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Sample records for international building code

  1. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Building Code (KBC) is updated every three years on a cycle one year behind the publication year for the International Building Code. Any changes to the code by the state of Kentucky...

  2. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November of 2015, the Commission adopted the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) with amendments. The Commission did not adopt the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as part...

  3. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas adopted the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as "the applicable state standard" for commercial and industrial buildings. Enforcement is provided by local jurisdictions; t...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2011 the Nebraska Building Energy Code was updated to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standards. As with the previous 2003 IECC standards, which had been in...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee adopts, promulgates and administers the state building code. Compliance is determined through the building permit and inspection process by local...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Act 093-0936 (Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings) was signed into law in August, 2004. The Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings became...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006 Iowa enacted H.F. 2361, requiring the State Building Commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized building energy code. The State Building Code...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NOTE: On March 9, 2016, the State Fire Prevention and Building Code Council adopted major updates to the State Uniform Code and the State Energy Code. The State Energy Code has been updated to 2015...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina State Building Code Council is responsible for developing all state codes. By statute, the Commissioner of Insurance has general supervision over the administration and...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Connecticut Office of the State Building Inspector establishes and enforces building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing and energy code requirements by reviewing, developing, adopting and...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  14. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Building Commission (FBC) is directed to adopt, revise, update, and maintain the Florida Building Code in accordance with Chapter 120 of the state statutes. The code is mandatory...

  15. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more deta...

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  17. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) is a statewide minimum requirement that local jurisdictions cannot amend. The code is applicable to all new buildings in the commonwealth. The...

  18. Guam- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2012 IECC is in effect for all residential and commercial buildings, Idaho schools, and Idaho jurisdictions that adopt and enforce building codes, unless a local code exists that is more...

  20. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In March 2006, SB 459 was enacted to promote renewable energy and update the state's building energy codes.

  1. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The State Building Code Council revised the Washington State Energy Code (WESC) in February 2013, effective July 1, 2013. The WESC is a state-developed code based upon ASHRAE 90.1-2010 and the...

  2. Building Energy Codes Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Jeremy Williams, Project Manager Building Technologies Peer Review April 2014 Presentation Overview: * Introduction * Statutory Requirements * Program Structure * Recent accomplishments 2 Introduction: Background NATIONAL STATE LOCAL Building codes are developed through national industry consensus processes with input from industry representatives, trade organizations, government officials, and the general public Model energy codes

  3. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire adopted a mandatory statewide building code in 2002 based on the 2000 IECC. S.B. 81 was enacted in July 2007, and it upgraded the New Hampshire Energy Code to the 2006 IECC. In Dece...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A mandatory energy code is not enforced at the state level. If a local energy code is adopted, it is enforced at the local level. Builders or sellers of new residential buildings (single-family or...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Indiana Residential Building Code is based on the 2003 IRC with state amendments (eff. 9/11/05). This code applies to 1 and 2 family dwellings and townhouses. During the adoption process,...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Changes to the energy code are submitted to the Uniform Building Code Commission. The proposed change is reviewed by the Commission at a monthly meeting to decide if it warrants further considera...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado is a home rule state, so no statewide energy code exists, although state government buildings do have specific requirements. Voluntary adoption of energy codes is encouraged and efforts...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority to promulgate the Massachusetts State Building Code (MSBC). The energy provisions in the MSBC were developed by the Boa...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri does not have a statewide building or energy code for private residential and commercial buildings, and there currently is no state regulatory agency authorized to promulgate, adopt, or...

  10. Building Energy Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Cohan Program Manager Building Energy Codes April 22, 2014 Presentation Outline * Mission * Goals * Program Organization * StrategiesRoles * Near-Term Focus * Measuring ...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Building Performance Standards (MBPS) are adopted by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Codes Administration. As required by legislation passed in...

  12. Tribal Green Building Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with even amount of white space between photos and header Tribal Green Building Codes Chelsea Chee November 1 3, 2012 SAND 2012---9858C Photos placed in horizontal position with ...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Both State building codes adoption and enforcement efforts fall under the purview of the State Fire Marshal’s Office within the Department of Commerce and Insurance (C&I). Any changes to the...

  14. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) by rule may choose to adopt the latest published editions of the energy efficiency provisions of the International Residential Code (IRC) or the...

  15. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-09-30

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of about $145 a year for an average new house. Construction cost increases are estimated at $655. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of close to $100 a year because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  16. Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2009-10-18

    Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

  17. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mesa, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-03-31

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the 2003 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of $145 a year for an average new house compared to the 2003 IECC. This energy cost saving decreases to $125 a year for the 2009 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Construction cost increases (per home) for complying with the 2009 IECC are estimated at $1256 relative to the 2003 IECC and $800 for 2006 IECC. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of about $80 a year by complying with the 2009 IECC because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  18. Building Energy Codes: State and Local Code Implementation Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mark Lessans Fellow Building Energy Codes: State and Local Code Implementation Overview ... building code regarding energy efficiency to the revised model code and submit a ...

  19. Nevada Energy Code for Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Legislation signed in 2009 changed the process of adopting building codes in the state. Previously, the statewide code would only apply to local governments that had not already adopted a code,...

  20. Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013 ...

  1. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Bureau of Construction Codes is responsible for the administration of the State Construction Code Act (1972 PA 230), also known as the Uniform Construction Code.

  2. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia's Department of Community Affairs periodically reviews, amends and/or updates the state minimum standard codes. Georgia has "mandatory" and "permissive" codes. Georgia State Energy Code...

  3. NEEP Building Energy Codes Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Markets value and prioritize energy efficiency - Rating and Disclosure ( VT, Cambridge, MA) * Robust & qualified building energy code work force: DE, RI, MA, MD, NY * ...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mississippi's existing state code is based on the 1977 Model Code for Energy Conservation (MCEC). The existing law does not mandate enforcement by localities, and any revised code will probably...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. These codes may be voluntarily adopted at the local level. Local jurisdictions...

  6. Model Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Building Performance Standards (EEBPS) are statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Building Standards Commission (BSC) is responsible for administering California's building standards adoption, publication, and implementation. Since 1989, the BSC has published tr...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Jersey Uniform Construction Code Act provides that model codes and standards publications shall not be adopted more frequently than once every three years. However, a revision or amendment...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation passed in March 2010 authorized the Alabama Energy and Residential Code (AERC) Board to adopt mandatory residential and commercial energy codes for all jurisdictions. In 2015, the AER...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1993 State Legislature updated the state energy code to the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC) and established a procedure to update the standard. Then in 1995, following consultation with an...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All residential and commercial structures are required to comply with the state’s energy code. The 2009 New Mexico Energy Conservation Code (NMECC), effective June 2013, is based on 2009...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects the public's safety by: adopting rules governing the construction, repair, and rehabilitation of buildings in the state;...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) has the authority to upgrade commercial and residential energy standards through the regulatory process. The current code, the 2009 UCC, became...

