory cases described in the Code of Federal Regulations 10 CFR 71 and Regulatory Guides published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1977 and 1978.

Mok, G.C.; Thomas, G.R.; Gerhard, M.A.; Trummer, D.J.; Johnson, G.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microsoft Word - SSRL_LCLS_User_Shipping_Request_Form_hazmat_1-25-2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous Material) Hazardous Material) Will this be shipped to a location outside of the U.S.? No ___ Yes ___ If yes, user must complete Power of Attorney and certify concurrence with terms and conditions. Confirm with Cathy Knotts or Lisa Dunn that this has been completed. _______ * HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MUST BE DECLARED AND MUST BE APPROVED BY ES&H REPRESENTATIVE. (see reverse side of this form) * A Separate form must be submitted for each hazmat declared. * It can take several days to process shipping requests through SLAC. Missing or insufficient information will delay shipments further. Your name: _____________________________ Date: ______________________________ Where can you be reached if there are questions (cell phone?): ___________________________

194

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 91.087 90.500 85 76.075 ...

195

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... 2013 Africa 117.064 119.114 123.609 ...

196

IWA (International Workshop Agreement)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IWA content IWA (International Workshop Agreement) iso1rss IWA (International Workshop Agreement) Past Meeting Presentations 2nd Internati

197

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

Application of a new multi-agent Hybrid Co-evolution based Particle Swarm Optimisation methodology in ship design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a multiple objective 'Hybrid Co-evolution based Particle Swarm Optimisation' methodology (HCPSO) is proposed. This methodology is able to handle multiple objective optimisation problems in the area of ship design, where the simultaneous ... Keywords: ?-disturbance, Multi-agent, Optimisation, Particle Swarm Optimisation, Ship design

Hao Cui; Osman Turan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

AEC SYMPOSIUM ON PACKAGING AND REGULATORY STANDARDS FOR SHIPPING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS, HELD IN GERMANTOWN, MARYLAND , DECEMBER 3-5, 1962  

SciTech Connect

A total of twenty papers and one roundtable discussion were presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for eighteen of the papers. The papers for which no abstracts were prepared are concerned with impact energy sorption by large shipping casks, design of a Pu and enriched U shipping container, and the roundtable discussion on regulatory standards. (J.R.D.)

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

CFD Model Estimates of the Airflow Distortion over Research Ships and the Impact on Momentum Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity and air–sea turbulent flux measurements made from shipborne instruments are biased due to the effect of the ship on the flow of air to the instruments. The presence of the ship causes the airflow to a particular instrument site to ...

M. J. Yelland; B. I. Moat; R. W. Pascal; D. I. Berry

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A bio-inspired multi-agent system framework for real-time load management in all-electric ship power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All-electric ship power systems have limited generation capacity and finite rotating inertia compared with large power systems. Moreover, all-electric ship power systems include large portions of nonlinear loads and dynamic loads relative to the total ...

Xianyong Feng / Karen L. Butler-Purry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Impact of Ship-Produced Aerosols on the Microstructure and Albedo of Warm Marine Stratocumulus Clouds: A Test of MAST Hypotheses 1i and 1ii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalously high reflectivity tracks in stratus and stratocumulus sheets associated with ships (known as ship tracks) are commonly seen in visible and near-infrared satellite imagery. Until now there have been only a limited number of in situ ...

P. A. Durkee; K. J. Noone; R. J. Ferek; D. W. Johnson; J. P. Taylor; T. J. Garrett; P. V. Hobbs; J. G. Hudson; C. S. Bretherton; G. Innis; G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel; C. D. O’Dowd; L. M. Russell; R. Gasparovic; K. E. Nielsen; S. A. Tessmer; E. Öström; S. R. Osborne; R. C. Flagan; J. H. Seinfeld; H. Rand

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Optimization of direct drive induction motors for electric ship propulsion with high speed propellers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct drive electric ship propulsion can offer increased flexibility and reduced overall fuel consumption compared to geared mechanical systems [Davis 1987, Doerry 2007]. As a well-established technology, induction motors are a dependable and economical ... Keywords: AC motors, induction motor drives, induction motors, thermal analysis

S. C. Englebretson; J. L. Kirtley, Jr; C. Chryssostomidis

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Errors of Atlantic Air–Sea Fluxes Derived from Ship Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using individual ship reports of the Comprehensive Ocean–Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) monthly 1° × 1° averages of the air–sea flux fields in the Atlantic are computed to investigate the variance on a seasonal-to-interannual timescale. As an ...

R. Lindau

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Simulation Study on Ship Motion Control Algorithm Based on AOCS Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on linear dynamic equation optimization, a particular control structure is introduced in this paper, which can be acronymized as AOCS (Asymptotic Observer + Corrector + Speed control law ), and the control quality requirements especially the economy ... Keywords: Ship motion control, Asymptotic observer, Optimal control, Corrector

Hongbo Wang; Yiping Guo; Zhao Pan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ship Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2007 the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown sailed southward within 300 km of the coast of Ecuador and Peru, sampling surface meteorology, air–sea turbulent and radiative fluxes, cloud properties, and upper-air soundings from the equator to 20°...

S. P. de Szoeke; C. W. Fairall; Sergio Pezoa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Classification of total load demand profiles for war-ships based on pattern recognition methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classification of total load demand profiles for every type of war-ships is crucial information, because it is the necessary base for a series of studies and operations, such as load estimation, load shedding and power management systems. In this ... Keywords: adequacy measures, clustering algorithms, load profiles, pattern recognition, warship

G. J. Tsekouras; I. S. Karanasiou; F. D. Kanellos

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Influence of the Atmospheric Surface Layer on a Turbulent Flow Downstream of a Ship Superstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a set of turbulence measurements at sea in the area of high flow distortion in the near wake and recirculation zone behind a ship's superstructure that is similar in geometry to a helicopter hangar/flight deck arrangement ...

Luksa Luznik; Cody J. Brownell; Murray R. Snyder; Hyung Suk Kang

210

Improved safety through training for gas-handling operations at the ship-jetty interface  

SciTech Connect

Leith Nautical College has found that integrated training of both ship and dock personnel in LNG-cargo handling is beneficial to both groups of workers. Overlapping coursework alleviate much of the difficulties which emerge in implementing this approach. The use of computers and models to simulate loading and off-loading operation has been a valuable aid in training workers for maximum safety.

Mcquire, G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Separator assembly for use in spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator assembly for use in a spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

Bucholz, J.A.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

An end-to-end simulator for the all-electric ship MVDC integrated power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a large scale Medium Voltage DC all-electric ship integrated power system is modeled from the prime mover (gas turbine) to the propulsion load. This system has a three-phase 21MW synchronous machine as a main generator and a three-phase ... Keywords: DDG51 destroyer, electromechanical system, feedback control

M. Miloševi? Marden; P. Prempraneerach; J. L. Kirtley; G. Karniadakis; C. Chryssostomidis

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SMI 2012: Full Paper: Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for constructing blades of hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers based on design parameters that possess a clear hydraulic meaning. The design process corresponds to the classical construction of a blade using the medial surface ... Keywords: B-spline representation, CAD-model, Hydroelectric turbine blade, Medial axis-based design, Propeller blade

M. Rossgatterer; B. Jüttler; M. Kapl; G. Della Vecchia

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Outline · Introduction · Wind Turbine Operational Conditions · Wind Turbine Operation under Atmospheric Icing · Wind Turbine Operation under Fault Condition · Conclusions www.cesos.ntnu.no M. Etemaddar

Nørvåg, Kjetil

215

Wind Stress over the Arabian Sea from Ship Reports and Seasat Scatterometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasat scatterometer data over the Arabian Sea are used to build wind stress fields during July and August 1978. They are first compared with 3-day wind analyses from ship data along the Somali coast. Seasat scatterometer specifications of 2 m s?...

C. Perigaud; P. Delecluse; J. F. Minster

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Multi-tiered sensing and data processing for monitoring ship structures  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive structural health monitoring (SHM) system is a critical mechanism to ensure hull integrity and evaluate structural performance over the life of a ship, especially for lightweight high-speed ships. One of the most important functions of a SHM system is to provide real-time performance guidance and reduce the risk of structural damage during operations at sea. This is done by continuous feedback from onboard sensors providing measurements of seaway loads and structural responses. Applications of SHM should also include diagnostic capabilities such as identifying the presence of damage, assessing the location and extent of damage when it does occur in order to plan for future inspection and maintenance. The development of such SHM systems is extremely challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with the missions of high performance ships, the lack of data from known damage conditions, the limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, the management of the vast amounts of data, and the need for continued, real-time data processing. This paper will discuss some of these challenges and several outstanding issues that need to be addressed in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum high-speed catamaran, the HSV-2 Swift. A multi-tiered approach for sensing and data processing will be discussed as potential SHM architecture for future shipboard application. This approach will involve application of low cost and dense sensor arrays such as wireless communications in selected areas of the ship hull in addition to conventional sensors measuring global structural response of the ship. A recent wireless hull monitoring demo on FSF-I SeaFighter will be discussed as an example to show how this proposed architecture is a viable approach for long-term and real-time hull monitoring.

Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWCCD; Lynch, Jerome [UNIV. OF MICHIGAN; Brady, Thomas [NSWCCD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 112.4 107.7 103.5 96.5 ...

218

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 1.907 1.909 2.101 2.197 ...

219

Internal Audit Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Internal Audit Process 110304 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Internal Audit Process Document Number: P-007 Rev. 110304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa...

220

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Germany 135.7 139.1 124.7 153.7 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Intern Programs | PARTI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics of Accelerators and Related Technology for International Students (PARTI) About Apply Visa Info For Current Interns Program Description Fermilab's PARTI program offers...

