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1

The international magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

Fowler, T.K.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

2

International Atomic Energy Agency holds conference on fusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Atomic Energy Agency holds conference on fusion roadmap By John Greenwald November 8, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Hutch Neilson, third from left,...

3

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Signs U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.21.06 U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction November 21, 2006 PARIS, FRANCE - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Under Secretary for Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the

4

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement November 21, 2006 - 9:25am Addthis Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction PARIS, FRANCE - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Under Secretary for Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation to sign an agreement to build the international fusion energy project known as ITER. "The energy that powers the stars is moving closer to becoming a new source of energy for the Earth through the technology represented by ITER," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The ITER Members represent over

5

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 084001 (13pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/48/8/084001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 084001] and created a vacuum leak in the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) [4]. The damage was explained comparisons between theory and experiment [5­7], wave amplitudes an order of magnitude larger than

Heidbrink, William W.

6

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 45 (2005) 271275 doi:10.1088/0029-5515/45/4/008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion, 52.55.H 1. Introduction An economically viable fusion reactor must sustain high- pressure, stable discrepancy between theory and experiment is that slight variations in the boundary geometry can sufficiently

Hudson, Stuart

7

Thursday, January 30, 2003 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces U.S. to Join Negotiations on Major International Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thursday, January 30, 2003 Energy Secretary Abraham Announces U.S. to Join Negotiations on Major of a major international magnetic fusion research project, U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham announced of the laboratory. The Bush administration believes that fusion is a key element in U.S. long-term energy plans

8

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creation. References [1] Tamm I.E. 1959 Theory of the magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part I Plasma Physics.D. Theory of magnetic thermonuclear reactor, part 2 Plasma Physics and the Problem of ControlledIOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014003

9

Fusion energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement; Large-Scale...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

today joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation to sign an agreement to build the international fusion...

11

FUSION ENERGY Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports a vigorous research and development program for fusion energy. Fusion represents a potential energy source that is sustainable and has favorable safety and environmental features. Like fission, fusion offers the opportunity to generate substantial quantities of energy while producing no CO2 or other “greenhouse gases” that may contribute to global warming. Even with substantial conservation efforts and improvements in end-use efficiency, the future world demand for energy is expected to increase as a result of population growth and economic development. The timely advent of fusion as a practical energy source may be crucial. In particular, the ANS believes the following: 1. The long-term benefits of fusion energy warrant a sustained effort aimed at advancing fusion science and technology. International cooperation is a cost-effective complement to strong national programs. 2. Recent scientific progress in fusion research has been encouraging and warrants an enhanced and expanded fusion engineering and technology development program. 3. Based on the continuing success of physics and technology development programs, it appears

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers for Internal Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

We have begun building the ''Mercury'' laser system as the first in a series of new generation diode-pumped solid-state lasers for inertial fusion research. Mercury will integrate three key technologies: diodes, crystals, and gas cooling, within a unique laser architecture that is scalable to kilojoule and megajoule energy levels for fusion energy applications. The primary near-term performance goals include 10% electrical efficiencies at 10 Hz and 100J with a 2-10 ns pulse length at 1.047 mm wavelength. When completed, Mercury will allow rep-rated target experiments with multiple chambers for high energy density physics research.

Payne, S A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Bayramian, A; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Emanuel, M A; Orth, C D; Rothenberg, J. E; Schaffers, K I; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E; Powell, H T

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the abstracts of the paper presented at the 1994 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

15

Fusion Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

16

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Division http:www.ornl.govscinseddivisionfed.shtml Please click link above if you were not already redirected to the page....

17

The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the possibility of fusion as an energy source for electricity generation was realized in the 1950s, understanding of the plasma state was primitive. The fusion goal has been paced by, and has stimulated, the development of plasma physics. Our understanding of complex, nonlinear processes in plasmas is now mature. We can routinely produce and manipulate 100 million degree plasmas with remarkable finesse, and we can identify a path to commercial fusion power. The international experiment, ITER, will create a burning (self-sustained) plasma and produce 500 MW of thermal fusion power. This talk will summarize the progress in fusion research to date, and the remaining steps to fusion power.

Prager, Stewart (PPPL)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

President Bush Issues Executive Order Designating ITER International Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

President President Bush Issues Executive Order Designating ITER International Fusion Energy Organization A Public Interest Organization News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.19.07 President Bush Issues Executive Order Designating ITER International Fusion Energy Organization A Public Interest Organization Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page November 19, 2007 The White House today announced that President Bush has issued an Executive Order designating the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization as a public international organization. For the purposes of the International

19

1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is a guide to the 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference. It consists largely of abstracts of the oral and poster presentations that were to be made, and gives some general information about the conference and its schedule.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

(Fusion energy research)  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Daily Princetonian -International fusion project will use Princeton physics lab Summer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine the viability of exploiting cold fusion as an energy source around the world. Much of the researchThe Daily Princetonian - International fusion project will use Princeton physics lab Summer Program | Previous | Next | Calendar International fusion project will use Princeton physics lab By ABBY WILLIAMS

22

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly

23

ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY FOR THE 21 CENTURY ENERGY MARKET AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactor /Commercial Reactor Engineering Design Expending Performance Phase High Working Rate CDA EDA are condensed under the Earth during a few hundred millions of year. This precious gift will be expired within.) Disposal cost for radioactive materials is one of important element for commercial use of fusion. Figure 9

24

International information exchange in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed.

Strickler, C.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of “points ” highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

André Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 91.087 90.500 85 76.075 ...

28

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... 2013 Africa 117.064 119.114 123.609 ...

29

The Project of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Maosheng Li; Rong Liu; Xueming Shi; Weiwei Yi; Yaosong Shen; Xianjue Peng

30

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 44 (2004) S254S265 PII: S0029-5515(04)88685-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial in the condensation reaction that builds a 1­5 µm polymer overcoat withnoreplicationofthefoamcellstructure the ablator, has a critical effect on the performance (gain) of the target. Layering requires establishing

Tillack, Mark

31

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 104010 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/49/10/104010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation (April 1988), Tore Supra remains the only large tokamak fully equipped for steady-state operation of steady- state tokamak operation, retains all its scientific interest and relevance to the fusion heating systems configuration. In the prospect of the ITER steady-state operation phase and of DEMO

�cole Normale Supérieure

32

Path toward fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the fusion research program is given. Some of the problems that plagued the developmental progress are described. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fusion Energy Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering activities. Our plasma theorists develop the fundamental plasma theory and computational base needed to understand plasma behavior in fusion devices, to...

34

Future of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, fusion R&D programs have made enormous technical progress. Projected billion-dollar scale research facilities are designed to approach net energy production. In this century, scientific and engineering progress must continue until the economics of fusion power plants improves sufficiently to win large scale private funding in competition with fission and non-nuclear energy systems. This economic advantage must be sustained: trillion dollar investments will be required to build enough fusion power plants to generate ten percent of the world's energy. For Inertial Fusion Energy, multi-billion dollar driver costs must be reduced by up to an order of magnitude, to a small fraction of the total cost of the power plant. Major cost reductions could be achieved via substantial improvements in target performance-both higher gain and reduced ignition energy. Large target performance improvements may be feasible through a combination of design innovations, e.g., ''fast ignition,'' propagation down density gradients, and compression of fusion fuel with a combination of driver and chemical energy. The assumptions that limit projected performance of fusion targets should be carefully examined. The National Ignition Facility will enable development and testing of revolutionary targets designed to make possible economically competitive fusion power plants.

Nuckolls, J H; Wood, L L

2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program  

SciTech Connect

This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970`s, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department`s planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Converting energy from fusion into useful forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If fusion power reactors are to be feasible, it will still be necessary to convert the energy of the nuclear reaction into usable form. The heat produced will be removed from the reactor core by a primary coolant, which might be water, helium, molten lithium-lead, molten lithium-containing salt, or CO2. The heat could then be transferred to a conventional Rankine cycle or Brayton (gas turbine) cycle. Alternatively it could be used for thermochemical processes such as producing hydrogen or other transport fuels. Fusion presents new problems because of the high energy neutrons released. These affect the selection of materials and the operating temperature, ultimately determining the choice of coolant and working cycle. The limited temperature ranges allowed by present day irradiated structural materials, combined with the large internal power demand of the plant, will limit the overall thermal efficiency. The operating conditions of the fusion power source, the materials, coolant, and energy conversion system w...

Kovari, M; Jenkins, I; Kiely, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 112.4 107.7 103.5 96.5 ...

38

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 1.907 1.909 2.101 2.197 ...

39

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Germany 135.7 139.1 124.7 153.7 ...

40

The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Princeton, New Jersey, USA The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion devices The purpose of this symposium is to bring together scientists and engineers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

International Energy Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phadke AAPhadke@lbl.gov (510) 486-6855 Links International Energy Studies Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

42

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 10 10 11 11 11 10 ...

43

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan (s) (s) (s) (s ...

44

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Net Generation ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 0.039 ...

45

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Installed Capacity ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.411 ...

46

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ; ...

47

U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project Thursday, January 30, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Fusion-Energy-Plan.html?pagewanted=  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project Thursday, January 30, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Fusion-Energy-range international collaboration to develop fusion energy as a commercial power source, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer-Plan.html?pagewanted= print&position=top Page: 1 January 30, 2003 U.S. to Participate in Fusion Project By THE ASSOCIATED

48

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Loading ...

49

U.S.Statements on International Fusion Reactor (ITER) Siting Decision |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S.Statements on International Fusion Reactor (ITER) Siting U.S.Statements on International Fusion Reactor (ITER) Siting Decision U.S.Statements on International Fusion Reactor (ITER) Siting Decision June 28, 2005 - 1:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today in Moscow, Russia, the ministers representing the six ITER parties, including Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, announced the ITER international fusion reactor will be located at the EU site in Cadarache, France. Below are statements by U.S. government officials following the signing of the agreement at the Ministerial Meeting. The text of the announcement by the six parties is available at www.iter.org/index_newsroom.htm. Statement by U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman: "Plentiful, reliable energy is critical to continued worldwide economic

50

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

51

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 50 (2010) 014005 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/1/014005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term sustainable economic develop- ment, it is necessary for China to exploit renewable energy 0029's Republic of China 2 Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China 3 Southwestern Institute of Physics, CNNC, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China E-mail: j li

52

Fusion reactors as future energy sources  

SciTech Connect

From conference on energy policies and the international system; New, Delhi, India (4 Dec 1973). The need is now apparent for a global energy policy with the following characteristics: Compatibility with environmental and economic factors; large fuel resources, the recovery and exploration of which have minimal environmental impact and which do not introduce disturbing factors into the world political situation. Fusion power in this context is discussed, including assessments of its potential and of the problems yet to be solved in achieving its realization. The proposition is advanced that fusion should be considered as the ultimate source of energy, and that other sources of energy, including conventional nuclear power, should be considered as interim sources. (auth)

Post, R.F.; Ribe, F.L.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

U. S. Fusion Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

Fusion implementation scenarios for the US have been developed. The dependence of these scenarios on both the fusion development and implementation paths has been assessed. A range of implementation paths has been studied. The deployment of CANDU fission reactors in Canada and the deployment of fission reactors in France have been assessed as possible models for US fusion deployment. The waste production and resource (including tritium) needs have been assessed. The conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that it is challenging to make a significant impact on energy production during this century. However, the rapid deployment of fission reactors in Canada and France support fusion implementation scenarios for the US with significant power production during this century. If the country can meet the schedule requirements then the resource needs and waste production are found to be manageable problems.

John A. Schmidt; Dan Jassby; Scott Larson; Maria Pueyo; Paul H. Rutherford

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

56

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | ...

57

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ...

58

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 0.213 Kuwait 63.500 Lebanon 0 Oman ...

59

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks |

60

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 Middle East 802.157 Bahrain 0.125 ...

62

Fusion energy for hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

64

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

65

Fusion Energy [Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Fusion Energy Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Fusion Energy Bookmark and Share Since 1995, Argonne has had primary responsibility for the development of new design rules regarding various components in a fusion reactor, particularly those subject to irradiation embrittlement. During 1998, Argonne issued the final draft of the structural design criteria for in-vessel components in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER).

66

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science | Princeton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy science American Fusion News Category: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Link: Applying physics, teamwork to fusion energy...

67

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govfesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

68

Hydrogen fusion-energy reactions  

SciTech Connect

At the Los Alamos Ion Beam Facility we have installed a low-energy fusion cross section (LEFCS) apparatus specifically designed to measure cross sections to high accuracy for the various fusion-energy reactions among the hydrogen isotopes in the bombarding-energy range 10 to 120 keV. To date, we have completed and published our study of the D(t,..cap alpha..)n reaction, have finished data-taking for the D(d,p)T and D(d,/sup 3/He)n reactions, and have nearly finished data-taking for the T(t,..cap alpha..)nn reaction. Here we describe the LEFCS facility, present final and preliminary results for these reactions, and compare them with R-matrix calculations. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Brown, R.E.; Jarmie, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

and Enable Development of Fusion’s Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstrate advanced physics operation of a tokamak in steadystate with Burn – Utilize conservative expressions of all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics to produce 100-250 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q 2 weeks – Further develop all elements of Advanced Tokamak physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO Develop fusion’s nuclear technology – Test materials with high neutron fluence (3-6 MW-yr/m 2) with duty factor 0.3 on a year – Demonstrate Tritium self-sufficiency – Develop fusion blankets that make both tritium and electricity at 1-2 MW/m 2 neutron fluxes – Develop fusion blankets that produce hydrogen With ITER and IFMIF, provide the basis for a fusion DEMO Power Plant

R. D. Stambaugh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

SPIELMAN,RICK B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

72

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 0.2 ...

73

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 Kuwait ...

74

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.225 0.220 0.231 0.251 ...

75

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.214 0.225 0.220 0.231 ...

76

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 17.1 6.5 3.2 37.8 26.0 10.0 ...

77

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.220 0.213 0.213 0.213 ...

78

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 20.058 19.861 19.295 19.625 ...

79

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 41.1 35.6 30.8 28.1 30.8 31 ...

80

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... United States 100.150 ... 180.028 Virgin Islands, U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

83

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

International energy annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related FieldsFusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fieldscalled, in the magnetic fusion energy community, a tandem

Kwan, J.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

87

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

88

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

89

Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will present a uniform technical assessment of the benefits of the three approaches. The draft report will be presented and extensively discussed during the July meeting, leading to a final report. This report will provide critical fusion community input to the decision process of FESAC and DOE in 2002-2003, and to the review of burning plasma science by the National Academy of Sciences called for by FESAC and Energy Legislation which was passed by the House of Representatives [H.R. 4]. Members of the fusion community are encouraged to participate in the Snowmass working groups.

N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demonstrating a Target Supply for Inertial Fusion Energy (A24816)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Science And Technology 47, 1131 (2005)16th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Madison Wisconsin, US, 2004999609940

Goodin, D.T.

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

91

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

92

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation ...

93

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

94

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

95

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

96

International Energy Statistics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics > Countries > International Energy Statistics International Energy Statistics Petroleum Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Reserves | Imports | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Exports | CO2 Emissions | Heat Content Natural Gas All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Coal All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Electricity Generation | Consumption | Capacity | Imports | Net Imports | Exports | Distribution Losses | Heat Content Renewables Electricity Generation| Electricity Consumption | Biofuels Production | Biofuels Consumption | Heat Content Total Energy

97

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Jordan ...

