National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for intermediate wti delivered

  1. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  2. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P.

    2007-07-01

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous RoSPA awards at site and sector level and nomination, at Company level, for the RoSPA George Earle trophy for outstanding performance in Health and Safety (Reactor Sites, 2006). After 'setting the scene' and describing the challenges that the company has had to respond to, the paper explains how these improvements have been delivered. Specifically it explains the process that has been followed and the parts played by sites and suppliers to deliver improved performance. With the experience of already having transitioned several Magnox stations from operations to defueling and then to decommissioning, the paper describes the valuable experience that has been gained in achieving an optimum change process and maintaining momentum. (authors)

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly...

  4. Delivering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2Department ofperDOEDocumentsDelegations,and

  5. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for potato production in Kyrgyzstan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research, Walter Pett, and David Douches, Michigan State University. An IPM package is a set of practices

  6. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for open field tomato production in Uzbekistan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management. An IPM package is a set of practices and technologies that can be used in production to increase yield

  7. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for wheat production in Tajikistan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research State University; Dr. Anvar Jalilov, Tajik Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Tajikistan. An IPM package

  8. Feedstock System to Deliver Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    Feedstock System to Deliver Biomass Into a Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolyzer Chloë Cullen | Teresa with steam and biomass as inputs. Professor Goldfarb is seeking to control the rate of biomass: The Solution: The Problem: Currently, Professor Goldfarb's lab technicians can only feed about 10 mL of biomass

  9. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  10. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

    2015-04-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  11. Table 1. Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode" "Year","Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)","Average Delivered Cost...

  12. Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to Disposal Facility in Texas...

  13. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote...

  14. Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan Deputy Secretary Poneman Delivers Remarks on Nuclear Power at Tokyo American Center in Japan December 15, 2011 -...

  15. Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015...

  16. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  17. Plasticity of Intermediate Filament Subunits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirmse, Robert

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) assembled in vitro from recombinantly expressed proteins have a diameter of 8–12 nm and can reach several micrometers in length. IFs assemble from a soluble pool of subunits, tetramers in the ...

  18. Chemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or with light-source capabilities to image materials of importance to the nation's energy and environmentalChemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for In Situ, Molecular-Scale Imaging A complete, precise and realistic view of chemical, materials and biochemical processes and an understanding

  19. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which...

  20. Nuclear Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyam, Radhey

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ is large enough ($\\sim$ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss applications of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  1. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodson, S.A. (JHU)

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  2. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  3. Microtubule and Intermediate Filament Patterns around the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorobjev, Ivan

    4 Microtubule and Intermediate Filament Patterns around the Centrosome in Interphase Cells I. B of the Centrosome III. Centrosome and Intermediate Filaments A. Intermediate Filament Foci in the Centrosome B. Effect of Ultracentrifugation of Living Cells on Their Intermediate Filament System: Identification

  4. Junior Intermediate Senior Chiefland Hardware &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Junior Intermediate Senior Chiefland Hardware & Farm Supply Williston Ace Hardware Bronson Ace Hardware #12;#12;MAP OF YOUR GARDEN ROWS RUN NORTH TO SOUTH BETWEEN ROW SPACING WITHIN ROW PLANT SPACING, and pesticides for growing a garden 20 feet by 26 feet and is donated by BRONSON, WILLISTON ACE HARDWARE

  5. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding inCustomer-Comments Sign InTAMUiv e in663 DARHT Delivers

  6. Working With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  7. Intermediate wave-function statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Berkolaiko; J. P. Keating; B. Winn

    2003-08-05

    We calculate statistical properties of the eigenfunctions of two quantum systems that exhibit intermediate spectral statistics: star graphs and Seba billiards. First, we show that these eigenfunctions are not quantum ergodic, and calculate the corresponding limit distribution. Second, we find that they can be strongly scarred by short periodic orbits, and construct sequences of states which have such a limit. Our results are illustrated by numerical computations.

  8. Some Guidelines on How to Deliver a Good Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almulhem, Ahmad

    Some Guidelines on How to Deliver a Good Presentation Some Guidelines on How toSome Guidelines on How to Deliver a Good PresentationDeliver a Good Presentation King Fahd University of Petroleum irrelevant slides Review, rework, revise: Give it your best Practice, practice, ..., and practice your talk

  9. Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price.

  10. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  11. Strangeness production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2004-03-05

    Kaon production, in particular $K^+$ production in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies is discussed. Main emphasis is put on the question if subthreshold $K^+$ production can serve as a suitable tool to test the high density phase of such reactions and to deliver information on the high density behavior of the nuclear equation of state. It is shown that the $K^+$ excitation function in heavy ($Au+Au$) over light ($C+C$) systems provides a robust observable which, by comparison to data, strongly favors a soft equation of state. A second question of interest is the existence of an in-medium kaon potential as predicted by effective chiral Lagrangiens. Here it is argued that transport calculations support this scenario with, in the meantime, a significant level of consistency.

  12. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimring, Mark

    2014-01-01

    CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Zimring, M. ,Billingsley, M. 2011. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middleof the Census. [EIA] U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  13. Smart Grid: Creating Jobs while Delivering Reliable,Environmentally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smart Grid: Creating Jobs while Delivering Reliable, Environmentally-friendly Energy Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017)...

  14. Obama Administration Delivers More than $36 Million to Pennsylvania...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects Obama Administration Delivers More than 36 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects...

  15. Obama Administration Delivers Nearly $72 Million for Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nearly 72 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 7 States and Territories Obama Administration Delivers Nearly 72 Million for Energy Efficiency and...

  16. Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More than 101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania Obama Administration Delivers More than 101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and...

  17. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  18. Intermediate evolution using SNIa, and BAO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, V H

    2015-01-01

    We study the intermediate evolution model and show that, compared with the recent study of a power-law evolution, the intermediate evolution is a better description of the low-redshift regime supported by observations from type Ia supernovae and BAO. We found also that recent data suggest that the intermediate evolution is as good a fit to this redshift range as the $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  19. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantities. Because Criegee intermediates have long been thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry, the announcement of a method to directly measure their reactivity...

  20. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  1. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intermediates, and major products. However, for improving combustion efficiency and controlling pollution, it is necessary to understand flame chemistry at the...

  2. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than 150 years of study, combustion seems to be well understood in terms of average energy output, high-concentration intermediates, and major products. However, for...

  3. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    output, high-concentration intermediates, and major products. However, for improving combustion efficiency and controlling pollution, it is necessary to understand flame...

  4. Galaxy Groups at Intermediate Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; S. L. Morris; H. Lin; P. B. Hall; D. R. Patton; M. Sawicki; C. W. Shepherd

    2000-08-14

    Galaxy groups likely to be virialized are identified within the CNOC2 intermediate redshift galaxy survey using an iterative method. The number-velocity dispersion relation is in agreement with the low-mass extrapolation of the cluster normalized Press-Schechter function. The two-point group-group correlation function has r_0=6.8+/- 0.3 Mpc, which is larger than the correlations of individual galaxies at the level predicted from n-body calibrated halo clustering. The groups are stacked in velocity and position to create a sample large enough for measurement of a density and velocity dispersion profile. The stacked mean galaxy density profile falls nearly as a power law with r^{-2.5} and has no well-defined core. The projected velocity dispersion is examined for a variety of samples with different methods and found to be either flat or slowly rising outwards. The combination of a steeper-than-isothermal density profile and the outward rising velocity dispersion implies that the mass-to-light ratio of groups rises with radius. The M/L can be kept nearly constant if the galaxy orbits are nearly circular, although such strong tangential anisotropy is not supported by other evidence. The segregation of mass and light is not dependent on galaxy luminosity but is far more prominent in the red galaxies than the blue. The M/L gradient could arise from orbital ``sloshing'' of the galaxies in the group halos, dynamical friction acting on the galaxies in a background of ``classical'' collisionless dark matter, or, more speculatively, the dark matter may have a true core.

  5. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the EE Global Forum -- As Delivered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivered May 21, 2014 - 2:19pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, thank you, Kateri. And, A, it's true that I was here within a few hours of being...

  6. Delivered by Ingenta to: IP : 90.148.96.123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    hydrogen (for PEMFCs) or hydrogen-rich reformate (for SOFCs) for extended periods, and deliver hydrogen Ceramic Powders, Ceria, Precious Metals, Ruthenium, Palladium, Rhodium, Sulfur-Tolerant Catalysts, Fuel Reforming, Hydrogen. CONTENTS 1. Introduction

  7. Training is sponsoring Excel Intermediate & Advanced Courses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Due to a tremendous response, Training is sponsoring additional Excel Intermediate & Advanced Courses. The classes will be held on Wednesday and Thursday, May 20-21, 8 a.m.-5 p.m....

  8. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactant, CH2I. The CH2I reacts with a large excess of O2 to produce CH2OO-formaldehyde oxide-the simplest form of Criegee intermediate. The intense tunable light from the...

  9. Engineering Dilute Nitride Semiconductor Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luce, Alexander Vallejo

    2015-01-01

    Shockley-Queisser limit 2 Intermediate band solar cells 2.1for viable intermediate band solar cells . . . . 2.6for intermediate band solar cell. (a) Schematic band diagram

  10. Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity to reconstruct past Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) have the advantage of allowing transient

  11. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

  12. A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery System A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for...

  13. Intermediate Temperature SOFC Operation Using Lanthanum Gallate Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elangovan, S.; Balagopal, S. Hartvigsen, J.; Tipmer, M.; Larsen, D.

    2005-01-27

    This presentation discusses intermediate temperature SOFC operation using lanthanum gallate electrolyte.

  14. Harmony: A Desktop Grid for Delivering Enterprise Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Sriram

    .com 2 Dept. of Computer Science, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, 1081 HV, The Netherlands, E-mail: swami.com 4 Dept of Computer Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, E-mail: srikrishHarmony: A Desktop Grid for Delivering Enterprise Computations Vijay K. Naik1 , Swaminathan

  15. Fiber delivered probe for efficient CARS imaging of tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Fiber delivered probe for efficient CARS imaging of tissues Mihaela Balu1, Gangjun Liu1, Zhongping-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal in biological tissues. We discuss the design challenges including capturing the back- scattered forward generated CARS signal in the sample and the effects of fiber

  16. Today's electrical transmission system delivers high levels of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    #12;Today's electrical transmission system delivers high levels of reliability, and society's needs for electricity demand that reliability be maintained as we transition to clean electricity generation of conventional and superconducting conductors. The power grid is a complex machine in which electricity is gener

  17. UT Arlington > Features Building tiny robots to deliver medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    UT Arlington > Features Building tiny robots to deliver medicine Coming from a family of doctors systems. "I've always been interested in medicine and medical-related fields," she says. So much so in India, Rao had only two options: dental school or engineering. Considering her interest in medicine, she

  18. Reaction plane dispersion at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lukasik; W. Trautmann

    2006-03-29

    A method to derive the corrections for the dispersion of the reaction plane at intermediate energies is proposed. The method is based on the correlated, non-isotropic Gaussian approximation. It allowed to construct the excitation function of genuine flow values for the Au+Au reactions at 40-150 MeV/nucleon measured with the INDRA detector at GSI.

  19. www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS www.westlothian.gov.ukWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Industry Park, Bellsquarry, Livingston www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS Brucefield Industry Park #12;www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS The problem Polluted discharge & flash flooding from Brucefield Industry Park www.westlothianonline.infoWEST LOTHIAN COUNCIL DELIVERS

  20. Regular paper Search for intermediates of photosynthetic water oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junge, Wolfgang

    II of cyanobacteria and plants incorporates the catalytic centre of water oxidation. PoweredRegular paper Search for intermediates of photosynthetic water oxidation Juergen Clausen & Wolfgang Key words: intermediate, photosynthesis, Photosystem II, S-state, water oxidation Abstract Photosystem

  1. Engineering Dilute Nitride Semiconductor Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luce, Alexander Vallejo

    2015-01-01

    Shockley-Queisser limit 2 Intermediate band solar cells 2.1with a realistic solar spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3for viable intermediate band solar cells . . . . 2.6

  2. Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation Dennis A. Hansell 2002. [1] An evaluation of DOC export with the formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water east of Japan. The new intermediate water, formed at a rate of 2­5 Sv, exports DOC at 13 ± 6 Tg DOC yr

  3. Apparatus and method for delivering a fluid to a container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for delivering a fluid into a container has a carriage movably associated with a holding mechanism along an axis. A piston is attached to the carriage and a cylinder is slidably attached to the piston along the axis. The cylinder has a hole formed therein that extends along the axis. A needle extending along the axis is attached to the piston and passes through the cylinder hole. The needle has a first operative position relative to the piston when the needle is retracted within the cylinder and a second operative position relative to the piston when the needle extends from the cylinder.