222

LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping Effort LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping Effort December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis From left, EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Frank Marcinowski, San Ildefonso Pueblo Governor Terry Aguilar, Los Alamos County Council Chair Sharon Stover, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, Los Alamos Site Office Manager Kevin Smith, and Laboratory Director Charles McMillan applaud as the 1,000th shipment of waste leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory. From left, EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Frank Marcinowski, San Ildefonso Pueblo Governor Terry Aguilar, Los Alamos County Council Chair Sharon Stover, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, Los

223

LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping Effort LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping Effort December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis From left, EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Frank Marcinowski, San Ildefonso Pueblo Governor Terry Aguilar, Los Alamos County Council Chair Sharon Stover, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, Los Alamos Site Office Manager Kevin Smith, and Laboratory Director Charles McMillan applaud as the 1,000th shipment of waste leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory. From left, EM Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Frank Marcinowski, San Ildefonso Pueblo Governor Terry Aguilar, Los Alamos County Council Chair Sharon Stover, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, Los

224

9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optimization of 200 MWth and 250 MWt Ship Based Small Long Life NPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design optimization of ship-based 200 MWth and 250 MWt nuclear power reactors have been performed. The neutronic and thermo-hydraulic programs of the three-dimensional X-Y-Z geometry have been developed for the analysis of ship-based nuclear power plant. Quasi-static approach is adopted to treat seawater effect. The reactor are loop type lead bismuth cooled fast reactor with nitride fuel and with relatively large coolant pipe above reactor core, the heat from primary coolant system is directly transferred to watersteam loop through steam generators. Square core type are selected and optimized. As the optimization result, the core outlet temperature distribution is changing with the elevation angle of the reactor system and the characteristics are discussed.

Fitriyani, Dian [Department of Physics, Andalas University, Limau Manis, Padang, West Sumatra (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, jl. Ganesha no. 10, Bandung, West Jawa (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

226

USING A CONTAINMENT VESSEL LIFTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE OPERATIONS OF SHIPPING PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

The 9977 and the 9975 shipping packages are used in various nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy. These shipping packages are often loaded in designated areas with designs using overhead cranes or A-frames with lifting winches. However, there are cases where loading operations must be performed in remote locations where these facility infrastructures do not exist. For these locations, a lifting apparatus has been designed to lift the containment vessels partially out of the package for unloading operations to take place. Additionally, the apparatus allows for loading and closure of the containment vessel and subsequent pre-shipment testing. This paper will address the design of the apparatus and the challenges associated with the design, and it will describe the use of the apparatus.

Loftin, Bradley [Savannah River National Laboratory; Koenig, Richard [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

Prediction of gas pressurization and hydrogen generation for shipping hazard analysis : Six unstabilized PU 02 samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiolysis of water to form hydrogen gas is a safety concern for safe storage and transport of plutonium-bearing materials. Hydrogen gas is considered a safety hazard if its concentration in the container exceeds five percent hydrogen by volume, DOE Docket No. 00-1 1-9965. Unfortunately, water cannot be entirely avoided in a processing environment and these samples contain a range of water inherently. Thermodynamic, chemical, and radiolysis modeling was used to predict gas generation and changes in gas composition as a function of time within sealed containers containing plutonium bearing materials. The results are used in support of safety analysis for shipping six unstabilized (i.e. uncalcined) samples from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sits (RFETS) to the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). The intent of this work is to establish a time window in which safe shipping can occur.

Moody, E. W. (Eddie W.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Lyman, J. L. (John L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface synoptic weather reports for the entire globe, gathered from various available data sets, were processed, edited, and rewritten to provide a single data set of individual observations of clouds, spanning the 44 years 1952-1995 for ship data and the 26 years 1971-1996 for land station data. In addition to the cloud portion of the synoptic report, each edited report also includes the associated pressure, present weather, wind, air temperature, and dew point (and sea surface temperature over oceans).

Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

Pope, R.B.; Diggs, J.M. (eds.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Test plan/procedure for the SPM-1 shipping container system. Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The 49 CFR 173.465 Type A packaging tests will verify that SPM-1 will provide adequate protection and pass as a Type A package. Test will determine that the handle of the Pig will not penetrate through the plywood spacer and rupture the shipping container. Test plan/procedure provides planning, pre-test, setup, testing, and post-testing guidelines and procedures for conducting the {open_quotes}Free Drop Test{close_quotes} procedure for the SPM-1 package.

Flanagan, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

THERMAL PROPERTIES OF FIBERBOARD OVERPACK MATERIALS IN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 9975 shipping package incorporates a cane fiberboard overpack for thermal insulation and impact resistance. Thermal properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity) have been measured on cane fiberboard and a similar wood fiber-based product at several temperatures representing potential storage conditions. While the two products exhibit similar behavior, the measured specific heat capacity varies significantly from prior data. The current data are being developed as the basis to verify that this material remains acceptable over the extended storage time period.

VORMELKER, PHILLIP; DAUGHERTY, W. L.

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Maintenance manual for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System cask. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the Maintenance Manual for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask. These instructions address requirements for maintenance, inspection, testing, and repair, supplementing general information found in the BUSS Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), SAND 83-0698. Use of the BUSS cask is authorized by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the shipment of special form cesium chloride or strontium flouride capsules.

Bronowski, D.R.; Yoshimura, H.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 10 10 11 11 11 10 ...

234

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan (s) (s) (s) (s ...

235

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Net Generation ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 0.039 ...

236

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Installed Capacity ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.411 ...

237

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ; ...

238

New Facility Aids in Lab's Capability to Ship TRU Waste to WIPP |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Aids in Lab's Capability to Ship TRU Waste to WIPP Facility Aids in Lab's Capability to Ship TRU Waste to WIPP New Facility Aids in Lab's Capability to Ship TRU Waste to WIPP December 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers move standard waste boxes to the High-Energy Real Time Radiography facility. Workers move standard waste boxes to the High-Energy Real Time Radiography facility. A standard waste box enters the HE-RTR at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility x-rays waste drums that contain high-density items such as motors and pumps and larger containers known as standard waste boxes. A standard waste box enters the HE-RTR at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility x-rays waste drums that contain high-density items such as motors and pumps and larger containers known as standard waste boxes. Workers move standard waste boxes to the High-Energy Real Time Radiography facility.

239

Feasibility study on the verification of fresh fuel assemblies in shipping containers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of using various nondestructive measurement techniques to determine the presence of fuel assemblies inside shipping containers and to examine the feasibility of measuring the fissile content of the containers. Passive and active techniques based on both gamma and neutron assay were examined. In addition, some experiments and calculations were performed to evaluate neutron techniques. Passive counting of the 186 keV gamma from {sup 235}U is recommended for use as an attributes measurement technique. Experiments and studies indicated that a bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator is the preferred detector. A properly designed system based on this detector will provide a compact detector that can selectively verify fuel assemblies within a shipping container while the container is in a stack of similarly loaded containers. Missing fuel assemblies will be readily detected, but gamma counting of assemblies cannot detect changes in the fissile content of the inner rods in an assembly. If a variables technique is required, it is recommended that more extensive calculations be performed and removal of the outer shipping container be considered. Marking (sealing) of the assemblies with a uniquely identifiable transponder was also considered. This would require the development of procedures that would assure proper application and removal of the seal. When change to a metal outer container occurs, the technique will no longer be useful unless a radiolucent window is included in the container. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Swinth, K.L.; Tanner, J.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Global performance analysis of floating harbor and container ship for loading and offloading operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility and general performance of a floating harbor system is studied with regard to the relative motion of a floating quay and a container ship. A 350[m]× 160[m] box-type barge is selected as the floating harbor and it is positioned by a dolphin mooring system. The container ship is tied to the land wall by hawsers. The hydrodynamic interactions between floating bodies and a fixed quay wall in close proximity with a side-by-side arrangement are investigated. A three dimensional wave-body diffraction/radiation panel program WAMIT is used for the calculation of hydrodynamic information and response amplitude operators (RAO) of the three bodies in frequency domain. Subsequently, the vessel-mooring coupled dynamic analysis program WINPOST is employed to produce motion time histories in time domain. The frequency-domain RAO is successfully compared with time-domain RAO in case viscous forces are neglected. Compared to Brajesh Kumar’s (2005) study, 12×12 full hydrodynamic interactions between the two floating bodies are included and dynamic wind loading is considered in addition to wave and current loadings. All the relative motion statistics are calculated from the respective motion time histories for a typical operational condition and a typical survival condition. The relative motion between the interacting bodies is small in the operational condition to ensure the efficacy of container loading and offloading operation from both sides of the ship while the loading and offloading operation is not available in the survival condition.

Lim, Sung Ho

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Internal Audit Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

242

Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid Document Number: F-012 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-007, Internal Audit Process Notify of Changes: Internal Auditors Referenced Document(s): F-011 Internal Audit Report F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0304 Change title from Worksheet to Job Aid and changed revision from alpha to numeric for consistency. F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 3 of 5 Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 4 of 5

243

CAPSIZE: A personal computer program and cross-section library for determining the shielding requirements, size, and capacity of shipping casks subject to various proposed objectives  

SciTech Connect

A new interactive program called CAPSIZE has been written for the IBM-PC to rapidly determine the likely impact that proposed design objectives might have on the size and capacity of spent fuel shipping casks designed to meet those objectives. Given the burnup of the spent fuel, its cooling time, the thickness of the internal basket walls, the desired external dose rate, and the nominal weight limit of the loaded cask, the CAPSIZE program will determine the maximum number of PWR fuel assemblies that may be shipped in a lead-, steel-, or uranium-shielded cask meeting those objectives. The necessary neutron and gamma shield thicknesses are determined by the program in such a way as to meet the specified external dose rate while simultaneously minimizing the overall weight of the loaded cask. The one-group cross-section library used in the CAPSIZE program has been distilled from the intermediate results of several hundred 1-D multigroaup discrete ordinates calculations for different types of casks. Neutron and gamma source terms, as well as the decay heat terms, are based on ORIGEN-S analyses of PWR fuel assemblies having exposures of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 gigawatt days per metric tonne of initial heavy metal (GWD/MTIHM). In each case, values have been tabulated at 17 different decay times between 120 days and 25 years. Other features of the CAPSIZE program include a steady-state heat transfer calculation which will minimize the size and weight of external cooling fins, if and when such fins are required. Comparisons with previously reported results show that the CAPSIZE program can generally estimate the necessary neutron and gamma shield thicknesses to within 0.16 in. and 0.08 in., respectively. The corresponding cask weights have generally been found to be within 1000 lbs of previously reported results. 13 refs., 20 figs., 54 tabs.