  14. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the State Fire Marshal is granted the authority to promulgate amendments, revisions, and alternative compliance methods for the code.

  15. State building energy codes status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This document contains the State Building Energy Codes Status prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 and dated September 1996. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards has developed this document to provide an information resource for individuals interested in energy efficiency of buildings and the relevant building energy codes in each state and U.S. territory. This is considered to be an evolving document and will be updated twice a year. In addition, special state updates will be issued as warranted.

  16. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On May 2014, Delaware updated its energy code to 2012 IECC with amendments for residential sector and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for the commercial sector. The Delaware specific amendments to...

  17. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authority for adopting the state energy codes was previously vested in the Energy Security Office of the Department of Commerce (originally the Department of Public Services). In 1999-2000, the...

  18. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Energy Code amendments were most recently updated for both residential and non-residential construction in 2014. In October 2010 Oregon also adopted the Oregon Solar Installation...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All new residential, commercial, and community-owned buildings constructed on or after January 1, 1992 that receive financing from the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) must comply with...

  20. Building Energy Code | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Energy Code Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial andor residential construction to adhere...

  1. Building Energy Codes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Energy Codes Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial andor residential construction to adhere...

  2. Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical ... 2014 BTO Peer Review Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes ...

  3. Building Codes Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Resources Building Codes Resources Some commercial and/or residential construction codes mandate certain energy performance requirements for the design, materials, and equipment used in new construction and renovations. State-wide minimum codes may be amended by local jurisdictions to be more stringent if energy performance requirements are lacking or liberal. Find building codes resources below. DOE Resources Building Energy Codes Program: Resource Center Building Energy Codes Program:

  4. Building Energy Codes Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Overview 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Bing Liu bing.liu@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ADOPT COMPLY DEVELOP FY12 FY13 FY14 $6.8M $4.8M $4.0M Program Summary Timeline: Multi-year program in support of DOE statutory requirements Key Milestones: 1. Update Building Energy Codes Cost-Effectiveness Methodology (Aug 2014) 2. Revised Compliance Methodology (Sept 2014) 3. 90.1-2013 Cost Analysis (Oct 2014) 4. REScheck Update Including Enhancements (Aug 2014) 5.

  5. City of San Francisco- Green Building Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the...

  6. Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code includes the statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include log homes, ma...

  7. Building Energy Codes Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and ...

  8. Building Energy Code | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Type Building Energy Code Summary Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program ...

  9. N. Mariana Islands- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  10. Building Energy Codes Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provide funding to help measure & improve code compliance The Building Energy Codes Program aims to "lock in" savings from energy codes by participating in code development processes and supporting local and state governments in the adoption and implementation of progressively more advanced building energy codes across the country. External Influences: DOE budget, Construction industry, Real estate market, State/local policies & budget Objectives Activities / Partners Outputs

  11. A Comparison of the 2003 and 2006 International Energy Conservation Codes to Determine the Potential Impact on Residential Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K; Baxter, Van D

    2008-03-01

    The IECC was updated in 2006. As required in the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1992, Title 3, DOE has a legislative requirement to "determine whether such revision would improve energy efficiency in residential buildings" within 12 months of the latest revision. This requirement is part of a three-year cycle of regular code updates. To meet this requirement, an independent review was completed using personnel experienced in building science but not involved in the code development process.

  12. Appliance Standards and Building Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards Overview for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review appstdsoverviewcymbalsky040213...

  13. Cost and code study of underground buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Various regulatory and financial implications for earth-sheltered houses and buildings are discussed. Earth-sheltered houses are covered in the most detail including discussions of building-code restrictions, HUD Minimum Property Standards, legal aspects, zoning restrictions, taxation, insurance, and home financing. Examples of the initial-cost elements in earth-sheltered houses together with projected life-cycle costs are given and compared to more-conventional energy-conserving houses. For larger-scale underground buildings, further information is given on building code, fire protection, and insurance provisions. Initial-cost information for five large underground buildings is presented together with energy-use information where available.

  14. Building Energy Codes Program (BECP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements 2 BECP Budget FY 2015 5.59M + FOA budget 2Myr 3 800,000 825,000 5,607,000 Development Adoption Compliance Goal Reduce energy use in buildings subject to...

  15. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit:...

  16. Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert ...

  17. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer ...

  18. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations This webinar provided an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in ...

  19. Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Photo of an unvented and insulated ...

  20. Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Bing Liu, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory View the Presentation Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer ...

  1. Seminar on building codes and standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A seminar was conducted for state building code officials and state energy officials to discuss the following: status of the states regulatory activities for energy conservation standards for buildings; the development, administration, and enforcement processes for energy conservation standards affecting new construction; lighting and thermal standards for existing buildings; status of the development and implementation of the Title III Program, Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS); and current status of the State Energy Conservation Program. The welcoming address was given by John Wenning and the keynote address was delivered by John Millhone. Four papers presented were: Building Energy Performance Standards Development, James Binkley; Lighting Standards in Existing Buildings, Dorothy Cronheim; Implementation of BEPS, Archie Twitchell; Sanctions for Building Energy Performance Standards, Sue Sicherman.

  2. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes03_guttman_040213.pdf (544.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Building America System Research

  3. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Takagi, T.

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Japan, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Japan.

  4. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; McJeon, Haewon C.; Shui, Bin; Lee, Seung Eon

    2009-04-17

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Korea, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial buildings in Korea.

  5. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

  6. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  7. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-30

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

  8. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-02

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Australia, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Australia.

  9. Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes04_zweig_040213.pdf (708.72 KB) More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: Southeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Stretch/Reach Codes Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

  10. Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes01_wagner_040213.pdf (510.35 KB) More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through

  11. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Building Energy Codes Program activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation Building Energy Codes Program Overview -

  12. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovations | Department of Energy Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations This webinar provided an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations. The presenter also described new content on the Building America Solution Center that will help builders meet code requirements and will help code officials apply codes to

  13. Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Fact Sheet Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet Building energy codes have been in place for over 20 years. Today's codes are providing energy savings of more than 30% compared to the codes of a decade ago. They're also saving consumers an estimated $5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet below to learn more about the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes program. View the Fact Sheet

  14. Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where we’re going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

  15. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This ...

  16. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSIASHRAEIES Standard 90.1-2013; ...

  17. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at ...

  18. Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization: The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Resource...

  19. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer ...