98

RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY GROUPS COVET FUSION'S BUDGET A group called the Energy Efficiency Education Project (1333 H St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005-4707; 202-682-1270), claiming to represent over 80 billion in the DOE budget out of fusion, fission and fossil energy research and into "more cost

99

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

100

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

International energy annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: Wells, Peggy Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041

104

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: PE7 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

105

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: AM4 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

106

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

107

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

108

Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium and tritium), are derived from water and the metal lithium, a relatively abundant resource. The fuels are virtually inexhaustible and they are available worldwide. Deuterium from one gallon of seawater would provide the equivalent energy of 300 gallons of gasoline, or over a half ton of coal. This energy is released when deuterium and tritium nuclei are fused together to form a helium nucleus and a neutron. The neutron is used to breed tritium from lithium. The energy released is carried by the helium nucleus (3.5 MeV) and the neutron (14 MeV). The energetic helium nucleus heats the fuel, helping to sustain the fusion reaction. Once the helium cools, it is collected and becomes a useful byproduct. A fusion power plant would produce no climate-changing gases.

Moses, E

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

. References "Energy Solutions International" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnergySolutionsInternational&oldid344882" Categories: Clean Energy...

110

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

111

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

113

Fusion: an energy source for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA's international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Pro- jections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

115

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy...

116

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

118

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

119

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

120

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fusion Energy Division Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Agreement with UT-Battelle to collaborate with Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science. Division Director Stanley L. Milora Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box...

123

Fusion energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy energy Subscribe to RSS - Fusion energy The energy released when two atomic nuclei fuse together. This process powers the sun and stars. Read more Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions inside fusion plasmas Researchers led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have won highly competitive allocations of time on two of the world's fastest supercomputers. The increased awards are designed to advance the development of nuclear fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity. Read more about Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions inside fusion plasmas Two PPPL-led teams win increased supercomputing time to study conditions

124

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

125

Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source  

SciTech Connect

Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Goerz, D.A.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Understanding and accepting fusion as an alternative energy source  

SciTech Connect

Fusion, the process that powers our sun, has long promised to be a virtually inexhaustible source of energy for mankind. No other alternative energy source holds such bright promise, and none has ever presentd such formidable scientific and engineering challenges. Serious research efforts have continued for over 30 years in an attempt to harness and control fusion here on earth. Scientists have made considerable progress in the last decade toward achieving the conditions required for fusion power, and recent experimental results and technological progress have made the scientific feasibility of fusion a virtual certainty. With this knowledge and confidence, the emphasis can now shift toward developing power plants that are practical and economical. Although the necessary technology is not in hand today, the extension to an energy producing system in 20 years is just as attainable as was putting a man on the moon. In the next few decades, the world's population will likely double while the demand for energy will nearly quadruple. Realistic projections show that within the next generation a significant fraction of our electric power must come from alternative energy sources. Increasing environmental concerns may further accelerate this timetable in which new energy sources must be introduced. The continued development of fusion systems to help meet the energy needs of the future will require greater public understanding and support of this technology. The fusion community must do more to make the public aware of the fact that energy is a critical international issue and that fusion is a viable and necessary energy technology that will be safe and economical. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Goerz, D.A.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to Commercial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Considerable effort has been dedicated to determining the possible properties of a magneticconfinement fusion power plant, particularly in the U.S.1, Europe2 and Japan3. There has also been some effort to detail the development path to fusion energy, particularly in the U.S.4 Only limited attention has been given, in Japan5 and in China6, to the options for a specific device to form the bridge from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, to commercial fusion energy. Nor has much attention been paid, since 2003, to the synergies between magnetic and inertial fusion energy development. Here we consider, at a very high level, the possibility of a Qeng ? 1 Pilot Plant, with linear dimensions ~ 2/3 the linear dimensions of a commercial fusion power plant, as the needed bridge. As we examine the R&D needs for such a system we find significant synergies between the needs for the development of magnetic and inertial fusion energy.

Robert J. Goldston

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

129

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

130

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Germany 165.6 120.4 124.9 133.1 ...

131

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

132

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

133

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

134

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

135

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

136

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

137

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

138

Accelerated plan to develop magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that, despite funding delays since the passage of the Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980, fusion development could still be carried to the point of a demonstration plant by the year 2000 as called for in the Act if funding, now about $365 million per year, were increased to the $1 billion range over the next few years (see Table I). We have also suggested that there may be an economic incentive for the private sector to become in accelerating fusion development on account of the greater stability of energy production costs from fusion. Namely, whereas fossil fuel prices will surely escalate in the course of time, fusion fuel will always be abundantly available at low cost; and fusion technology poses less future risk to the public and the investor compared to conventional nuclear power. In short, once a fusion plant is built, the cost of generating electricity mainly the amortization of the plant capital cost - would be relatively fixed for the life of the plant. In Sec. V, we found that the projected capital cost of fusion plants ($2000 to $4000 per KW/sub e/) would probably be acceptable if fusion plants were available today.

Fowler, T.K.

1986-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fusion energy development: Breakeven and beyond: Keynote address  

SciTech Connect

The scientific feasibility, technological inevitability, and economic necessity of fusion as an energy source are discussed.

Furth, H.P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

142

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

143

International energy annual, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Unconventional Total Conventional Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011

145

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ;

146

ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 279 284 287 281 287 Greece ...

149

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

International Clean Energy Coalition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

152

HEDP and new directions for fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

The Quest for fusion energy has a long history and the demonstration of thermonuclear energy release in 1951 represented a record achievement for high energy density. While this first demonstration was in response to the extreme fears of mankind, it also marked the beginning of a great hope that it would usher in an era of boundless cheap energy. In fact, fusion still promises to be an enabling technology that can be compared to the prehistoric utilization of fire. Why has the quest for fusion energy been so long on promises and so short in fulfillment? This paper briefly reviews past approaches to fusion energy and suggests new directions. By putting aside the old thinking and vigorously applying our experimental, computational and theoretical tools developed over the past decades we should be able to make rapid progress toward satisfying an urgent need. Fusion not only holds the key to abundant green energy, but also promises to enable deep space missions and the creation of rare elements and isotopes for wide-ranging industrial applications and medical diagnostics.

Kirkpatrick, Ronald C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

International energy annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

155

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

156

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

157

TW Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place Germany Sector Wind energy Product TW.Energy international is a joint venture between the two Hannover-based companies target GmbH and Windwrts Energie...

158

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3.3.4 Chamber Radius and Fusion Neutron Flux . . . . .1.1.3.2 Fusion Energy . . . . . . . . .1.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purpose

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

160

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

162

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

163

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW1 8LH Sector Carbon Product London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change....

164

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

165

Target Tracking and Engagement for Inertial Fusion Energy - A Tabletop Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / The Technology of Fusion Energy - Inertial Fusion Technology: Targets and Chambers

Lane Carlson; Mark Tillack; Thomas Lorentz; Jon Spalding; Neil Alexander; Graham Flint; Dan Goodin; Ronald Petzoldt

166

Systems Modeling for the Laser Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

W. R. Meier et al.

167

Molten Salt Fuel Version of Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

R. W. Moir; H. F. Shaw; A. Caro; Larry Kaufman; J. F. Latkowski; J. Powers; P. E. A. Turchi

168

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

169

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

170

Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion energy is one of only a few truly long-term energy options. Since its inception in the 1950s, the vision of the fusion energy research program has been to develop a viable means of harnessing the virtually unlimited energy stored in the nuclei of light atoms--the primary fuel deuterium is present as one part in 6,500 of all hydrogen. This vision grew out of the recognition that the immense power radiated by the sun is fueled by nuclear fusion in its hot core. Such high temperatures are a prerequisite for driving significant fusion reactions. The fascinating fourth state of matter at high temperatures is known as plasma. It is only in this fourth state of matter that the nuclei of two light atoms can fuse, releasing the excess energy that was needed to separately bind each of the original two nuclei. Because the nuclei of atoms carry a net positive electric charge, they repel each other. Hydrogenic nuclei, such as deuterium and tritium, must be heated to approximately 100 million degrees Celsius to overcome this electric repulsion and fuse. There have been dramatic recent advances in both the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas and in the generation of fusion power in the laboratory. Today, there is little doubt that fusion energy production is feasible. For this reason, the general thrust of fusion research has focused on configuration improvements leading to an economically competitive product. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are among the reasons to pursue these opportunities [1]. In this paper we review the tremendous scientific progress in fusion during the last 10 years. We utilize the detailed engineering design activities of burning plasma experiments as well as conceptual fusion power plant studies to describe our visions of attractive fusion power plants. We use these studies to compare technical requirements of an attractive fusion system with present achievements to identify remaining technical challenges for fusion. We discuss scenarios for fusion energy deployment in the energy market.

Meier, W; Najmabadi, F; Schmidt, J; Sheffield, J

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

MicroEnergy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MicroEnergy International MicroEnergy International Jump to: navigation, search Name MicroEnergy International Place Berlin, Germany Zip D-10587 Sector Renewable Energy Product Promotes renewable energy technologies in the developing countries. References MicroEnergy International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. MicroEnergy International is a company located in Berlin, Germany . References ↑ "MicroEnergy International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MicroEnergy_International&oldid=348787" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

172

DOE International Energy Advisors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outreach Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Federal, State, and Local Coordination DOE International Energy Advisors Monitoring, Reporting, and Analysis Emergency...

173

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

174

International District Energy Association | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International District Energy Association International District Energy Association International District Energy Association November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis International District Energy Association logo Since its formation in 1909, the International District Energy Association (IDEA) has served as a principal industry advocate and management resource for owners, operators, developers, and suppliers of district heating and cooling systems in cities, campuses, bases, and healthcare facilities. Today, with over 1,400 members in 26 countries, IDEA continues to organize high-quality technical conferences that inform, connect, and advance the industry toward higher energy efficiency and lower carbon emissions through innovation and investment in scalable sustainable solutions. With the support of DOE, IDEA

175

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Unconventional Total United States China Canada Conventional Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy ...

176

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Highlights. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040.

177

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Total Other Russia Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011 DOE/EIA-0484(2011)

178

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas Total Russia Europe Central Asia Natural gas (trillion cubic feet) U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2011

179

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

180

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Inertial Fusion Energy and its Materials Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, IOMMMS Global Materials Forum: Materials in a Green Economy: An International ... Recent Development of Materials for Green Energy in Korea.

183

LBNL International Energy Studies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LBNL International Energy Studies LBNL International Energy Studies (Redirected from International Energy Studies) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Energy Studies Name International Energy Studies Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Implementation, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Dataset Website http://ies.lbl.gov References IES Homepage[1] Abstract The International Energy Studies (IES) Group has been active for more than 25 years and is composed of scientists active on the world forum in the areas of energy, forestry, and climate research. Recently LBNL and UC Berkeley also initiated a new program on India the Berkeley India Joint Leadership on Energy and Environment (BIJLEE).

184

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distribution Categories: Magnetic Fusion Energy (UC-20) MFE--Plasma Systems (UC-20a) MFE Temperature Response 4-7 4.6 Thermal Storage Requirements 4-16 4.6.1 Pressurized Water/Steam System 4-19 4

Harilal, S. S.

185

Pulsed energy storage in fusion devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research and development on pulsed energy technologies, primarily for pulsed high-beta fusion systems, is described. Systems studies at Los Alamos and elsewhere have served to define these required technologies, which include fast discharging homopolar machines, pulsed superconducting coils, and the associated switching technology. Programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Westinghouse, and The University of Texas are described here.

Thomassen, K.I.; Rogers, J.D.; Ribe, F.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D4. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 23.5 23.2 22.9 22.9 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.7 18.8 18.4 17.7 17.4 17.5 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 0.2 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 1.4 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.1 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.7 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.3 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 44.6 44.3 43.8 43.6 43.8 44.3 -0.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

187

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.2 29.2 31.3 33.4 35.1 37.0 39.4 41.6 1.2 United States a 22.9 23.8 25.3 26.3 26.9 27.6 28.7 29.5 0.7 Canada 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 1.7 Mexico/Chile 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.5 4.3 5.1 6.1 7.2 3.6 OECD Europe 18.8 19.8 19.7 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.7 OECD Asia 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 1.3 Japan 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.2 5.2 1.0 South Korea 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.5 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.7 Total OECD 53.2 55.6 58.2 61.5 64.4 68.0 72.1 76.0 1.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 19.8 21.8

188

A Conceptual Study for a Feasible Fusion Energy Utilization Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Jung Hoon Han et al.

189

Compact, Efficient Laser Systems Required for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

A. Bayramian et al.

190

Timely Delivery of Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

M. Dunne et al.

191

LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Thomas M. Anklam; Mike Dunne; Wayne R. Meier; Sarah Powers; Aaron J. Simon

192

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IFE - NIF & LIFE / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

Jeffery F. Latkowski et al.

193

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Low Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 217 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9

194

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth case projections Low Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 203 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6

195

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

D D High Oil Price case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 209 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0

196

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth case projections High Economic Growth case projections * World energy consumption * Gross domestic product This page inTenTionally lefT blank 197 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9

197

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kaya Identity factor projections Kaya Identity factor projections * Carbon dioxide intensity * Energy intensity * GDP per capita * Population This page inTenTionally lefT blank 289 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan

198

Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fired generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 402 435 461 505 568 631 697 1.9 United States a 350 379 390 420 472 519 566 1.6 Canada 20 19 26 28 29 32 35 1.9 Mexico/Chile 31 36 45 56 68 80 95 3.8 OECD Europe 217 219 213 204 218 234 252 0.5 OECD Asia 128 134 140 144 148 157 163 0.8 Japan 83 90 96 97 100 101 101 0.7 South Korea 27 26 26 28 29 35 38 1.1 Australia/New Zealand 18 18 18 19 20 22 23 1.0 Total OECD 746 787 814

200

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2009-2040 (2005 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 32,959 33,559 36,264 39,848 43,145 46,824 51,175 56,306 1.7 United States a 41,478 42,130 45,224 49,521 53,259 57,343 62,044 67,452 1.6 Canada 34,582 35,285 37,485 40,040 41,910 43,909 46,715 50,028 1.2 Mexico/Chile 12,215 12,750 14,862 16,996 19,460 22,324 25,830 30,192 2.9 OECD Europe 25,770 26,269 27,363 29,924 32,694 35,369 38,368 41,753 1.6 OECD Asia 28,623 29,875 32,912 36,117 39,347 42,264 45,505 48,961 1.7 Japan 29,469 30,827 33,255

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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201

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 470 475 499 523 547 569 591 612 0.8 United States a 308 310 325 340 356 372 388 404 0.9 Canada 34 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 1.0 Mexico/Chile 129 131 138 144 150 155 159 162 0.7 OECD Europe 553 556 570 580 588 594 598 601 0.3 OECD Asia 202 203 204 205 204 203 201 199 -0.1 Japan 128 128 127 125 122 119 117 114 -0.4 South Korea 48 48 49 50 50 50 50 49 0.1 Australia/NewZealand 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 35 0.9 Total OECD 1,226 1,234 1,273 1,307 1,339 1,366 1,390 1,411 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 338 338 342 342 342 340 337 334 0.0 Russia 141 140 142 141 139 136 134 131 -0.2 Other 197