  4. Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996Deutsche Bank AGTotal Delivered Commercial

  5. Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996Deutsche Bank AGTotal Delivered

  6. Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996Deutsche Bank AGTotal DeliveredReal

  7. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  8. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E. (Altadena, CA); Crane, Douglas Todd (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-10-27

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  9. Nucleosynthesis in intermediate mass AGB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Lattanzio; Corinne Charbonnel; Manuel Forestini

    1999-12-15

    We present a summary of the main sites for nucleosynthesis in intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. We then discuss some detailed evolutionary models and how these have been used to create a synthetic evolution code which calculates the nucleosynthesis very rapidly, enabling us to investigate changes in some uncertain parameters in AGB evolution, such as mass-loss and dredge-up. We then present results for C, C/O, Mg and Al. We also discuss the changes due to the recent NACRE compilation of reaction rates.

  10. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.Engineering Metal(2) Cu (3) OEnol Intermediates

  11. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.Engineering Metal(2) Cu (3) OEnol IntermediatesEnol

  12. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.Engineering Metal(2) Cu (3) OEnolEnol Intermediates

  13. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  14. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  15. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins...

  16. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over...

  17. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    unifying mechanism for protein folding? [Review]. Trends incoordinate for protein folding. Journal of Chemical PhysicsIntermediates can accelerate protein folding. Proceedings of

  18. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-11-01

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  19. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-10-18

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  20. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    including cost, energy and thermal comfort analysis, whichfor greatest energy benefits, prioritize thermal comfortMinimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Cindy

  1. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  2. Sandia Energy - Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of the Cost Home Energy CRF Facilities Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities Systems...

  3. Computer Information Systems Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) delivers resources that advance computing as a science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Information Systems Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) delivers resources that advance computing as a science and a profession. ACM provides the computing field's premier Digital

  4. Intracellular Tracking of Single Native Molecules with Electroporation-Delivered Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chang

    Intracellular Tracking of Single Native Molecules with Electroporation-Delivered Quantum Dots Chen Sun, Zhenning Cao, Min Wu, and Chang Lu*,,§ School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia

  5. The RGB Sample of Intermediate BL Lacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. I. Kollgaard; E. D. Feigelson; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert

    1999-05-12

    Combining newly identified and previously known BL Lacs from the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog, we present a sample of 127 BL Lacs, the largest ever derived from a single uniform survey. A Complete sample of 33 objects brighter than O=18.0 mag is also presented. These samples are compared to other known BL Lac samples and are generally found to exhibit properties intermediate between those of the previously disparate classes of High and Low energy peaked BL Lacs (HBLs and LBLs, respectively). This result is most dramatic in the distribution of the X-ray to radio logarithmic flux ratios, where the RGB BL Lacs are shown to peak precisely where the sharp dichotomy between the two subclasses was previously seen. The alpha_ro vs alpha_ox diagram also shows the RGB sample smoothly bridges the gap between the previously distinct subclasses of LBLs and HBLs. We also find a weak, but statistically significant correlation between the composite X-ray spectral index alpha_xox and alpha_ro. This implies that the more LBL-like RGB BL Lacs have a secondary source of X-ray emission, possibly from an inverse Compton component. We also present both the X-ray and radio logN-logS distributions for which the competing HBL/LBL unification scenarios have differing predictions. The unknown effects of the triple flux limit inherent in the RGB Complete sample makes quantitative analysis uncertain, but the characteristics of the RGB sample compare well both with results obtained from previous samples and with general theoretical predictions based on a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Our analysis indicates that the unimodal distribution of BL Lac properties found in the RGB sample likely reliably reflect the underlying population, while the bimodal distribution found in earlier studies arose primarily from observational selection effects.

  6. Way Beyond Widgets: Delivering Integrated Lighting Design in Actionable Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Richman, Eric E.; Jones, Carol C.

    2008-08-17

    Previously, energy-efficiency strategies for commercial spaces have focused on using efficient equipment without providing specific detailed instructions. Designs by experts in their fields are an energy-efficiency product in its own right. A new national program has developed interactive application-specific lighting designs for widespread use in four major commercial sectors. This paper will describe the technical basis for the solutions, energy efficiency and cost-savings methodology, and installations and measurement/verification to-date. Lighting designs have been developed for five types of retail stores (big box, small box, grocery, specialty market, and pharmacy) and are planned for the office, healthcare, and education sectors as well. Nationally known sustainable lighting designers developed the designs using high-performance commercially available products, daylighting, and lighting controls. Input and peer review was received by stakeholders, including manufacturers, architects, utilities, energy-efficiency program sponsors (EEPS), and end-users (i.e., retailers). An interactive web tool delivers the lighting solutions and analyzes anticipated energy savings using project-specific inputs. The lighting solutions were analyzed against a reference building using the space-by-space method as allowed in the Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004) co-sponsored by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA). The results showed that the design vignettes ranged from a 9% to 28% reduction in the allowed lighting power density. Detailed control strategies are offered to further reduce the actual kilowatt-hour power consumption. When used together, the lighting design vignettes and control strategies show a modeled decrease in energy consumption (kWh) by 33% to 50% below the baseline design.

  7. Cree's High-Power White LED Delivers 121 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree's commercial high-power white LEDs can now deliver 121 lm/W at 35A/cm2 current density. These particular Cree XLamp® XP-G LEDs deliver 267 lumens at a drive current of 700 mA and an operating...

  8. New HI 21-cm absorbers at low and intermediate redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwaan, M A; Péroux, C; Murphy, M T; Bouché, N; Curran, S J; Biggs, A D

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening HI 21-cm absorbers at intermediate and low redshift (0180 K. A subset of our systems were also searched for OH absorption, but no detections were made.

  9. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES FOR DELINEATION ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Why study protein folding .............................................................................. 3 1.2.1 How fast should a protein fold ........................................................... 3

  10. 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autor, David

    This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, ...

  11. Intermediate connector for stacked organic light emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrade, Brian

    2013-02-12

    A device is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an intermediate connector disposed between the anode and the cathode. A first organic layer including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the anode and the intermediate connector, and a second including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the intermediate connector and the cathode. The intermediate connector includes a first metal having a work function lower than 4.0 eV and a second metal having a work function lower than 5.0 eV. The work function of the first metal is at least 0.5 eV less than the work function of the second metal. The first metal is in contact with a sublayer of the second organic layer that includes a material well adapted to receive holes from a low work function metal.

  12. Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically correct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahle, Andreas

    Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically of Chicago, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA ABSTRACT Intravascular brachytherapy has shown brachytherapy with the target range determined from the patient's prescribed dose. Furthermore, di

  13. Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically correct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahle, Andreas

    Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically of Chicago, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA ABSTRACT Intravascular brachytherapy has shown brachytherapy with the target range determined from the patient's prescribed dose. Furthermore, differences

  14. Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems Jeffrey Siegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National and air conditioner performance. These parameters included placing the entire air conditioning system

  15. Seismic evolution of low/intermediate mass PMS stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. G. Pinheiro

    2007-12-05

    This article presents a study of the evolution of the internal structure and seismic properties expected for low/intermediate mass Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) stars. Seismic and non-seismic properties of PMS stars were analysed. This was done using 0.8 to 4.4M$_\\odot$ stellar models at stages ranging from the end of the Hayashi track up to the Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS). This research concludes that, for intermediate-mass stars (M$>$1.3M$_\\odot$), diagrams comparing the effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) against the small separation can provide an alternative to Christensen-Dalsgaard (C-D) diagrams. The impact of the metal abundance of intermediate mass stars (2.5-4.4M$_\\odot$) has over their seismic properties is also evaluated.

  16. Cell Host & Microbe Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdivia, Raphael

    Cell Host & Microbe Article Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions within a cell leading to the highest yield of EBs (Wilson et al., 2006). The expansion of inclu- sions is likely fueled by the acquisition of membrane lipids from Golgi-derived vesicles (Carabeo et al

  17. ME 360N Intermediate Heat Transfer ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    and Internal), Heat Exchangers (1) 3. Heat Exchanger Analysis (1) 4. Radiation (Intro) (Properties, Surface (1) 22. Nat'l. Conv. (1) 23. Intro Heat Exchangers & Energy Balances (1) 24. Overall H.T. Coeff ­ Intermediate Heat Transfer Page 2 ABET EC2000 syllabus Class/Laboratory Schedule (Type, number and duration

  18. Capturing fleeting intermediates in a catalytic CH amination reaction cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    for the mechanistic study of catalytic processes. mass spectrometry | transient intermediates | C­H oxidation | catalysis Catalytic methods for selective C­H oxidation rely on the exquisite choreography of a series oxidant (4, 5, 11). The fast rates of the on- and off-path steps in this catalytic process

  19. Metal Vinylidenes and Allenylidenes as Intermediates in Catalytic Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Metal Vinylidenes and Allenylidenes as Intermediates in Catalytic Transformations Literature Group Key references: Metal Vinylidenes in Catalysis. Bruneau, C.; Dixneuf, P. H. Acc. Chem. Res. 1999, 32.; Pinkerton, A. B. Chem. Rev. 2001, 101, 2067-2096. Outline: · Definitions · Metal vinylidene generation

  20. Cellular Automata and Intermediate Degrees Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutner, Klaus

    Cellular Automata and Intermediate Degrees K. Sutner Computer Science Department Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract We study a classification of cellular automata based on the Turing degree of the orbits of the automaton. The difficulty of determining the membership of a cellular

  1. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  2. Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

  3. UBVI photometry of the intermediate age open cluster NGC 6939

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gloria Andreuzzi; Angela Bragaglia; Monica Tosi; Gianni Marconi

    2003-11-13

    We present CCD UBVI photometry of the nearby, intermediate age open cluster NGC 6939. Using the synthetic Colour - Magnitude Diagrams technique we estimate the following parameters: age between 1.3 and 1.0 Gyr (depending on whether or not overshooting is considered), reddening 0.34

  4. A Note on the Intermediate Region in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. I. Barenblatt; A. J. Chorin; V. M. Prostokishin

    2000-02-16

    We demonstrate that the processing of the experimental data for the average velocity profiles obtained by J. M. \\"Osterlund (www.mesh.kth.se/$\\sim$jens/zpg/) presented in [1] was incorrect. Properly processed these data lead to the opposite conclusion: they confirm the Reynolds-number-dependent scaling law and disprove the conclusion that the flow in the intermediate (`overlap') region is Reynolds-number-independent.