Bucholz, J.A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Digital Library Approach to the Reconstruction of Ancient Sunken Ships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout the ages, countless shipwrecks have left behind a rich historical and technological legacy. In this context, nautical archaeologists study the remains of these boats and ships and the cultures that created and used them. Ship reconstruction can be seen as an incomplete jigsaw reconstruction problem. Therefore, I hypothesize that a computational approach based on digital libraries can enhance the reconstruction of a composite object (ship) from fragmented, incomplete, and damaged pieces (timbers and ship remains). This dissertation describes a framework for enabling the integration of textual and visual information pertaining to wooden vessels from sources in multiple languages. Linking related pieces of information relies on query expansion and improving relevance. This is accomplished with the implementation of an algorithm that derives relationships from terms in a specialized glossary, combining them with properties and concepts expressed in an ontology. The main archaeological sources used in this dissertation are data generated from a 17th-century Portuguese ship, the Pepper Wreck, complemented with information obtained from other documented and studied shipwrecks. Shipbuilding treatises spanning from the late 16th- to the 19th-centuries provide textual sources along with various illustrations. Additional visual materials come from a repository of photographs and drawings documenting numerous underwater excavations and surveys. The ontology is based on a rich database of archaeological information compiled by Mr. Richard Steffy. The original database was analyzed and transformed into an ontological representation in RDF-OWL. Its creation followed an iterative methodology which included numerous revisions by nautical archaeologists. Although this ontology does not pretend to be a final version, it provides a robust conceptualization. The proposed approach is evaluated by measuring the usefulness of the glossary and the ontology. Evaluation results show improvements in query expansion across languages based on Blind Relevance Feedback using the glossary as query expansion collection. Similarly, contextualization was also improved by using the ontology for categorizing query results. These results suggest that related external sources can be exploited to better contextualize information in a particular domain. Given the characteristics of the materials in nautical archaeology, the framework proposed in this dissertation can be adapted and extended to other domains.

Monroy Cobar, Carlos A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Compensation of Wave-Induced Motion and Force Phenomena for Ship-Based High Performance Robotic and Human Amplifying Systems  

SciTech Connect

The decrease in manpower and increase in material handling needs on many Naval vessels provides the motivation to explore the modeling and control of Naval robotic and robotic assistive devices. This report addresses the design, modeling, control and analysis of position and force controlled robotic systems operating on the deck of a moving ship. First we provide background information that quantifies the motion of the ship, both in terms of frequency and amplitude. We then formulate the motion of the ship in terms of homogeneous transforms. This transformation provides a link between the motion of the ship and the base of a manipulator. We model the kinematics of a manipulator as a serial extension of the ship motion. We then show how to use these transforms to formulate the kinetic and potential energy of a general, multi-degree of freedom manipulator moving on a ship. As a demonstration, we consider two examples: a one degree-of-freedom system experiencing three sea states operating in a plane to verify the methodology and a 3 degree of freedom system experiencing all six degrees of ship motion to illustrate the ease of computation and complexity of the solution. The first series of simulations explore the impact wave motion has on tracking performance of a position controlled robot. We provide a preliminary comparison between conventional linear control and Repetitive Learning Control (RLC) and show how fixed time delay RLC breaks down due to the varying nature wave disturbance frequency. Next, we explore the impact wave motion disturbances have on Human Amplification Technology (HAT). We begin with a description of the traditional HAT control methodology. Simulations show that the motion of the base of the robot, due to ship motion, generates disturbances forces reflected to the operator that significantly degrade the positioning accuracy and resolution at higher sea states. As with position-controlled manipulators, augmenting the control with a Repetitive Learning Controller has little impact due to the variable nature of the wave period. We then introduce a new approach to HAT control, Ship Motion Compensation for Force Control Systems (SMCFCS). This basic approach uses inclinometer and acceleration information from the base of the robot to compensate for ship motion disturbances. Results of the simulation study show over an order of magnitude decrease in the disturbance force reflected back to the operator and an order of magnitude increase in positioning accuracy and resolution.

Love, LJL

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Essays in international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of essays on the effect of trade costs on international trade. Chapter 1 derives and empirically examines how factor proportions determine the structure of commodity trade when international ...

Romalis, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

International aeronautical user charges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AOCS: supporting international standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trade standards improve efficiency of production and ease international commerce. They can also affect profitability. AOCS: supporting international standards inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents f

249

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

250

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | ...

251

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ...

252

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 0.213 Kuwait 63.500 Lebanon 0 Oman ...

253

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks |

254

RFI Comments - ASIS International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sincerely, /s/ Jack Lichtenstein Vice President, Government Affairs & Public Policy ASIS International 1625 Prince Street Alexandria, VA 22314

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN ...

256

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 Middle East 802.157 Bahrain 0.125 ...

257

Engineering analysis report of the design of the F-144-1 shipping container to E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company  

SciTech Connect

Design and engineering panameters for the F-144-1 shipping container for transporting FFTF fuel pin bundles or fuel assemblies are presented. (TFD)

Lusk, E.C.; Burian, R.J.

1972-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Experience with certifying borated stainless steel as a shipping cask basket material  

SciTech Connect

The original cask designs for a cask demonstration project featured fuel baskets constructed of borated stainless steel (bss) as a structural material. The project is intended to demonstrate casks that can be used for both shipping and storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The baskets were intended to maintain the fuel assemblies in a subcritical array for both normal and accident conditions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, however, judged bss to be unacceptable as a structural material. The cask designs were subsequently modified. The knowledge gained during this cask demonstration project may be applicable to development of bss as a basket material in future cask design. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Abbott, D.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Nickell, R.E. (Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

REVIEW OF CLEANING SOLUTIONS FOR USE ON COMPONENTS OF THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Several candidate cleaning products have been reviewed for use as a disinfectant on 9975 shipping package components which contain or have contacted mold. Following review of the compatibility of these products with each component, ammonia (ammonium hydroxide diluted to 1.5 wt% concentration) appears compatible with all package components that it might contact. Each of the other candidate products is incompatible with one or more package components. Accordingly, ammonia is recommended for this purpose. It is further recommended that all components which are disinfected be subsequently rinsed with di-ionized or distilled water.

Daugherty, W.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for Naval ships. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corp., and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. In addition, these new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships.

Verderber, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Investigation of broadband over power line channel capacity of shipboard power system cables for ship communications networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadband over Power Line (BPL) technology has garnered significant attention lately due to recent advancements in solid state technologies and channel coding schemes. The successful application of BPL technology for in-home automation and networking has led to suggestions of applying BPL in other systems including ships. The application of BPL technology using the Shipboard Power System (SPS) as a potential communications network for ship automation systems has been proposed, to achieve recent U.S. Navy ship management concepts geared toward reducing ship manning while improving operational efficiency. This thesis presents an analytical model developed to examine the channel response characteristics and estimated throughput capacity of SPS cables. The work used a multiconductor transmission line theory based approach to model the channel response of SPS distribution lines and estimated the channel throughput capacity using a “water-filling” communication technique. This work found that BPL using the SPS holds a strong potential for use as a communications network for ship communication systems.

Akinnikawe, Ayorinde

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Shipping Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... guide in determining the total cost of your ... with foreign shipments, these prices may not ... Federal Express Gas cylinders (domestic only), $45.00 each. ...

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Office of EERE: International Team  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office of EERE: International Team on AddThis.com... Policy & Analysis Technology-to-Market International International Partnerships & Projects Stakeholder Engagement...

264

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect

This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

AGING BEHAVIOR OF VITON O-RING SEALS IN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is storing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The Pu materials were packaged according to the DOE-STD-3013 standard and shipped to the SRS in Type B 9975 packages. The robust 9975 shipping package was not designed for long-term product storage, but it is a specified part of the storage configuration and the KAMS facility safety basis credits the 9975 design with containment. Within the 9975 package, nested stainless steel containment vessels are closed with dual O-ring seals based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT or GLT-S fluoroelastomer. The aging behavior of the O-ring compounds is being studied to provide the facility with advanced notice of nonconformance and to develop life prediction models. A combination of field surveillance, leak testing of surrogate fixtures aged at bounding service temperatures, and accelerated-aging methodologies based on compression stress-relaxation and oxygen consumption analysis is being used to evaluate seal performance. A summary of the surveillance program relative to seal aging behavior is presented.

Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.; Dunn, K.; Bellamy, S.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

ES-3100: A New Generation Shipping Container for Bulk Highly Enriched Uranium and Other Fissile Materials  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping bulk quantities of surplus fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU), over the next 15 to 20 years for disposition purposes. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container is the package of choice for most of these shipments. However, the 6M does not conform to the Type B packaging requirements in the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10CFR71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the secure transportation system of DOE. BWXT Y-12 is currently developing a package to replace the DOT 6M container for HEU disposition shipping campaigns. The new package is based on state-of-the-art, proven, and patented insulation technologies that have been successfully applied in the design of other packages. The new package, designated the ES-3100, will have a 50% greater capacity for HEU than the 6M and will be easier to use. Engineering analysis on the new package includes detailed dynamic impact finite element analysis (FEA). This analysis gives the ES-3100 a high probability of complying with regulatory requirements.

Arbital, J.G.; Byington, G.A.; Tousley, D.R.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Deployment and Operation of the ES-3100 Type B Shipping Container  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping, for disposition purposes, bulk quantities of fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU). The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container has been the workhorse for NNSA and many other shippers of radioactive material since the 1980s. However, the 6M does not conform to the packaging requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the DOE secure transportation system by the end of 2006. BWXT Y-12 developed and licensed the ES-3100 container to replace the DOT 6M. The ES-3100 was certified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in April 2006. The process of deploying the new package began in June 2005 and is planned to be completed in July 2006. The package will be fully operational and completely replace the DOT 6M at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) by October 2006. This paper reviews the deployment process and the mock loading station that was installed at National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Specialized equipment, tools, and instrumentation that support the handling and loading operations of the ES-3100 are described in detail. Loading options for other user sites are explored in preparation for deployment of this new state-of-the-art shipping container throughout the DOE complex and the private sector.

Arbital, J. G.; Tousley, D. R.: Miller, D. B.

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Documentation for initial testing and inspections of Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to compile data generated during the initial tests and inspections of the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask. In addition, this report will verify that the testing criteria identified in section 8.1 of the BUSS Cask Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) was met. The BUSS Cask Model R-1 is a type B shipping container used for shipment of radioactive cesium-137 and strontium-90 capsules to Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The BUSS Cask body and lid are each one-piece forgings fabricated from ASTM A473, Type 304 stainless steel. The primary purpose of the BUSS Cask is to provide shielding and confinement as well as impact, puncture, and thermal protection for the capsules under both normal and accident conditions. Chapter 8 of the BUSS Cask SARP requires several acceptance tests and inspections, each intended to evaluate the performance of different components of the BUSS Cask system, to be performed before its first use. The results of the tests and inspections required are included in this document.

Lundeen, J.E.