202

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 119 123 130 133 130 135 0.5 United States a 101 104 111 114 114 109 113 0.4 Canada 13 13 11 13 16 16 16 0.7 Mexico/Chile 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 5.1 OECD Europe 132 124 128 142 143 143 142 0.3 OECD Asia 67 45 65 71 79 80 82 0.7 Japan 49 20 34 35 36 37 37 -0.9 South Korea 18 25 32 36 43 43 45 3.2 Australia/New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 314 288 316 343 355 352 359 0.5 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42 49 58 65 73 80 85 2.4 Russia 24 28 35 40 45 50 55 2.8 Other 17 20 23 25 27 29 29 1.8 Non-OECD Asia 21

203

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 4 33 38 42 48 63 101 11.1 United States a 4 32 37 40 46 62 99 11.2 Canada 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 -- Mexico/Chile 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -- OECD Europe 23 78 85 89 94 98 102 5.1 OECD Asia 5 12 22 33 39 50 50 8.1 Japan 4 7 14 23 29 39 39 8.1 South Korea 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3.6 Australia/New Zealand 0 4 6 8 8 9 9 -- Total OECD 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Russia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Other 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Non-OECD Asia 1 31 76 94 107 120 129 17.2 China 1 26 67 79 90 100 105 17.0 India 0 3 7 13 14 17

204

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38 40 41 42 43 45 47 0.7 United States a 35 38 39 39 40 41 43 0.7 Canada 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.6 Mexico/Chile 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1.3 OECD Europe 73 75 76 77 78 79 80 0.3 OECD Asia 33 36 36 36 36 36 37 0.3 Japan 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 0.1 South Korea 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 1.2 Australia/New Zealand 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.4 Total OECD 144 151 153 155 158 160 163 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0.2 Russia 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.3 Other 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.2 Non-OECD Asia 26 36 45 54 63 69 73 3.4 China 20 27 36 45 53 59 61 3.9 India 3 4 4 4

205

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 170 177 181 190 201 214 228 1.0 United States a 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 0.1 Canada 75 78 80 85 93 101 109 1.3 Mexico/Chile 17 20 22 25 29 33 38 2.8 OECD Europe 151 155 169 176 183 189 195 0.9 OECD Asia 37 39 40 40 40 40 41 0.3 Japan 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 0.3 South Korea 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.3 Australia/New Zealand 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 0.3 Total OECD 358 371 389 405 424 443 464 0.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 87 91 99 103 110 118 125 1.2 Russia 47 49 54 58 62 66 69 1.3 Other 41 42 45 45 48 52 56 1.1 Non-OECD Asia

206

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections for Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel This page inTenTionally lefT blank 259 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,248 1,316 1,324 1,379 1,456 1,546 1,669 1.0 United States a 1,033 1,080 1,068 1,098 1,147 1,206 1,293 0.8 Canada 137 144 152 163 174 185 198 1.2 Mexico/Chile 78 93 104 118 135 155 177 2.8 OECD Europe 946 1,028 1,096 1,133 1,159 1,185 1,211 0.8 OECD Asia 441 444 473 489 501 516 524 0.6 Japan 287 275 293 300 304 309 306 0.2 South Korea 85 93 100 107 114

207

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

208

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

209

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

210

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

211

International Energy Agency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Agency International Energy Agency International Energy Agency November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis International Energy Agency logo DOE's market transformation efforts have reached to European and other countries who are part of the international distributed and decentralized energy community. Through its partnership with DOE, the combined heat and power (CHP) program of the International Energy Agency (IEA) conducts research and analysis of CHP markets and deployment efforts around the world and has used lessons learned from U.S. research, development, and deployment efforts to recommend market transformation activities and policies that will lead to new CHP installations worldwide. Addthis Related Articles International District Energy Association Related Links U.S. Clean Heat and Power Association

212

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sitesallmodulescontribredisredis.autoload.inc). You are here Home International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 International Nuclear Energy...

213

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

214

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

215

Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeding ratio from the separate zone blanket option with different neutron multipliers (internally cooled. Liquid Metal a. liquid metal as breeder and coolant b. liquid metal as breeder and a separate coolant 2. Solid Breeder (with separate coolant). The candidate liquid metals are lithium, Li,yPbg., and Li

Abdou, Mohamed

216

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National...

217

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ;

218

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

219

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

220

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 104.2 106.8 108.7 112.5 118.9 0.6 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.2 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.4 14.3 16.3 18.6 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.0 42.1 43.5 44.8 45.9 46.8 0.6 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.3 21.9 22.3 22.5 22.6 22.4 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.8 14.8 15.6 16.6 1.4 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.3 7.4 7.6 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.9 122.1 124.1 125.9 129.0 133.9 0.4 United States a 94.9 97.9 95.9 96.4 96.1 95.3 95.7 97.3 0.0 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.7 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.8 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.3 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.3 88.0 90.1 91.6 93.0 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.3 42.7 43.9 44.6 45.0 45.0 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.6 22.5 22.8 22.6 22.2 21.4 -0.1 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 12.9 13.7 14.5 15.1 15.8 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.9 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.7 7.9 0.6 Total OECD 234.7

222

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan 52.7 53.2 57.2 54.1 53.3 52.8 52.2 51.8 -0.1 South Korea 52.8 53.7 50.7 48.1 47.2 45.4 46.0 45.8 -0.5 Australia/NewZealand 67.1 66.3 63.1 60.9 60.1 59.5 58.7 58.0 -0.4

223

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

224

International Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Team International Team International Team The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) International Team advances the progress of EERE's domestic programs and accelerates global deployment of U.S. clean energy products and services through international collaboration. To realize the benefits of international collaboration, we coordinate with other offices in the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. government agencies to identify, negotiate and actively manage targeted partnerships and projects that help advance our strategic goals. The collaborative research we support is either in the "pre-competitive" space or includes intellectual property issues that have been agreed upon in advance. All funds support U.S.-based project performers or international organizations

225

Kousa International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Los Angeles, California Zip 90010 Sector Wind energy Product Los Angeles-based wind tower manufacturer. References Kousa International1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

226

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ; ...

227

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G5. World petroleum production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.8 35.0 33.9 34.2 36.5 39.3 42.8 45.3 0.9 Middle East 23.8 25.3 23.0 23.6 25.4 27.9 30.8 33.0 1.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.7 -0.1 West Africa 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.7 5.0 5.1 5.3 5.3 0.6 South America 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 50.1 50.0 54.1 55.9 56.8 59.5 62.2 65.7 0.9 OECD 20.4 20.3 23.1 23.6 23.4 23.4 24.2 25.2 0.7 OECD Americas 15.2

228

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

229

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 283 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel

230

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 37.6 43.9 47.5 50.7 56.3 61.5 1.9 Middle East 23.8 25.4 25.5 30.7 33.6 36.1 40.5 44.7 2.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.0 4.4 4.6 0.7 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.2 5.8 6.1 6.5 6.8 7.1 1.6 South America 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.6 3.9 4.2 4.6 5.1 2.0 Non-OPEC 51.6 51.6 55.5 56.8 57.8 59.2 58.9 59.6 0.5 OECD 21.2 21.2 23.5 23.2 22.5 22.0 21.6 22.0 0.1

231

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.9 35.1 36.1 38.4 40.0 42.5 45.7 48.9 1.1 Middle East 23.8 25.4 24.5 26.7 28.2 30.4 33.1 35.8 1.4 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.5 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.0 0.2 West Africa 4.4 4.3 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.6 5.8 5.9 0.9 South America 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 51.8 51.7 55.8 58.2 60.3 61.9 63.7 66.0 0.8 OECD 21.4 21.4 23.9 23.9 23.4 23.0 23.8 24.8 0.5 OECD Americas

232

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G3.World nonpetroleum liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Biofuels b 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Gas-to-liquids 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 12.5 Non-OPEC 1.6 1.6 1.9 2.3 2.8 3.3 3.8 4.3 3.5 OECD 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.4 Biofuels b 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.8 Coal-to-liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 15.0 Gas-to-liquids

233

International Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Cooperation International Cooperation International Cooperation Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Key Bilateral Activities US-India Energy Dialogue: Coal Working Group The Office of Fossil Energy and India's Ministry of Coal jointly chair the Coal Working Group initiative to exchange information on policies, programs and technologies to promote the efficient and environmentally responsible production and use of coal. US-China Collaboration in Fossil Energy R&D The Office of Fossil Energy and China's Ministry of Science and Technology

234

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Electricity 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.8 3.2 Total 2.1 2.3 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.0 4.6 2.7 Commercial Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.7 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 -- Electricity 0.9 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.9 2.4 2.9 3.9 Total 1.3 1.4 1.7 2.0 2.4 2.9 3.4 3.3 Industrial Liquids 4.8 4.7 5.5 6.2 7.1 8.2 9.6 2.4 Natural gas 3.3 3.3 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.2

235

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F19. Delivered energy consumption in Other Central and South America by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 3.2 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.9 Total 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.0 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.7 2.4 Total 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 2.2 Industrial Liquids 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 0.5 Natural gas 2.6 2.7

236

LBNL International Energy Studies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Studies Studies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Energy Studies Name International Energy Studies Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Implementation, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Dataset Website http://ies.lbl.gov References IES Homepage[1] Abstract The International Energy Studies (IES) Group has been active for more than 25 years and is composed of scientists active on the world forum in the areas of energy, forestry, and climate research. Recently LBNL and UC Berkeley also initiated a new program on India the Berkeley India Joint Leadership on Energy and Environment (BIJLEE).

237

NERSC Role in Fusion Energy Science Research Katherine Yelick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Energy Science Research Katherine Yelick NERSC Director Requirements Workshop NERSC Mission The mission of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

238

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 ...

239

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; ... Jordan 0 0 0 Kuwait 0 ...

240

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ; Electricity Prices ;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; ... 2013 JAN FEB MAR APR ...

242

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. ... Total Oil Supply (Thousand Barrels Per Day) Loading ... Units Conversion ...

243

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; ... Imports of Crude Oil including Lease Condensate ... Sudan and South Sudan 0 ...

244

International Energy-Efficiency Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 International Energy-Efficiency Standards Two cost-effective approaches to reducing energy use in buildings are minimum energy standards for appliances and incorporating energy-efficiency principles in building codes. More than two dozen nations already have adopted, will soon adopt, or are considering the adoption of energy-efficiency standards and codes. The Environmental Energy Technologies Division has pooled its resources in the field of energy-efficiency standards with its international activities to create the International Building and Appliance Standards team. The IBAS team convenes regularly to discuss progress in existing international standards activities as well as to identify possible new Berkeley Lab opportunities to support efficiency standards the world over.

245

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E4. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 24.2 25.1 25.2 25.2 25.7 26.7 0.4 United States a 18.6 18.9 19.4 20.0 19.8 19.6 19.7 20.2 0.2 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 0.4 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.8 3.0 3.3 3.6 4.0 1.7 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.7 14.5 14.7 15.1 15.4 15.8 0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.3 8.7 8.9 8.9 9.0 9.1 0.5 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 0.1 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.2 1.2 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 0.8 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 46.2 48.3 48.8 49.2 50.2 51.5 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

247

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I3. World other natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 13.0 11.3 10.7 10.4 10.0 10.1 9.8 -1.0 United States a 8.3 7.5 7.3 7.4 7.1 7.2 6.9 -0.6 Canada 2.9 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.2 -2.9 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 -0.4 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 OECD Europe 10.4 8.9 7.6 6.6 6.1 5.7 5.6 -2.0 North Europe 10.0 8.3 6.9 6.0 5.5 5.1 5.0 -2.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1.0 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -- OECD Asia 1.9 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 1.8 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.0

248

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 4.5 OECD Asia 2.1 2.8 4.0 5.0 5.7 6.3 6.9 4.0 Japan 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

249

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of the EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in the IEO2001 are consistent with those published in the AEO2001. IEO2001 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in

250

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 0.089 0.089 0.077 0.067 0.061 0.067 ...

251

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 43.2 41.0 41.1 35.6 30.8 28.1 ...

252

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... United States 3,883 ... 4,156.745 Virgin Islands, U.S. 0.978 0.987 0.855 0 ...

253

International Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Programs International Programs International Programs The Office of Environmental Management (EM) International Program seeks out international technical experts to support EM's mission of accelerated risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To achieve this, EM pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of the U.S. Department of Energy. The EM International Program currently works with the Russian Federation and Ukraine through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission. The EM International Program is also currently evaluating the potential benefits

254

International Clean Energy Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Clean Energy Analysis International Clean Energy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search About ICEA UNIDO small.png NREL small.png The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway promotes increased access to clean energy analysis tools, databases, methods and other technical resources which can be applied in developing countries. This wiki-based dynamic platform allows you to add to the inventory of clean energy organizations, tools, programs and data included on the site. We encourage you to expand the inventory of resources by clicking on "add" below the International Initiatives map. The gateway is organized by Information Toolkits which provide tools and resources to help answer a number of clean energy questions. The International Initiatives map also provides country-specific information on clean energy programs, tools and organizations. Click here to learn more about the ICEA gateway project.

255

Fusion Energy Division progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report covers all elements of the ORNL Fusion Program, including those implemented outside the division. Non-fusion work within FED, much of which is based on the application of fusion technologies and techniques, is also discussed. The ORNL Fusion Program includes research and development in most areas of magnetic fusion research. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US and international fusion efforts. The research discussed in this report includes: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts; engineering and physics of existing and planned devices; development and testing of plasma diagnostic tools and techniques; assembly and distribution of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects; development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas; and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. The activities involving the use of fusion technologies and expertise for non-fusion applications ranged from semiconductor manufacturing to environmental management.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy for Future Centuries: Prospects for Fusion Power as a Future Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction / Proceedings of the Tenth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

J. Ongena; G. Van Oost

257

Energy for Future Centuries: Prospects for Fusion Power as a Future Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction / Proceedings of the Ninth Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics

J. Ongena; G. Van Oost

258

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2. World Energy Consumption, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal line image...

259

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Percent Change in Energy Consumption and GDP in the Former Soviet Union (Percent Change). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

260

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal line...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 (Quadrillion Btu). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal...

262

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970, 1999, 2010, and 2020 (Percent of Total). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

263

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Intensity - Total Primary Energy Consumption per Dollar of GDP ... Jordan 14,329.544 13,433.919 14,116.659 13,602.945 ...

264

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Oil Markets Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Environmental Issues and World Energy Use...

265

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; ... Sudan and South Sudan 76.6 87.4 85 ...

266

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In 1995, coal accounted for 25 percent of the worlds primary energy consumption and 36 percent of the energy consumed worldwide for electricity generation. Those shares are not...

267

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

268

International Truck | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truck Truck Jump to: navigation, search Name International Truck Place Atlanta, GA Website http://www.internationaltruck. References International Truck[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2007 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Truck is a company located in Atlanta, GA. References ↑ "International Truck" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Truck&oldid=381698" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

269

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ; Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ; Heat ...