  5. Origins of Intermediate Velocity Particle Production in Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Gingras; A. Chernomoretz; Y. Larochelle; Z. Y. He; L. Beaulieu; G. C. Ball; F. Grenier; D. Horn; R. Roy; M. Samri; C. St-Pierre; D. Theriault; S. Turbide

    2001-08-31

    Investigation of intermediate-velocity particle production is performed on entrance channel mass asymmetric collisions of 58Ni+C and 58Ni+Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon. Distinctions between prompt pre-equilibrium ejections, multiple neck ruptures and an alternative phenomenon of delayed aligned asymmetric breakup is achieved using source reconstructed correlation observables and time-based cluster recognition in molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  7. GENIE: Delivering e-Science to the environmental scientist M. Y. Gulamali1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to deliver a Grid-based, modular, distributed and scalable Earth System Model for long-term and paleo-term aims of the GENIE project. 1 Introduction The Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model (GENIE-term benefits to the Earth system modelling community (and others who need to com- bine disparate models

  8. TESTING FORM Please deliver exams with envelope & testing form at least 24 hours in advance to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    TESTING FORM Please deliver exams with envelope & testing form at least 24 hours in advance to in a sealed envelope to Disability Services, or deposited into the mail slot located on the outside the door: ________________________________________ (Building/Office Number) ______ Return test to the Departmental Office

  9. Towards Optimal Energy Store-Carry-and-Deliver for PHEVs via V2G System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Weihua

    technology is incorporated to facilitate the energy delivery by providing electricity pricing and energy energy flow, non- stationary energy demand, battery characteristics, and TOU elec- tricity price. WeTowards Optimal Energy Store-Carry-and-Deliver for PHEVs via V2G System Hao Liang, Bong Jun Choi

  10. Maximizing Throughput of UAV-Relaying Networks with the Load-Carry-and-Deliver Paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, H. T.

    Maximizing Throughput of UAV-Relaying Networks with the Load-Carry-and-Deliver Paradigm Chen Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to relay messages between two distant ground nodes. For delay-tolerant applications like latency-insensitive bulk data transfer, we seek to maximize throughput by having a UAV load

  11. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  12. 3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY 3D Systems Packaging and Packages What ·Low-costandhighperformanceglassandsiliconinterposerswith 10x higher I/Os than organic packages at 2-10x lower cost per mm2 than wafer Si interposers for smart mobile and industrial

  13. 3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY 3D Systems Packaging-costdecouplingcapacitorsonsilicon,glassandorganic packages ·Novel nanocomposite dielectrics for low TCC, low loss and highpermittivity ·Demonstration of size #12;3D Systems Packaging Research Center 813 Ferst Drive, NW, Atlanta, GA 30332 · 404.894.9097 fax

  14. 3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    3D Systems Packaging Research Center DELIVERING BREAKTHROUGH IDEAS TO INDUSTRY 3D Systems Packaging and IPDs, highly- miniaturized fine-pitch chip-to-package and package-to- packageinterconnections ·Ultra-fine pitch die-to-package Cu-Cu interconnections and assembly ·EmbeddedthinIPDs Previous Major

  15. Cutting the carbon footprint of IT How to deliver measurable savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutting the carbon footprint of IT How to deliver measurable savings ­ an IBM study with the support of Defra #12;Contents Section 1 ­ Foreword Page 3 Assessing and reducing carbon footprint, and infrastructure. Section 3 ­ Measuring and improving the carbon footprint Page 12 Saving power, saving money

  16. Do Energy Efficiency Investments Deliver? Evidence from the Weatherization Assistance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    Do Energy Efficiency Investments Deliver? Evidence from the Weatherization Assistance Program that energy efficiency (EE) policies are beneficial because they induce investments that pay for themselves for energy end uses increases as a result of greater efficiency ­ the paper fails to find evidence

  17. UMBC Training Centers Partners with EC-Council, to Deliver Online Cybersecurity Training Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    UMBC Training Centers Partners with EC-Council, to Deliver Online Cybersecurity Training Programs "iClasses offer Students the option of live, instructor lead online security training virtually anywhere with access to the internet." March 21, 2011 - UMBC Training Centers, long time partner of the EC

  18. Energy Storage & Delivery The goal of this project is to deliver measurement methods specific to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Storage & Delivery Materials The goal of this project is to deliver measurement methods specific to polymeric and organic materials needed in next generation energy storage and delivery. · The NIST team is works closely with leaders in the energy storage and delivery field, including General

  19. Emergency Procedures Burnaby Campus REGISTER FOR SFU ALERTS The SFU Alerts system delivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Emergency Procedures Burnaby Campus REGISTER FOR SFU ALERTS The SFU Alerts system delivers emergency alerts to registered SFU members www.sfu.ca/sfualerts Report Emergencies 778 782 4500 or use Blue Emergency Phones Report Hazards 778 782 3582 or fmserv@sfu.ca Environmental Health and Safety & Emergency

  20. ECEEE 2005 SUMMER STUDY WHAT WORKS & WHO DELIVERS? 183 Local energy efficiency and demand-side

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be the basis for local energy policies and energy efficiency/demand-side management activities1, have been) activities in 1. DSM: Demand-Side Management; EE: energy efficiency (here, does not include renewableECEEE 2005 SUMMER STUDY ­ WHAT WORKS & WHO DELIVERS? 183 1,202 Local energy efficiency and demand-side

  1. A new report delivers MSHP performance data for use in whole-building simulation tools.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost effectiveness and performance in U.S. homes, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL that performance across a range of temperature, humidity, and equipment speed could be evaluated. Key ResultA new report delivers MSHP performance data for use in whole-building simulation tools. Mini

  2. Delivering the Green: The Future of California's Freight Transportation System Summary and Reading List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Delivering the Green: The Future of California's Freight Transportation System Summary and Reading List California's freight sector is a critical part of California's economic engine, generating. California's freight sector, including trucks, trains, and ships is also the largest contributor to ozone

  3. Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sujit K

    Bayesian Spatio-Temporal Modelling to Deliver More Accurate and Instantaneous Air Pollution concentrations in the atmosphere. Many urban and suburban areas have high levels of ozone concentrations, but many ru- ral areas also have high ozone levels as winds carry emissions hundreds of miles from

  4. Plasma/catalytic gas cleaning to deliver high quality syngas from waste biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma/catalytic gas cleaning to deliver high quality syngas from waste biomass Paul T. Williams, Alstom, Process Systems Enterprises Ltd, C-Tech Innovation Ltd Introduction #12;Background Biomass for decarbonising power production." BUT: · A key problem for biomass gasification is tar in the syngas. · Tar

  5. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

  6. Structural and mechanical properties of intermediate filaments under extreme conditions and disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Zhao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected ...

  7. EVALUATION OF TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INTERMEDIATE NON DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.”

  8. Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Tran, Binh-Nien (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-05-27

    The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

  9. Intermediate Vapor Expansion Distillation and Nested Enrichment Cascade Distillation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    shaft power is being substituted for heat which in many cases may be extremely low valued. Th~ next section describes how to avoid that problem, and even turn it to advantage. 136 ESL-IE-86-06-25 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial... will improve column efficiency by 15 to 100%, there has been little use of this technique to date." Intermediate vapor compression heat pumping was recently introduced as one practical means of achieving this benefit. Introduced in this paper are two new...

  10. File:Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdf JumpGerak.pdf Jump5.pdfIntermediate wind

  11. Delivering iMPACtThe Economic, Cultural and Social Impact of University College Dublin President's Foreword 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivering iMPACtThe Economic, Cultural and Social Impact of University College Dublin #12 and Heritage at UCD 28 April 2015 #12;2 The Economic, Cultural and Social Impact of UCD President's Foreword the education of our students and delivers impact economically, socially, culturally and in the formation

  12. Market-Oriented Cloud Computing: Vision, Hype, and Reality for Delivering IT Services as Computing Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Venugopal, Srikumar

    2008-01-01

    This keynote paper: presents a 21st century vision of computing; identifies various computing paradigms promising to deliver the vision of computing utilities; defines Cloud computing and provides the architecture for creating market-oriented Clouds by leveraging technologies such as VMs; provides thoughts on market-based resource management strategies that encompass both customer-driven service management and computational risk management to sustain SLA-oriented resource allocation; presents some representative Cloud platforms especially those developed in industries along with our current work towards realising market-oriented resource allocation of Clouds by leveraging the 3rd generation Aneka enterprise Grid technology; reveals our early thoughts on interconnecting Clouds for dynamically creating an atmospheric computing environment along with pointers to future community research; and concludes with the need for convergence of competing IT paradigms for delivering our 21st century vision.

  13. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_wti.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1 2011NovemberTexas

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1 2011NovemberTexas09

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1

  17. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2013-08-20

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  18. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-04-07

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  19. Creating an Energy Strategy that Delivers Cost Savings While Optimizing Asset Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, A.

    2006-01-01

    and electricity as opposed to flaring. Waste streams containing combustible process off- gas or biogas are now routinely diverted to specially designed boilers, and are used to supplement, or in some cases completely displace, natural gas used in some..., Business Development Cinergy Solutions Cincinnati, OH Creating an Energy Strategy that Delivers Cost Savings while Optimizing Asset Utilization Abstract Fortune 1000 companies are at the top of their field because they focus...

  20. The 1994 intermediate reline of H-3 furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J.D.; Nanavati, K.S.; Spirko, E.J.; Wakelin, D.H.

    1995-12-01

    LTV Steel`s Indiana Harbor Works H-3 Blast Furnace was rebuilt in 1988 to provide reliable operations at high production rates without damage to the shell for an overall campaign. This Rebuild included: (1) complete bosh and partial stack shell replacement; (2) a spray cooled carbon bosh; (3) a row of staves at the mantle and six rows of stack staves, all stack staves had noses (ledges at the top of the stave) with the exception of row 5; (4) silicon carbide filled semi graphite brick for the bosh, silicon carbide brick from the mantle area and to the top of stave row No. 1, super duty brick in front of the remaining staves and phosphate bonded high alumina brick in the upper stack; (5) movable throat armor; (6) upgraded instrumentation to follow furnace operation and lining wear occurring in the furnace. No work was done to the hearth walls and bottom, since these had been replaced in 1982 with a first generation graphite cooled design and has experienced 7.7 million NTHM. The furnace was blown in November 18, 1988 and operated through September 3, 1994, at which time it was blown down for its first intermediate repair after 7.85 million NTHM. This paper summarizes the operation of the furnace and then discusses the major aspects of the 1994 intermediate repair.

  1. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  2. Intermediate hearth repair technique at Thyssen Stahl AG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, W.; Bachhofen, H.J.; Ruether, P.; Ballewski, T. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays various techniques for the fastest possible intermediate repair and/or emplacement of refractory materials above the tuyere level allow a significant extension of furnace campaign life. The latter are hence now exclusively determined by the service life of the hearth. The improvement of hearth monitoring and the estimation of residual brick strength of the refractory lining on the basis of temperature measurements in the hearth enable the location of individual zones of premature wear. These measurement methods, which were developed by Thyssen Stahl AG, aid the decision to undertake selective repair of the hearth. Three areas of repair are differentiated: taphole zone; hearth wall, localized; and hearth wall, extensive. This hearth repair method is described in this report using the example of hearth refurbishing blast furnace 8, Hamborn.

  3. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  4. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  5. Kaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2005-09-01

    The article reviews the physics related to kaon and antikaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. Chiral dynamics predicts substantial modifications of the kaon properties in a dense nuclear environment. The status of the theoretical predictions as well as experimental evidences for medium effects such as repulsive/attractive mass shifts for $K^+/K^-$ are reviewed. In the vicinity of the thresholds, and even more pronounced below threshold, the production of strangeness is a highly collective process. Starting from elementary reaction channels the phenomenology of $K^+$ and $K^-$ production, i.e. freeze-out densities, time scales etc. as derived from experiment and theoretical transport calculations is presented. Below threshold kaon production shows a high sensitivity on the nuclear compression reached in heavy ion reactions. This allows to put constraints on the nuclear equation-of-state which are finally discussed.

  6. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  7. Synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry study of intermediates in fuel-rich 1,2-dimethoxyethane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Z. K.; Han, D. L.; Li, S. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Yuan, T.

    2009-04-21

    Intermediates in a fuel-rich premixed laminar 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) flame are studied by molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. About 30 intermediate species are identified in the present work, and their mole fraction profiles are evaluated. The experimental results show that the formations of intermediates, both hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons, are closely linked to the structure of fuel, which is consistent with the previous reports. Species produced from H atom abstraction and beta scission of DME usually have much higher concentrations than others. The oxygen atoms in DME are considered to act as partitions of the primary intermediates; therefore farther reactions among these primary intermediates are difficult to occur, resulting in absence of most large intermediate species.