1994-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

REVIEW OF AGING DATA ON EPDM O-RINGS IN THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Currently, all H1616 shipping package containers undergo annual re-verification testing, including containment vessel leak testing to verify leak-tightness (<1 x 10{sup -7} ref cc/sec air) as per ANSI N14.5. The purpose of this literature review is to supplement aging studies currently being performed by SRNL on the EPDM O-rings to provide the technical basis for extending annual re-verification testing for the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. The available data suggest that the EPDM O-rings can retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at or below bounding service temperatures (169 F or 76 C) beyond the 1 year maintenance period. Interpretation of available data suggests that a service life of at least 2 years and potentially 4-6 years may be possible at bounding temperatures. Seal lifetimes at lower, more realistic temperatures will likely be longer. Being a hydrocarbon elastomer, EPDM O-rings may exhibit an inhibition period due to the presence of antioxidants. Once antioxidants are consumed, mechanical properties and seal performance could decline at a faster rate. Testing is being performed to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

Skidmore, E.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

270

PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels for the 9977 shipping package using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum for each isotope generated using the ORIGEN-S and RASTA computer codes was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits contained in 10 CFR 71.47 for dose rate at the surface of the package is determined. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

Nathan, S.

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

International Collaboration on CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (USDOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. The evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration were documented in almost 100 papers and reports, including 18 peer-reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. These efforts were summarized in our project report issued January 2005 and covering the period August 23, 1998-October 23, 2004. An accompanying CD contained electronic copies of all the papers and reports. This report focuses on results of a two-year sub-task to update an environmental assessment of acute marine impacts resulting from direct ocean sequestration. The approach is based on the work of Auerbach et al. [6] and Caulfield et al. [20] to assess mortality to zooplankton, but uses updated information concerning bioassays, an updated modeling approach and three modified injection scenarios: a point release of negatively buoyant solid CO{sub 2} hydrate particles from a moving ship; a long, bottom-mounted diffuser discharging buoyant liquid CO{sub 2} droplets; and a stationary point release of hydrate particles forming a sinking plume. Results suggest that in particular the first two discharge modes could be successfully designed to largely avoid zooplankton mortality. Sub-lethal and ecosystem effects are discussed qualitatively, but not analyzed quantitatively.

Peter H. Israelsson; E. Eric Adams

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

273

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 0.2 ...

274

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 Kuwait ...

275

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.225 0.220 0.231 0.251 ...

276

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.214 0.225 0.220 0.231 ...

277

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 17.1 6.5 3.2 37.8 26.0 10.0 ...

278

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.220 0.213 0.213 0.213 ...

279

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 20.058 19.861 19.295 19.625 ...

280

International Workshop on Metrology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCOPE PROGRAM WORKSHOP FEES LODGING ABSTRACTS DEADLINES BANQUET SPONSORS DIRECTIONSVISITING ARGONNE POSTER SESSION HOME International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 41.1 35.6 30.8 28.1 30.8 31 ...

282

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q ...

283

Internal Curing Bibliography Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... de la Varga, I., Castro, J., Bentz, DP, and Weiss, WJ, Application of Internal Curing for Mixtures Containing High Volumes of Fly Ash, Cement and ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... United States 100.150 ... 180.028 Virgin Islands, U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

286

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix F Internal Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout F-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population...........................................................................................40 Comparison to dose estimates from global fallout

287

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

International Energy Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phadke AAPhadke@lbl.gov (510) 486-6855 Links International Energy Studies Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

289

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

290

International Natural Gas Workshop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Natural Gas Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 and a member of ...

291

Biofuels International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels International Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels International Place Indiana Sector Biofuels Product Pittsburgh based biofuels project developer presently...

292

Three Essays on International Agricultural Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many factors that affect international agricultural trade. One of them is international transportation costs. Another important factor is non-tariff barriers such as sanitary and phytosanitary regulations caused by animal disease outbreaks. The main purpose of this dissertation was to analyze how these factors interfere in the international agricultural trade by examining three cases. In Chapter II, a spatial price equilibrium model of the international cotton sector was utilized to evaluate the effects of the Panama Canal expansion (PCE) on the world cotton industry. Three scenarios were evaluated by reducing ocean freight rates from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports to Asian destinations. All scenarios suggested that cotton exports from U.S. Gulf and Atlantic ports would considerably increase. On the other hand, the West Coast ports decreased its participation in total U.S. cotton exports. Overall, total U.S. cotton exports were expected to increase due to the PCE. By using the same model which was used in Chapter II, the third chapter analyzes port improvements in Brazil. By March of 2012, the port of Salvador is expected to have undergone relevant improvements. As a result, the port of Salvador is expected to attract ocean shipping companies which are willing to export directly to Asian importing markets. Scenarios with different reductions in cotton export cost for this port were examined. In general, results indicated a shift in Brazil cotton export flows from the port of Santos to the port of Salvador as well as an increase in exports and producer revenues for the country. Finally, in Chapter IV, the impacts of the 2005 FMD outbreak on the Brazilian meat market was examined. The imposition of an import ban by Russia on Brazilian meat exports was also investigated. By using time series methods, it was found that the outbreak along with the import ban caused a temporary negative price shock to the Brazilian meat market. Export pork and export chicken prices were found to not fully recover after the removal of the import ban by Russia. On the other hand, the export beef price was indicated to undergo a complete recovery.

Costa, Rafael

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. It should be noted that the SGQ masses presented in this report represent limits that would comply with the external radiation limits under 10CFR Part 71. They do not necessarily bound lower limits that may be required to comply with other factors such as heat load of the package.

Nathan, S.

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for each spectral group. For a given isotope, the source spectrum is folded with the response for each group. The summed contribution from all isotopes determines the total dose from the RAM in the container.

Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

An applied paleoecology case study: Bahia Grande, Texas prior to construction of the Brownsville Ship Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahia Grande is a large lagoon located within Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Cameron County, Texas. When the Brownsville Ship Channel was built along the southern end of the lagoon in 1936, Bahia Grande was cut off from the marine water of Laguna Madre. Since that time, Bahia Grande has been primarily dry with only ephemeral fresh water coming from heavy rainfall events, resulting in a severe decline in biological productivity. A restoration project led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to cut new channels between Bahia Grande and the Ship Channel to restore the connection with Laguna Madre. This is a large-scale project with major implications for the water quality, surrounding ecology, and associated biota in the region. Unfortunately, because very little is known about Bahia Grande prior to isolation, it is difficult to predict whether the results of the restoration will be comparable to the pre-Ship Channel environment. Paleoecological data provide the best opportunity to understand what Bahia Grande was like in the past. This study uses statistical analyses of the molluscan death assemblages from Bahia Grande to gain a better understanding of the environmental conditions in the lagoon before it was isolated. The first question addressed is how does Bahia Grande relate to other water bodies on the Texas coast? This may provide a modern analog to the past conditions in Bahia Grande. The second question inquires whether there are any local patterns or variations within Bahia Grande and several smaller surrounding lagoons. These results provide an important baseline for comparison with the restored lagoon. The results of this investigation show that, in a regional context, Bahia Grande was most similar to Alazan Bay and Baffin Bay, which are mostly enclosed shallow bays with high salinities due to the arid climate and limited freshwater inflow. Within Bahia Grande, there are several distinct molluscan assemblages. Salinity and water coverage are the most likely environmental factors responsible for the differences within Bahia Grande. Additionally, data from surrounding lagoons strongly indicate that some connections with Bahia Grande existed in the past.

Lichlyter, Stephen Alvah

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

297

Comments on “A Statistical Determination of the Random Observational Errors Present in Voluntary Observing Ships’ Meteorological Reports”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy achievable for surface ship pressure reports and the sources of error in them are discussed. In The Met Office numerical weather prediction (NWP) system the error is estimated as 1 hPa, whereas Kent et al. calculated a figure of ...

N. Bruce Ingleby

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Spectral Ice Habit Prediction System (SHIPS). Part I: Model Description and Simulation of the Vapor Deposition Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Spectral Ice Habit Prediction System (SHIPS), which represents a continuous-property approach to microphysics simulation in an Eulerian cloud-resolving model (CRM). A two-moment hybrid-bin method is adopted to predict the ...

T. Hashino; G. J. Tripoli

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Measurements of Surface Seawater fCO2 from Volunteer Commercial Ships: Techniques and Experiences from Skaugran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical measurements made in the northern North Pacific from a commercial volunteer observing ship (VOS) program during March 1995–March 1998 are presented. Quasi-continuous measurements of the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2, which takes into account the ...

Paulette P. Murphy; Y. Nojiri; Y. Fujinuma; C. S. Wong; J. Zeng; T. Kimoto; H. Kimoto

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks, Appendix 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Fabrication Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contributing to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed. Shipping cask costs are provided.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydroelastic optimization of a keel fin of a sailing boat: a multidisciplinary robust formulation for ship design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a formulation for multidisciplinary design optimization of vessels, subject to uncertain operating conditions. The formulation couples the multidisciplinary design analysis with the Bayesian approach to decision problems affected by ... Keywords: Hydroelastic optimization, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), Robust Design Optimization (RDO), Ship design

Matteo Diez; Daniele Peri; Giovanni Fasano; Emilio F. Campana

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 6, 2011 October 6, 2011 Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped Waste Decades Ago IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for disposal both above and below ground. Now, some of those who sent the Cold War weapons waste to Idaho are helping identify the waste in pits dug up for the first time in more than 40 years. Pit 9 is the most recently completed buried waste exhumation project at INL's Radioactive Waste Management Complex. About $12 million in savings from the Idaho site's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup contributed to the project, which was

303

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiation Scanning Methods for Ship-to-Rail Intermodal Cargo Containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) runs the Rail Test Center (RTC) at the Port of Tacoma (POT). The RTC affords DNDO with the opportunity to test radiological and nuclear threat detection systems associated with the unique on-dock rail environment while in an operational seaport. DNDO selected the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to manage the RTC. The RTC is conducting various evaluation studies to assess scanning opportunities in terms of their affects on the num-ber of container moves required and the affect that the scanning opportunity has on the time it takes to move a container through the on-dock transfer process from ship to rail. The velocity and the number of container moves are directly associated with incremental costs to the terminal operators; increases in either of these parameters help in-form the potential for incremental costs that would result from the implementation of the opportunity.

Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Stansbury, Paul S.; Taira, Randal Y.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Collins, Robert

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

Britton, Jr.; Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGES 9975-01968, 9975-04353 AND 9975-06870  

SciTech Connect

Three 9975 shipping packages were examined to investigate the non-conforming condition of an axial air gap greater than 1 inch. This condition typically indicates the presence of excess moisture in the fiberboard overpack, and may be accompanied by degradation in the fiberboard properties. In the case of these three packages, no excess moisture was present, and the fiberboard was not visibly degraded. However, the lower fiberboard assembly from 9975-06870 was separated into two pieces. The lead shield from 9975-04353 was heavily corroded, while the shield from 9975-01968 had very little corrosion. In the case of 9975-06870, the shield was covered by a stainless steel sleeve, and the condition of the lead was not observed. No other conditions of concern were observed in these three packages.