  20. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  1. Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Photo of an unvented and insulated crawlspace. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research by Building Science Corporation that helped to clarify and contribute to code requirements that allow unvented crawlspaces in new home construction. This is critical because unvented crawlspaces save energy while improving

  2. Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Implementation activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation Building Energy Codes

  3. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 5 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. VIEW THE PRESENTATION Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review (393.33 KB) More Documents &

  4. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every

  5. How are Building Energy Codes Developed? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How are Building Energy Codes Developed? How are Building Energy Codes Developed? August 8, 2016 - 2:19pm Addthis Image courtesy of LBNL. Image courtesy of LBNL. David Cohan David Cohan Building Energy Codes Program Manager We recently gave an overview of building energy codes and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) corresponding role. Now, we are going to take a deeper dive into the three main steps in the codes process: how they are developed, adopted, and complied with. This post focuses on

  6. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the presentation BTO_PeerReview_CodesOverview_042214.pdf (543.56 KB) More Documents &

  7. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides states and their stakeholders with a short synopsis for what it would look like to include building ...

  8. Building Energy Codes Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  9. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in ... More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review ...

  10. Energy Efficiency Program Administrators and Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    Explores how energy efficiency program administrators have helped advance building energy codes at federal, state, and local levels using technical, institutional, financial, and other resources.

  11. Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    also saving consumers an estimated 5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet...

  12. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision...

  13. Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This ...

  14. Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

  15. A Retrospective Analysis of Commercial Building Energy Codes: 1990 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.; McDonald, Sean C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2010-10-01

    Building Energy Codes Program's efforts are designed to result in increased stringency in national model energy codes, more rapid and broader adoption by states and localities of updated codes, and increased compliance and enforcement. Report estimates the historical impact of Building Energy Codes Program in terms of energy savings achieved that are based upon various editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1).

  16. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Pam Cole, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This project is developing processes and resources for a Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) team to assist research partners and industry in overcoming codes and standards barriers to high-performance

  17. SPEERs Building Energy Codes Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of the REEO's, we are learning quickly, responding to ... Energy Code Compliance Collaborative in Oklahoma. *Double ... regional code datastrategies - provide technical ...

  18. The building codes and the forgotten basics of risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norte, M.

    1995-12-01

    Building codes specifically developed to identify and manage chronic, endemic, facilities, risks, and the information and monitoring resources that must support them, are fundamental elements of a broadly based and comprehensive system of conventional risk management and compliance processes. This presentation discusses the proper role of building codes in atruly mature risk management and regulatory compliance strategy.

  19. 1994 Building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    During the spring of 1994, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards, conducted five two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the United States. Workshops were held in Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and Denver. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing state building codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requirements for residential and commercial building energy codes, the Climate Change Action Plan, the role of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Building Energy Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the commercial and residential codes and standards, the Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants were also encouraged to inform DOE of their needs, particularly with regard to implementing building energy codes, enhancing current implementation efforts, and building on training efforts already in place. This paper documents the workshop findings and workshop planning and follow-up processes.

  20. Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Separation Walls | Department of Energy Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls This Building America Expert Meeting was conducted by the IBACOS team on Sept. 29, 2014, and focused on air sealing of area separation wall assemblies in multifamily buildings. This is an identified barrier that limits the ability of builders to cost effectively achieve higher energy efficiency and quality

  1. Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.ecn.nlfileadminecnunitsbsIEC...

  2. Could Building Energy Codes Mandate Rooftop Solar in the Future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williams, Jeremiah

    2012-08-01

    This paper explores existing requirements and compliance options for both commercial and residential code structures. Common alternative compliance options are discussed including Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), green-power purchasing programs, shared solar programs and other community-based renewable energy investments. Compliance options are analyzed to consider building lifespan, cost-effectiveness, energy trade-offs, enforcement concerns and future code development. Existing onsite renewable energy codes are highlighted as case studies for the code development process.

  3. Internal Dosimetry Code System Using Biokinetics Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-11-12

    Version 00 InDose is an internal dosimetry code to calculate dose estimations using biokinetic models (presented in ICRP-56 to ICRP71) as well as older ones. The code uses the ICRP-66 respiratory tract model and the ICRP-30 gastrointestinal tract model as well as the new and old biokinetic models. The code was written in such a way that the user can change any parameters of any one of the models without recompiling the code. All parametersmore » are given in well annotated parameters files that the user may change. As default, these files contain the values listed in ICRP publications. The full InDose code was planned to have three parts: 1) the main part includes the uptake and systemic models and is used to calculate the activities in the body tissues and excretion as a function of time for a given intake. 2) An optimization module for automatic estimation of the intake for a specific exposure case. 3) A module to calculate the dose due to the estimated intake. Currently, the code is able to perform only it`s main task (part 1) while the other two have to be done externally using other tools. In the future, developers would like to add these modules in order to provide a complete solution. The code was tested extensively to verify accuracy of its results. The verification procedure was divided into three parts: 1) verification of the implementation of each model, 2) verification of the integrity of the whole code, and 3) usability test. The first two parts consisted of comparing results obtained with InDose to published results for the same cases. For example ICRP-78 monitoring data. The last part consisted of participating in the 3rd EIE-IDA and assessing some of the scenarios provided in this exercise. These tests where presented in a few publications. Good agreement was found between the results of InDose and published data.« less

  4. Building International Emergency Management Systems | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Building International Emergency Management Systems NNSA helps nations develop the core elements of an emergency response program. Based on preliminary discussions with counterparts, NNSA develops emergency management programs with partner nations to exchange views and enhance development of effective emergency management systems. Generally, NNSA will assist foreign governments and international organizations with integration of emergency-program core

  5. Building Energy Codes: Residential Energy Code Field Study — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building Energy Codes Program: Residential Energy Code Field Study. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  6. City of Chicago- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CECC establishes standards to minimize solar energy absorbed by building roofs, a condition known as the urban heat island effect. Increased reflecting capacity of individual and aggregate...

  7. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate applicationmore » of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.« less

  8. International code of nomenclature of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, George M.; Parker, Charles T.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2015-11-20

    Here, this volume contains the edition of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes that was presented in draft form and available for comment at the Plenary Session of the Fourteenth International Congress of Bacteriology and Applied Microbiology (BAM), Montréal, 2014, together with updated lists of conserved and rejected bacterial names and of Opinions issued by the Judicial Commission. As in the past it brings together those changes accepted, published and documented by the ICSP and the Judicial Commission since the last revision was published. Several new appendices have been added to this edition. Appendix 11 addresses the appropriate application of the Candidatus concept, Appendix 12 contains the history of the van Niel Prize, and Appendix 13 contains the summaries of Congresses.