  8. "Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional costTotal Delivered

  9. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at National Lab Day on the Hill -- As Delivered |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13,Discuss theDepartment ofRequest -- As Delivered

  10. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at he 2014 National Science Bowl -- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13,Discuss theDepartment ofRequest -- As Delivered|

  11. NNSA Delivers All Scheduled W76-1 Units to Navy for 2012 | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving BasicSecurity Complex Delivers All

  12. INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Jessica McChesney, APS beamline scientist, connecting the transition edge sensor (TES) detector to the...

  13. Challenges in the Selective Transformation of Biomass to Useful Chemical Intermediates and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    highly hydroxylated biomass feedstocks into new chemical intermediates and thermoplastics. New scientific. We have developed new catalytic methods for transforming biomass feedstocks into new monomers

  14. Release of Information Deliver to: Registrar's Office, Administration Building Room 110, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725-1365

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Release of Information Deliver to: Registrar's Office, Administration Building will not release any information to any private individual and most agencies without your written permission--unless legally required. This Release of Information form

  15. Lysozyme Protein Solution with an Intermediate Range Order Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Porcar, L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL; Chen, Jinhong [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Falus, Peter [ORNL; Fratini, Emiliano [University of Florence; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Baglioni, P [University of Florence

    2011-01-01

    The formation of equilibrium clusters has been studied in both a prototypical colloidal system and protein solutions. The appearance of a low-Q correlation peak in small angle scattering patterns of lysozyme solution was attributed to the cluster-cluster correlation. Consequently, the presence of long-lived clusters has been established. By quantitatively analyzing both the SANS (small angle neutron scattering) and NSE (neutron spin echo) data of lysozyme solution using statistical mechanics models, we conclusively show in this paper that the appearance of a low-Q peak is not a signature of the formation of clusters. Rather, it is due to the formation of an intermediate range order structure governed by a short-range attraction and a long-range repulsion. We have further studied dynamic features of a sample with high enough concentration at which clusters are formed in solution. From the estimation of the mean square displacement by using short-time and long-time diffusion coefficient measured by NSE and NMR, we find that these clusters are not permanent but have a finite lifetime longer than the time required to diffuse over a distance of a monomer diameter.

  16. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15°

  17. Intermediate-break LOCA analyses for the AP600 design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.; Lime, J.F.

    1995-07-01

    A postulated double-ended guillotine break of a direct-vessel-injection line in an AP600 plant has been analyzed. This event is characterized as an intermediate break loss-of-coolant accident (IBLOCA). Most of the insights regarding the response of the AP600 safety systems to the postulated accident are derived from calculations performed with the TRAC-PFl/MOD2 code. However, complementary insights derived from a scaled experiment conducted in the ROSA facility, as well as insights based upon calculations by other codes, are also presented. The key processes occurring in an AP600 during a IBLOCA are primary coolant system depressurization, inventory depletion, inventory replacement via emergency core coolant injection, continuous core cooling, and long-term decay heat rejection to the atmosphere. Based upon the calculated and experimental results, the AP600 will not experience a core heat up and will reach a safe shutdown state using only safety-class equipment. Only the early part of the long-term cooling period initiated by In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank injection was evaluated Thus, the observation that the core is continuously cooled should be verified for the latter phase of the long-term cooling period, the interval when sump injection and containment cooling processes are important.

  18. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  19. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B.; Barron, W.F.; Kamel, A.M.; Santiago, H.T.

    1992-09-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  20. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. ); Barron, W.F. ); Kamel, A.M. ); Santiago, H.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  1. Oxide-supported PtCo alloy catalyst for intermediate temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Oxide-supported PtCo alloy catalyst for intermediate temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC) operating between 80° and 110 °C at different, Fuel cells, Oxygen reduction reaction, Doped Ti-oxide support, Intermediate temperature

  2. Trepanation in South-Central Peru During the Early Late Intermediate Period (ca. AD 10001250)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosmides, Leda

    Trepanation in South-Central Peru During the Early Late Intermediate Period (ca. AD 1000-two individuals from Andahuaylas, AMS radiocarbon dated to the early Late Intermediate Period (ca. AD 1000 grooving, drilling and boring, and lin- ear cutting were far less successful. Evidence of perioperative

  3. Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancho, Javier

    Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate MarõÂa P. IruÂn1 in surface- exposed hydrogen bonds connecting secondary-structure elements in the native protein. All hydrogen bonds analysed are formed in the molten globule intermediate, either with native strength

  4. A novel crystalline soft magnetic intermediate layer for perpendicular recording media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    to the head air bearing surface to enhance the recording performance. The prototypes of the soft magneticA novel crystalline soft magnetic intermediate layer for perpendicular recording media Soyoung Park the head to soft underlayer. In this paper, a soft magnetic intermediate layer is proposed to partially

  5. Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1995-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures.

  6. Nucleosynthesis of Elements in Low to Intermediate Mass Stars through the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattanzio, John

    Nucleosynthesis of Elements in Low to Intermediate Mass Stars through the AGB Phase John C on the nucleosynthesis and mixing mechanisms in low­ and intermediate­ mass stars. In addition to explicit studies grains from meteorites. This places strong constraints on nucleosynthesis and mixing in low

  7. Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUSOD 2007 Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells S)Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK Abstract-Intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) have of transport properties. I. INTRODUCTION The efficiency ofa single junction solar cell can be exceeded

  8. Intermediate Mirrors to Reach Theoretical Efficiency Limits of Multi-Bandgap Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapati, Vidya; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Creating a single bandgap solar cell that approaches the Shockley-Queisser limit requires a highly reflective rear mirror. This mirror enhances the voltage of the solar cell by providing photons with multiple opportunities for escaping out the front surface. Efficient external luminescence is a pre-requisite for high voltage. Intermediate mirrors in a multijunction solar cell can enhance the voltage for each cell in the stack. These intermediate mirrors need to have the added function of transmitting the below bandgap photons to the next cell in the stack. In this work, we quantitatively establish the efficiency increase possible with the use of intermediate selective reflectors between cells in a tandem stack. The absolute efficiency increase can be up to ~6% in dual bandgap cells with optimal intermediate and rear mirrors. A practical implementation of an intermediate selective mirror is an air gap sandwiched by antireflection coatings. The air gap provides perfect reflection for angles outside the escape c...

  9. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO); Taylor, Roger W. (Golden, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

  10. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

    1998-05-05

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

  11. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  12. Difference spectra of late intermediates of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindjee, R.; Dancshazy, Zs.; Ebrey, T.G. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1989-01-01

    The flash-induced difference absorbance spectra of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) were measured at various times after an actinic flash using a diode array spectrophotometer (300-700 nm). Difference spectra for three late bacteriorhodopsin photocycle intermediates M[sup fast] (M[sup f]), M[sup slow] (M[sup s]) and R are reported. The main distinguishing features of the 3 difference spectra at pH = 10.5 and 5C are as follows: M[sup f]: [triangle]A[sub max] = 412 nm, a shoulder at 436 nm, no absorbance change at 350 nm, [triangle]A[sub min] = 565 nm, [triangle]A412/[triangle]A565 = 0.8-0.9. M[sup s]: [triangle]A[sub max] = 412 nm, a shoulder at 386 nm, [triangle]A[sub min] = 570-575 nm, [triangle]A412/[triangle]A575 = 0.6. R: [triangle]A[sub max] = 336 and 350 nm (double peak ), minor peaks at 386 and 412 nms, [triangle]A[sub min] = 585-590 nm; [triangle]A350/[triangle]A585 = 0.2. The t[sub 1/2] of M[sup f], M[sup s] and R and the relative weights of BR570 recovered with these rates are: 1 sec (50%), 3-5 sec (25%) and 35 sec (25%) respectively. These spectral features can also be seen at pH = 7, [minus]16C, and at pH = 9-10.5, 20C. Based on some assumptions, the absorption maximum of R was calculated to be at ca. 550 nm. The extinction coefficient of R is approximately 70% that of light-adapted BR.

  13. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  14. Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalin, Azer

    2014-03-30

    Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 – 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

  15. Effects of petroleum distillate on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdullayev, Azer

    2009-06-02

    Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to better understand the effects of additives on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils. The studies have been conducted for the following oil samples...

  16. Experimental studies of steam-propane injection to enhance recovery of an intermediate crude oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinss, Judicael Christopher

    2001-01-01

    in accelerating oil production and to compare the performance of steam-propane injection versus steam injection alone on an intermediate crude oil of 21 ?API gravity. Eight experimental runs were performed: three pure steam injection runs, three steam...

  17. Systematics of intermediate mass fragment kinetic energy spectra in the projectile fragmentation of gold nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, P.; Choi, Y.; Elliot, J.B.; Hauger, J.A. [and others

    1995-10-01

    The characteristics of intermediate mass fragment kinetic energy spectra produced in 1 AGeV Au+C collisions are investigated as a means of determining the conditions at freezeout in multiframentation.

  18. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

  19. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  20. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2008-02-19

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  1. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerata, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  2. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2012-03-06

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  3. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  4. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  5. Design of compact intermediate heat exchangers for gas cooled fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gezelius, Knut, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Two aspects of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for GFR service have been investigated: (1) the intrinsic characteristics of the proposed compact printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE); and (2) a specific design optimizing ...

  6. Underwater Propulsion at Intermediate Re: Comparative Analyses of a Marine Pteropod and a Freshwater Cladoceran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwater Propulsion at Intermediate Re: Comparative Analyses of a Marine Pteropod of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University Introduction Results: Flow Fields Objective Methods. Pteropods stroke flexible wings in a complicated pattern to swim with a smoother, more fluid motion. Goal

  7. Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goosse, H.

    The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and ...

  8. Seismic evidence for thermal runaway during intermediate-depth earthquake rupture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Sarah A.

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes occur at depths where temperatures and pressures exceed those at which brittle failure is expected. There are two leading candidates for the physical mechanism behind these earthquakes: ...

  9. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  10. Release of Information Mail/deliver to: Boise State University Registrar's Office, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725-1365

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Release of Information Mail/deliver to: Boise State University Registrar's Office, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725-1365 FAX: (208) 426-3169 Boise State University will not release any information. This Release of Information form will stay in effect until you rescind it in writing. To Permit the Release

  11. Delivering web pages to mobile phones or personal digital assistants has become possible with the latest wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wee Sun

    1 ABSTRACT Delivering web pages to mobile phones or personal digital assistants has become possible. Converting web pages for delivery to a mobile device is an exciting new problem. In this paper, we propose a web page. This allows the extraction of only important parts of web pages for delivery to mobile

  12. Effectiveness of honey bees in delivering the biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis to blueberry flowers to suppress mummy berry disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    Effectiveness of honey bees in delivering the biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis to blueberry study to test the hypothesis that using bee hives equipped with dispensers containing the biocontrol of a hive-dispersed biocontrol product such as Serenade as a supplement during pollination can reduce

  13. eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic research platform to scholars worldwide. UC Berkeley Transportation Sustainability environmental performance Author: Turner, Brian T., Energy and Resources Group, Richard and Rhoda Goldman School

  14. High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2009-01-01

    with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

  15. MySDI: A Generic Architecture to Develop SDI Personalised Services (How to Deliver the Right Information to the Right User?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    Information to the Right User?) JOÃO FERREIRA, ALBERTO SILVA ISEL / INESC ID Lisboa ­ Portugal , IST / INESC in this paper a generic architecture to deal with the general problem: "How to Deliver the Right InformationMySDI: A Generic Architecture to Develop SDI Personalised Services (How to Deliver the Right

  16. Formation of the intermediate baryon systems in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

    2007-12-17

    The centrality experiments indicate regime change and saturation in the behavior of some characteristics of the secondary particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies. The phenomenon has a critical character. The simple models do not explain the effect. We suppose that the responsible mechanism to explain the phenomenon could be the formation and decay of the intermediate baryon systems. Such systems could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in compressed baryonic matter. Formation of big percolation cluster may change the properties of the medium, e.g., it could lead to the changing its transparency. This could be used to get a signal of the intermediate baryonic system formation. We consider two signals to identify the formation of the intermediate baryon systems: the critical changing of transparency of the strongly interacting matter and the enhancement of light nuclei production with increase in centrality.