Daugherty, W.

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

The PEACE PIPE: Recycling nuclear weapons into a TRU storage/shipping container  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes results of a contract undertaken by the National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to fabricate stainless steel ``pipe`` containers for use in certification testing at Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque to qualify the container for both storage of transuranic (TRU) waste at RFETS and other DOE sites and shipping of the waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). The paper includes a description of the nearly ten-fold increase in the amount of contained plutonium enabled by the product design, the preparation and use of former nuclear weapons facilities to fabricate the components, and the rigorous quality assurance and test procedures that were employed. It also describes how stainless steel nuclear weapons components can be converted into these pipe containers, a true ``swords into plowshare`` success story.

Floyd, D.; Edstrom, C. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp. (United States); Biddle, K.; Orlowski, R. [BNFL, Inc. (United States); Geinitz, R. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Keenan, K. [USDOE-RFFO (United States); Rivera, M. [Science Applications International Corp./LATA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for naval ships. Final report. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corporation and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. These new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships. An addendum to the original study describes the assessment of the performance of the advanced ballast system with a new F-17 fluorescent lamp. The results indicate the system performs reliably and shows increased efficacy. This new lamp/ballast system reduces the harmonic content to within Navy limits, and improves the power factor, resulting in a 50% reduction in line current.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Dumm, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

International energy annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

International Energy Statistics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics > Countries > International Energy Statistics International Energy Statistics Petroleum Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Reserves | Imports | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Exports | CO2 Emissions | Heat Content Natural Gas All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Coal All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Electricity Generation | Consumption | Capacity | Imports | Net Imports | Exports | Distribution Losses | Heat Content Renewables Electricity Generation| Electricity Consumption | Biofuels Production | Biofuels Consumption | Heat Content Total Energy

313

International maritime organization : rethinking marine environmental policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As environmentalism has swept into political prominence, influencing the environmental policy of developed nations, the IMO- the UN dedicated legislator of the shipping industry- has been increasingly faced with challenges ...

Hadjistassou, Constantinos Kyprou

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Towards a legal regime for limiting ship-source greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the 55th meeting of the International Maritime Organisationâs (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) in October 2006, the Committee noted that the impact of… (more)

Paul, Daniel Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Renewable Energy Resources Inc formerly Internal Hydro International Inc |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Hydro International Inc Internal Hydro International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33603 Sector Hydro Product Internal Hydro's technology takes waste, pumped pressures of fluids, gases or the constantly available natural flows of water and extracts power from them via a turbine. References Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) is a company located in Tampa, Florida . References ↑ "Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro

316

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

317

Essays in international finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of three essays on exchange rate policies and international capital flows in emerging markets. The first chapter examines the theoretical foundations of the "fear of floating" that has been ...

Jones, Geraint Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: Wells, Peggy Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041

320

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: PE7 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: AM4 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

322

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

324

MotorMaster+ International  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motors with MotorMaster+ International * Are your plant motor systems running at optimal energy efficiency? * Do you know how to cost-effectively determine whether to repair or...

325

INTERNAL FRICTION TO BERYLLIUM  

SciTech Connect

The internal friction in Be wire specimens was measured using a simple, inverted, torsional-pendulum system. Temperatures at liquid nitrogen to 735 deg C at a frequency of about 1 cps were used. (R.E.U.)

Ang, C.; Kamber, K.T.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Solar Power International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solar Power International (SPI) will be held October 21-24 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. The event attracts more than 15,000 professionals in solar energy and related fields and offers...

327

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

328

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

329

Mentors - Intern's First Week  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with orientation, safety training, meetings with the program administrator, a lecture, tour and settling into the workplace. By the end of the week, you should be sure your intern...

330

(International meetings on ecology)  

SciTech Connect

the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Internal Dose Assessment (IDA) Spreadsheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Internal Dose Assessment (IDA) Spreadsheet is to calculate internal occupational dose following the methodology described in the EPRI Alpha Monitoring Guidelines.

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

334

Spent Nuclear Fuel Trasportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository (if licensed) in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge--to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned. The objective of this lessons learned study was to identify successful, best-in-class trends and commonalities from past shipping campaigns, which OCRWM could consider when planning for the development and operation of a repository transportation system. Note: this paper is for analytical and discussion purposes only, and is not an endorsement of, or commitment by, OCRWM to follow any of the comments or trends. If OCRWM elects to make such commitments at a future time, they will be appropriately documented in formal programmatic policy statements, plans and procedures. Reviewers examined an extensive study completed in 2003 by DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP), Office of Environmental Management (EM), as well as plans and documents related to SNF shipments since issuance of the NTP report. OCRWM examined specific planning, business, institutional and operating practices that have been identified by DOE, its transportation contractors, and stakeholders as important issues that arise repeatedly. In addition, the review identifies lessons learned or activities/actions which were found not to be productive to the planning and conduct of SNF shipments (i.e., negative impacts). This paper is a 'looking back' summary of lessons learned across multiple transportation campaigns. Not all lessons learned are captured here, and participants in some of the campaigns have divergent opinions and perspectives about which lessons are most critical. This analysis is part of a larger OCRWM benchmarking effort to identify best practices to consider in future transportation of radioactive materials ('looking forward'). Initial findings from this comprehensive benchmarking analysis are expected to be available in late fall 2006.

M. Keister; K, McBride

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

337

Ship-Mounted Real-Time Surface Observational System on board Indian Vessels for Validation and Refinement of Model Forcing Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of ship-mounted real-time Automatic Weather Stations integrated with Indian geosynchronous satellites [Indian National Satellites (INSATs)] 3A and 3C, named Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services Real-Time Automatic ...

R. Harikumar; T. M. Balakrishnan Nair; G. S. Bhat; Shailesh Nayak; Venkat Shesu Reddem; S. S. C. Shenoi

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Effect of Inaccuracies in Weather-Ship Data on Bulk-Derived Estimates of Flux, Stability and Sea-Surface Roughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical error analysis (or sensitivity study) is performed for the momentum, heat, and humidity flux estimates made from weather-ship observations by using the bulk flux method. Bulk-derived stability and roughness errors are also examined. ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

international | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

international international Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from the best available solar resource datasets available to NREL by country. These vary in spatial resolution from 1 km to 1 degree (approximately 100 km) depending on the data source. High spatial resolution datasets (1 km to 40 km cells) were modeled to support country or regional projects. Where high resolution datasets were not available, data from NASA's Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) version 6 database were used. The data represents total potential solar energy per year as a function of land area per solar class (KWh/m²/day). Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity clean energy energy international

340

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

342

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

343

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

344

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

345

International energy annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

348

INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

Russell, W.H. Jr.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O' STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Safety analysis report vitrified high level waste type B shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report describes the design, analyses, and principle features of the Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) Cask. In preparing this report a detailed evaluation of the design has been performed to ensure that all safety, licensing, and operational goals for the cask and its associated Department of Energy program can be met. The functions of this report are: (1) to fully document that all functional and regulatory requirements of 10CFR71 can be met by the package; and (2) to document the design and analyses of the cask for review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The VHLW Cask is the reusable shipping package designed by GNSI under Department of Energy contract DE-AC04-89AL53-689 for transportation of Vitrified High Level Waste, and to meet the requirements for certification under 10CFR71 for a Type B(U) package. The VHLW cask has been designed as packaging for transport of canisters of Vitrified High Level Waste solidified at Department of Energy facilities.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO CLOSURE TORQUES AND SEQUENTIAL IMPACTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a finite-element technique to simulate the structural responses and to evaluate the cumulative damage of a radioactive material packaging requiring bolt closure-tightening torque and subjected to the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR71). Existing finite-element methods for modeling closure stresses from bolt pre-load are not readily adaptable to dynamic analyses. The HAC events are required to occur sequentially per 10CFR71 and thus the evaluation of the cumulative damage is desirable. Generally, each HAC event is analyzed separately and the cumulative damage is partially addressed by superposition. This results in relying on additional physical testing to comply with 10CFR71 requirements for assessment of cumulative damage. The proposed technique utilizes the combination of kinematic constraints, rigid-body motions and structural deformations to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in modeling the effect of cumulative damage. This methodology provides improved numerical solutions in compliance with the 10CFR71 requirements for sequential HAC tests. Analyses were performed for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) designed by Savannah River National Laboratory to demonstrate the applications of the technique. The methodology proposed simulates the closure bolt torque preload followed by the sequential HAC events, the 30-foot drop and the 30-foot dynamic crush. The analytical results will be compared to the package test data.

Wu, T; Paul Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

SCAVENGING OF PARTICULATE MATTER IN CONNECTION WITH NUCLEAR-POWERED SHIPS. Final Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect

The work carried out over a 2 1/2-yr period on the scavenging of radioactive particles which might be released by the reactor system of a nuclear- powered ship is summarized. Two types of dispersions were considered: aerosols and hydrosols. Radioactive aerosols were scavenged by heterogeneous coagulation with solid and liquid aerosols produced within the radioactive aerosol cloud. Liquid or highly hygroscopic particles, which can be classified as solid particles with liquld films on their surfaces, were found to be the most effective scavengers. A system of fine water spray and hydrolysis products of silicon tetrafluoride was found to be suitable for field application. Scavenging of radioactive cations, anions, and colloids of corrosion and fission products was studied in substitute ocean water, natural ocean water, and natural harbor water. A scavenging system composed of KMnO/sub 4/ and ferrous salts successfully removed most of the radioisotopes. Fe(OH)/sub 3/--MnO/sub 2/ hydrate adsorbed and absorbed radioactive species, thus transferring them from a liquid to a solid phase. Addition of Floc 111 to the system improved sedimentation. The KMnO/sub 4/-FeSO/sub 4/-Floc 111 system was found to bs suitable for field application. (auth)

Rosinski, J.