  9. Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab (Device build

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab | Jefferson Lab Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab (Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab External Link: http://hamptonroads.com/2012/02/device-built-odu-crack-natures-code-takes-ride By jlab_admin on Tue, 2012-02-14

  10. Building guide : how to build Xyce from source code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Verley, Jason C.

    2013-08-01

    While Xyce uses the Autoconf and Automake system to configure builds, it is often necessary to perform more than the customary %E2%80%9C./configure%E2%80%9D builds many open source users have come to expect. This document describes the steps needed to get Xyce built on a number of common platforms.

  11. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided ...

  12. Puerto Rico- Building Energy Code with Mandatory Solar Water Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, the Governor of Puerto Rico provided assurance that Puerto Rico would update its building energy codes as part of the state's application for State Energy Program funds from the American...

  13. Building Energy Codes Rulemaking | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investigation | Department of Energy Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation (2.17 MB) Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky (57.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Paducah Site End State Vision Enhancements to Natural Attenuation: Selected Case Studies X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio Energy

    This page

  14. Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

    2000-09-30

    1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.

  15. Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  16. Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  17. Potential Job Creation in Minnesota as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  18. Potential Job Creation in Nevada as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  19. Synthesis Report on the Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Haiyan, Lin; Congu, Yu; Halverson, Mark A.; Bo, Song; Jingru, Liu; Evans, Meredydd; Xiajiao, Zhu; Siwei, Lang

    2011-03-31

    China building energy code and details to help improve building energy efficiency at global, national and local levels

  20. Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

  1. Code for INternal DosimetrY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-05-30

    The Code for Internal Dosimetry Software Package (CINDY1.4) was developed to assist in the interpretation of bioassay data, provide bioassay projections, and evaluate committed and calendar-year doses from intake or bioassay measurement data. CINDY1.4 addresses the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 5480.11 and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) 10 CFR 20 by providing the capabilities to calculate organ dose equivalents and effective dose equivalents using the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP) 30more » approach. Biokinetic models, which allow user-modified parameter values, are used to estimate intakes based on bioassay data using weighted and unweighted least-squares regression between measured and expected bioassay values, to estimate organ burdens as well as urinary and fecal excretion rates from a given intake, and to determine organ doses for annual, 50-year, calendar year, or any other time point. Intakes to be considered may be either acute or chronic, and may consist of many combinations of intake routes, radionuclides, and physical and chemical forms. A four-compartment input model (with user defined parameters) is used for wounds and absorption. Direct injection can be simulated as direct absorption. Appropriate metabolic models for each radionuclide are selected by the user from menus. Metabolic models available in CINDY1.4 are the ICRP 30 lung model, ICRP 30 gastrointestinal model, ICRP 30 general systematic model, Johnson and Dunford tritium model, ICRP 30 tritium model, including the Johnson HT lung model, Johnson alkaline earth model, ICRP 54 iodine model, tellurium-iodine model, Jones excretion model, Durbin excretion model, ICRP 54 excretion models, Wrenn-Lipsztein uranium model, Fisher Modified Wrenn-Lipsztein uranium model, and the ICRP 30 carbon model. For Windows 95 or Windows NT an alternate CD is required.« less

  2. Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2012-02-14

    This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

  3. International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes September 12, 2014 - 12:16pm Addthis For the past several years, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has teamed with the Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology (IWES) in Germany to lead an international effort under the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 30 to improve the tools

  4. Resources for Sustainable Federal Buildings and Campuses | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Program: Website provides information about the 2015 International ... Find information about Commercial Buildings Integration and Residential Buildings ...

  5. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy

  6. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us for a free webinar that will provide an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations. Learn about new content on the Building America Solution Center that will help builders meet code requirements and will help code officials apply codes to new and emerging innovations. Our presenter will be:

  7. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Unvented Crawlspaces Code Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research which has supported acceptance of unvented crawlspaces in the IRC.

  9. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  10. Energy Department Invests $6 Million to Increase Building Energy Code Compliance Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has awarded $6 million to fund projects that will investigate whether investing in education, training, and outreach programs can produce a significant change in residential building code compliance rates.

  11. Building International Emergency Management Systems | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Generally, NNSA will assist foreign governments and international organizations with integration of emergency-program core elements, including communications systems, networks and ...

  12. Building Energy Codes Newsletter: Setting the Standard-February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-02-01

    This newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy Buildng Energy Codes Program keeps readers up to date on energy code standards; the February 2010 issue focuses on helping states with code adoption, compliance, and resources.

  13. Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DC Energy Conservation Code is updated regularly as national codes are revised or if a change is proposed by local code enforcement officials, industry, design professionals, or other...

  14. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - ICC Education Summit, Las Vegas, NV - National &18;odes &18;ollaborative (REEO's, &17;&18;P, NSEO), monthly conference calls - Idaho Codes Collaborative, Boise - Nevada Codes ...

  15. An Analysis of Statewide Adoption Rates of Building Energy Code by Local Jurisdictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2012-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to generally inform the U.S. Department of Energys Building Energy Codes Program of the local, effective energy code adoption rate for a sample set of 21 states, some which have adopted statewide codes and some that have not. Information related to the residential energy code adoption process and status at the local jurisdiction was examined for each of the states. Energy code status information was gathered for approximately 2,800 jurisdictions, which effectively covered approximately 80 percent of the new residential building construction in the 21 states included in the study.

  16. Mandating better buildings: a global review of building codes and prospects for improvement in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Brown, Marilyn A.; Cox, Matt; Jackson, Roderick

    2015-03-11

    This paper provides a global overview of the design, implementation, and evolution of building energy codes. Reflecting alternative policy goals, building energy codes differ significantly across the United States, the European Union, and China. This review uncovers numerous innovative practices including greenhouse gas emissions caps per square meter of building space, energy performance certificates with retrofit recommendations, and inclusion of renewable energy to achieve “nearly zero-energy buildings”. These innovations motivated an assessment of an aggressive commercial building code applied to all US states, requiring both new construction and buildings with major modifications to comply with the latest version of the ASHRAE 90.1 Standards. Using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), we estimate that by 2035, such building codes in the United States could reduce energy for space heating, cooling, water heating and lighting in commercial buildings by 16%, 15%, 20% and 5%, respectively. Impacts on different fuels and building types, energy rates and bills as well as pollution emission reductions are also examined.