270

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) Projections of world energy consumption and supply in IEO2007 were generated using EIA's SAGE model. SAGE is used to project energy use in detail at the end- use sector level. It is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy con- sumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well

271

International Energy Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: International energy initiative Name International energy initiative Agency/Company /Organization International Energy Initiative Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Implementation Resource Type Case studies/examples Website http://www.iei-asia.org/ Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia Equivalent URI http://iei-asia.org/projects.htm References [1] The international energy initiative (IEI) was founded in 1991, and has active regional programmes in India. IEI focuses on translating sustainable energy analysis into real solutions for developing nations around the world.[2] IEI's mode of working is referred to as INTAAACT, which means integrating information, training, analysis, advocacy, and action into projects. The Asian Regional Energy Initiative under a regional Director, was established

272

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

273

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

274

Fusion-supported decentralized nuclear energy system  

SciTech Connect

A decentralized nuclear energy system is proposed comprising mass-produced pressurized water reactors in the size range 10 to 300 MW (thermal), to be used for the production of process heat, space heat, and electricity in applications where petroleum and natural gas are presently used. Special attention is given to maximizing the refueling interval with no interim batch shuffling in order to minimize fuel transport, reactor downtime, and opportunity for fissile diversion. These objectives demand a substantial fissile enrichment (7 to 15%). The preferred fissile fuel is U-233, which offers an order of magnitude savings in ore requirements (compared with U-235 fuel), and whose higher conversion ratio in thermal reactors serves to extend the period of useful reactivity and relieve demand on the fissile breeding plants (compared with Pu-239 fuel). Application of the neutral-beam-driven tokamak fusion-neutron source to a U-233 breeding pilot plant is examined. This scheme can be extended in part to a decentralized fusion energy system, wherein remotely located large fusion reactors supply excess tritium to a distributed system of relatively small nonbreeding D-T reactors.

Jassby, D.L.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

International energy-investment dilemma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of a unified international energy market is dispelled, and the problems that exist in finding stable investors for the uncertain projects are approached. It is shown how the current contracting techniques are inappropriate for the emerging large-scale energy projects, and suggestions are made for new approaches that emphasize clauses for reviews, penalties, supply terms, inflation and oil price escalations, and currency; financing arrangements; government and international agency guarantees; and jurisdiction of national regulatory bodies. The efficiency of the world's human resources will be responsible for establishing investor confidence which will enable major financers to become involved in international energy megaprojects.

Tempest, P.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption IEO98 projects that total annual world energy consumption could be 75 percent higher in 2020 than it was in 1995. Demand for all sources of energy except nuclear power is expected to grow over the projection period. Altenative Growth Cases Trends in Energy Intensity Emissions of Greenhouse Gases and the Kyoto Protocol Carbon Emissions Reference Case Trends in Primary Energy Consumption Forecast Comparisons By 2020 the world is projected to consume three times the amount of energy it used 25 years ago (Figure 11). Despite the recent economic crisis in Southeast Asia, which may reduce expected growth of energy consumption in the short term, EIA believes that almost half of the worldÂ’s projected energy increment will occur in developing Asia. Indeed, the IEO98 reference

279

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions for the IEO2006 Kyoto Protocol Case Energy-Related Emissions of Greenhouse Gases The System for the Analysis of Global energy Markets (SAGE)-the model used by EIA to prepare the IEO2006 mid-term projections-does not include non-energy- related emissions of greenhouse gases, which are esti- mated at about 15 to 20 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions, based on inventories submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). SAGE models global energy supply and demand and, therefore, does not address agricultural and other non-energy-related emissions. EIA implicitly assumes that percentage reductions of non-energy-related emissions and their associated abatement costs will be similar to those for energy- related emissions. Non-energy-related greenhouse gas emissions are likely to grow faster than energy-related

280

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on 7 projections, end-use energy consumption depends on resource endowment, economic growth, and other political, social, and demographic factors. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is dominated by petroleum-based liquids products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines IEO2007 reference case projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non-OECD regions. Transportation Sector Energy use in the transportation

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281

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 147. OECD and non-OECD energy intensity and carbon intensity, 1990-2040 (index, 1990 = 1.0) Non-OECD carbon intensity Non-OECD energy intensity

282

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ; Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ;

283

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ; Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ; Heat Content; Country; Country: Tip: Hold ...

284

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption of Energy (Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide per Person) Loading...

285

Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir; N. N. Martovetsky; A. W. Molvik; D. D. Ryutov; T. C. Simonen

286

Optimized Data Fusion in Bandwidth and Energy Constrained Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimized Data Fusion in Bandwidth and Energy Constrained Sensor Networks Xianren Wu and Zhi Tian Abstract-- This paper considers the problem of decentralized data fusion (DDF) for large wireless sensor this setting, we derive the maximum likelihood (ML) data fusion rule for decentralized parameter estimation

Tian, Zhi "Gerry"

287

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

288

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the 6 projections, end-use energy consumption in the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors varies widely among regions and from country to country. One way of looking at the future of world energy mar- kets is to consider trends in energy consumption at the end-use sector level. With the exception of the transpor- tation sector, which is almost universally dominated by petroleum products at present, the mix of energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors varies widely by region, depending on a combination of regional factors, such as the availability of energy resources, the level of economic development, and polit- ical, social, and demographic factors. This chapter out- lines the IEO2006 projections for delivered energy consumption by end-use sector in the OECD and non- OECD regions. Residential Sector

289

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

290

REP-Rated Target Injection for Inertial Fusion Energy (A24820)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Sci. And Technol. 47, 1143 (2005)16th Topical Meeting on Technology Fusion Energy Madison Wisconsin, US, 2004999609950

Frey, D.T.

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Preface Highlights World Energy Consumption The World Oil Market (Errata as of May 13, 1998) Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectric and Other Renewable Energy Electricity Appendix A-World Energy Consumption, Oil Production, and Carbon Emissions Tables (PDF) Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A1-A13 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A14-A26 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A27-A39 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A40-A50 Appendix B-World Energy Projection System Appendix C-A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Preface The Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s outlook for world energy trends is presented in this report. Model projections now extending to the year 2020 are reported, and regional trends are discussed.

292

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. The IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand from 2004 to 2030. Total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase from 447 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 quadrillion Btu in 2030-a 57-percent increase over the projection period (Table 1 and Figure 8). The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Generally, countries outside the OECD 3 have higher projected economic growth rates and more rapid population growth

293

Electrical Energy Requirements for Accelerator and Fusion Neutrons  

SciTech Connect

The electrical energy requirements and costs of accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides of fission wastes are compared. Both systems use the same blanket concept, but tritium breeding is taken into account for the fusion system. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have the same electrical energy requirement per available blanket neutron when the blanket coverage is comparable and the fusion energy gain is near breakeven (Q {approx}1), but the fusion plant has only a fraction of the energy requirement when Q >> 1. If the blanket thermal energy is converted to electricity, the fusion plant and ATW have comparable net electrical energy outputs per available neutron when Q {approx}1.5 and the blanket neutron multiplication is large.

Jassby, Daniel L.; Schmidt, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States)

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

295

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Motorization Levels in Selected Countries, 1970, and 2020 (Vehicles per Thousand Persons). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

296

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

9. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fossil Fuel, 1970-2020 (Billion Metric Tons Carbon Equivalent). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center...

297

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11. Carbon Intensity in Selected Countries and Regions, 1999 and 2020 . For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. horizonal...

298

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Comparison of 2001 and 2002 World Oil Price Projections (2000 Dollars per Barrel). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

299

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ... Portugal 0.168 0.256 0.362 0.496 ...

300

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ... Portugal 0.020 1.600 3.500 3.300 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; Coal Prices ... Portugal 5,232 4,586 5,159 2,982 ...

302

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ; ... Portugal 0.537 0.537 1.048 1.029 1.029 1.029 ...

303

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Non-OECD Statistics" (2012), www.iea.org (subscription site). Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013, DOEEIA-0383(2013) (Washington, DC: April 2013); AEO2013 National...

304

International Energy Forum Ministerial | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Forum Ministerial International Energy Forum Ministerial International Energy Forum Ministerial April 24, 2006 - 10:27am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me take this opportunity to thank our hosts for their hospitality, as well as their efforts in arranging this meeting of the International Energy Forum. Let me also thank my fellow panelists and the panel Chair Minister Naimi, who I look forward to seeing again in Washington next week. These are challenging times in the energy world--demand and supply are roughly in balance, spare capacity is very slim, and continued strong economic growth around the world is fueling increasing demand. I believe that we can meet the challenge if both consumers and producers act responsibly; if we all implement policies that encourage stability,

305

International Energy Outlook 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 5 July 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy...

306

INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY AGENCE INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE International Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies !Examples: "CO2 capture and storage "Hydrogen "Renewables "Energy Efficiency #12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY AGENCE INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE CO2 Capture and Storage #12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCYINTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY AGENCE INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE International Energy Conference 19

307

Renewable Energy Resources Inc formerly Internal Hydro International Inc |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Hydro International Inc Internal Hydro International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33603 Sector Hydro Product Internal Hydro's technology takes waste, pumped pressures of fluids, gases or the constantly available natural flows of water and extracts power from them via a turbine. References Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) is a company located in Tampa, Florida . References ↑ "Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro

308

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic (human- caused) emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, and as a result world energy use has emerged at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2006 reference case, world carbon dioxide emissions increase from 25,028 million metric tons in 2003 to 33,663 million metric tons in 2015 and 43,676 million metric tons in 2030 (Figure 65). 14 The Kyoto Protocol, which requires participating "Annex I" countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions collectively to an annual

309

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

310

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Sector Industrial Sector Energy Sector International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Industrial Sector Energy Sector Figure 82. Annual changes in world industrial and all other end-use energy consumption from previous year, 2006-2010 Figure 83. World delivered energy consumption in the industral and all other end-use sectors, 2005-2035 Figure 84. OECD and Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 85. World industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 86. World industrial sector energy consumption by major energy-intensive industry shares, 2007 Figure 87. OECD and Non-OECD major steel producers, 2008 Figure 88. OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 89. Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035

311

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation...

312

Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work in Fusion Energy Greg Hammett & Russell Kulsred Princeton University Wednesday, Dec 4, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at...

313

Liquid Metal MHD Energy Conversion in Fusion Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative Concepts for Power Conversion / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

L. Blumenau; H. Branover; A. El-Boher; E Spero; S. Sukoriansky; G. Talmage; E. Greenspan

314

In-Situ MHD Energy Conversion for Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative Concepts for Power Conversion / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

R. B. Campbell; M. A. Hoffman; B. G. Logan

315

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

316

Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ceramic matrix composites are considered among the key enabling materials for advanced nuclear reactors and fusion energy systems. Silicon ...

317

International Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Figure 10. World Enery Intensity by Region, 1970-2020 (Thousand Btu per 1997 Dollar of GDP). For more detailed information, contact the National Energy Information Center at (202)...

318

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources While renewable energy sources are not expected to gain market share, they are expected to retain an 8-percent share of world energy use through 2020. Regional Activity World events and low fossil fuel prices in 1997 have had mixed effects on the markets for hydroelectricity and other renewable energy sources. World oil prices have fallen from $24 per barrel in 1996 to the 1997 price of $17per barrel, and they are expected to remain below $23 per barrel through 2020 (prices in 1996 U.S. dollars). Low fossil fuel prices will continue to make it difficult for renewable energy sources to compete for market share. On the other hand, the climate change protocol developed in Kyoto, Japan, in 1997 increases interest in the potential role of renewables, inasmuch as

319

DOE International Energy Advisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy is a critical operational requirement and cornerstone of planning and logistics for the Department of Defense (DOD).  It is also part of the strategic context in which the Combatant Commands...

320

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Appendix F Table F10. Total Non-OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sectorfuel Projections Average annual percent change,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Appendix F Table F16. Delivered energy consumption in the Middle East by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sectorfuel Projections Average annual percent...

322

Electrical energy requirements for ATW and fusion neutrons  

SciTech Connect

This note compares the electrical energy requirements of accelerator (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides of fission wastes. Both systems use the same blanket concept but for each source neutron the fusion system must utilize one blanket neutron for tritium breeding. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have the same electrical energy requirement per available blanket neutron when the blanket coverage is comparable and fusion Q {approx} 1, but the fusion plant has only a fraction of the energy requirement when Q {much{underscore}gt} 1. If the blanket thermal energy is converted to electricity, the fusion plant and ATW have comparable net electrical energy outputs per available neutron when Q {>=} 2.

Jassby, D.L.; Schmidt, J.A.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Structural Materials for Fission and Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Structural materials represent the key for containment of nuclear fuel and fission products as well as reliable and thermodynamically efficient production of electrical energy from nuclear reactors. Similarly, high-performance structural materials will be critical for the future success of proposed fusion energy reactors, which will subject the structures to unprecedented fluxes of high-energy neutrons along with intense thermomechanical stresses. Advanced materials can enable improved reactor performance via increased safety margins and design flexibility, in particular by providing increased strength, thermal creep resistance and superior corrosion and neutron radiation damage resistance. In many cases, a key strategy for designing highperformance radiation-resistant materials is based on the introduction of a high, uniform density of nanoscale particles that simultaneously provide good high temperature strength and neutron radiation damage resistance.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solar Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International International Address 76 S. 2nd St. Carbondale, CO 81623 Place Carbondale, Colorado Zip 81623 Website http://www.solarenergy.org/ References http://www.solarenergy.org/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization "For 20 years, Solar Energy International has been dedicated to hands-on and online solar training and renewable energy education in wind, micro-hydro, sustainable building and developing world technologies. Solar Energy International also works with grassroots and development organizations to promote sustainability and improve quality of life worldwide through viable outreach programs. The Renewable Energy for Developing World Workshop intends to explore different applications for renewable energy technologies in developing countries. Participants will

325

Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Kevin J. Kramer; Jeffery F. Latkowski; Ryan P. Abbott; John K. Boyd; Jeffrey J. Powers; Jeffrey E. Seifried

326

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Figure 91. World liquids consumption by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 92. OECD and Non-OECD transportation sector liquids consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 93. OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007, 2025, and 2035 Figure 94. North America transportation energy use by country, 2007 and 2035 Figure 95. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 96. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 97. Non-OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007-2035 Figure 98. Non-OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 99. Transportation energy use per capita in China and South Korea, 2007-2035

327

"50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Steady-state operation is a highly desirable characteristic for a magnetic fusion power plant with toroidal multipole at GA 1966 #12;Four New Superconducting Tokamaks will Address Steady- State Advanced by Sakharov in the early 50s). ­ Wave propagation became basis for RF heating · Experimental Progress (some

328

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix C Appendix C A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union, the petroleum transportation networks in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan were designed to provide petroleum to the internal Soviet economy and, in particular, to meet the Soviet militaryÂ’s need for petroleum [1]. Investment in the Caspian Basin petroleum transportation system was, however, severely deficient. In order for the producers in the Caspian Sea area to become major petroleum exporters, existing petroleum transport lines, which generally head northward into Russia, will need upgrading. More importantly, new lines will need to be built to transport Caspian Sea oil to export markets, in some combination of westward to the Mediterranean,

329

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0484(2013) July 24, 2013 Chapter 7. Industrial sector energy consumption ... 413.87 266.34 2026.00 420.32 269.99 2027.00 426.56 273.31 2028.00 432.82 276.90 ...

330

International Energy Annual, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

Not Available

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Basics of Fusion-Fission Research Facility (FFRF) as a Fusion Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Leonid E. Zakharov

332

Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Example of NIF fusion target hohlraum with multiple beamsimilar to those used on NIF. . . . . Overview of LFFHNES Nuclear Energy System NIF National Ignition Facility ODS

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1.3.1 Fission Energy . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3.21.1.3.3 Fission-Fusion Hybrids . . . . 1.2 Scope and Purposei CONTENTS Fission Blanket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook Figure 12. World marketed energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 13. World marketed energy consumption:OECD and Non-OECD, 1990-2035 Figure 14. Shares of world energy consumption in the United States, China, and India, 1990-2035 Figure 15. Marketed energy use in the Non-OECD economies by region, 1990-2035 Figure 16. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 17. Coal consumption in selected world regions, 1990-2035 Figure 18. World electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 19. Renewable electricity generation in China by energy source, 2007-2035 Figure 20. World nuclear generating capacity by region, 2007 and 2035

336

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... United States 948.446 ... 978.020 986.215 994.888 Virgin Islands, U.S . 0.323 0.323 ...