1960-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in dioxin-contaminated sediments from the Houston ship channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Port of Houston and the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) are highly industrialized areas along Galveston Bay, Texas. The HSC is highly polluted with a host of persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. The main objective of this study was to determine the potential for in situ bioremediation in the HSC sediments. Our study focused on the bacterial group Dehalococcoides, since it is the only known group to reductively dechlorinate dioxins. Culture independent methods were used to determine the presence or absence of Dehalococcoides in HSC sediments. Molecular methods including PCR, cloning, restriction enzyme digest, and sequencing were used to determine the diversity of Dehalococcoides as well as total bacterial diversity in HSC sediments. The metabolically active members of the microbial community in HSC sediments were also determined using the same molecular methods as described above. Dehalococcoides was detected in every sediment core and at various depths within each core. Depths ranged from 1cm (SG-6) to 30cm (11261). Dehalococcoides diversity was centered on Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 and Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. Overall bacterial diversity in HSC sediments was dominated by Proteobacteria, especially Deltaproteobacteria, and Chloroflexi, which include Dehalococcoides. Total bacterial diversity at a wetlands control site was dominated by Betaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were determined to be the major metabolically active groups within the HSC sediments. These findings indicate that the HSC sediments have great potential for successful in situ bioremediation. These results also support the use of Dehalococcoides as a biological proxy for dioxin contamination.

Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes  

SciTech Connect

The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

Manson, S.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering; Gianoulakis, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Darrell Kicker International Exchange Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International University Doshisha University Hakuoh University Hiroshima University Hiroshima City University

357

The development of short sea shipping in the United States : a dynamic alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current projections show that U.S. international trade is expected to reach nearly two billion tons by 2020, approximately double today's level. With such a large forecasted growth in trade coming through the United States ...

Connor, Peter H. (Peter Harold)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

International Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation. Collaboration with governmental, academic, and industrial organizations in other countries expands the technical depth of the EM program. Working with the international community offers the opportunity to develop consensus on approaches to science, technology and policy for environmental

359

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ENGINEERING InternatIonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and multilateral, for example, the asian development Bank, International atomic energy agency (united nations and the Sydney cBd, our city campus is easily accessible by bus and train. close to cosmopolitan inner-city suburbs such as glebe, Surry Hills and darling Harbour, the city campus is surrounded by places to shop

University of Technology, Sydney

362

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International CLIVAR Project Office, CLIVAR Publication Series No. 98. (not peer reviewed) #12;3 CONTENTS Part 1, are they predictable and how will they be affected by climate change? The goals of the workshop were to review, and its role in recent southern hemisphere climate change was reviewed. Measures of the SAM were also

Quartly, Graham

363

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

International Children's Book Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Children's Book Day April 2nd 2013 Folktales Storytelling & wORKSHOP By Barry Stewart, Lobby 2pm ­ 3 pm: UF Smathers Library, Room 1A Books with WingsBy Peter Sís 7pm ­ 9pm: PK Yonge Performing Arts Center 1080 SW 11th Street, Gainesville Peter Sís Award Winning Children's Book Author

Watson, Craig A.

365

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

368

A Study of Stranding of Juvenile Salmon by Ship Wakes Along the Lower Columbia River Using a Before-and-After Design: Before-Phase Results  

SciTech Connect

Ship wakes produced by deep-draft vessels transiting the lower Columbia River have been observed to cause stranding of juvenile salmon. Proposed deepening of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about the potential impact of the deepening project on juvenile salmon stranding. The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory design and conduct a study to assess stranding impacts that may be associated with channel deepening. The basic study design was a multivariate analysis of covariance of field observations and measurements under a statistical design for a before and after impact comparison. We have summarized field activities and statistical analyses for the ?before? component of the study here. Stranding occurred at all three sampling sites and during all three sampling seasons (Summer 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005), for a total of 46 stranding events during 126 observed vessel passages. The highest occurrence of stranding occurred at Barlow Point, WA, where 53% of the observed events resulted in stranding. Other sites included Sauvie Island, OR (37%) and County Line Park, WA (15%). To develop an appropriate impact assessment model that accounted for relevant covariates, regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationships between stranding probability and other factors. Nineteen independent variables were considered as potential factors affecting the incidence of juvenile salmon stranding, including tidal stage, tidal height, river flow, current velocity, ship type, ship direction, ship condition (loaded/unloaded), ship speed, ship size, and a proxy variable for ship kinetic energy. In addition to the ambient and ship characteristics listed above, site, season, and fish density were also considered. Although no single factor appears as the primary factor for stranding, statistical analyses of the covariates resulted in the following equations: (1) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height + Salmonid Density + Kinetic energy proxy ? Tidal Height + Tidal Height x Salmonid Density. (2) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Total Wave Distance + Salmonid Density Index. (3) Log(Total Wave Height) {approx} Ship Block + Tidal Height + Location + Ship Speed. (4) Log(Total Wave Excursion Across the Beach) {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height The above equations form the basis for a conceptual model of the factors leading to salmon stranding. The equations also form the basis for an approach for assessing impacts of dredging under the before/after study design.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, J R.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Miller, Martin C.; Johnson, Gary E.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. Operating costs of a salt cavern terminal are lower than tank based terminals because ''boil off'' is eliminated and maintenance costs of caverns are lower than LNG tanks. Phase II included the development of offshore mooring designs, wave tank tests, high pressure LNG pump field tests, heat exchanger field tests, and development of a model offshore LNG facility and cavern design. Engineers designed a model facility, prepared equipment lists, and confirmed capital and operating costs. In addition, vendors quoted fabrication and installation costs, confirming that an offshore salt cavern based LNG terminal would have lower capital and operating costs than a similarly sized offshore tank based terminal. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or purposeful damage, and much more acceptable to the community. More than thirty industry participants provided cost sharing, technical expertise, and guidance in the conduct and evaluation of the field tests, facility design and operating and cost estimates. Their close participation has accelerated the industry's acceptance of the conclusions of this research. The industry participants also developed and submitted several alternative designs for offshore mooring and for high pressure LNG heat exchangers in addition to those that were field tested in this project. HNG Storage, a developer, owner, and operator of natural gas storage facilities, and a participant in the DOE research has announced they will lead the development of the first offshore salt cavern based LNG import facility. Which will be called the Freedom LNG Terminal. It will be located offshore Louisiana, and is expected to be jointly developed with other members of the research group yet to be named. An offshore port license application is scheduled to be filed by fourth quarter 2005 and the terminal could be operational by 2009. This terminal allows the large volume importa

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an evaluation of the cask handling capabilities of those reactors which are operating or under construction. A computerized data base that includes cask handling information was developed with information from the literature and utility-supplied data. The capability of each plant to receive and handle existing spent fuel shipping casks was then evaluated. Modal fractions were then calculated based on the results of these evaluations and the quantities of spent fuel projected to be generated by commercial nuclear power plants through 1998. The results indicated that all plants are capable of receiving and handling truck casks. Up to 118 out of 130 reactors (91%) could potentially handle the larger and heavier rail casks if the maximum capability of each facility is utilized. Design and analysis efforts and physical modifications to some plants would be needed to achieve this high rail percentage. These modifications would be needed to satisfy regulatory requirements, increase lifting capabilities, develop rail access, or improve other deficiencies. The remaining 12 reactors were determined to be capable of handling only the smaller truck casks. The percentage of plants that could receive and handle rail casks in the near-term would be reduced to 64%. The primary reason for a plant to be judged incapable of handling rail casks in the near-term was a lack of rail access. The remaining 36% of the plants would be limited to truck shipments. The modal fraction calculations indicated that up to 93% of the spent fuel accumulated by 1998 could be received at federal storage or disposal facilities via rail (based on each plant's maximum capabilities). If the near-term cask handling capabilities are considered, the rail percentage is reduced to 62%.

Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Lezberg, A.J.; Votaw, E.F.; Collingham, M.I.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Determing Degradation Of Fiberboard In The 9975 Shipping Package By Measuring Axial Gap  

SciTech Connect

Currently, thousands of model 9975 transportation packages are in use by the US Department of Energy (DOE); the design of which has been certified by DOE for shipment of Type B radioactive and fissile materials in accordance with Part 71, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), or 10 CFR 71, Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. These transportation packages are also approved for the storage of DOE-STD-3013 containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As such, the 9975 has been continuously exposed to the service environment for a period of time greater than the approved transportation service life. In order to ensure the material integrity as specified in the safety basis, an extensive surveillance program is in place in K-Area Complex (KAC) to monitor the structural and thermal properties of the fiberboard of the 9975 shipping packages. The surveillance approach uses a combination of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) field surveillance and Destructive Examination (DE) lab testing to validate the 9975 performance assumptions. The fiberboard in the 9975 is credited with thermal insulation, criticality control and resistance to crushing. During surveillance monitoring in KAC, an increased axial gap of the fiberboard was discovered on selected items packaged at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Many of these packages were later found to contain excess moisture. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the fiberboard under storage conditions and during transport. In laboratory testing, the higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction of fiberboard material and compaction rate. The fiberboard height is reduced by compression of the layers. This change is observed directly in the axial gap between the flange and the air shield. The axial gap measurement is made during the pre-use inspection or during the annual recertification process and is a screening measurement for changes in the fiberboard.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

373

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

374

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

376

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

377

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

378

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

379

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

380

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Internal Resources Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Budget Budget Proposals Human Resources Administration Internal Resources Administration--Includes an Administrative Services Directory and an A-Z index. Budget - Contacts Employee Talent Profile System--A system, launched by Jay Keasling in late 2012, populated with profiles of both scientists and non-scientists, meant to be a resource for the creation of teams across the Biosciences Area and the persue of collective funding opportunities both internal and external to the Laboratory. Complete your profile and look for more system enhancements in the coming year. Equipment List (viewable by Berkeley Lab staff only) -- A list of equipment used in the Life Sciences Division. Several equipment needs training prior to use, therefore, please always contact the person responsible if interested in using the equipment. If listed as a contact on

382

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides current data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

International Politics of Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to ratify the Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Comprehensive Test Ban treaties, Bhutan has also not ratified them. Bhutan supported India’s nuclear test in 1998. Journal of Bhutan Studies 106 Conclusions In conclusion we could say that no single... characterized by its close and intimate relationship with India. It agreed to be advised by India in international affairs. A treaty to this effect was signed in 1949 (Rose 1977, 77), before the country abandoned its isolation, but took on importance only...

Galay, Karma

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

International petroleum statistics report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international data. The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent 12 months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Loading ...

389

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Ref.: 10-35/PDG/IRS/HQ Post ­Doctoral Appointment, Peru. The Center: CIP is a not-for-profit international agricultural research organization

Wang, Z. Jane

390

Hanford internal dosimetry program manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: International Activities Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection Agency, Millennium Challenge Corporation, Overseas Private Development Investment Corporation, as well as numerous international sponsors and partners, including the...