  17. Mandating better buildings: a global review of building codes and prospects for improvement in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Brown, Marilyn A.; Cox, Matt; Jackson, Roderick

    2015-03-11

    This paper provides a global overview of the design, implementation, and evolution of building energy codes. Reflecting alternative policy goals, building energy codes differ significantly across the United States, the European Union, and China. This review uncovers numerous innovative practices including greenhouse gas emissions caps per square meter of building space, energy performance certificates with retrofit recommendations, and inclusion of renewable energy to achieve “nearly zero-energy buildings”. These innovations motivated an assessment of an aggressive commercial building code applied to all US states, requiring both new construction and buildings with major modifications to comply with the latest version of themore » ASHRAE 90.1 Standards. Using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), we estimate that by 2035, such building codes in the United States could reduce energy for space heating, cooling, water heating and lighting in commercial buildings by 16%, 15%, 20% and 5%, respectively. Impacts on different fuels and building types, energy rates and bills as well as pollution emission reductions are also examined.« less

  18. Building the International Lattice Data Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark G. Beckett, Paul Coddington, Blint Jo, Chris M. Maynard, Dirk Pleiter, Osamu Tatebe, Tomoteru Yoshie

    2011-06-01

    We present the International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG), a loosely federated grid-of-grids for sharing data from Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) simulations. The ILDG comprises of metadata, file-format and web-service standards, which can be used to wrap regional data-grid interfaces, allowing seamless access to catalogues and data in a diverse set of collaborating regional grids. We discuss the technological underpinnings of the ILDG, primarily the metadata and the middleware, and offer a critique of its various aspects with the hindsight of the design work and the two years of production.

  19. Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects in Jaipur: Testing the Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Yu, Sha

    2014-03-26

    The Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) in Jaipur, India is constructing two new buildings on its campus that allow it to test implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC), which Rajasthan made mandatory in 2011. PNNL has been working with MNIT to document progress on ECBC implementation in these buildings.

  20. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Distinctive Characteristics * BCAP is the catalyst for developing state-based, long- term solutions: - Convene state experts; train ...

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Status of State Energy Codes: Commercial Sector(1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current Commercial codes as of March 2012. DOE/EERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, http://www

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Status of State Energy Codes: Residential Sector (1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current residential codes as of March 2012. DOEEERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, ...

  3. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standard Issues to Energy Innovations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Text-alternative version of the May 20 webinar on an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations.

  4. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Platinum standards, while the courthouse and other buildings have been rebuilt to LEED Certified and Gold standards saving a combined total of 200,000 in energy costs per year. ...

  5. International Code Assessment and Applications Program: Summary of code assessment studies concerning RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.R.

    1993-12-01

    Members of the International Code Assessment Program (ICAP) have assessed the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) advanced thermal-hydraulic codes over the past few years in a concerted effort to identify deficiencies, to define user guidelines, and to determine the state of each code. The results of sixty-two code assessment reviews, conducted at INEL, are summarized. Code deficiencies are discussed and user recommended nodalizations investigated during the course of conducting the assessment studies and reviews are listed. All the work that is summarized was done using the RELAP5/MOD2, RELAP5/MOD3, and TRAC-B codes.

  6. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, P. C.; Halverson, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    This guidance document was prepared using the input from the meeting summarized in the draft CSI Roadmap to provide Building America research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods.

  7. Overcoming Codes and Standards Barriers to Innovations in Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-02-15

    In this journal article, the authors discuss approaches to overcoming building code barriers to energy-efficiency innovations in home construction. Building codes have been a highly motivational force for increasing the energy efficiency of new homes in the United States in recent years. But as quickly as the codes seem to be changing, new products are coming to the market at an even more rapid pace, sometimes offering approaches and construction techniques unthought of when the current code was first proposed, which might have been several years before its adoption by various jurisdictions. Due to this delay, the codes themselves can become barriers to innovations that might otherwise be helping to further increase the efficiency, comfort, health or durability of new homes. . The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America, a program dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of America’s housing stock through research and education, is working with the U.S. housing industry through its research teams to help builders identify and remove code barriers to innovation in the home construction industry. The article addresses several approaches that builders use to achieve approval for innovative building techniques when code barriers appear to exist.

  8. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building America program implemented a new Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) Team in 2013. The Team’s mission is to assist Building America (BA) research teams and partners in identifying and resolving conflicts between Building America innovations and the various codes and standards that govern the construction of residences. A CSI Roadmap was completed in September, 2013. This guidance document was prepared using the information in the CSI Roadmap to provide BA research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America (BA) innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods. For more information on the BA CSI team, please email: CSITeam@pnnl.gov

  9. International Building Energy eXchange (IBEX) Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This site will help you find information on current, international projects or other activities (e.g., strategic dialogs or initiatives) related to energy efficiency and renewable energy in buildings. The database includes collaborative international projects/activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, other U.S. federal agencies, development banks, and selected foundations and non-governmental organizations. The IBEX database enables you to learn about specific buildings-related projects of interest and who is working on them, understand the distribution of projects (e.g., geographic distribution and types of projects going forward), discover potential markets, and understand where there are research gaps and opportunities for collaboration.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies in the United States Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Public Buildings Homes Existing Policy Policy Being Considered Rating Requirement Disclosure Requirement Austin, TX Connecticut Arlington County, VA Alaska California Colorado Denver, CO Austin, TX District of Columbia Illinois Hawaii Kansas New York, NY Maine Michigan Montgomery County, MD San Francisco, CA Maryland Minnesota Nevada Seattle, WA Massachusetts Ohio New York Washington

  11. Clark County- Energy Conservation Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2010, Clark County adopted Ordinance 3897, implementing the Southern Nevada version of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial buildings...

  12. Alternative Formats to Achieve More Efficient Energy Codes for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Halverson, Mark A.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Makela, Eric J.

    2013-01-26

    This paper identifies and examines several formats or structures that could be used to create the next generation of more efficient energy codes and standards for commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) to provide technical support to the development of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. While the majority of PNNL’s ASHRAE Standard 90.1 support focuses on developing and evaluating new requirements, a portion of its work involves consideration of the format of energy standards. In its current working plan, the ASHRAE 90.1 committee has approved an energy goal of 50% improvement in Standard 90.1-2013 relative to Standard 90.1-2004, and will likely be considering higher improvement targets for future versions of the standard. To cost-effectively achieve the 50% goal in manner that can gain stakeholder consensus, formats other than prescriptive must be considered. Alternative formats that include reducing the reliance on prescriptive requirements may make it easier to achieve these aggressive efficiency levels in new codes and standards. The focus on energy code and standard formats is meant to explore approaches to presenting the criteria that will foster compliance, enhance verification, and stimulate innovation while saving energy in buildings. New formats may also make it easier for building designers and owners to design and build the levels of efficiency called for in the new codes and standards. This paper examines a number of potential formats and structures, including prescriptive, performance-based (with sub-formats of performance equivalency and performance targets), capacity constraint-based, and outcome-based. The paper also discusses the pros and cons of each format from the viewpoint of code users and of code enforcers.