337

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Coal Markets World Coal Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles from 2003 to 2030, with the non-OECD countries accounting for 81 percent of the increase. Coal's share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 27 percent in 2030. In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles, from 5.4 billion short tons 7 in 2003 to 10.6 billion tons in 2030 (Figure 48). Coal consumption increases by 3.0 percent per year on average from 2003 to 2015, then slows to an average annual increase of 2.0 per- cent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and pri- mary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts

338

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural gas trails coal as the fastest growing primary energy source in IEO2006. Natural gas trails coal as the fastest growing primary energy source in IEO2006. The natural gas share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 26 percent in 2030. Consumption of natural gas worldwide increases from 95 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 182 trillion cubic feet in 2030 in the IEO2006 reference case (Figure 34). Although natural gas is expected to be an important fuel source in the electric power and industrial sectors, the annual growth rate for natural gas consumption in the projec- tions is slightly lower than the growth rate for coal con- sumption-in contrast to past editions of the IEO. Higher world oil prices in IEO2006 increase the demand for and price of natural gas, making coal a more econom- ical fuel source in the projections. Natural gas consumption worldwide increases at an average rate of 2.4 percent

339

Improved Magnetic Fusion Energy Economics via Massive Resistive Electromagnets  

SciTech Connect

Abandoning superconductors for magnetic fusion reactors and instead using resistive magnet designs based on cheap copper or aluminum conductor material operating at "room temperature" (300 K) can reduce the capital cost per unit fusion power and simplify plant operations. By increasing unit size well beyond that of present magnetic fusion energy conceptual designs using superconducting electromagnets, the recirculating power fraction needed to operate resistive electromagnets can be made as close to zero as needed for economy without requiring superconductors. Other advantages of larger fusion plant size, such as very long inductively driven pulses, may also help reduce the cost per unit fusion power.

Woolley, R.D.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. In recent years, atmospheric concentrations of carbon diox- ide have been rising at a rate of about 0.5 percent per year, and because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, world energy use has emerged at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2007 refer- ence case, world carbon dioxide emissions are projected to rise from 26.9 billion metric tons in 2004 to 33.9 billion metric tons in 2015 and 42.9 billion metric tons in 2030. 17 From 2003 to 2004,

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341

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Dis tri bu tion Cate gory UC-950 In ter na tional En ergy Out look 1998 April 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of In te grated Analy sis and Fore cast ing U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lyti cal agency within the De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or of any other or gani za tion. Con tacts The Inter na tional Energy Out look is pre pared by the Energy Infor ma tion Admin istra tion (EIA). Gen eral

342

U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference September 19, 2011 -...

343

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas By 2020, the worldÂ’s annual consumption of natural gas is projected to be more than double the 1995 level. Much of the growth is expected to fuel electricity generation worldwide. Reserves Regional Activity Natural gas is expected to be the fastest-growing primary energy source in the world over the next 25 years. In the IEO98 reference case, gas consumption grows by 3.3 percent annually through 2020, as compared with 2.1-percent annual growth for oil and renewables and 2.2 percent for coal. By 2020, the worldÂ’s consumption of natural gas is projected to equal 172 trillion cubic feet, more than double the 1995 level (Figure 43). Much of the growth is expected to fuel electricity generation worldwide (Figure 44), but resource availability, cost, and environmental considerations will

344

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Between 1995 and 2020, the worldÂ’s annual consumption of electricity is projected to rise from 12 trillion kilowatthours to 23 trillion kilowatthours. The greatest increases are expected in developing Asia and in Central and South America. Primary Fuel Use The Financing of Electric Power Expansion Public Policy Reform in the Electricity Industry Regional Highlights Throughout the world, electricity is and will continue to be the fastest growing component of energy demand. Between 1995 and 2020, total world electricity demand is expected to rise from 12 trillion kilowatthours to 23 trillion kilowatthours (Table 25). Demand growth will be slowest in the industrialized countries; but even in the advanced economies, which currently account for about 60 percent of world electricity use, absolute

345

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The World Oil Market The World Oil Market Oil prices are expected to remain relatively low, and resources are not expected to constrain substantial increases in oil demand through 2020. Oil usecontinues to dominate transportation energy markets. Oil Demand Growth in Industrialized Countries Oil Demand Growth in Nonindustrialized Countries Oil Demand and Transportation The Composition of World Oil Supply Worldwide Petroleum Trade in the Reference Case World Oil Price Projections Other Views of Prices and Production Policies To Lessen Environmental Damage from Transportation Fuel Use In the early 1990s, oil demand was relatively flat: oil consumption worldwide was only 1 million barrels per day higher in 1993 than it was in 1989. Since 1993, however, the worldÂ’s demand for oil has risen by almost

346

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth 4. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 121.2 132.4 143.4 152.5 161.6 1.6 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 100.6 108.7 116.9 123.2 129.1 1.4 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 13.7 15.1 16.6 18.1 19.7 1.9 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.9 8.6 9.9 11.2 12.8 3.4 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 71.9 78.9 85.6 92.4 99.8 1.7 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 29.5 32.1 35.1 38.2 41.7 1.9 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 23.2 25.2 27.6 30.1 32.9 1.9 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 6.3 6.9 7.5 8.1 8.8 1.8

347

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Reference Case, . World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Reference Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 119.8 128.1 136.5 142.1 147.1 1.2 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 99.8 105.8 112.2 115.7 118.6 1.1 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 13.3 14.3 15.4 16.4 17.5 1.5 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.6 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 2.8 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 69.7 74.5 79.0 83.4 88.1 1.2 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 28.4 30.1 32.1 34.1 36.3 1.3 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 22.3 23.5 25.1 26.7 28.5 1.3 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 6.1 6.6 7.0 7.4 7.8 1.4 Total Industrialized 184.7 199.1 205.8 217.9 232.8 247.6 259.6 271.5 1.2

348

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth 7. World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth Case, 1990-2020 (Quadrillion Btu) Region/Country History Projections Average Annual Percent Change, 1995-2020 1990 1995 1996 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Industrialized Countries North America 99.7 108.0 112.2 118.3 123.6 129.3 131.3 132.7 0.8 United Statesa 83.9 90.4 94.0 98.9 102.6 106.9 107.7 107.7 0.7 Canada 10.9 12.2 12.6 12.9 13.6 14.2 14.8 15.5 1.0 Mexico 4.9 5.5 5.6 6.4 7.4 8.2 8.8 9.5 2.2 Western Europe 61.9 64.8 66.7 67.6 70.4 72.9 75.3 77.8 0.7 Industrialized Asia 23.0 26.3 26.9 27.3 28.2 29.4 30.5 31.6 0.7 Japan 18.1 20.8 21.4 21.3 22.0 22.9 23.7 24.6 0.7 Australasia 4.9 5.6 5.5 5.9 6.2 6.5 6.7 7.0 0.9

349

International Clean Energy Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Gateway Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Clean Energy Analysis (Redirected from International Clean Energy Analysis) Jump to: navigation, search About ICEA UNIDO small.png NREL small.png The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway promotes increased access to clean energy analysis tools, databases, methods and other technical resources which can be applied in developing countries. This wiki-based dynamic platform allows you to add to the inventory of clean energy organizations, tools, programs and data included on the site. We encourage you to expand the inventory of resources by clicking on "add" below the International Initiatives map. The gateway is organized by Information Toolkits which provide tools and resources to help answer a number of clean energy questions. The International Initiatives map also provides country-specific information on clean energy programs, tools and organizations. Click here to learn more about the ICEA gateway project.

350

Fusion utilization projections in the United States energy economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed in some detail in this report: (1) applications of fusion energy, (2) fusion implementation in the US energy system, (3) reactor performance requirements, (4) technology for electric applications, and (5) technology for synthetic fuel/chemical applications. (MOW)

Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.A.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, natural gas consumption in the non-OECD countries grows In the IEO2007 reference case, natural gas consumption in the non-OECD countries grows more than twice as fast as in the OECD countries. Production increases in the non-OECD region account for more than 90 percent of the growth in world production from 2004 to 2030. Consumption of natural gas worldwide increases from 100 trillion cubic feet in 2004 to 163 trillion cubic feet in 2030 in the IEO2007 reference case (Figure 40). By energy source, the projected increase in natural gas consump- tion is second only to coal. Natural gas remains a key fuel in the electric power and industrial sectors. In the power sector, natural gas is an attractive choice for new generating plants because of its relative fuel efficiency. Natural gas also burns more cleanly than coal or petro- leum products, and as more governments begin imple- menting national or

352

(International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)  

SciTech Connect

Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

1991-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fusion technology development. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

In FY97, the General Atomics (GA) Fusion Group made significant contributions to the technology needs of the magnetic fusion program. The work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, International and Technology Division, of the US Department of Energy. The work is reported in the following sections on Fusion Power Plant Studies (Section 2), Plasma Interactive Materials (Section 3), Magnetic Diagnostic Probes (Section 4) and RF Technology (Section 5). Meetings attended and publications are listed in their respective sections. The overall objective of GA`s fusion technology research is to develop the technologies necessary for fusion to move successfully from present-day physics experiments to ITER and other next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately to fusion power plants. To achieve this overall objective, we carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and we conduct research to develop basic knowledge about these technologies, including plasma technologies, fusion nuclear technologies, and fusion materials. We continue to be committed to the development of fusion power and its commercialization by US industry.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix F Table F12. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.1 Natural gas 1.7 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 1.2 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.4 Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 2.4 Total 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 1.3 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.3 Natural gas 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.8 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 -0.1 Electricity 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 3.4 Total 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 2.1 Industrial Liquids 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 1.2 Natural gas 2.7 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.2 3.5 3.7 1.1 Coal 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 1.4 Electricity 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.2 Total 6.7 6.9 7.1 7.5 8.2 8.9 9.6 1.2 Transportation

355

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix B Table B2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Economic Growth case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 46.3 47.9 48.2 48.4 49.4 51.1 0.3 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.1 34.8 37.2 39.5 42.0 44.1 1.3 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.7 21.5 22.4 22.7 23.2 23.9 0.2 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.2 11.6 13.2 1.1 Other 11.9 11.9 14.0 15.3 16.2 17.7 19.9 23.3 2.3 Total 117.0 120.2 122.0 129.8 134.8 139.5 146.0 155.6 0.9 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 28.0 28.5 28.6 28.8 29.2 29.5 -0.1 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.3 21.1 21.5 22.8 24.0 25.4 0.7 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.4 11.1 10.8 -0.4 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.3 18.0 18.7 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 82.2 85.7 88.9 91.3 93.4 95.4 0.5 OECD Asia

356

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix F Table F14. Delivered energy consumption in India by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.9 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 -0.1 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 2.4 Electricity 0.6 1.0 1.3 1.8 2.4 3.0 3.8 6.4 Total 1.7 2.2 2.6 3.0 3.6 4.2 5.0 3.7 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 3.0 Electricity 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.3 1.6 6.5 Total 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.1 1.3 1.7 2.0 5.5 Industrial Liquids 3.2 3.4 4.0 4.5 4.9 5.1 5.1 1.6 Natural gas 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.0 Coal 4.1 4.4 5.1 5.7 6.2 6.3 6.1 1.4 Electricity 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.3 1.4 Total 11.3 11.9 13.7 15.3 16.7 17.5 17.6 1.5 Transportation Liquids 2.3 2.8 3.6 4.8 6.2 8.1

357

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix E Table E2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 46.5 48.1 48.1 48.4 49.4 51.5 0.3 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.0 34.1 36.0 37.8 39.7 41.7 1.1 Coal 21.3 22.5 20.2 20.8 21.2 21.5 22.0 22.4 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 10.8 10.9 0.5 Other 11.9 11.9 13.8 14.9 15.9 16.8 18.1 20.3 1.8 Total 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 28.4 30.0 30.5 31.2 32.0 32.7 0.2 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.6 21.6 22.0 23.5 24.9 26.4 0.9 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.3 12.2 11.9 11.7 11.4 11.1 -0.3 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.5 17.3 18.0 18.7 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia

358

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix A Table A2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.9 46.4 46.0 45.8 46.1 47.0 0.0 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 32.0 34.1 35.9 37.7 40.1 42.3 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.9 20.3 21.1 21.5 21.9 22.2 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 10.8 11.2 0.6 Other 11.9 11.9 13.7 15.0 15.9 16.8 18.3 20.8 1.9 Total 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 27.9 28.4 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 -0.2 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 20.3 21.0 21.4 22.7 23.9 25.2 0.7 Coal 11.9 12.2 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.3 11.0 10.7 -0.4 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia Liquids

359

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Appendix F Table F8. Delivered energy consumption in South Korea by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.9 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 2.3 Total 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.2 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.6 Natural gas 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 2.0 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.1 2.6 Total 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 2.1 Industrial Liquids 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 0.8 Natural gas 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.4 Coal 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.2 Electricity 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 Total 4.7 5.2 5.6 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 1.0 Transportation Liquids 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.0 2.0

360

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Appendix F Table F2. Total OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 4.3 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.4 -0.8 Natural gas 12.0 11.9 12.2 12.5 12.8 12.9 12.9 0.3 Coal 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 -1.4 Electricity 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 1.1 Total 28.2 28.1 29.0 29.9 30.8 31.3 32.0 0.4 Commercial Liquids 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2 2.2 -0.7 Natural gas 6.8 7.0 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.2 8.4 0.7 Coal 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 -0.9 Electricity 10.4 11.2 12.0 12.9 13.9 14.8 15.7 1.4 Total 20.2 20.9 22.0 23.2 24.4 25.5 26.5 0.9 Industrial Liquids 27.4 27.5 29.3 30.3 31.0 31.7 32.6 0.6 Natural gas 19.4 20.2 21.7 22.7 23.5 24.3 25.2 0.9 Coal 8.7 8.7 9.0 9.2 9.2 9.2 9.2 0.2 Electricity 11.0 11.3 12.0 12.4 12.6 12.9 13.2 0.6 Total 71.9 72.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix D Table D2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.0 44.8 44.1 43.6 43.8 45.0 -0.1 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 31.9 34.0 36.2 38.4 40.7 43.0 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.3 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.2 22.6 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 11.1 12.4 0.9 Other 11.9 11.9 13.6 15.0 15.9 17.0 18.9 21.8 2.0 Total 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 OECD Europe Liquids 30.8 30.6 27.3 27.1 27.1 27.3 27.6 27.8 -0.3 Natural gas 19.3 20.4 19.9 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.6 Coal 11.9 12.2 11.9 11.6 11.3 11.0 10.7 10.4 -0.5 Nuclear 8.6 8.9 9.2 9.6 10.8 11.0 11.1 11.1 0.7 Other 9.4 10.4 12.3 14.6 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 Total 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia

362

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Appendix F Table F18. Delivered energy consumption in Brazil by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.1 Total 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.4 2.2 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 1.1 1.4 3.9 Total 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 3.8 Industrial Liquids 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.6 2.9 3.3 1.6 Natural gas 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Coal 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.8 0.9 2.5 Electricity 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.2 1.9 Total 6.4 6.5 7.0 7.5 8.3 9.3 10.6 1.7 Transportation Liquids 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.7 3.8 4.1 1.2