  17. The Role of Phase Space in Complex Fragment Emission from Low to Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. G. Moretto; R. Ghetti; K. X. Jing; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

    1996-07-24

    The experimental emission probabilities of complex fragments by low energy compound nuclei and their dependence upon energy and atomic number are compared to the transition state rates. Intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for a variety of reactions at intermediate energies are shown to be binomial and thus reducible at all measured transverse energies. From these distributions a single binary event probability can be extracted which has a thermal dependence. A strong thermal signature is also found in the charge distributions. The n-fold charge distributions are reducible to the 1-fold charge distributions through a simple scaling dictated by fold number and charge conservation.

  18. Redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Balazs, L G; Veres, P

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important task of the Gamma-Ray Burst field is the classification of the bursts. Many researches have proven the existence of the third kind (intermediate duration) of GRBs in the BATSE data. Recent works have analyzed BeppoSax and Swift observations and can also identify three types of GRBs in the data sets. However, the class memberships are probabilistic we have enough observed redshifts to calculate the redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate GRBs. They are significantly farther than the short bursts and seems to be closer than the long ones.

  19. Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

    2008-08-01

    A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

  20. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 3. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the project description, list of participants, and system specifications for the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii.

  1. Selective Monoterpene-like Cyclization Reactions Achieved by Water Exclusion from Reactive Intermediates in a Supramolecular Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart-Cooper, William

    2014-01-01

    9  has  been  observed when water is absent.   (31)  For the  exclusion  of  water  from  reactive  intermediates Reactions Achieved by Water Exclusion from Reactive

  2. Experimental studies of steam-propane injection for the Duri intermediate crude oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendroyono, Arief

    2003-01-01

    for the intermediate Duri crude oil. The experiments involved injecting steam or a mixture of steam and propane into a cell in which was tamped a mixture of sand, oil and water. The cell was placed inside a vacuum jacket set at a reservoir temperature of 100?F...

  3. Kinetics of cooling-and decompression-induced crystallization in hydrous mafic-intermediate magmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    Kinetics of cooling- and decompression-induced crystallization in hydrous mafic-intermediate magmas April 2013 Available online 7 May 2013 Keywords: Magma crystallization Cooling Decompression Crystal using cooling and decompression experiments. These experiments were designed so that the driving force

  4. Trapping Conformational Intermediate States in the Reaction Center Protein from Photosynthetic Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunner, Marilyn

    , electron tunneling reaction in RCs. Conformational flexibility is important for the function of proteins (1 photosynthetic reaction center protein (RCs)1 has a number of physiological electron tunneling reactionsTrapping Conformational Intermediate States in the Reaction Center Protein from Photosynthetic

  5. Understanding the Importance of Intermediate Representations in Engineering Problem-Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobek II, Durward K.

    Understanding the Importance of Intermediate Representations in Engineering Problem-Solving Durward that representations play in engineering problem solving. Modern cognitive psychology has shown that not only do important implications for how educators can help students develop effective problem-solving skills. 1

  6. Discovery of Eight Recycled Pulsars - The Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Edwards

    1999-11-19

    We have conducted a pulsar survey of intermediate Galactic latitudes (15deg 0.57 Mo and > 1.2 Mo), while anotherhas a low mass (~0.2 Mo) companion in a 23.3-d orbit, residing the well-known orbital period ``gap''.

  7. Intermediate statistics for a system with symplectic symmetry: the Dirac rose graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    statistics formed of a gas of energy levels interacting with a logarithmic potential. Spectral statisticsIntermediate statistics for a system with symplectic symmetry: the Dirac rose graph J.M. Harrison1 Abstract We study the spectral statistics of the Dirac operator on a rose-shaped graph-- a graph

  8. Structural Evidence for a Dehydrated Intermediate in Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Biosynthesis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biosynthesis* Received for publication,December 6, 2009, and in revised form, February 23, 2010 Published, JBC- zolone and phenolic rings, has been attributed to one of the intermediate states in the GFP chromophore biosynthesis. The UV irradiation ( 250­300 nm) of aceGFP-G222E drives the chromophore maturation further

  9. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

  10. EE443L: Intermediate Control Lab Lab2: Modeling a DC motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    EE443L: Intermediate Control Lab Lab2: Modeling a DC motor Introduction: In this lab we will develop and validate a basic model of a permanent magnet DC motor (Yaskawa Electric, Mini-series, Minertia motor). The specific input/output relationship, which we are interested in determining, is the manner

  11. Shapes of flux domains in the intermediate state of type-I superconductors Alan T. Dorsey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    as a collection of tense current ribbons flowing along the superconducting-normal interfaces and subject of Landau's original conformal mapping treatment of the laminar state, in which the superconductor-normalShapes of flux domains in the intermediate state of type-I superconductors Alan T. Dorsey

  12. Peptide Inhibitors of Dengue-Virus Entry Target a Late-Stage Fusion Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    with positive-strand RNA genomes packaged into compact particles, about 500 A° in diameter [5]. Their fusionPeptide Inhibitors of Dengue-Virus Entry Target a Late- Stage Fusion Intermediate Aaron G. Schmidt1 School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America Abstract The mechanism of membrane fusion

  13. On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water Zouhair Lachkar Mesoscale eddies CFC-11 Ventilation Southern Ocean a b s t r a c t The spatial distribution of Antarctic and ventilation are substantially affected by mesoscale eddies. To diagnose the role of eddies, we made global CFC

  14. Intermediate and deep water formation in the Okinawa Trough Hirohiko Nakamura,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Intermediate and deep water formation in the Okinawa Trough Hirohiko Nakamura,1 Ayako Nishina,1-diffusion equation. On the other hand, deep water in the Okinawa Trough, below the sill depth of the Kerama Gap be maintained by buoyancy gain of the deep water due to strong diapycnal diffusion (4.8­9.5 3 1024 m2 s21

  15. Analysis of passive scalar advection in parallel shear flows: Sorting of modes at intermediate time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camassa, Roberto

    Analysis of passive scalar advection in parallel shear flows: Sorting of modes at intermediate time; published online 4 November 2010 The time evolution of a passive scalar advected by parallel shear flows. INTRODUCTION The advection-diffusion of a passive scalar is a pivotal problem in mathematical physics

  16. On utility-based derivative pricing with and without intermediate trades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallsen, Jan

    On utility-based derivative pricing with and without intermediate trades Jan Kallsen and Christoph on the assumption that investors are identical utility maximizers and that deriva- tive supply and demand are balanced. It is closely related to (marginal) utility-based pricing in the sense of Hugonnier et al. (2005

  17. Simulation of glacial Cycles with an Earth System Model of intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    Statistical-Dynamical Atmosphere Model (POTSDAM) Surface Energy and Mass balance Interface (SEMI) annual mass circulation ·Conclusions and outlook #12;·Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 Petoukhov et of THC are important to fully complete the glacial terminations. #12;Outlook ·Close the carbon cycle

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of proteins in cages: influence of confinement on the stability of intermediate states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Ojeda; Aurora Londono; Nan-Yow Chen; Martin Garcia

    2008-08-04

    We present a theoretical study of the folding of small proteins inside confining potentials. Proteins are described in the framework of an effective potential model which contains the Ramachandran angles as degrees of freedom and does not need any {\\it a priori} information about the native state. Hydrogen bonds, dipole-dipole- and hydrophobic interactions are taken explicitly into account. An interesting feature displayed by this potential is the presence of some intermediates between the unfolded and native states. We consider different types of confining potentials in order to study the structural properties of proteins folding inside cages with repulsive or attractive walls. Using the Wang-Landau algorithm we determine the density of states (DOS) and analyze in detail the thermodynamical properties of the confined proteins for different sizes of the cages. We show that confinement dramatically reduces the phase space available to the protein and that the presence of intermediate states can be controlled by varying the properties of the confining potential. Cages with strongly attractive walls lead to the disappearance of the intermediate states and to a two-state folding into a less stable configuration. However, cages with slightly attractive walls make the native structure more stable than in the case of pure repulsive potentials, and the folding process occurs through intermediate configurations. In order to test the metastable states we analyze the free energy landscapes as a function of the configurational energy and of the end-to-end distance as an order parameter.

  19. Quasi-static and Quasi-dynamic Modeling of Earthquake Failure at Intermediate Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Quasi-static and Quasi-dynamic Modeling of Earthquake Failure at Intermediate Scales GERT ZO¨ LLER1 of the regions around the fault, static/ kinetic friction laws with possible gradual healing, and stress transfer based on the solution of CHINNERY (1963) for static dislocations in an elastic half-space. As a new

  20. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by Fe.1063/1.1448489 I. INTRODUCTION The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transport- able liquid such as methanol process and as the simplest model for alkane oxidation.1,2 Although no direct, efficient methane­methanol

  1. Soumis J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Soumis à J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test using Nd1.95NiO4 Abstract This work deals with SOFC single cell tests using neodymium nickelate Nd1.95NiO4+ as cathode electrochemical activity with respect to classical materials. The SOFC cells were fabricated from an anode

  2. Intermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parameter in the photovoltaic PV solar cell technology. It is defined as = FFVocJsc Pin , 1 where FFIntermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina Nano to implement the intermediate-band solar cell with the efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit

  3. Isospin relaxation time in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we have studied the isospin and momentum relaxation times in the heavy residues formed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. It is found that only at incident energies below the Fermi energy...

  4. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

    1996-11-05

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  5. Small-world properties emerge in highly compartmentalized networks with intermediate group sizes and numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Small-world properties emerge in highly compartmentalized networks with intermediate group sizes recent studies have focused on two statistical properties observed in diverse real-world networks: the small-world property and compartmentalization D. J. Watts and S. H. Strogatz, Nature 393, 440 1998 ; M

  6. Radical Intermediates in the Addition of OH to Propene: Photolytic Precursors and Angular Momentum E ects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We investigate the photolytic production of two radical intermediates photofragment translational spectroscopy to detect several dissociation products of the unstable C3H6OH radicals: OH + propene, methyl + acetaldehyde, and ethyl + formaldehyde. We also use the angular momenta

  7. Identification of Critical Nodes and Links in Financial Networks with Intermediation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    . Kontoghiorghes, B. Rustem, and P. Winker, Editors, Springer, Berlin, Germany (2008) pp 273-297. Summary with intermediation. The measure captures risk, trans- action cost, price, transaction flow, revenue, and demand like water or electricity?" The advances in information technology and globalization have further

  8. HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Decreases Bending Energy and Promotes Curved Fusion Intermediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    HIV-1 Fusion Peptide Decreases Bending Energy and Promotes Curved Fusion Intermediates Stephanie in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is fusion between the viral envelope and the T x-ray scattering is that the bending modulus KC is greatly reduced upon addition of the HIV fusion

  9. Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H. [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, C. X. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-07-15

    In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

  10. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity the Earth system in high levels of spatial and/or temporal resolu- tion and the processes that they model. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system

  11. Mutations in yhiT enable utilization of exogenous pyrimidine intermediates in Salmonella enterica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coller, Jeff

    Mutations in yhiT enable utilization of exogenous pyrimidine intermediates in Salmonella enterica auxotrophs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. The gain-of-function phenotypes both resulted from a continual supply of deoxyribo- and ribonucleoside triphosphates. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica

  12. Rubidium, zirconium, and lithium production in intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Raai, Mark A; Karakas, Amanda I; Garcia-Hernandez, Domingo A; Yong, David

    2012-01-01

    A recent survey of a large sample of Galactic intermediate-mass (>3 Msun) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars shows that they exhibit large overabundances of rubidium (Rb) up to 100--1000 times solar. These observations set constraints on our theoretical notion of the slow neutron capture process (s process) that occurs inside intermediate-mass AGB stars. Lithium (Li) abundances are also reported for these stars. In intermediate-mass AGB stars, Li can be produced by proton captures occuring at the base of the convective envelope. For this reason the observations of Rb, Zr, and Li set complementary constraints on different processes occurring in the same stars. We present predictions for the abundances of Rb, Zr, and Li as computed for the first time simultaneously in intermediate-mass AGB star models and compare them to the current observational constraints. We find that the Rb abundance increases with increasing stellar mass, as is inferred from observations but we are unable to match the highest observed [R...