392

Young Leader International Scholar Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ESSENTIALS. MEMBERS ... The chosen International Scholars also spend a few days visiting select industrial facilities, research labs, or universities.

393

Internal absorber solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

Sletten, Carlyle J. (106 Nagog Hill Rd., Acton, MA 01720); Herskovitz, Sheldon B. (88 Hammond St., Acton, MA 01720); Holt, F. S. (46 Emerson Rd., Winchester, MA 01890); Sletten, E. J. (Chestnut Hill Rd. R.F.D. Rte. #4, Amherst, NH 03031)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

International energy annual, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

396

International energy annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An improvement to an internal combustion engine is disclosed that has a fuel system for feeding a fuel-air mixture to the combustion chambers and an electrical generation system, such as an alternator. An electrolytic cell is attached adjacent to the engine to generate hydrogen and oxygen upon the application of a voltage between the cathode and anode of the electrolytic cell. The gas feed connects the electrolytic cell to the engine fuel system for feeding the hydrogen and oxygen to the engine combustion chambers. Improvements include placing the electrolytic cell under a predetermined pressure to prevent the electrolyte from boiling off, a cooling system for the electrolytic cell and safety features.

Valdespino, J.M.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

International Space Station Again  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the fifth time in 2 1/2 years, the International Space Station (ISS) had to execute a collision avoidance maneuver in early April to ensure a safe miss distance for a piece of orbital debris. As solar activity increases during the next few years, the frequency of ISS collision avoidance might increase as many hundreds of resident space objects drift down through the ISS orbital regime. The subject of concern in late March 2011 was a fragment from Cosmos 2251, the Russian communications satellite which had accidentally collided with the U.S. Iridium 33 communications satellite in February 2009, producing more than

Iss Airlock Shields; A Note On Active; A Publication Of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

International petroleum statistics report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This monthly publication provides international oil data for January 1998. The report presents data on oil production, demand, imports, and stocks in four sections. Section 1 containes time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 containes annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

402

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

403

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

404

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

International Clean Energy Coalition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1084 through 1994.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Understanding Lustre Internals  

SciTech Connect

Lustre was initiated and funded, almost a decade ago, by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) Office of Science and National Nuclear Security Administration laboratories to address the need for an open source, highly-scalable, high-performance parallel filesystem on by then present and future supercomputing platforms. Throughout the last decade, it was deployed over numerous medium-to-large-scale supercomputing platforms and clusters, and it performed and met the expectations of the Lustre user community. As it stands at the time of writing this document, according to the Top500 list, 15 of the top 30 supercomputers in the world use Lustre filesystem. This report aims to present a streamlined overview on how Lustre works internally at reasonable details including relevant data structures, APIs, protocols and algorithms involved for Lustre version 1.6 source code base. More importantly, it tries to explain how various components interconnect with each other and function as a system. Portions of this report are based on discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lustre Center of Excellence team members and portions of it are based on our own understanding of how the code works. We, as the authors team bare all responsibilities for all errors and omissions in this document. We can only hope it helps current and future Lustre users and Lustre code developers as much as it helped us understanding the Lustre source code and its internal workings.

Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [ORNL; Wang, Di [ORNL; Huang, He [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

412

International Truck | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truck Truck Jump to: navigation, search Name International Truck Place Atlanta, GA Website http://www.internationaltruck. References International Truck[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2007 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Truck is a company located in Atlanta, GA. References ↑ "International Truck" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Truck&oldid=381698" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

413

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International | National Nuclear Security Administration International | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > International International U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

414

International Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Programs International Programs International Programs The Office of Environmental Management (EM) International Program seeks out international technical experts to support EM's mission of accelerated risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To achieve this, EM pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of the U.S. Department of Energy. The EM International Program currently works with the Russian Federation and Ukraine through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission. The EM International Program is also currently evaluating the potential benefits

415

International Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Team International Team International Team The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) International Team advances the progress of EERE's domestic programs and accelerates global deployment of U.S. clean energy products and services through international collaboration. To realize the benefits of international collaboration, we coordinate with other offices in the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. government agencies to identify, negotiate and actively manage targeted partnerships and projects that help advance our strategic goals. The collaborative research we support is either in the "pre-competitive" space or includes intellectual property issues that have been agreed upon in advance. All funds support U.S.-based project performers or international organizations

416

Western Ledge Reef Wreck: The Analysis and Reconstruction of the Late 16th-Century Ship of the Spanish Empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Ledge Reef Wreck, discovered and later excavated in Bermuda between 1989 and 1991, is a prime example of Iberian shipbuilding within a broader Atlantic context. Operating during the late 16th-century, arguably one of the most fascinating periods of Spanish maritime history, the ship epitomizes the culture and technology identified with the celebrated fleets of the Carrera de Indias. By combining the new and previously unavailable data with that of the original reports, this dissertation outlines the structural details of this small utilitarian vessel which plowed the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and the Spanish America. Regarded as one of the better preserved Iberian shipwrecks in the New World, the hull timbers were disassembled and raised to the surface for detailed recording and analysis; the most comprehensive being the study and reconstruction presented in this dissertation. This data not only illustrates the transition from late medieval ship construction founded on the unempirical and intuitive style of local shipwrights to that of the geometrically- and scientific-rooted Renaissance design philosophy, but also to a frame-led assembly sequence. The hull remains and associated cultural material excavated from the site prove to be an important 16th- and 17th-century collection of Spanish and New World origin, which collectively reinforce the notion that the Western Ledge Reef Wreck was on its homebound course when it sunk among treacherous Bermuda reefs sometime between 1560 and 1600.

Bojakowski, Piotr

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A shipping crate from the 1865 California shipwreck Brother Jonathan: hardware from the Russell and Erwin Manufacturing Company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the summer of 2000, divers recovered a large shipping crate from the wreck of the Brother Jonathan, a steamboat that sank off of Crescent City, California on 30 July 1865. Ownership of the crate was taken over by the state of California and was sent to Texas A&MÂ?s Conservation Research Laboratory for excavation and conservation. As soon as work began, it became clear that the crate contained a shipment of a variety of hardware most likely destined for a general store as each of the artifacts discovered was found in high quantities. Also, there was a wide variety of artifacts discovered, tools, architectural pieces, food preparation, fur trapping, and personal items. The crate was shipped from San Francisco from the warehouse of the Russell and Erwin Manufacturing Company; however, its final destination is unknown. Records for this warehouse and for the boat were destroyed in the earthquake and fire of 1906, so the destination for these goods is purely speculative. Using information from the excavation of the crate and a historical analysis of the contents led to a plausible theory. After careful review, it seems most likely that the crate was intended for a general store in a small town with a rural customer base.

Sowden, Carrie Elizabeth

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

International Electricity Trade - Open Access | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Electricity Trade - Open Access International Electricity Trade - Open Access DOE has consistently expressed its policy that international electricity trade should be...

419

Florida International University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive Contact Florida International University Professors and Faculty of Interest Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle against Neuro-AIDS Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Exceptional Students and Alumnus DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional De DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional Development Corps

420

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix C Appendix C A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union, the petroleum transportation networks in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan were designed to provide petroleum to the internal Soviet economy and, in particular, to meet the Soviet militaryÂ’s need for petroleum [1]. Investment in the Caspian Basin petroleum transportation system was, however, severely deficient. In order for the producers in the Caspian Sea area to become major petroleum exporters, existing petroleum transport lines, which generally head northward into Russia, will need upgrading. More importantly, new lines will need to be built to transport Caspian Sea oil to export markets, in some combination of westward to the Mediterranean,

422

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

423

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

424

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

425

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

426

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

427

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

428

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

429

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

430

International Agreements Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITRATIOAL ITRATIOAL AGREE MENT~S/ MITMES SEREARY SAME W. BDAN JANUARY 205-EEME 2008o Page 1 of 1 Matthews, Carol From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 2:52 PM To: Nicoll, Eric; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements Attachments: Agreements - 1979 to Present.pdf Here's on electronic version of what PI provided............. From: Nicoll, Eric Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:40 AM To: Morman, Laurie; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements OK then we will not include the ones which have come up here. Thanks. Did they organize it by year? From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:38 AM To: Nicoll, Eric; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements PI has already provided the International agreements.

431

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

432

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

433

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

434

Internal Program Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Advanced Applications Research & Development (AARD) Internal Program Review 27-28 June 2013 Washington, DC Joe Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Lab DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Management Review Topics  Project objective  Major technical accomplishments that will be completed this year  Deliverables and schedule for activities to be completed under FY13 funding  Risk factors affecting timely completion of planned activities as well as movement through RD&D cycle  Early thoughts on follow-on work that should be considered for funding in FY14 3 Management Review Issues  RD&D stage of the project: - Theoretical study-proof of concept - Modeling/simulation-using real data?

435

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA's international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Pro- jections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

436

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

437

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

438

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

439

International Oil and Gas Board International Oil and Gas Board...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Board International Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Abu Dhabi http www abudhabi ae...

440

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Jordan ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Shipping Remote Handled Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An Operational Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On January 18, 2007, the first ever shipment of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) waste left the gate at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), headed toward the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal, thus concluding one of the most stressful, yet rewarding, periods the authors have ever experienced. The race began in earnest on October 16, 2006, with signature of the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary's Final Order, ruling that the '..draft permit as changed is hereby approved in its entirety.' This established the effective date of the approved permit as November 16, 2006. The permit modification was a consolidation of several Class 3 modification requests, one of which included incorporation of RH TRU requirements and another of which incorporated the requirements of Section 311 of Public Law 108-137. The obvious goal was to complete the first shipment by November 17. While many had anticipated its approval, the time had finally come to actually implement, and time seemed to be the main item lacking. At that point, even the most aggressive schedule that could be seriously documented showed a first ship date in March 2007. Even though planning for this eventuality had started in May 2005 with the arrival of the current Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) contractor (and even before that), there were many facility and system modifications to complete, startup authorizations to fulfill, and many regulatory audits and approvals to obtain before the first drum could be loaded. Through the dedicated efforts of the ICP workers, the partnership with Department of Energy (DOE) - Idaho, the coordinated integration with the Central Characterization Project (CCP), the flexibility and understanding of the regulatory community, and the added encouragement of DOE - Carlsbad Field Office and at Headquarters, the first RH TRU canister was loaded on December 22, 2006. Following final regulatory approval on January 17, 2007, the historic event finally occurred the following day. While some of the success of this endeavor can be attributed to the sheer will and determination of the individuals involved, the fact that it was established and managed as a separate sub-project under the ICP, accounts for a majority of the success. Utilizing a structured project management approach, including development of, and management to, a performance baseline, allowed for timely decision making and the flexibility to adapt to changing conditions as the various aspects of the project matured. This paper provides some insight into how this was achieved, in a relatively short time, and provides an overview of the experience of start-up of a new retrieval, characterization, loading, and transportation operation in the midst of an aggressive cleanup project. Additionally, as one might expect, everything within the project did not go as planned, which provides a great opportunity to discuss some lessons learned. Finally, the first shipment was just the beginning. There are 224 additional shipments scheduled. In keeping with the theme of WM 2008, Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, this paper will address the future opportunities and challenges of RH TRU waste management at the INL. (authors)