363

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Appendix A Table A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 11.9 11.9 13.7 15.0 15.9 16.8 18.3 20.8 1.9 United States a 6.9 7.0 8.1 8.9 9.3 9.6 10.3 11.9 1.8 Canada 4.2 4.0 4.5 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.9 6.4 1.6 Mexico/Chile 0.8 0.9 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.7 2.1 2.4 3.5 OECD Europe 9.4 10.4 12.6 14.7 16.4 17.2 17.9 18.5 2.0 OECD Asia 2.1 2.3 2.9 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 1.8 Japan 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3 1.5 South Korea 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 3.0 Australia/NewZealand 0.7 0.7 1.0 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 2.3 Total OECD 23.4 24.6 29.2 33.0 35.9 37.8 40.1 43.3 1.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.7 5.1 1.5 Russia 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.8 1.6 Other 1.2 1.5

364

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Appendix F Table F6. Delivered energy consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 2.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.6 -0.8 Natural gas 5.6 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.5 6.6 6.8 0.7 Coal 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 -1.3 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 1.4 Total 11.7 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.5 13.7 13.9 0.6 Commercial Liquids 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 -1.0 Natural gas 2.2 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 0.9 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.0 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.7 5.0 5.3 1.7 Total 6.5 6.9 7.4 7.8 8.3 8.6 9.0 1.1 Industrial Liquids 9.6 9.0 9.5 10.1 10.5 10.9 11.3 0.5 Natural gas 6.6 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.7 6.8 0.1 Coal 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 0.0 Electricity 4.4 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.6 0.2 Total 25.4 24.1 24.9 25.8 26.3 26.8 27.4 0.3 Transportation Liquids

365

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Appendix J Table J2. World energy intensity by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (thousand Btu per 2005 dollar of GDP) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 7.6 7.5 6.7 6.1 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.2 -2.0 United States a 7.4 7.5 6.6 6.0 5.4 4.8 4.3 3.9 -2.1 Canada 11.7 11.2 10.5 9.7 9.3 8.9 8.4 8.0 -1.1 Mexico/Chile 5.3 5.3 4.8 4.4 4.2 4.1 3.9 3.7 -1.1 OECD Europe 5.6 5.6 5.3 4.9 4.6 4.3 4.0 3.8 -1.3 OECD Asia 6.5 6.5 6.0 5.8 5.5 5.3 5.0 4.8 -1.0 Japan 5.6 5.6 5.2 5.1 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.7 -0.6 South Korea 8.1 8.2 7.4 6.7 6.0 5.6 5.1 4.6 -1.9 Australia/NewZealand 8.7 8.4 7.7 7.3 6.7 6.3 5.8 5.4 -1.5 Total OECD 6.6 6.6 6.0 5.6 5.2 4.8 4.4 4.1 -1.6 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 10.1 10.5 9.1 7.8 6.8 6.1 5.5 4.9 -2.5 Russia 13.9 14.7 12.7 11.2 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.8 -1.7 Other 6.9 7.1 6.2 5.1 4.4 3.8 3.3 2.9 -2.9 Non-OECD Asia

366

ICF International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICF International ICF International Jump to: navigation, search Name ICF International Address 9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22031-1207 USA Place Washington, District of Columbia Stock Symbol NASDAQ:ICFI Year founded 1969 Number of employees 1001-5000 References http://www.icfi.com/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization Contents 1 Organization Overview 1.1 Markets 2 Resources 2.1 Programs 3 References Organization Overview "ICF International partners with government and commercial clients to deliver professional services and technology solutions in the energy, environment, and infrastructure; health, social programs, and consumer/financial; and public safety and defense markets." Markets Aviation Climate Community Development Defense Education

367

Panda Energy International Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy International Inc Energy International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Panda Energy International Inc Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75244 Sector Renewable Energy Product Texas-based power asset construction company, investment firm and renewable project developer. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept.

Teofilo, V.L.; Aase, D.T.; Bickford, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Graphic data - Highlights > Graphic data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic data - Highlights Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 2. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 3. World liquids production, 1990-2035 Figure 4. Net change in world natural gas production by region, 2007-2035 Figure 5. World coal consumption by region, 1990-2035 Figure 6. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 7. World renewable electricity generation by energy source excluding world and hydropower, 2007-2035 Figure 8. World delivered energy consumption in the industrial sector, 2007-2035 Figure 9. World delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector, 2005-2035 Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035

370

2007 Estimated International Energy Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

EIA - 2009 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 The International Energy Outlook 2009 (IEO2009) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2009 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), (March 2009). A revised, updated AEO2009 reference case projection was released on April 17, 2009. It reflects the impact of provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA2009), enacted in mid-February 2009, on U.S. energy markets. The revised AEO2009 reference case includes updates for the U.S. macroeconomic outlook, which has been changing at an unusually rapid rate in recent months. Throughout IEO2009, significant changes to the U.S. outlook relative to the published AEO2009 reference case are noted for the reader's reference. The complete revised AEO2009 reference case results for the United States can be viewed on the EIA web site: http://www.eia.gov/oiaf/aeo.

372

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion Vintage DOE: What is Fusion January 10, 2011 - 12:45pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs As our team works to build our new website and new content features over the coming months, we're also reviewing the Department's video archives. In the below piece, a narrator ask people on the street "what is fusion?" and then, around the 2-minute mark, kicks off a nice introduction to fusion science. It's worth a watch if you could use a brush up on the basic science, or if you'd just enjoy a reminder of what Americans were wearing a couple decades ago. With much research and development, scientists at the Department of Energy have done a great deal to advance our knowledge of fusion since the time

373

International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Energy Agency (IEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) (Redirected from International Energy Agency) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Energy Agency (IEA) Name International Energy Agency (IEA) Address 9 rue de la Fédération Place Paris, France Zip 75015 Number of employees 51-200 Year founded 1974 Phone number +33 1 40 57 65 54 Website http://www.iea.org Coordinates 48.8548086°, 2.2905775° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.8548086,"lon":2.2905775,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Renewable Energy Institute International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International International Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Institute International Name Renewable Energy Institute International Address 5022 Bailey Loop Place McClellan, California Zip 95652 Region Bay Area Coordinates 38.657365°, -121.390278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.657365,"lon":-121.390278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production avoidance. Sensitivity of benefits-gained to timing of market-entry is presented. These results show the importance of achieving market entry in the 2030 time frame. Economic modeling results show that fusion energy can be competitive with other low-carbon energy sources. The paper concludes with a description of the LIFE commercialization path. It proposes constructing a demonstration facility capable of continuous fusion operations within 10 to 15 years. This facility will qualify the processes and materials needed for a commercial fusion power plant.

Anklam, T; Simon, A J; Powers, S; Meier, W R

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Emissions Figure 103. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035 Figure 104. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 105. U.S.energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel in IEO2009 and IEO2010, 2007, 2015, and 2035 Figure 106. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 107. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the Non-OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 108. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 109. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 110. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion, 1990-2035

377

GreenPower International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name GreenPower International Place Alloa, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip FK10 3LP Sector Hydro, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Renewable energy project developer focused on...

378

International Solar Consulting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Solar Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name International Solar Consulting Place Newport Beach, California Zip 92660 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product...

379

Federal Energy Management Program: Establish Internal Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction...

380

NREL International Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from International Program at NREL) (Redirected from International Program at NREL) Jump to: navigation, search Name International Program at NREL Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.nrel.gov/applying_t References NREL International Program [1] NREL teams with governments, private developers, and international institutions to advance clean energy technology development worldwide through technical expertise and deployment capabilities that support international energy projects and initiatives. Our efforts to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency technology adoption on a global scale include: Multilateral partnerships Bilateral partnerships Climate/environmental initiatives Global energy assessments and knowledge transfer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Fusion -A clean future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be expected, even if energy can be used more efficiently. At the same time, we need to find new ways; Governments are divided over whether to include nuclear fission in their energy portfolios; and renewable, lithium, which is abundant in the earth's crust; · An efficient way of making energy. Just one kilogram

383

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this yearÂ’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

384

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 112.4 107.7 103.5 96.5 ...

385

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 103.3 106.4 107.0 112.4 ...

386

Overview of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Devlopment and Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

This publication gives a comprehensive introduction to controlled fusion research. Topics covered in the discussion include the following: (1) fusion system engineering and advanced design, (2) plasma engineering, (3) magnetic systems, (4) materials, (5) environment and safety, and (6) alternate energy applications. (MOW)

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

International Energy Outlook - Special Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A A Energy Information Administration Forecast Channel. If having trouble viewing this page, contact the National Energy Informaiton Center at (202) 586-8800. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Environment> International Energy Outlook> Special Topics International Energy Outlook 2004 Converting Gross Domestic Product for Different Countries to U.S. Dollars: Market Exchange Rates and Purchasing Power Parity Rates The world energy forecasts in IEO2004 are based primarily on projections of GDP for different countries and regions, which for purposes of comparison are expressed in 1997 U.S. dollars. First, GDP projections are prepared for the individual countries in terms of their own national currencies and 1997 prices of goods and services. Then, the projections are converted to 1997 U.S. dollars by applying average 1997 foreign exchange rates between the various national currencies and the dollar. The resulting projections of real GDP are thus based on national 1997 prices in each country and the 1997 market exchange rate (MER) for each currency against the U.S. dollar.

388

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

389

Energy Vision International Florida | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vision International Florida Vision International Florida Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Vision International Florida Place Florida, California Sector Geothermal energy, Services Product Provides geothermal heat pumps; and administrative services to EVI subsidiaries. Coordinates 27.9758°, -81.541061° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.9758,"lon":-81.541061,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Fission-Suppressed Fusion, Thorium-Cycle Breeder and Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir

391

A Fusion Hybrid Reactor Based on the Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

Terry Kammash

392

ORYXE Energy International Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORYXE Energy International Inc ORYXE Energy International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name ORYXE Energy International Inc Place Irvine, California Zip 92618 Sector Carbon, Hydro Product ORYXE Energy International Inc develops, certifies, and distributes bio-additives that improve fuel performance and reduce toxic emissions from the combustion of hydrocarbons, such as diesel fuel and gasoline. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

highlights.gif (3388 bytes) highlights.gif (3388 bytes) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 65 percent from 1996 to 2020. The current economic problems in Asia and Russia have lowered projections relative to last year’s report. In the reference case projections for this International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), world energy consumption reaches 612 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) by 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1)—an increase of 65 percent over the 24-year projection period. The IEO99 projection for the world’s energy demand in 2020 is about 4 percent (almost 30 quadrillion Btu) lower than last year’s projection. The downward revision is based on events in two parts of the world: Asia and Russia. In Asia, the economic crisis that began in early 1997 persisted throughout 1998, as economic

394

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) To Forecasting Home Page bullet1.gif (843 bytes) EIA Homepage HIGHLIGHTS World energy consumption is projected to increase by 60 percent from 1997 to 2020. Recent price developments in world oil markets and economic recovery in Southeast Asia have altered projections relative to last yearÂ’s report. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000), world energy consumption increases by 60 percent over a 23-year forecast period, from 1997 to 2020. Energy use worldwide increases from 380 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1997 to 608 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 1999 are reflected in this yearÂ’s outlook. Shifting short-term world oil markets, the beginnings

395

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 6: Electricity World electricity consumption doubles in the IEO2006 projections from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD countries account for 71 percent of the projected growth, and OECD countries account for 29 percent. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2003-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 56. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 57. Net Electricity Consumption in OECD Countries by End-Use Sector, 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

396

Journal of Nuclear Materials, Volumes 367-370, 2007, 1586-1589 Designing Optimised Experiments for the International Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility R. Kemp1 G.A. Cottrell2 and H.K.D.H. Bhadesia1 1 Department EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon., OX14 3DB, UK Abstract The development of fusion power requires a facility for assessing the behaviour of materials subjected to damage

Cambridge, University of

397

June 28, 2005 U.S.Statements on International Fusion Reactor (ITER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce clean, safe, renewable, and commercially-available fusion energy by the middle of this century to the ITER talks. China, the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation, and South Korea also

398

Applications of fusion thermal energy to industrial processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of applying fusion thermal energy as process heat in the iron-steel industry, petrochemical industry, cement industry, and in the production of acetylene fom coal via calcium carbide are discussed. These four industries were selected for analysis because they require massive amounts of energy. This preliminary study concludes that the production of synthetic fuels using fusion heat appears to be the most promising method of storing and transporting this heat. Of the four industries studied, the iron-steel and the petrochemical industries appear to be the most promising because they consume substantial amounts of hydrogen and oxygen as feedstocks. These can be produced from water using the high-temperature fusion heat. The production of hydrogen and oxygen using fusion heat will also reduce the capital investment required for these industries. These two industries also consume tremendous amounts of heat at temperatures which can be delivered from a fusion blanket via chemical heat pipes.

Bowman, R.M.; Jody, B.J.; Lu, K.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Inertial fusion: an energy-production option for the future  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the inertial-confinement approach to fusion energy. After explaining the fundamentals of fusion, they describe the state of the art of fusion experiments, emphasizing the results achieved through the use of neodymium-doped glass lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at other laboratories. They highlight recent experimental results confirming theoretical predictions that short-wavelength lasers have excellent energy absorption on fuel pellets. Compressions of deuterium-tritium fuel of over 100 times liquid density have been measured, only a factor of 10 away from the compression required for a commercial reactor. Finally, it is shown how to exploit the unique characteristics of inertial fusion to design reactor chambers that have a very high power density and a long life, features that the authors believe will eventually lead to fusion power at a competitive cost.

Hovingh, J.; Pitts, J.H.; Monsler, M.J.; Grow, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NREL International Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name International Program at NREL Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Website http://www.nrel.gov/applying_t References NREL International Program [1] NREL teams with governments, private developers, and international institutions to advance clean energy technology development worldwide through technical expertise and deployment capabilities that support international energy projects and initiatives. Our efforts to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency technology adoption on a global scale include: Multilateral partnerships Bilateral partnerships Climate/environmental initiatives Global energy assessments and knowledge transfer Researcher-driven collaboration.[1] NREL International Program Presentation

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

402

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

403

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

404

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

405

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategic plans. Large  Scale  Computing  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   DOE  

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

International Energy Outlook 2002 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Linda Doman linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041 World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler Aloulou Fawzi george.butler@eia.doe.gov aloulou.fawzi@eia.doe.gov 202/586-9503 202/586-7818 Natural Gas Phyllis Martin Bruce Bawks phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov 202/586-9592 202/586-6579 ChinaÂ’s West-to-East Pipeline Aloulou Fawzi aloulou.fawzi@eia.doe.gov 202/586-7818

407

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Contacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Bruce Bawks - 202/586-6579 bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Phyllis Martin - 202/586-9592 phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov Gas-to-Liquids Technology William Trapmann - 202/586-6408 william.trapmann@eia.doe.gov Coal Michael Mellish - 202/586-2136

408

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Printer Friendly Version (PDF) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Linda Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Bruce Bawks (bruce.bawks@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-6579) Natural Gas Sara Banaszak Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Coal Sara Banaszak

409

Edison International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edison International Edison International Place Rosemead, California Zip 91770 Product Utility company and parent of SCE and Edison Mission Energy. Coordinates 34.08072°, -118.076539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.08072,"lon":-118.076539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

410

Biofuels International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels International Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels International Place Indiana Sector Biofuels Product Pittsburgh based biofuels project developer presently...