  13. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings | Department of Energy Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. <em>Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952</em> The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952 On May 4, 2007, a massive tornado

  14. 2015-03-16 Issuance: Building Energy Codes Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding the DOE Methodology for Assessing the Cost-effectiveness of Building Energy Codes, as issued by the Building Energy Codes Program Manager on March 16, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  15. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  16. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  17. Verification of RESRAD-build computer code, version 3.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-06-02

    RESRAD-BUILD is a computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material. It is part of a family of codes that includes RESRAD, RESRAD-CHEM, RESRAD-RECYCLE, RESRAD-BASELINE, and RESRAD-ECORISK. The RESRAD-BUILD models were developed and codified by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); version 1.5 of the code and the user's manual were publicly released in 1994. The original version of the code was written for the Microsoft DOS operating system. However, subsequent versions of the code were written for the Microsoft Windows operating system. The purpose of the present verification task (which includes validation as defined in the standard) is to provide an independent review of the latest version of RESRAD-BUILD under the guidance provided by ANSI/ANS-10.4 for verification and validation of existing computer programs. This approach consists of a posteriori V&V review which takes advantage of available program development products as well as user experience. The purpose, as specified in ANSI/ANS-10.4, is to determine whether the program produces valid responses when used to analyze problems within a specific domain of applications, and to document the level of verification. The culmination of these efforts is the production of this formal Verification Report. The first step in performing the verification of an existing program was the preparation of a Verification Review Plan. The review plan consisted of identifying: Reason(s) why a posteriori verification is to be performed; Scope and objectives for the level of verification selected; Development products to be used for the review; Availability and use of user experience; and Actions to be taken to supplement missing or unavailable development products. The purpose, scope and objectives for the level of verification selected are described in this section of the Verification Report. The development products that were used for

  18. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides states and their stakeholders with a short synopsis for what it would look like to include building energy codes in their climate and energy plans, including current activity at the national and state levels, best practices, energy savings examples, cost-effectiveness, EM&V and DOE support.

  19. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning energy.gov/eere/slsc/EEopportunities March 18, 2016 2 About this Presentation Slide Overview * Summary * Purpose and Benefits * Current Status * State and Local Role * Best Practices in Implementation * Complementary / Related Programs * National Savings Estimates * Savings Examples from States * Cost-Effectiveness * Evaluation, Measurement, & Verification * DOE Support * Additional Resources This short presentation is

  20. Guide to the Changes between the 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, Terry S.; Conover, David R.

    2012-05-31

    The International Code Council (ICC) published the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code{reg_sign} (IECC) in early 2012. The 2012 IECC is based on revisions, additions, and deletions to the 2009 IECC that were considered during the ICC code development process conducted in 2011. Solid vertical lines, arrows, or asterisks printed in the 2012 IECC indicate where revisions, deletions, or relocations of text respectively were made to 2009 IECC. Although these marginal markings indicate where changes have been made to the code, they do not provide any further guidance, leaving the reader to consult and compare the 2009 and 2012 IECC for more detail.

  1. Assessing Foundation Insulation Strategies for the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code in Cold Climate New Home Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VonThoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.; Mosiman, G.

    2013-04-01

    While the International Energy Conservation Code 2012 (IECC 2012) has been adopted at a national level, only two cold climate states have adopted it as their new home energy code. Understanding the resistance to adoption is important in assisting more states accept the code and engage deep energy strategies nationwide. This three-part assessment by the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership was focused on foundation insulation R-values for cold climates and the design, construction, and performance implications. In Part 1 a literature review and attendance at stakeholder meetings held in Minnesota were used to assess general stakeholder interest and concerns regarding proposed code changes. Part 2 includes drawings of robust foundation insulation systems that were presented at one Minnesota stakeholder meeting to address critical issues and concerns for adopting best practice strategies. In Part 3 a sampling of builders participated in a telephone interview to gain baseline knowledge on insulation systems used to meet the current energy code and how the same builders propose to meet the new proposed code.

  2. City of Frisco- Residential and Commercial Green Building Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2013, existing green building codes were repealed and the 2012 International Residential Code with amendments was adopted. Among the amendments were energy efficiency requirements appr...

  3. Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-01-31

    India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human

  4. Adoption, implementation and enforcement of commercial building energy codes in New Mexico and Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J W; Thurman, A G; Shankle, D L

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering ways to encourage states to adopt energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial buildings in the private sector. Such standards are now mandatory for federal buildings, and for private buildings in 34 states; in the remaining 16 states, the standards serve as guidelines for voluntary compliance. In this study for DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assessed the process by which energy codes for commercial buildings were adopted and implemented in Arizona and New Mexico. Information was gathered primarily through a series of interviews with state officials, city building officials, architects and engineers, builders, and staff from utilities in the two states. Until other state processes are studied, the extent of the similarities and dissimilarities to the situation in New Mexico and Arizona are unknown. A more extensive study may show that at least some elements of the two state's experience have been paralleled in other parts of the country. General strategies to encourage the adoption of energy codes, assist implementation, and support enforcement were developed based on the research from Arizona and New Mexico and are presented in this report. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for their residential and commercial building standards. ASHRAE used 38 climate groupings ...

  6. Feedbacks from Focus Group Meeting on Training and Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Lin , Haiyan; Song, Bo; Halverson, Mark A.; Evans, Meredydd; Zhu, Xiaojiao

    2011-01-01

    A focus group meeting is a very effective quality research approach to collect information on a specific project. Through focus group meetings at both Changchun and Ningbo in August 2010, the project team gained a more complete understandings of key stakeholders (such as their education level), their training needs and expectations, key factors influencing their decision making, and incurred implementation difficulties. In addition, the meeting helped the project team (especially PNNL) improve its understanding of the implementation status of building energy codes in other regions (such as small cities and counties neighboring to urban areas, small townships and rural areas distant from urban areas). The collected feedbacks will serve as important input not only for better design of training materials and the development of an on-line training website, but also for development of follow-up projects to promote building energy codes in China.

  7. ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. I B.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1b Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and...

  8. AVTA: Vehicle to Grid Power Flow Regulations and Building Codes Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is a review of Vehicle-to-Grid power flow regulations and building codes, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  9. Items Supporting the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Implementation of the IMBA Computer Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.

    2008-01-07

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program has adopted the computer code IMBA (Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis) as its primary code for bioassay data evaluation and dose assessment using methodologies of ICRP Publications 60, 66, 67, 68, and 78. The adoption of this code was part of the implementation plan for the June 8, 2007 amendments to 10 CFR 835. This information release includes action items unique to IMBA that were required by PNNL quality assurance standards for implementation of safety software. Copie of the IMBA software verification test plan and the outline of the briefing given to new users are also included.