  13. Analysis of the efficiency of intermediate band solar cells based on quantum dot supercrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heshmati, S; Golmohammadi, S; Abedi, K; Taleb, H

    2014-03-28

    We have studied the influence of the quantum-dot (QD) width and the quantum-dot conduction band (QD-CB) offset on the efficiency of quantum-dot intermediate band solar cells (QD-IBSCs). Simulation results demonstrate that with increasing QD-CB offset and decreasing QD width, the maximum efficiency is achieved. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Enhancing Source-Based Clone Detection Using Intermediate Representation Gehan M. K. Selim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Ying

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6 3kcdfEnhancing Source-Based Clone Detection Using Intermediate Representation Gehan M. K. Selim School of Computing, Queens University Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6 gehan@cs.queensu.ca King Chun Foo, Ying Zou

  15. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN C. LATTANZIO AND CHERYL A. FROST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattanzio, John

    NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN C. LATTANZIO AND CHERYL A. FROST Department AND PETER R. WOOD Mount Stromlo and Siding Springs Observatories, ANU Abstract. We discuss nucleosynthesis lagging somewhat behind. Studies are desperately needed of the nucleosynthesis which occurs during

  16. Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India Brazil-China-India Workshop on Energy Efficiency Financing Cross country exchange, outreach and dissemination Juan Zak URC Brazil, May 2004 #12;2 What is URC ? · URC is the UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy

  17. Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

  18. Effective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studied in stacked organic light-emitting devices OLEDs . Stacked OLEDs with two identical emissive units organic light-emitting diode OLED device.1­3 The first three-color SOLED was reported in 1997, in whichEffective intermediate layers for highly efficient stacked organic light-emitting devices J. X. Sun

  19. Nucleosynthesis of Elements in Low to Intermediate Mass Stars through the AGB Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John C. Lattanzio; Arnold I. Boothroyd

    1997-05-23

    We present a review of the main phases of stellar evolution with particular emphasis on the nucleosynthesis and mixing mechanisms in low- and intermediate-mass stars. In addition to explicit studies of the effects of the first, second and third dredge-up, we also discuss cool bottom processing and hot bottom burning.

  20. Structure and Electronic Configurations of the Intermediates of Water Oxidation in Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Zakharova, Taisiya; Alperovich, Igor; Meyer, Thomas J.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-04-08

    Catalytic O{sub 2} evolution with cis,cis-[(bpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)Ru{sup III}ORu{sup III}(OH{sub 2})(bpy){sub 2}]{sup 4+} (bpy is 2,2-bipyridine), the so-called blue dimer, the first designed water oxidation catalyst, was monitored by UV-vis, EPR, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with ms time resolution. Two processes were identified, one of which occurs on a time scale of 100 ms to a few seconds and results in oxidation of the catalyst with the formation of an intermediate, here termed [3,4]'. A slower process occurring on the time scale of minutes results in the decay of this intermediate and O{sub 2} evolution. Spectroscopic data suggest that within the fast process there is a short-lived transient intermediate, which is a precursor of [3,4]'. When excess oxidant was used, a highly oxidized form of the blue dimer [4,5] was spectroscopically resolved within the time frame of the fast process. Its structure and electronic state were confirmed by EPR and XAS. As reported earlier, the [3,4]' intermediate likely results from reaction of [4,5] with water. While it is generated under strongly oxidizing conditions, it does not display oxidation of the Ru centers past [3,4] according to EPR and XAS. EXAFS analysis demonstrates a considerably modified ligand environment in [3,4]'. Raman measurements confirmed the presence of the O-O fragment by detecting a new vibration band in [3,4]' that undergoes a 46 cm{sup -1} shift to lower energy upon {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O exchange. Under the conditions of the experiment at pH 1, the [3,4]' intermediate is the catalytic steady state form of the blue dimer catalyst, suggesting that its oxidation is the rate-limiting step.

  1. Energy Management in Small Commercial Buildings: A Look at How HVAC Contractors Can Deliver Energy Efficiency to this Segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hult, Erin; Granderson, Jessica; Mathew, Paul

    2014-07-01

    While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hour onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.

  2. SU-E-T-506: Dosimetric Verification of Photon MLC Delivered Electron Fields for Implementing MERT On An Artiste Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Wang, L; Ma, C; Fan, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of photon MLC delivered electron fields for implementing energy-intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) on an Artiste linac. Methods: It was proposed to deliver MERT on an Artiste linac at a short SSD (60 cm) to reduce beam penumbra caused by electron scatters. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning code was used for treatment planning. Our previous study showed that the measured dose distribution of a breast plan showed good agreement with the calculations in low-medium dose regions while the differences in high dose regions were outstanding. A continuous work found that the discrepancy is mainly caused by improper modeling in MC for the single focused MLC in the Artiste which was simplified as double focused in the previous MC simulations. With this remodeled MLC in the calculations, an energy-intensity modulated electron plan using 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV was generated for a breast treatment on a breast phantom at a 60 cm SSD and recalculated regarding a solid water phantom. For a test study, four of MLC segments (each with a different energy) generated in the plan were delivered to the phantom and a film measurement was performed at the depth of 2 cm. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: For composite doses of the four segments, measured 2D dose distributions overall agree well with the calculations (3mm/3%) in most area. The separate measurement for a single MLC segment for each of energies also showed the consistence with the calculations. Conclusion: After remodeling MLC in the MC calculations, the measured dose distribution for a subset of MLC segments from a MERT plan showed good agreement. Further detailed verification for the full plan will be the work in the next step.

  3. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  4. DNA packaging intermediates of bacteriophage X174 Leodevico LIlagit, Norman H Olson1, Terje Dokland1, Cynthia LMusic1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    DNA packaging intermediates of bacteriophage X174 Leodevico LIlagit, Norman H Olson1, Terje Dokland, bacteriophage X174 packages its I)NA genome into a procapsid that is assem- bled from structural intermediates proteins B and D. Provirions are formed by packaging of DNA together with the small internal J proteins

  5. Formation of Stabilized Ketene Intermediates in the Reaction of P) with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene) Thiolate Self-Assembled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Formation of Stabilized Ketene Intermediates in the Reaction of O(3 P) with Oligo, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States ABSTRACT: We have taken steps to develop in formation of a ketene intermediate via phenyl migration. Under single-collision conditions in the gas phase

  6. Intermediate water links to Deep Western Boundary Current variability in the subtropical NW Atlantic during marine isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    Intermediate water links to Deep Western Boundary Current variability in the subtropical NW Received 21 December 2006; accepted 24 April 2007; published 2 August 2007. [1] Records from Ocean Drilling Intermediate Water formation also suggested by a divergence in the benthic d13 C records with Site 1057 values

  7. A density functional theory study of hydroxyl and the intermediate in the water formation reaction on Pt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    A density functional theory study of hydroxyl and the intermediate in the water formation reaction: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:19:40 #12;A density functional theory study of hydroxyl and the intermediate functional theory has been used to study the adsorption of hydroxyl at low and high coverages and also

  8. Novel Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Vincent Wu, University of California, Berkeley, 2011 SURF Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Introduction The need to develop new cathode materials for intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCsNovel Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Vincent Wu, University) is driven by the temperature conditions required for IT-SOFC operation. Designing SOFCs to operate at lower

  9. A Study to Assess Needed Improvements and Barriers in Planning and Delivering Agricultural Extension Activities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnaw, Yousif Khalid

    2013-07-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess planning and delivering agricultural extension activities in the Kurdistan region of Iraq for future program implementation. The study was a descriptive research and used a modified ...

  10. Partnering with Utilities Part 2- Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) is part two in the series Partnering with Utilities:Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs.

  11. Partnering with Utilities Part 2: Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation; given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP); is part 2 in the series; Partnering with Utilities:Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs.

  12. MCNP6 simulation of light and medium nuclei fragmentation at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepan G. Mashnik; Leslie M. Kerby

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes

  13. Generalized Slow Roll Conditions and the Possibility of Intermediate Scale Inflation in Scalar-Tensor Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2001-06-06

    Generalized slow roll conditions and parameters are obtained for a general form of scalar-tensor theory (with no external sources), having arbitrary functions describing a nonminimal gravitational coupling F(\\phi), a Kahler-like kinetic function k(\\phi), and a scalar potential V(\\phi). These results are then used to analyze a simple toy model example of chaotic inflation with a single scalar field \\phi and a standard Higgs potential and a simple gravitational coupling function. In this type of model inflation can occur with inflaton field values at an intermediate scale of roughly 10^{11} GeV when the particle physics symmetry breaking scale is approximately 1 TeV, provided that the theory is realized within the Jordan frame. If the theory is realized in the Einstein frame, however, the intermediate scale inflation does not occur.

  14. A study of nuclear stopping in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Escano-Rodriguez; D. Durand; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; the INDRA Collaboration

    2005-03-14

    Nuclear stopping has been investigated in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Firstly, it is found that the isotropy ratio, Riso, reaches a minimum near the Fermi energy and saturates or slowly increases depending on the mass of the system as the beam energy increases. An approximate scaling based on the size of the system is found above the Fermi energy suggesting the increasing role of in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions. Secondly, the charge density distributions in velocity space, dZ/dvk and dZ/dv?, reveal a strong memory of the entrance channel and, as such, a sizeable nuclear transparency in the intermediate energy range. Lastly, it is shown that the width of the transverse velocity distribution is proportional to the beam velocity.

  15. MCNP6 simulation of light and medium nuclei fragmentation at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to 4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes

  16. Elliptic flow and system size dependence of transition energies at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yingxun Zhang; Zhuxia Li

    2006-06-02

    The elliptic flow for $Z\\le2$ particles in heavy ion collisions at energies from several tens to several hundreds MeV per nucleon is investigated by means of transport model,i.e. a new version of the Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (ImQMD05). In this model, a complete Skyrme potential energy density functional is employed. The influence of different effective interactions and medium corrections of nucleon-nucleon cross sections on the elliptic flow are studied. Our results show that a soft nuclear equation of state and incident energy dependent in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections are required for describing the excitation function of the elliptic flow at intermediate energies. The size dependence of transition energies for the elliptic flow at intermediate energies is also studied. The system size dependence of transition energies fits a power of system size with a exponent of 0.223.

  17. IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3: A DEEPLY ECLIPSING INTERMEDIATE POLAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aungwerojwit, A.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Wheatley, P. J.; Pyrzas, S.; Staels, B.; Krajci, T.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.

    2012-10-20

    We present time-resolved photometry of a cataclysmic variable discovered in the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H{alpha} Survey of the northern galactic plane, IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3, and classify the system as the fourth deeply eclipsing intermediate polar known with an orbital period of P {sub orb} = 8.16 hr and a spin period of P {sub spin} = 2210 s. The system shows mild variations of its brightness that appear to be accompanied by a change in the amplitude of the spin modulation at optical wavelengths and a change in the morphology of the eclipse profile. The inferred magnetic moment of the white dwarf is {mu}{sub wd} {approx} (6-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} G cm{sup 3}, and in this case IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3 will evolve either into a short-period EX Hya-like intermediate polar with a large P {sub spin}/P{sub orb} ratio or, perhaps more likely, into a synchronized polar. Swift observations show that the system is an ultraviolet and X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum that is consistent with those seen in other intermediate polars. The ultraviolet light curve shows orbital modulation and an eclipse, while the low signal-to-noise ratio X-ray light curve does not show a significant modulation on the spin period. The measured X-ray flux is about an order of magnitude lower than would be expected from scaling by the optical fluxes of well-known X-ray-selected intermediate polars.