411

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation: The German Experience" JĂĽrgen at Urbana-Champaign. His research and teaching interests include: energy security, climate change

Sheridan, Jennifer

412

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code MFE Magnetic Fusion Energy MOX Mixed Oxide NES Nuclearreprocessing mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, as will be discussedbegun using Mixed ox- ide or MOX fuel as a means of both

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Energy Agency (IEA) (Redirected from IEA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Energy Agency (IEA) Name International Energy Agency (IEA) Address 9 rue de la Fédération Place Paris, France Zip 75015 Number of employees 51-200 Year founded 1974 Phone number +33 1 40 57 65 54 Website http://www.iea.org Coordinates 48.8548086°, 2.2905775° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.8548086,"lon":2.2905775,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Fusion energy science: Clean, safe, and abundant energy through innovative science and technology  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy science combines the study of the behavior of plasmas--the state of matter that forms 99% of the visible universe--with a vision of using fusion--the energy source of the stars--to create an affordable, plentiful, and environmentally benign energy source for humankind. The dual nature of fusion energy science provides an unfolding panorama of exciting intellectual challenge and a promise of an attractive energy source for generations to come. The goal of this report is a comprehensive understanding of plasma behavior leading to an affordable and attractive fusion energy source.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

416

International Energy Outlook - Chapter References  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chapter References Chapter References International Energy Outlook 2004 Chapter References World Energy and Economic Outlook 1. D.F. Barnes et al., “Tackling the Rural Energy Problem in Developing Countries,” Finance & Development, Vol. 34, No. 2 (June 1997), pp. 11-15. 2. A. Kirby, “Russia’s Climate Tussle Spins On,” BBC News Online (December 4, 2003). 3. A.C. Revkin, “Into Thin Air: Kyoto Accord May Not Die (or Matter),” The New York Times (December 4, 2003), p. A6. 4. The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, “President Announces Clear Skies & Global Climate Change Initiatives” (Press Release, February 14, 2002), web site www.whitehouse.gov/news/ releases/2002/02/20020214-5.html. 5. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2004, DOE/EIA-0383(2004) (Washington, DC, January 2004); and Global Insight, Inc., World Overview (Lexington, MA, September 2003). India’s GDP growth rates were adjusted downward, based on the judgment of EIA analysts.

417

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Use Transportation Energy Use picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Oil is expected to remain the primary fuel source for transportation throughout the world, and transportation fuels are projected to account for almost 57 percent of total world oil consumption by 2020. Transportation fuel use is expected to grow substantially over the next two decades, despite oil prices that hit 10-year highs in 2000. The relatively immature transportation sectors in much of the developing world are expected to expand rapidly as the economies of developing nations become more industrialized. In the reference case of the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), energy use for transportation is projected to increase by 4.8 percent per year in the developing world, compared with

418

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5350 bytes) transportation.gif (5350 bytes) Transportation energy use is projected to constitute more than half of the worldÂ’s oil consumption in 2020. Developing nations account for more than half the expected growth in transportation energy use in the IEO99 forecast. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents a more detailed analysis than in previous years of the underlying factors conditioning long-term growth prospects for worldwide transportation energy demand. A nationÂ’s transportation system is generally an excellent indicator of its level of economic development. In many countries, personal travel still means walking or bicycling, and freight movement often involves domesticated animals. High rates of growth from current levels in developing countries such as China and India still leave their populations

419

Evaluation of DD and DT fusion fuel cycles for different fusion-fission energy systems  

SciTech Connect

A study has been carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of an energy system to produce a new source of fissile fuel for existing fission reactors. The denatured fuel cycles were used because it gives additional proliferation resistance compared to other fuel cycles. DT and DD fusion drivers were examined in this study with a thorium or uranium blanket for each fusion driver. Various fuel cycles were studied for light-water and heavy-water reactors. The cost of electricity for each energy system was calculated.

Gohar, Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is expected to continue. Although 1999 world consumption, at 4.7 billion short tons,9 was 15 percent higher than coal use in 1980, it was lower than in any year since 1984 (Figure 51). The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 1999 and 2020, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent, but with considerable variation among regions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

electricity.gif (3233 bytes) electricity.gif (3233 bytes) Electricity continues to be the most rapidly growing form of energy consumption in the IEO99 projections. The strongest long-term growth in electricity consumption is projected for the developing countries of Asia. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America (Figure 64). In the reference case for the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), the projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations average nearly 5 percent per year from 1996 to 2020 (Table 17). Electricity consumption growth in Central and South America is projected to exceed 4 percent between 1996 and 2020. The projected increases in electricity use are based on expectations of rapid

422

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Electricity Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2035 Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030 Figure 72. Net electricity generation in North America, 1990-2035 Figure 73. Net electricity generation in North America by Fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 74. Net electricity generation in OECD Europe by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 75. Net electricity generation in OECD Asia, 2007-2035 Figure 76. Net electricity generation in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035

423

Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy's Office of Science #12;Fusion is part of SC's part of the American Competitiveness Initiative is improved." - Energy Policy Act of 2005, Sec. 972(b)(1)(E) Outreach to S&T Communities #12;Outreach to S of science and technology ­ No direct incentive for broader communities to initiate ­ Energy Policy Act

424

Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step Ren Pellat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, will have to be properly considered in tokamak reactor design. MHD theory and modelling have been Atomic Energy Chairman of the CCE-FU Energy and environment. Nuclear and renewable energies 8 ­ 9 March allowed to continuously progress towards the fusion reactor which stays a physics and technology ambitious

425

International Energy Outlook 2000 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2000 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia and South America. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2020. The IEO2000 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia and South America. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2020. Current Trends Influencing World Energy Demand Changing world events and their effects on world energy markets shape the long-term view of trends in energy demand. Several developments in 1999—shifting short-term world oil markets, the recovery of developing Asian markets, and a faster than expected recovery in the economies of the former Soviet Union— are reflected in the projections presented in this year’s International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). In 1998, oil prices reached 20-year lows as a result of oil surpluses

426

Ynfiniti Engineering Services International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Jump to: navigation, search Name Ynfiniti Engineering Services International Place Spain Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Company that specializes in the installation and maintenance of wind farms and solar plants. References Ynfiniti Engineering Services International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ynfiniti Engineering Services International is a company located in Spain . References ↑ "Ynfiniti Engineering Services International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ynfiniti_Engineering_Services_International&oldid=353364" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

427

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, financial analysis, ... International Energy Outlook 2013. Release Date: July 25, 2013 ...

428

Neutronics issues and inertial fusion energy: a summary of findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed and compared five major inertial fusion energy (IFE) and two representative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) power plant designs for their environment, safety, and health (ES&H) characteristics. Our work has focussed upon the neutronics of each of the designs and the resulting radiological hazard indices. The calculation of a consistent set of hazard indices allows comparisons to be made between the designs. Such comparisons enable identification of trends in fusion ES&H characteristics and may be used to increase the likelihood of fusion achieving its full potential with respect to ES&H characteristics. The present work summarizes our findings and conclusions. This work emphasizes the need for more research in low-activation materials and for the experimental measurement of radionuclide release fractions under accident conditions.

Latkowski, J. F., LLNL

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fusion dynamics of symmetric systems near barrier energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections was explained as the lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model. The numbers of nucleon transfer in the neck region are appreciably dependent on the incident energies, but strongly on the reaction systems. A comparison of the neck dynamics is performed for the symmetric reactions $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni and $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. An increase of the ratios of neutron to proton in the neck region at initial collision stage is observed and obvious for neutron-rich systems, which can reduce the interaction potential of two colliding nuclei. The distribution of the dynamical fusion barriers and the fusion excitation functions are calculated and compared them with the available experimental data.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

International Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

431

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2007 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

432

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2008 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2008 (IEO2008) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2008 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

433

Multimodal Options for Materials Research to Advance the Basis for Fusion Energy in the ITER Era  

SciTech Connect

Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major materials systems that are candidates for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: 1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and 2) Using this improved understanding to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption:OECDand Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 12....

435

Application of small-signal fusion energy gain  

SciTech Connect

The measured burnup fraction of the 1-MeV tritons produced in a deuterium tokamak plasma, multiplied by 17.5, is essentially the small-signal fusion energy gain g/sub T/ for an ideal 1-MeV triton beam injected into the deuterium plasma. The measured g/sub T/ can be converted directly into the two-component fusion energy gain that would be realized if a lower energy tritium beam were injected into the plasma, or if a deuterium beam were injected into a tritium target plasma having the same parameters as the acutal deuterium plasma. Under certain conditions, g/sub T/ greater than or equal to 1 can be obtained by injection of a low-current 225-keV tritium beam into a hot deuterium plasma, thereby verifying that the plasma has the essential characteristics needed for achieving macroscopic fusion energy ''break-even.''

Jassby, D.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

International Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation. Collaboration with governmental, academic, and industrial organizations in other countries expands the technical depth of the EM program. Working with the international community offers the opportunity to develop consensus on approaches to science, technology and policy for environmental

437

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Natural Gas Figure 36. World natural gas consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 37. Change in world natural gas production by region, 2007 and 2035 Figure 38. Natural gas consumption in North America by country, 2007-2035 Figure 39. Natural gas consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 40. Natural gas consumption in OECD Asia by country and end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 41. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035 Figure 42. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD by Asia by country, 2007-2035 Figure 43. OECD natural gas production by country, 1990-2035 Figure 44. OECD Europe natural gas production, 1990-2035 Figure 45. Middle East natural gas production, 1990-2035

438

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IEO > Order Information IEO > Order Information International Energy Outlook 2009 Ordering Information This EIA publications may be purchased from the U.S. Government Printing Office via the Internet, phone, fax, postal mail, or teletype. Payment must accompany all orders. Method Reference Internet U.S. Government Online Bookstore Phone DC Metro Area: (202) 512-1800 Toll-Free: (866) 512-1800 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m., Eastern time, M-F Fax (202) 512-2104 Mail Superintendent of Documents P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 For additional information see, U.S. Government Online Bookstore Support Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as public and academic libraries; Federal, State, local, and foreign governments; EIA survey respondents; and the

439

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2001 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. In the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) reference case, worldwide electricity consumption is projected to increase at an average annual rate of 2.7 percent from 1999 to 2020 (Table 20). The most rapid growth in electricity use is projected for developing Asia, at 4.5 percent per year, and by 2020 developing Asia is expected to consume more than twice as much electricity as it did in 1999. ChinaÂ’s electricity consumption is projected to triple, growing by an average of 5.5 percent per year from 1999 to 2020. The expected growth rate for electricity use in

440

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Laser Intertial Fusion Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the neutronics design aspects of a hybrid fusion-fission energy system called the Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LFFH). A LFFH combines current Laser Inertial Confinement fusion technology with that of advanced fission reactor technology to produce a system that eliminates many of the negative aspects of pure fusion or pure fission systems. When examining the LFFH energy mission, a significant portion of the United States and world energy production could be supplied by LFFH plants. The LFFH engine described utilizes a central fusion chamber surrounded by multiple layers of multiplying and moderating media. These layers, or blankets, include coolant plenums, a beryllium (Be) multiplier layer, a fertile fission blanket and a graphite-pebble reflector. Each layer is separated by perforated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel walls. The central fusion chamber is surrounded by an ODS ferritic steel first wall. The first wall is coated with 250-500 {micro}m of tungsten to mitigate x-ray damage. The first wall is cooled by Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} eutectic, chosen for its neutron multiplication and good heat transfer properties. The {sub 17}Pb{sub 83} flows in a jacket around the first wall to an extraction plenum. The main coolant injection plenum is immediately behind the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}, separated from the Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} by a solid ODS wall. This main system coolant is the molten salt flibe (2LiF-BeF{sub 2}), chosen for beneficial neutronics and heat transfer properties. The use of flibe enables both fusion fuel production (tritium) and neutron moderation and multiplication for the fission blanket. A Be pebble (1 cm diameter) multiplier layer surrounds the coolant injection plenum and the coolant flows radially through perforated walls across the bed. Outside the Be layer, a fission fuel layer comprised of depleted uranium contained in Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles having a packing fraction of 20% in 2 cm diameter fuel pebbles. The fission blanket is cooled by the same radial flibe flow that travels through perforated ODS walls to the reflector blanket. This reflector blanket is 75 cm thick comprised of 2 cm diameter graphite pebbles cooled by flibe. The flibe extraction plenum surrounds the reflector bed. Detailed neutronics designs studies are performed to arrive at the described design. The LFFH engine thermal power is controlled using a technique of adjusting the {sup 6}Li/{sup 7}Li enrichment in the primary and secondary coolants. The enrichment adjusts system thermal power in the design by increasing tritium production while reducing fission. To perform the simulations and design of the LFFH engine, a new software program named LFFH Nuclear Control (LNC) was developed in C++ to extend the functionality of existing neutron transport and depletion software programs. Neutron transport calculations are performed with MCNP5. Depletion calculations are performed using Monteburns 2.0, which utilizes ORIGEN 2.0 and MCNP5 to perform a burnup calculation. LNC supports many design parameters and is capable of performing a full 3D system simulation from initial startup to full burnup. It is able to iteratively search for coolant {sup 6}Li enrichments and resulting material compositions that meet user defined performance criteria. LNC is utilized throughout this study for time dependent simulation of the LFFH engine. Two additional methods were developed to improve the computation efficiency of LNC calculations. These methods, termed adaptive time stepping and adaptive mesh refinement were incorporated into a separate stand alone C++ library name the Adaptive Burnup Library (ABL). The ABL allows for other client codes to call and utilize its functionality. Adaptive time stepping is useful for automatically maximizing the size of the depletion time step while maintaining a desired level of accuracy. Adaptive meshing allows for analysis of fixed fuel configurations that would normally require a computationally burdensome number of depletion zones. Alternatively, Adaptive M

Kramer, K

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Tool RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Tool Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.retscreen.net/ang/home.php Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/retscreen-international-clean-energy- Language: String representation "English,Arabic, ... Urdu,Vietnamese" is too long. Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Training & Education The RETScreen International Clean Energy Project Analysis Software is a unique decision-support tool. The software, provided free-of-charge, can be used worldwide to evaluate the energy production and savings, costs,

444

International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Awards for Appliance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Awards for Appliance Manufacturers and Retailers Title International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Awards for Appliance...