  10. Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code - Building America Top Innovation Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy ...

  11. International Energy Outlook 2016-Buildings sector energy consumption -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    484(2016) I May 2016 International Energy Outlook 2016 ~ Independent Statistics & Ana[ysis e~ ~* a~ 1 U.S. ~~ergy. Information Administration Contacts The International Energy Outlook 2016 was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis (john.conti@eia.gov, 202-586-2222); Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team (paul.holtberg@eia.gov, 202-586-1284); Jim Diefenderfer, Director, Office

  12. Method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT heat-flow code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Montan, D.N.

    1980-04-01

    One objective of the spent fuel test in Climax Stock granite (SFTC) is to correctly model the thermal transport, and the changes in the stress field and accompanying displacements from the application of the thermal loads. We have chosen the ADINA and ADINAT finite element codes to do these calculations. ADINAT is a heat transfer code compatible to the ADINA displacement and stress analysis code. The heat flow problem encountered at SFTC requires a code with conduction, radiation, and ventilation capabilities, which the present version of ADINAT does not have. We have devised a method for calculating internal radiation and ventilation with the ADINAT code. This method effectively reproduces the results from the TRUMP multi-dimensional finite difference code, which correctly models radiative heat transport between drift surfaces, conductive and convective thermal transport to and through air in the drifts, and mass flow of air in the drifts. The temperature histories for each node in the finite element mesh calculated with ADINAT using this method can be used directly in the ADINA thermal-mechanical calculation.

  13. Progress in building the International Lattice Data Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Joo; C.M. Maynard

    2006-07-01

    The International Lattice Data Grid (ILDG) [1] has been making steady progress from an abstract concept to a more concrete implementation. The last year saw the completion of the MDC Web service specification, and the ILDG member groups; CSSM (Australia), Latfor data grid (LDG) (Germany), LDA (Japan), QCDgrid (UK), USQCD (USA), have either completed or are moving towards its implementation The Replica Catalogue service is in the process of being defined and data transfer trials have begun.

  14. A brief introduction on training and public information of building energy codes in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2010-12-01

    This report is associated with the project of Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China (55793). The report aims to give Chinese audience a brief introduction on training and public information activities of building energy codes in the U.S. The report contains four sections: Section One is about the development history and implementation of building energy codes in the U.S. Section Two is about the organizations of training and public information activities, mainly focused on ASHRAE, ICC, federal and state government. Policy implication, which is Section Three, addresses the role of federal government and on-line training and public information activities in promoting training and public information (the current China training system lacks strong support of central government and on-line training activities). Conclusions are made in Section Four. This report will be uploaded to an upcoming Chinese website which is devoted to provide first-time free on-line training and public information of building energy codes in China.

  15. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installation of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.

  16. International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, Brent R; Solodov, Alexander A; Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Zhernosek, Alena V; McKinney, Teressa L; Pickett, Chris A; Peerani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

  17. Inventory of U.S.-led International Activities on Building Energy Efficiency Initial Findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2010-04-01

    Several U.S. Government agencies promote energy efficiency in buildings internationally. The types and scope of activities vary by agency. Those with the largest role include the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both USAID and the Department of State have a substantial presence overseas, which may present some complementarities with the Department of Energy’s efforts to reach out to other countries. Generally speaking, USAID focuses on capacity building and policy issues; the Department of State focuses on broad diplomatic efforts and some targeted grants in support of these efforts, and EPA has more targeted roles linked to ENERGY STAR appliances and a few other activities. Several additional agencies are also involved in trade-related efforts to promote energy efficiency in buildings. These include the Department of Commerce, the Export-Import Bank, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Trade and Development Agency (TDA). This initial synthesis report is designed to summarize broad trends and activities relating to international cooperation on energy efficiency in buildings, which can help the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in developing its own strategy in this area. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will develop a more complete synthesis report later in 2010 as it populates a database on international projects on building energy efficiency.

  18. Building international genomics collaboration for global health security

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cui, Helen H.; Erkkila, Tracy; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2015-12-07

    Genome science and technologies are transforming life sciences globally in many ways and becoming a highly desirable area for international collaboration to strengthen global health. The Genome Science Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is leveraging a long history of expertise in genomics research to assist multiple partner nations in advancing their genomics and bioinformatics capabilities. The capability development objectives focus on providing a molecular genomics-based scientific approach for pathogen detection, characterization, and biosurveillance applications. The general approaches include introduction of basic principles in genomics technologies, training on laboratory methodologies and bioinformatic analysis of resulting data, procurement, and installationmore » of next-generation sequencing instruments, establishing bioinformatics software capabilities, and exploring collaborative applications of the genomics capabilities in public health. Genome centers have been established with public health and research institutions in the Republic of Georgia, Kingdom of Jordan, Uganda, and Gabon; broader collaborations in genomics applications have also been developed with research institutions in many other countries.« less

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  1. Methodology of Internal Assessment of Uncertainty and Extension to Neutron Kinetics/Thermal-Hydraulics Coupled Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Giannotti, W.; Ivanov, K.

    2005-02-15

    The best-estimate calculation results from complex system codes are affected by approximations that are unpredictable without the use of computational tools that account for the various sources of uncertainty.The code with (the capability of) internal assessment of uncertainty (CIAU) has been previously proposed by the University of Pisa to realize the integration between a qualified system code and an uncertainty methodology and to supply proper uncertainty bands each time a nuclear power plant (NPP) transient scenario is calculated. The derivation of the methodology and the results achieved by the use of CIAU are discussed to demonstrate the main features and capabilities of the method.In a joint effort between the University of Pisa and The Pennsylvania State University, the CIAU method has been recently extended to evaluate the uncertainty of coupled three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics calculations. The result is CIAU-TN. The feasibility of the approach has been demonstrated, and sample results related to the turbine trip transient in the Peach Bottom NPP are shown. Notwithstanding that the full implementation and use of the procedure requires a database of errors not available at the moment, the results give an idea of the errors expected from the present computational tools.

  2. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  3. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Historically, only Industrial Facilities (ISO 50003 Industry - light to medium and ... is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ...

  4. Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code - Building America Top Innovation | Department of Energy Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code - Building America Top Innovation Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code - Building America Top Innovation Image of a San Antonio home. Since air leakage is so critical to home performance, Building America research consistently focused on promoting better air sealing and air barrier details, including field

  5. Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

  6. EERE's International Partnerships on Display in Paris | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EERE International leads partnerships with China, India, Brazil, South Africa, and other major economies on topics such as building code development and enforcement, integration of ...