  18. Intermediate- to Deep-Water Circulation Changes on Short and Long Time Scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Daniel Patrick

    2012-07-16

    . Deborah Thomas Oceanic circulation remains one of the poorly understood elements of the global climate system, despite its importance to planetary heat redistribution and carbon cycling. The nature of deep-water formation and circulation in ancient... oceans are even more poorly constrained. In order to understand climate dynamics of past and future climates we must have a better understanding of the role of deep-ocean circulation. In this dissertation I investigated changes in intermediate...

  19. Power-law and intermediate inflationary models in $f(T)$-gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Rezazadeh; A. Abdolmaleki; K. Karami

    2015-09-26

    We study inflation in the framework of $f(T)$-gravity in the presence of a canonical scalar field. After reviewing the basic equations governing the background cosmology in $f(T)$-gravity, we turn to study the cosmological perturbations and obtain the evolutionary equations for the scalar and tensor perturbations. Solving those equations, we find the power spectra for the scalar and tensor perturbations. Then, we consider a power-law form for the $f(T)$ function in the action and examine the inflationary models with the power-law and intermediate scale factors. We see that in contrast with the standard inflationary scenario based on the Einstein gravity, in the considered $f(T)$-gravity scenario, the power-law and intermediate inflationary models can be compatible with the observational results of Planck 2015 at 68\\% CL. In our $f(T)$-gravity setting, the potentials responsible for both the power-law and intermediate inflationary models have the power-law form $V(\\phi ) \\propto {\\phi ^m}$ but the power $m$ is different for them. Therefore, we can refine some of power-law inflationary potentials in the framework of $f(T)$-gravity while they are disfavored by the observational data in the standard inflationary scenario. Interestingly enough, the self-interacting quartic potential $V(\\phi ) \\propto {\\phi ^4}$ which has special reheating properties, can be consistent with the Planck 2015 data in our $f(T)$-gravity scenario while it is ruled out in the standard inflationary scenario.

  20. Characteristics and sources of intermediate size particles in recovery boilers : final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Larry L.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Verrill, Christopher L.; Wessel, Richard A.

    2005-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) Forest Products research program, a collaborative investigation was conducted on the sources, characteristics, and deposition of particles intermediate in size between submicron fume and carryover in recovery boilers. Laboratory experiments on suspended-drop combustion of black liquor and on black liquor char bed combustion demonstrated that both processes generate intermediate size particles (ISP), amounting to 0.5-2% of the black liquor dry solids mass (BLS). Measurements in two U.S. recovery boilers show variable loadings of ISP in the upper furnace, typically between 0.6-3 g/Nm{sup 3}, or 0.3-1.5% of BLS. The measurements show that the ISP mass size distribution increases with size from 5-100 {micro}m, implying that a substantial amount of ISP inertially deposits on steam tubes. ISP particles are depleted in potassium, chlorine, and sulfur relative to the fuel composition. Comprehensive boiler modeling demonstrates that ISP concentrations are substantially overpredicted when using a previously developed algorithm for ISP generation. Equilibrium calculations suggest that alkali carbonate decomposition occurs at intermediate heights in the furnace and may lead to partial destruction of ISP particles formed lower in the furnace. ISP deposition is predicted to occur in the superheater sections, at temperatures greater than 750 C, when the particles are at least partially molten.

  1. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  2. Accuracy of B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) transition rates from intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Cook; T. Glasmacher; A. Gade

    2005-12-19

    The method of intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation has been widely used to determine absolute B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) quadrupole excitation strengths in exotic nuclei with even numbers of protons and neutrons. Transition rates measured with intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation are compared to their respective adopted values and for the example of 26Mg to the B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) values obtained with a variety of standard methods. Intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation is found to have an accuracy comparable to those of long-established experimental techniques.

  3. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, for November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The data accumulated during November 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, are presented. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  4. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

    2009-02-01

    Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

  5. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  6. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03

    A new approach to- and method for characterization of fissile nuclide contaminated soils and process piping has been developed and implemented for low and intermediate level wastes, using new calibration bases for photon counting. The method has...

  7. Intermediate to felsic middle crust in the accreted Talkeetna arc, the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island, Alaska: An analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Matthew Rioux,1,2 James Mattinson,1 Bradley Hacker,1 Peter Kelemen,3 Jurek Blusztajn,4 Karen Hanghøj,3. Hacker, P. Kelemen, J. Blusztajn, K. Hanghøj, and G. Gehrels (2010), Intermediate to felsic middle crust

  8. Production of optimised machine-code for high-level languages using machine-independent intermediate codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Peter Salkeld

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the problems associated with using machine-independent intermediate codes in the translation from a high-level language into machine code, with emphasis on minimising code size ...

  9. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ?6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ?T2b or GS 3+4, ?T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease. In patients with GS 4+3 or T2c disease, the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT did improve FFF.

  10. Energy barriers, cooperativity, and hidden intermediates in the folding of small proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 37, Room 6114E, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: yawen@helix.nih.gov

    2006-02-17

    Current theoretical views of the folding process of small proteins (<{approx}100 amino acids) postulate that the landscape of potential mean force (PMF) for the formation of the native state has a funnel shape and that the free energy barrier to folding arises from the chain configurational entropy only. However, recent theoretical studies on the formation of hydrophobic clusters with explicit water suggest that a barrier should exist on the PMF of folding, consistent with the fact that protein folding generally involves a large positive activation enthalpy at room temperature. In addition, high-resolution structural studies of the hidden partially unfolded intermediates have revealed the existence of non-native interactions, suggesting that the correction of the non-native interactions during folding should also lead to barriers on PMF. To explore the effect of a PMF barrier on the folding behavior of proteins, we modified Zwanzig's model for protein folding with an uphill landscape of PMF for the formation of transition states. We found that the modified model for short peptide segments can satisfy the thermodynamic and kinetic criteria for an apparently two-state folding. Since the Levinthal paradox can be solved by a stepwise folding of short peptide segments, a landscape of PMF with a locally uphill search for the transition state and cooperative stabilization of folding intermediates/native state is able to explain the available experimental results for small proteins. We speculate that the existence of cooperative hidden folding intermediates in small proteins could be the consequence of the highly specific structures of the native state, which are selected by evolution to perform specific functions and fold in a biologically meaningful time scale.

  11. The Impact of Biomass Feedstock Supply Variability on the Delivered Price to a Biorefinery in the Peace River Region of Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen, Jamie [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Kloeck, T. [Alberta Agriculture; Townley-Smith, Lawrence [AAFC; Stumborg, Mark [AAFC

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural residue feedstock availability in a given region can vary significantly over the 20 25 year lifetime of a biorefinery. Since delivered price of biomass feedstock to a biorefinery is related to the distance travelled and equipment optimization, and transportation distance increases as productivity decreases, productivity is a primary determinant of feedstock price. Using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) modeling environment and a standard round bale harvest and delivery scenario, harvest and delivery price were modelled for minimum, average, and maximum yields at four potential biorefinery sites in the Peace River region of Alberta, Canada. Biorefinery capacities ranged from 50,000 to 500,000 tonnes per year. Delivery cost is a linear function of transportation distance and can be combined with a polynomial harvest function to create a generalized delivered cost function for agricultural residues. The range in delivered cost is substantial and is an important consideration for the operating costs of a biorefinery.

  12. Excitation of the 3p states in electron-sodium scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamali, M. Z. M.; Wong, B. R.; Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    A coupled-channel-optical method (CCOM), to investigate the excitation of the 3p states for e{sup ?}-Na scattering at intermediate energies, is reported. Nine atomic states( Na(3s), Na(3p), Na(4s), Na(3d), Na(4p), Na(5s), Na(4d), Na(5p), Na(5d) ) together with three optical potentials are used in this work. The inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) as well as the reduced Stokes parameters are compared with latest theoretical data and experimental measurements.

  13. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of sodium melt on ?”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  14. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on ?”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175°C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  15. Cyclic intermediates isolated from the synthesis of alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, J.P.; Loy, D.A.; Shea, K.J.; Greaves, J.; Dorhout, P.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The hydrolysis and condensation of {sigma},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes with acid catalysts normally leads to polymeric gels within a few hours. However, when the alkylene-bridge is short (ethyl, propyl, or butyl) gelation times of days or even months have been observed. Investigations into the initial condensation reactions revealed that highly condensed bicycle and tricyclic dimers are major products when the alkylene bridge is short. Some of these dimeric compounds have been isolated as crystalline solids. These intermediates have been characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR and x-ray crystallography.

  16. Reprocessing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of spectroscopic binaries: II. Systems with a giant component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pourbaix; H. M. J. Boffin

    2002-11-21

    By reanalyzing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of a large sample of spectroscopic binaries containing a giant, we obtain a sample of 29 systems fulfilling a carefully derived set of constraints and hence for which we can derive an accurate orbital solution. Of these, one is a double-lined spectroscopic binary and six were not listed in the DMSA/O section of the catalogue. Using our solutions, we derive the masses of the components in these systems and statistically analyze them. We also briefly discuss each system individually.

  17. Reprocessing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of spectroscopic binaries II. Systems with a giant component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D

    2003-01-01

    By reanalyzing the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data of a large sample of spectroscopic binaries containing a giant, we obtain a sample of 29 systems fulfilling a carefully derived set of constraints and hence for which we can derive an accurate orbital solution. Of these, one is a double-lined spectroscopic binary and six were not listed in the DMSA/O section of the catalogue. Using our solutions, we derive the masses of the components in these systems and statistically analyze them. We also briefly discuss each system individually.

  18. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    century in the Human Genome Project (HGP) underlined recognition throughout research and clinical the HGP, however, are challenging these boundaries and health professionals throughout the health service

  19. Far infrared CO and H$_2$O emission in intermediate-mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matuszak, M; Kristensen, L E; Herczeg, G J; Tychoniec, L; van Kempen, T; Fuente, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) provide a link to understand how feedback from shocks and UV radiation scales from low to high-mass star forming regions. Aims: Our aim is to analyze excitation of CO and H$_2$O in deeply-embedded intermediate-mass YSOs and compare with low-mass and high-mass YSOs. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectral maps are analyzed for 6 YSOs with bolometric luminosities of $L_\\mathrm{bol}\\sim10^2 - 10^3$ $L_\\odot$. The maps cover spatial scales of $\\sim 10^4$ AU in several CO and H$_2$O lines located in the $\\sim55-210$ $\\mu$m range. Results: Rotational diagrams of CO show two temperature components at $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim320$ K and $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim700-800$ K, comparable to low- and high-mass protostars probed at similar spatial scales. The diagrams for H$_2$O show a single component at $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim130$ K, as seen in low-mass protostars, and about $100$ K lower than in high-mass protostars. Since the uncertainties in $T_\\mathrm{rot}$ are of the same order as the differen...

  20. An inner disk below the ADAF: the intermediate spectral state of black hole accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. Liu; ; F. Meyer; E. Meyer-Hofmeister

    2006-06-09

    Aims: The hard and soft spectral states of black hole accretion are understood as connected with ADAF accretion (truncated disk) and standard disk accretion, respectively. However, observations indicate the existence of cool gas in the inner region at times when the disk is already truncated outside. We try to shed light on these not yet understood intermediate states. Methods: The disk-corona model allows to understand the spectral state transitions as caused by changes of the mass flow rate in the disk and provides a picture for the accretion geometry when disk truncation starts at the time of the soft/hard transition, the formation of a gap in the disk filled by an advection-dominated flow (ADAF) at the distance where the evaporation is maximal. We study the interaction of such an ADAF with an inner thin disk below. Results: We show that, when the accretion rate is not far below the transition rate, an inner disk could exist below an ADAF, leading to an intermediate state of black hole accretion.

  1. THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEPTUNE TROJANS AND THE MISSING INTERMEDIATE-SIZED PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Trujillo, Chadwick A.