445

Free Energy International Canada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada Canada Jump to: navigation, search Name Free Energy International (Canada) Place Richmond, British Columbia, Canada Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product British Columbia-based Free Energy is a technology developer focused on the solar thermal, geothermal and waste-to-energy sectors. The company has received government funding in Alberta for a geothermal project it is developing with Borealis GeoPower. Coordinates 37.5407°, -77.433654° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5407,"lon":-77.433654,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Inertial and inductive energy storage for fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy storage is necessary for all proposed fusion reactor systems. The plasma physics for confinement and primarily the energy transfer time determine the nature of the storage system. Discharge times vary from 0.7 ms for theta-pinch reactors to one to two seconds for tokamak reactors. Three classes of devices are available for energy storage--inductors, capacitors, and rotating machines. The transfer of the energy from the store imposes unusual switching requirements. The broad requirements for reactor energy stores and more specifically those for tokamak experimental power reactors (EPR) and for the Scyllac fusion test reactor (SFTR) will be presented. Assessments and comparisons of alternative energy storage and transfer systems for these devices are to be discussed. The state of the pulsed superconducting inductive energy storage coils and homopolar development programs will be emphasized. Plans for tokamak ohmic-heating systems will be discussed briefly.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Integrated Energy Systems International Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Systems International Ltd Energy Systems International Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Energy Systems International Ltd Place United Kingdom Zip PR1 2NL Sector Biomass Product UK-based firm which operates in energy technology management and cost control. The firm is working with International Paper on a biomass project. References Integrated Energy Systems International Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Integrated Energy Systems International Ltd is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Integrated Energy Systems International Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Integrated_Energy_Systems_International_Ltd&oldid=347005"

449

Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program  

SciTech Connect

This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects of the program. The report also outlines a process for establishing a database for the fusion research program that will indicate how each research element fits into the overall program. This database will also include near-term milestones associated with each research element, and will facilitate assessments of the balance within the program at different levels. The Office of Fusion Energy Sciences plans to begin assembling and using the database in the Spring of 2001 as we receive proposals from our laboratories and begin to prepare our budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2003.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Magnetic fusion: planning for the future  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of international cooperation in the fusion program is given. The author shares his views on the technical prospects and future potential of fusion as a practical energy source. (MOW)

Fowler, T.K.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and...

452

Gateway:International/About | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International/About International/About Jump to: navigation, search The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway seeks to catalyze the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency decision support tools to inform policy, program, and project development. Through a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) collaborative initiative, this community web portal will provide outreach and training programs to foster dissemination and application of analysis tools, with special emphasis on developing countries. It complements existing forums that provide technical information on clean energy policies and project development, with a unique focus on analysis tools and methods.

453

Proceedings: Fourth International Conference on Cold Fusion: Volume 3: Nuclear Measurements Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fourth International Conference on Cold Fusion was held December 6-9, 1993 in Lahaina, Hawaii with the presentation of 125 papers appearing in these proceedings. A number of new experimental approaches were presented (e.g., the use of ceramic proton conductors at high temperature, and the use of ultrasonic cavitation in heavy water to load palladium and titanium foils with deutronium). The wide range of theoretical models and speculations shows that the field remains in an exploratory phase.

1994-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Proceedings: Fourth International Conference on Cold Fusion: Volume 4: Theory and Special Topics Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fourth International Conference on Cold Fusion was held December 6-9, 1993 in Lahaina, Hawaii with the presentation of 125 papers appearing in these proceedings. A number of new experimental approaches were presented (e.g.,the use of ceramic proton conductors at high temperature, and the use of ultrasonic cavitation in heavy water to load palladium and titanium foils with deutronium. The wide range of theoretical models and speculations shows that the field remains in an exploratory phase.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

SolarPro Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarPro Energy International SolarPro Energy International Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarPro Energy International Place Granite Bay, California Zip 95746 Sector Solar Product SolarPro Energy installs solar power systems using PV panels for residential and commercial properties. References SolarPro Energy International[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SolarPro Energy International is a company located in Granite Bay, California . References ↑ "SolarPro Energy International" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SolarPro_Energy_International&oldid=351417" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

456

International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/platform.asp International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform Screenshot References: International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform[1] Logo: International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform "The Technology Platform's central aim is to accelerate and scale-up action for the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. It will do this by creating a forum that:

457

International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System Model Documentation 2012 November 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov

458

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

161 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market...

459

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fusion: A necessary component of US energy policy  

SciTech Connect

US energy policy must ensure that its security, its economy, or its world leadership in technology development are not compromised by failure to meet the nation's electrical energy needs. Increased concerns over the greenhouse effect from fossil-fuel combustion mean that US energy policy must consider how electrical energy dependence on oil and coal can be lessened by conservation, renewable energy sources, and advanced energy options (nuclear fission, solar energy, and thermonuclear fusion). In determining how US energy policy is to respond to these issues, it will be necessary to consider what role each of the three advanced energy options might play, and to determine how these options can complement one another. This paper reviews and comments on the principal US studies and legislation that have addressed fusion since 1980, and then suggests a research, development, and demonstration program that is consistent with the conclusions of those prior authorities and that will allow us to determine how fusion technology can fit into a US energy policy that takes a balanced, long term view of US needs. 17 refs.

Correll, D.L. Jr.

1989-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil is expected to remain the primary fuel source for transportation throughout the world, and transportation fuels are projected to account for more than one-half of total world oil consumption from 2005 through 2020. Oil is expected to remain the primary fuel source for transportation throughout the world, and transportation fuels are projected to account for more than one-half of total world oil consumption from 2005 through 2020. With little competition from alternative fuels, at least at the present time, oil is expected to remain the primary energy source for fueling transportation around the globe in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000) projections. In the reference case, the share of total world oil consumption that goes to the transportation sector increases from 49 percent in 1997 to 55 percent in 2020 (Figure 84). The IEO2000 projections group transportation energy use into three travel modes—road, air, and other (mostly rail but also including pipelines, inland waterways, and

462

Perspective on Fusion Energy Presentation at TWAS-ARO Meeting Bibliotheca Alexandria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

major new (clean) energy sources (e.g. fusion) · Expand use of existing "clean" energy sources (e;Incentives for Developing Fusion Sustainable energy source (for DT cycle: provided that Breeding BlanketsPerspective on Fusion Energy Presentation at TWAS-ARO Meeting Bibliotheca Alexandria December 21

Abdou, Mohamed

463

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2000 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2000 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Worldwide electricity consumption in 2020 is projected to be 76 percent higher than its 1997 level. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America. The projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations are close to 5 percent per year over the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000) forecast period (Table 20), and the growth rate for Central and South America averages about 4.2 percent per year. As a result, the developing nations in the two regions

464

International Energy: Subject Thesaurus. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Agency: Subject Thesaurus contains the standard vocabulary of indexing terms (descriptors) developed and structured to build and maintain energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency`s International Nuclear Information System (INIS) staff representing the more than 100 countries and organizations that record and index information for the international nuclear information community. ETDE member countries are also members of INIS. Nuclear information prepared for INIS by ETDE member countries is included in the ETDE Energy Database, which contains the online equivalent of the printed INIS Atomindex. Indexing terminology is therefore cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This structured vocabulary reflects thscope of international energy research, development, and technological programs. The terminology of this thesaurus aids in subject searching on commercial systems, such as ``Energy Science & Technology`` by DIALOG Information Services, ``Energy`` by STN International and the ``ETDE Energy Database`` by SilverPlatter. It is also the thesaurus for the Integrated Technical Information System (ITIS) online databases of the US Department of Energy.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inertial confinement and high density Inertial confinement and high density plasma physics Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's Inertial Confinement Fusion program is conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester, and the Trident Laser Facility at Los Alamos. Within inertial confinement fusion and the high energy density area, Los Alamos specializes in hohlraum energetics, symmetry tuning, warm dense matter physics, and hydrodynamics in ultra-extreme conditions. When complete, this research will enable the exploitation of fusion as an energy resource and will enable advanced research in stockpile stewardship

466

Fusion-Fission Hybrid Using a D-D Cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Driver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

George H. Miley; Bradley Boyer

467

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Fusion energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

signed by former Energy Secretary Steven Chu and presented by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, cited Hawryluk for "applying his wealth of big-science project management experience...

468

BBI International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name BBI International Place Salida, Colorado Zip 81201 Sector Biofuels Product Information service provider for the Biofuels industry. Is developing 2...

469

Prescience International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Zip 94102 Product String representation "San Francisco b ... ging companies." is too long. References Prescience International1 LinkedIn Connections...

470

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

d-ibm-collaborate-advancing-supercomputing-technology Article U.S. Signs International Fusion Energy Agreement Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project to Begin Construction http:...

471

Fusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Energy Supply and Needs Global per capita energy usage Global Per Capita energy usage will increase even will continueto bethe dominant sources of energy inthe U.S. during the next thirty years - Coal for electrical power production - Oil for transportation - Natural gas for heating/electrical power - Nuclear fission

472

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2007 International Energy Outlook 2007 The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report is also released in print. Projection Tables Appendix A. Reference Case Appendix B. High Economic Growth Case Appendix C. Low Economic Growth Case Appendix D. High World Oil Price Case Appendix E. Low World Oil Price Case Appendix F. Reference Case Projections by End Use Appendix G. Projections of Petroleum and Other Liquids Productions in Three Cases

473

Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548 Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 650°C and has a low enough vapor pressure. Li and Li17Pb83 would also work but must be 1.5 m thick and increased pumping power features required by use of Li or Li17Pb83 suggest Flibe might be the lowest cost to a large variety of chamber design concepts for inertial fusion energy (IFE). Refs. [1­8] provide

Abdou, Mohamed

474

Determination of Atomic Data Pertinent to the Fusion Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress that has been made on the determination of atomic data pertinent to the fusion energy program. Work is reported on the identification of spectral lines of impurity ions, spectroscopic data assessment and compilations, expansion and upgrade of the NIST atomic databases, collision and spectroscopy experiments with highly charged ions on EBIT, and atomic structure calculations and modeling of plasma spectra.

None

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

475

An Evaluation of Fusion Energy R&D Gaps Using Technology Readiness Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plants, Demo, and Next Steps / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

M. S. Tillack et al.

476

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ; Energy Intensity ; Conversions ; Population ;

477

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels Consumption | Heat Content ; Total Energy. Total Primary Energy Production | Total Primary Energy Consumption ; Indicators. CO2 Emissions ; Carbon Intensity ;

478

FusEdWeb | Fusion Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Confinement Fusion Magnetic Confinement Fusion FusEdWeb: Discover Fusion CPEP's Online Fusion Course Fusion FAQ Fusion and Plasma Glossary Plasma Dictionary Student and Teacher Resources Education and Outreach Ideas Other Fusion and Plasma Sites Great Sites Internet Plasma Physics EXperience GA's Fusion Energy Slide Show International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor National Ignition Facility Search webby award honoree Webby Awards Honoree April 10, 2007 webby award honoree Links2Go - Fusion, November 9, 1998 FusEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education Our Sun | Other Stars and Galaxies | Inertial Confinement | Magnetic Confinement Fusion by Magnetic Confinement The image above is an artistic rendering of a tokamak, a donut-shaped magnetic vacuum chamber in which wispy vapors of fusion fuel are

479

Aerotecture International Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerotecture International Inc Aerotecture International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Aerotecture International Inc Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60608 Sector Wind energy Product Micro-wind turbine manufacturer. References Aerotecture International Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Aerotecture International Inc is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "Aerotecture International Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aerotecture_International_Inc&oldid=341835" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

480

International Energy and Climate Initiative - Energy+ | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initiative - Energy+ Initiative - Energy+ Jump to: navigation, search Name International Energy and Climate Initiative - Energy+ Agency/Company /Organization Norway Ministry of Foreign Affairs Partner Government of Kenya, Government of Bhutan, Government of Liberia, Government of Ethiopia, Government of Maldives, Government of Senegal, Government of Morocco, Government of Tanzania, Government of Nepal, Government of United Kingdom, Government of France, Government of Denmark, Government of Switzerland, Government of The Netherlands, Government of Republic of Korea, Government of Norway, World Bank, Asian Development Bank, African Development Bank, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), International Energy Agency (IEA), Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP), ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE), Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE), International Hydropower Association (IHA), World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), United Nations Foundation (UNF), Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP), World Wildlife Fund, Friends of the Earth Norway, Practical Action UK, World Future Council, Bellona

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "international fusion energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Senator Dianne Feinstein Statement on the Fusion Energy Sciences Act of 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and polluting. Beyond expanding renewable energy sources such as those from the sun and the wind, fusion holdsSenator Dianne Feinstein Statement on the Fusion Energy Sciences Act of 2001 June 28, 2001 Mr to accelerate the development of fusion energy as a practical and realistic alternative to fossil fuels for our

482

News Release: Energy Department and International Atomic Energy Agency to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and International Atomic Energy and International Atomic Energy Agency to Host Remediation Workshop News Release: Energy Department and International Atomic Energy Agency to Host Remediation Workshop August 9, 2012 - 9:44am Addthis Energy Department and International Atomic Energy Agency to Host Remediation Workshop News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 judy.miller@lm.doe.gov GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are hosting the International Workshop on Legacy Management and Regulatory Supervision of Uranium Legacy Sites from August 13 through 24 to exchange information and share examples of regulatory processes and case studies of site remediation, including post-remediation long-term care programs. Scientists, environmental

483

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation The Office of International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation (INEPC) collaborates with international partners to support the safe, secure, and peaceful use of nuclear energy. It works both bilaterally and multilaterally to accomplish this work. Today, nuclear energy represents the single largest source of, carbon-free baseload energy, accounting for nearly 20% of the electricity generated in the United States and 70% of our low-carbon production, avoiding over 600 million metric tons of carbon emissions. With approximately 440 commercial reactors operating in 30 countries-and 300 more valued at $1.6 trillion

484

International energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1997 (IE097) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2015.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Iteknowledgies International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iteknowledgies International Iteknowledgies International Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iteknowledgies International Name Iteknowledgies International Place Scottsdale, Arizona Zip 85259 Sector Services Year founded 2002 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 480-205-0881 Website http://www.iteknowledgies.com Coordinates 33.6978967°, -111.7376178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6978967,"lon":-111.7376178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

486

Greenlife International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and equipment saler References Greenlife International1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

487

MGM International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MGM International MGM International Jump to: navigation, search Name MGM International Place Miami, Florida Zip 33131 Product MGM International is a CDM project development, investment and commercialisation firm. Coordinates 25.728985°, -80.237419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.728985,"lon":-80.237419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

488

International Energy Outlook 2002 - Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights World Energy Consumption Preface World Oil Markets Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable Resources Environmental Issues and World Energy...

489

International Masonry Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Masonry Institute Masonry Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name International Masonry Institute Place Annapolis, MD Website http://www.internationalmasonr References International Masonry Institute[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Masonry Institute is a company located in Annapolis, MD. References ↑ "International Masonry Institute" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Masonry_Institute&oldid=379413" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

490

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Appendix I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I International Energy Outlook 2006 Appendix I: System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIAÂ’s international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Projections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each regionÂ’s existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

491

Solco International Ltd formerly Solar Energy Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Ltd formerly Solar Energy Systems International Ltd formerly Solar Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Solco International Ltd (formerly Solar Energy Systems) Place Welshpool, Western Australia, Australia Zip 6016 Sector Solar Product Solar techology company specialising in solar powered energy systems, pumps and reverse osmosis water purification systems. References Solco International Ltd (formerly Solar Energy Systems)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solco International Ltd (formerly Solar Energy Systems) is a company located in Welshpool, Western Australia, Australia . References ↑ "Solco International Ltd (formerly Solar Energy Systems)" Retrieved from

492

RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre Jump to: navigation, search Logo: RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre Name RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre Agency/Company /Organization Natural Resources Canada Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Pathways analysis Website http://www.retscreen.net/ang/h References Centre Overview [1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. "The RETScreen International Clean Energy Decision Support Centre seeks to build the capacity of planners, decision-makers and industry to implement renewable energy, cogeneration and energy efficiency projects. This objective is achieved by: developing decision-making tools (i.e. RETScreen

493

Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1665. [38] B G Logan, 1993 Fusion Engineering and Design 22,J Perkins, (June 2007), to be submitted to Nuclear Fusion. [36] M Tabak 1996 Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2. [37] S Atzeni, and

Logan, B.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494