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software-EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated January 31, 2007, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software … Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Unhappy with internal corporate search? : learn tips and tricks for building a controlled vocabulary ontology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arpin, Bettina Karin Schimanski; Jones, Brian S.; Bemesderfer, Joy; Ralph, Mark E.; Miller, Jennifer L

    2010-06-01

    Are your employees unhappy with internal corporate search? Frequent complaints include: too many results to sift through; results are unrelated/outdated; employees aren't sure which terms to search for. One way to improve intranet search is to implement a controlled vocabulary ontology. Employing this takes the guess work out of searching, makes search efficient and precise, educates employees about the lingo used within the corporation, and allows employees to contribute to the corpus of terms. It promotes internal corporate search to rival its superior sibling, internet search. We will cover our experiences, lessons learned, and conclusions from implementing a controlled vocabulary ontology at Sandia National Laboratories. The work focuses on construction of this ontology from the content perspective and the technical perspective. We'll discuss the following: (1) The tool we used to build a polyhierarchical taxonomy; (2) Examples of two methods of indexing the content: traditional 'back of the book' and folksonomy word-mapping; (3) Tips on how to build future search capabilities while building the basic controlled vocabulary; (4) How to implement the controlled vocabulary as an ontology that mimics Google's search suggestions; (5) Making the user experience more interactive and intuitive; and (6) Sorting suggestions based on preferred, alternate and related terms using SPARQL queries. In summary, future improvements will be presented, including permitting end-users to add, edit and remove terms, and filtering on different subject domains.

  10. Building Code Compliance and Enforcement: The Experience of SanFrancisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinanace and California'sBuildign Standards for New Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.

    1990-11-01

    As part of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) technical assistance to the Sustainable City Project, compliance and enforcement activities related to local and state building codes for existing and new construction were evaluated in two case studies. The analysis of the City of San Francisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance (RECO) showed that a limited, prescriptive energy conservation ordinance for existing residential construction can be enforced relatively easily with little administrative costs, and that compliance with such ordinances can be quite high. Compliance with the code was facilitated by extensive publicity, an informed public concerned with the cost of energy and knowledgeable about energy efficiency, the threat of punishment (Order of Abatement), the use of private inspectors, and training workshops for City and private inspectors. The analysis of California's Title 24 Standards for new residential and commercial construction showed that enforcement of this type of code for many climate zones is more complex and requires extensive administrative support for education and training of inspectors, architects, engineers, and builders. Under this code, prescriptive and performance approaches for compliance are permitted, resulting in the demand for alternative methods of enforcement: technical assistance, plan review, field inspection, and computer analysis. In contrast to existing construction, building design and new materials and construction practices are of critical importance in new construction, creating a need for extensive technical assistance and extensive interaction between enforcement personnel and the building community. Compliance problems associated with building design and installation did occur in both residential and nonresidential buildings. Because statewide codes are enforced by local officials, these problems may increase over time as energy standards change and become more complex and as other standards (eg, health and

  11. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  12. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  13. Building.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant in ITER refers to plant systems located outside the Tokamak Building. A thick wall ... The cooling water system provides for the rejection of heat from a variety of ITER systems ...

  14. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  15. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  16. Codes and Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basics » Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Currently, thirteen U.S. and two international standards development organizations (SDOs) are developing and publishing the majority of the voluntary domestic codes and standards. These organizations typically work with the public and private sectors to craft standards. In the U.S., the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) coordinates standards development, provides guidance on consensus building, recommends that no more than one standard

  17. Code System for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting from an Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1982-06-15

    WRAITH calculates the atmospheric transport of radioactive material to each of a number of downwind receptor points and the external and internal doses to a reference man at each of the receptor points.

  18. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

  19. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Transformations, Inc. Net Zero Energy Communities (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, Transformations, Inc. partnered with the Building Science Corporation team to build new net zero energy houses in three developments in Massachusetts that achieve a 45% reduction in energy use compared to 2009 International Residential Code.

  20. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  1. Property:Incentive/ResCode | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mandatory statewide. Buildings must also meet requirements set by CALGreen, the statewide green building code. Building Energy Code (Colorado) + 2003 IECC or any successor edition...

  2. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of LANL Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason P. Wilke

    2005-09-30

    The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

  3. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  4. Comparison of the Supplement to the 2004 IECC to the Current New York Energy Conservation Code - Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2004-09-01

    The New York State Department of State requested the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a report consisting of two components. The first component is an analysis comparing the effects on energy usage as a result of implementation of the 2004 Supplement to the IECC with the current New York code. The second component is an engineering analysis to determine whether additional costs of compliance with the proposal would be equal to or less than the present value of anticipated energy savings over a 10-year period. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed the requested assessment of the potential code upgrade.

  5. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  6. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  7. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  8. Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about appliance standards, building energy codes, ENERGY STAR program and tax incentives for building efficiency.

  9. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP).

  10. MeshVoro: A Three-Dimensional Voronoi Mesh Building Tool for the TOUGH Family of Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, C. M.; Boyle, K. L.; Reagan, M.; Johnson, J.; Rycroft, C.; Moridis, G. J.

    2013-09-30

    Few tools exist for creating and visualizing complex three-dimensional simulation meshes, and these have limitations that restrict their application to particular geometries and circumstances. Mesh generation needs to trend toward ever more general applications. To that end, we have developed MeshVoro, a tool that is based on the Voro (Rycroft 2009) library and is capable of generating complex threedimensional Voronoi tessellation-based (unstructured) meshes for the solution of problems of flow and transport in subsurface geologic media that are addressed by the TOUGH (Pruess et al. 1999) family of codes. MeshVoro, which includes built-in data visualization routines, is a particularly useful tool because it extends the applicability of the TOUGH family of codes by enabling the scientifically robust and relatively easy discretization of systems with challenging 3D geometries. We describe several applications of MeshVoro. We illustrate the ability of the tool to straightforwardly transform a complex geological grid into a simulation mesh that conforms to the specifications of the TOUGH family of codes. We demonstrate how MeshVoro can describe complex system geometries with a relatively small number of grid blocks, and we construct meshes for geometries that would have been practically intractable with a standard Cartesian grid approach. We also discuss the limitations and appropriate applications of this new technology.

  11. Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnerSim version 07.11.30

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnerSim version 07.11.30 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- DOE-21.E-JJH version 130

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that DOE-2.1E-JJH version 130 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- DOE-21.E version 119

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that DOE-21.E version 119 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  18. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 1.3.0.018

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 1.3.0.018 version 130 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 1.4.0.025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 1.4.0.025 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  1. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.0.0.025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.0.0.025 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  2. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  3. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  4. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  5. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  6. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.2.0.023

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.4 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.