Anderson, S.; Bradford, J.; Clements, T.; Crisp, D.; Sherick, M. [CH2M-WG Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); D'Amico, E. [Washington TRU Solutions, Denver, CO (United States); Lattin, W. [United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, K. [United States Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only Charge to Department USPS First Class Mail International International Metered Mail Form and must be kept separate from all other domestic mail. · International mail

Palmeri, Thomas

443

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

444

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

445

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

446

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

447

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D4. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 23.5 23.2 22.9 22.9 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.7 18.8 18.4 17.7 17.4 17.5 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 0.2 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 1.4 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.1 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.7 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.3 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 44.6 44.3 43.8 43.6 43.8 44.3 -0.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

448

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

449

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

450

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.2 29.2 31.3 33.4 35.1 37.0 39.4 41.6 1.2 United States a 22.9 23.8 25.3 26.3 26.9 27.6 28.7 29.5 0.7 Canada 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 1.7 Mexico/Chile 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.5 4.3 5.1 6.1 7.2 3.6 OECD Europe 18.8 19.8 19.7 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.7 OECD Asia 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 1.3 Japan 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.2 5.2 1.0 South Korea 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.5 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.7 Total OECD 53.2 55.6 58.2 61.5 64.4 68.0 72.1 76.0 1.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 19.8 21.8

451

Degradation of Steam Generator Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Regulatory Perspective on Industry's Response to Generic Letter 97-06, " Degradation of Steam Generator Internals" by S. Coffin, M. Subudhi, ...

452

Operations Management International, Inc. Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The remainder are industrial and international customers. ... The company's policy is to hire workers formerly ... but it quickly becomes an inclusive affair. ...

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

453

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

454

Kousa International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Los Angeles, California Zip 90010 Sector Wind energy Product Los Angeles-based wind tower manufacturer. References Kousa International1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

455

International Quality Assurance Standards (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tests to make quantitative predictions about photovoltaic (PV) modules are needed. This presentation proposes the creation of international quality assurance standards for PV modules.

Kurtz, S.; Hacke, P.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Yamamichi, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Geopolitics, History, and International Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Redundancy Problem: Why More Nuclear Security Forces MayProduce Less Nuclear Security", Risk Analysis 24(4): 935–and international security, eco- nomic development, nuclear

Robinson, William I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW1 8LH Sector Carbon Product London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change....

458

International Natural Gas Workshop Presnetations  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Session 2: European Natural Gas Outlook: ... Impact of U.S. LNG on International Gas Prices Philip Q Hanser, The Brattle Group PDF: Speaker Biographies: PDF:

459

BBI International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name BBI International Place Salida, Colorado Zip 81201 Sector Biofuels Product Information service provider for the Biofuels industry. Is developing 2...

460

Prescience International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Zip 94102 Product String representation "San Francisco b ... ging companies." is too long. References Prescience International1 LinkedIn Connections...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international shipping marpol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

462

NREL: International Activities - Multilateral Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21st Century Power Partnership, the Clean Energy Solutions Center, and the International Smart Grid Action Network. Clean Energy Solutions Center NREL operates the Clean Energy...

463

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sitesallmodulescontribredisredis.autoload.inc). You are here Home International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 International Nuclear Energy...

464

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation ...

465

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

466

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

467

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Bilateral...

468

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for Appliances Title International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for...

469

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fired generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 402 435 461 505 568 631 697 1.9 United States a 350 379 390 420 472 519 566 1.6 Canada 20 19 26 28 29 32 35 1.9 Mexico/Chile 31 36 45 56 68 80 95 3.8 OECD Europe 217 219 213 204 218 234 252 0.5 OECD Asia 128 134 140 144 148 157 163 0.8 Japan 83 90 96 97 100 101 101 0.7 South Korea 27 26 26 28 29 35 38 1.1 Australia/New Zealand 18 18 18 19 20 22 23 1.0 Total OECD 746 787 814

470

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2009-2040 (2005 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 32,959 33,559 36,264 39,848 43,145 46,824 51,175 56,306 1.7 United States a 41,478 42,130 45,224 49,521 53,259 57,343 62,044 67,452 1.6 Canada 34,582 35,285 37,485 40,040 41,910 43,909 46,715 50,028 1.2 Mexico/Chile 12,215 12,750 14,862 16,996 19,460 22,324 25,830 30,192 2.9 OECD Europe 25,770 26,269 27,363 29,924 32,694 35,369 38,368 41,753 1.6 OECD Asia 28,623 29,875 32,912 36,117 39,347 42,264 45,505 48,961 1.7 Japan 29,469 30,827 33,255

471

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 470 475 499 523 547 569 591 612 0.8 United States a 308 310 325 340 356 372 388 404 0.9 Canada 34 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 1.0 Mexico/Chile 129 131 138 144 150 155 159 162 0.7 OECD Europe 553 556 570 580 588 594 598 601 0.3 OECD Asia 202 203 204 205 204 203 201 199 -0.1 Japan 128 128 127 125 122 119 117 114 -0.4 South Korea 48 48 49 50 50 50 50 49 0.1 Australia/NewZealand 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 35 0.9 Total OECD 1,226 1,234 1,273 1,307 1,339 1,366 1,390 1,411 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 338 338 342 342 342 340 337 334 0.0 Russia 141 140 142 141 139 136 134 131 -0.2 Other 197

472

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 119 123 130 133 130 135 0.5 United States a 101 104 111 114 114 109 113 0.4 Canada 13 13 11 13 16 16 16 0.7 Mexico/Chile 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 5.1 OECD Europe 132 124 128 142 143 143 142 0.3 OECD Asia 67 45 65 71 79 80 82 0.7 Japan 49 20 34 35 36 37 37 -0.9 South Korea 18 25 32 36 43 43 45 3.2 Australia/New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 314 288 316 343 355 352 359 0.5 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42 49 58 65 73 80 85 2.4 Russia 24 28 35 40 45 50 55 2.8 Other 17 20 23 25 27 29 29 1.8 Non-OECD Asia 21

473

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 4 33 38 42 48 63 101 11.1 United States a 4 32 37 40 46 62 99 11.2 Canada 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 -- Mexico/Chile 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -- OECD Europe 23 78 85 89 94 98 102 5.1 OECD Asia 5 12 22 33 39 50 50 8.1 Japan 4 7 14 23 29 39 39 8.1 South Korea 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3.6 Australia/New Zealand 0 4 6 8 8 9 9 -- Total OECD 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Russia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Other 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Non-OECD Asia 1 31 76 94 107 120 129 17.2 China 1 26 67 79 90 100 105 17.0 India 0 3 7 13 14 17

474

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38 40 41 42 43 45 47 0.7 United States a 35 38 39 39 40 41 43 0.7 Canada 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.6 Mexico/Chile 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1.3 OECD Europe 73 75 76 77 78 79 80 0.3 OECD Asia 33 36 36 36 36 36 37 0.3 Japan 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 0.1 South Korea 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 1.2 Australia/New Zealand 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.4 Total OECD 144 151 153 155 158 160 163 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0.2 Russia 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.3 Other 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.2 Non-OECD Asia 26 36 45 54 63 69 73 3.4 China 20 27 36 45 53 59 61 3.9 India 3 4 4 4

475

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

476

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 170 177 181 190 201 214 228 1.0 United States a 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 0.1 Canada 75 78 80 85 93 101 109 1.3 Mexico/Chile 17 20 22 25 29 33 38 2.8 OECD Europe 151 155 169 176 183 189 195 0.9 OECD Asia 37 39 40 40 40 40 41 0.3 Japan 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 0.3 South Korea 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.3 Australia/New Zealand 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 0.3 Total OECD 358 371 389 405 424 443 464 0.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 87 91 99 103 110 118 125 1.2 Russia 47 49 54 58 62 66 69 1.3 Other 41 42 45 45 48 52 56 1.1 Non-OECD Asia

477

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections for Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel This page inTenTionally lefT blank 259 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,248 1,316 1,324 1,379 1,456 1,546 1,669 1.0 United States a 1,033 1,080 1,068 1,098 1,147 1,206 1,293 0.8 Canada 137 144 152 163 174 185 198 1.2 Mexico/Chile 78 93 104 118 135 155 177 2.8 OECD Europe 946 1,028 1,096 1,133 1,159 1,185 1,211 0.8 OECD Asia 441 444 473 489 501 516 524 0.6 Japan 287 275 293 300 304 309 306 0.2 South Korea 85 93 100 107 114

478

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

International Perspectives Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCTAD serves as the focal point within the United Nations Secretariat for all matters related to foreign direct investment and transnational corporations. In the past, the Programme on Transnational Corporations was carried out by the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations (1975-1992) and the Transnational Corporations and Management Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Development (1992-1993). In 1993, the Programme was transferred to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. UNCTAD seeks to further the understanding of the nature of transnational corporations and their contribution to development and to create an enabling environment for international investment and enterprise development. UNCTAD's work is carried out through intergovernmental deliberations, technical assistance activities, seminars, workshops and conferences. The term "country " as used in this study also refers, as appropriate, to territories or areas; the designations employed and the presentation of the material do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the

United Nations

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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481

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G5. World petroleum production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.8 35.0 33.9 34.2 36.5 39.3 42.8 45.3 0.9 Middle East 23.8 25.3 23.0 23.6 25.4 27.9 30.8 33.0 1.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.7 -0.1 West Africa 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.7 5.0 5.1 5.3 5.3 0.6 South America 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 50.1 50.0 54.1 55.9 56.8 59.5 62.2 65.7 0.9 OECD 20.4 20.3 23.1 23.6 23.4 23.4 24.2 25.2 0.7 OECD Americas 15.2

482

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

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Reference case projections Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 283 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel

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International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

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International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9 22.3 22.5 22.6 22.4 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.8 14.8 15.6 16.6 1.4 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD

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International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

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International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6 22.2 21.4 -0.1 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.1 15.8 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD 234.7

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International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other pe