    2010-11-10

    We present an ultra-deep survey for Neptune Trojans using the Subaru 8.2 m and Magellan 6.5 m telescopes. The survey reached a 50% detection efficiency in the R band at m{sub R} = 25.7 mag and covered 49 deg{sup 2} of sky. m{sub R} = 25.7 mag corresponds to Neptune Trojans that are about 16 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.05). A paucity of smaller Neptune Trojans (radii < 45 km) compared with larger ones was found. The brightest Neptune Trojans appear to follow a steep power-law slope (q = 5 {+-} 1) similar to the brightest objects in the other known stable reservoirs such as the Kuiper Belt, Jupiter Trojans, and main belt asteroids. We find a roll-over for the Neptune Trojans that occurs around a radius of r = 45 {+-} 10 km (m{sub R} = 23.5 {+-} 0.3), which is also very similar to the other stable reservoirs. All the observed stable regions in the solar system show evidence for Missing Intermediate-Sized Planetesimals (MISPs). This indicates a primordial and not collisional origin, which suggests that planetesimal formation proceeded directly from small to large objects. The scarcity of intermediate- and smaller-sized Neptune Trojans may limit them as being a strong source for the short period comets.

  2. Exploring intermediate (5-40AU) scales around AB Aurigae with the Palomar Fiber Nuller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Jonas; Liewer, Kurt; Martin, Stefan; Loya, Frank; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Serabyn, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent Ks-band interferometric observations of the young pre-main-sequence star AB Aurigae obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller (PFN). Reaching a contrast of a few 10-4 inside a field of view extending from 35 to 275 mas (5-40AU at AB Aur's distance), the PFN is able to explore angular scales that are intermediate between those accessed by coronagraphic imaging and long baseline interferometry. This intermediate region is of special interest given that many young stellar objects are believed to harbor extended halos at such angular scales. Using destructive interference (nulling) between two sub-apertures of the Palomar 200 inch telescope and rotating the telescope pupil, we measured a resolved circumstellar excess at all probed azimuth angles. The astrophysical null measured over the full rotation is fairly constant, with a mean value of 1.52%, and a slight additional azimuthal modulation of +/-0.2%. The isotropic astrophysical null is indicative of circumstellar emission dominated by an azimu...

  3. Seismic evidence for a weak radial differential rotation in intermediate-mass core helium burning stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deheuvels, S; Beck, P G; Mosser, B; Østensen, R; García, R A; Goupil, M J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mixed modes that are split by rotation in Kepler red giants has made it possible to probe the internal rotation profiles of these stars, which brings new constraints on the transport of angular momentum in stars. Mosser et al. (2012) have measured the rotation rates in the central regions of intermediate-mass core helium burning stars (secondary clump stars). Our aim was to exploit& the rotational splittings of mixed modes to estimate the amount of radial differential rotation in the interior of secondary clump stars using Kepler data, in order to place constraints on angular momentum transport in intermediate-mass stars. We selected a subsample of Kepler secondary clump stars with mixed modes that are clearly rotationally split. By applying a thorough statistical analysis, we showed that the splittings of both gravity-dominated modes (trapped in central regions) and p-dominated modes (trapped in the envelope) can be measured. We then used these splittings to estimate the amount of differ...

  4. A Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Survey of Intermediate Redshift (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdis, Georgios E; Hopwood, R; Huang, J -S; Farrah, D; Pearson, C; Alonso-Herrero, A; Bock, J J; Clements, D; Cooray, A; Griffin, M J; Oliver, S; Fournon, Perez; Riechers, D; Swinyard, B M; Scott, D; Thatte, N; Valtchanov, I; Vaccari, M

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 10^11.5L_sun). With these measurements we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [CII]\\,157.7microns, as well as the molecular gas of z~0.3 (U)LIRGs and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L_CII/L_FIR ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-$z$ star forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [CII] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow a L_CII-L_FIR relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high-z AGN dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L_CII/L_FIR ratio and the far-IR color L_60/L_100 observed in...

  5. Lithium evolution in intermediate age and old open clusters: NGC 752 revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sestito; S. Randich; R. Pallavicini

    2004-07-15

    We present new high resolution spectroscopic observations of the intermediate age (~2 Gyr) open cluster NGC 752. We investigate the Li vs. Teff distribution and we obtain a new accurate determination of the cluster metallicity. We compare the results for NGC 752 with other intermediate age and old clusters spanning the age range from the Hyades (~0.6 Gyr) to NGC 188 (~6-8 Gyr). We find that NGC 752 has a solar iron content ([Fe/H]=+0.01+/-0.04), at variance with early reports of sub-solar metallicity. We find that NGC 752 is only slightly more Li depleted than the younger Hyades and has a Li pattern almost identical to that observed in the ~2 Gyr old IC 4651 and NGC 3680. As for the latter clusters, we find that NGC 752 is characterized by a tight Li vs. Teff distribution for solar-type stars, with no evidence for a Li spread as large as the one observed in the solar age solar metallicity M 67. We discuss these results in the framework of mixing mechanisms and Li depletion on the main sequence (MS). We conclude that the development of a large scatter in Li abundances in old open clusters might be an exception rather than the rule (additional observations of old clusters are required), and that metallicity variations of the order of ~0.2 dex do not affect Li depletion after the age of the Hyades.

  6. Reservoir Modeling by Data Integration via Intermediate Spaces and Artificial Intelligence Tools in MPS Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, Rouhollah; Khamehchi, Ehsan

    2013-12-15

    Conditioning stochastic simulations are very important in many geostatistical applications that call for the introduction of nonlinear and multiple-point data in reservoir modeling. Here, a new methodology is proposed for the incorporation of different data types into multiple-point statistics (MPS) simulation frameworks. Unlike the previous techniques that call for an approximate forward model (filter) for integration of secondary data into geologically constructed models, the proposed approach develops an intermediate space where all the primary and secondary data are easily mapped onto. Definition of the intermediate space, as may be achieved via application of artificial intelligence tools like neural networks and fuzzy inference systems, eliminates the need for using filters as in previous techniques. The applicability of the proposed approach in conditioning MPS simulations to static and geologic data is verified by modeling a real example of discrete fracture networks using conventional well-log data. The training patterns are well reproduced in the realizations, while the model is also consistent with the map of secondary data.

  7. Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound CePd3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanelli, V. R.; Lawrence, J. M.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Osborn, R.; Bauer, E. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Thompson, J. D.; Booth, C. H.; Christianson, A. D.; Riseborough, P. S.

    2014-06-25

    We report inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal of the intermediate valence compound CePd3. At 300 K the magnetic scattering is quasielastic, with half-width G = 23 meV, and is independent of momentum transfer Q. At low temperature, the Q-averaged magnetic spectrum is inelastic, exhibiting a broad peak centered near E-max = 55 meV. These results, together with the temperature dependence of the susceptibility, 4f occupation number, and specific heat, can be fit by the Kondo/Anderson impurity model. The low temperature scattering near Emax, however, shows significant variations with Q, reflecting the coherence of the 4f lattice. The intensity is maximal at (1/2, 1/2, 0), intermediate at (1/2, 0, 0) and (0, 0, 0), and weak at (1/2, 1/2, 1/2). We discuss this Q-dependence in terms of current ideas about coherence in heavy fermion systems.

  8. Your company may be looking to transition existing datacenter infrastructure (primarily physical and virtualized environments) to deliver a private cloud to your business. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Your company may be looking to transition existing datacenter infrastructure (primarily physical datacenter investments and skill sets to deliver a private cloud today. Pooling and dynamic allocation of datacenter resources. With Virtual Machine Manager, you can pool and virtualize your compute, network

  9. Ecosystem Services in Decision Making: Time to Deliver Author(s): Gretchen C. Daily, Stephen Polasky, Joshua Goldstein, Peter M. Kareiva, Harold A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Ecosystem Services in Decision Making: Time to Deliver Author(s): Gretchen C. Daily, Stephen. 7, No. 1, The Role of Ecosystem Services in Conservation and Resource Management (Feb., 2009), pp of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity

  10. Cross sections for electron scattering by propane in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, G. L. C. de; Lee, M.-T.; Sanches, I. P.; Rawat, P.; Iga, I.; Santos, A. S. dos; Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Brescansin, L. M.; Homem, M. G. P.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2010-07-15

    We present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron scattering by propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer as well as total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 2 to 500 eV. Also, experimental absolute elastic cross sections are reported in the 40- to 500-eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Pade approximant is used to solve the scattering equations. The experimental angular distributions of the scattered electrons are converted to absolute cross sections using the relative flow technique. The comparison of our calculated with our measured results, as well as with other experimental and theoretical data available in the literature, is encouraging.

  11. Rotating Stellar Models Can Account for the Extended Main Sequence Turnoffs in Intermediate Age Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    We show that the extended main sequence turnoffs seen in intermediate age Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) clusters, often attributed to age spreads of several hundred Myr, may be easily accounted for by variable stellar rotation in a coeval population. We compute synthetic photometry for grids of rotating stellar evolution models and interpolate them to produce isochrones at a variety of rotation rates and orientations. An extended main sequence turnoff naturally appears in color-magnitude diagrams at ages just under 1 Gyr, peaks in extent between ~1 and 1.5 Gyr, and gradually disappears at around 2 Gyr in age. We then fit our interpolated isochrones by eye to four LMC clusters with very extended main sequence turnoffs: NGC 1783, 1806, 1846, and 1987. In each case, stellar populations with a single age and metallicity can comfortably account for the observed extent of the turnoff region.

  12. Using Intermediate-Luminosity Optical Transients (ILOTs) to reveal extended exo-solar Kuiper belt objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bear, Ealeal

    2016-01-01

    We suggest that in the rare case of an Intermediate-Luminosity Optical Transient (ILOTs) event, evaporation of exo-solar Kuiper belt objects (ExoKBOs) at distances of d~500 - 10000AU from the ILOT can be detected. If the ILOT lasts for 1 month to a few years, enough dust might be ejected from the ExoKBOs for the IR emission to be detected. Because of the large distance of the ExoKBOs, tens of years will pass before the ILOT wind disperses the dust. We suggest that after an ILOT outburst there is a period of months to several years during which IR excess emission might hint at the existence of a Kuiper belt analog (ExoK-Belt).

  13. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore »the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  14. Collective and fractal properties of pion jets in the four-velocity space at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov; A. K. Ponosov; F. M. Sergeev

    2010-02-02

    Experimental results are presented for study of collective and fractal properties of soft pion jets in the space of relative four-dimensional velocities. Significant decreasing is obtained for mean square of second particle distances from jet axis for pion-proton interactions at initial energies $\\sim 3$ GeV in comparison with hadron-nuclear collisions at close energies. The decreasing results in power dependence of distance variable on collision energy for range $\\sim 2 - 4$ GeV. The observation allows us to estimate the low boundary of manifestation of color degree of freedom in pion jet production. Cluster dimension values were deduced for pion jets in various reactions. Fractional values of this dimension indicate on the manifestation of fractal-like properties by pion jets. Changing of mean kinetic energy of jet particles and fractal dimension with initial energy increasing is consistent with suggestion for presence of color degrees of freedom in pion jet production at intermediate energies.

  15. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  16. Faddeev and Glauber Calculations at Intermediate Energies in a Model for n+d Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. Elster; T. Lin; W. Gloeckle; S. Jeschonnek

    2008-05-14

    Obtaining cross sections for nuclear reactions at intermediate energies based on the Glauber formulation has a long tradition. Only recently the energy regime of a few hundred MeV has become accessible to ab-initio Faddeev calculations of three-body scattering. In order to go to higher energies, the Faddeev equation for three-body scattering is formulated and directly solved without employing a partial wave decomposition. In the simplest form the Faddeev equation for interacting scalar particles is a three-dimensional integral equation in five variables, from which the total cross section, the cross sections for elastic scattering and breakup reactions, as well as differential cross sections are obtained. The same observables are calculated based on the Glauber formulation. The first order Glauber calculation and the Glauber rescattering corrections are compared in detail with the corresponding terms of the Faddeev multiple scattering series for projectile energies between 100 MeV and 2 GeV.

  17. Transient model of an intermediate surge system for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, B.; Blankenship, J.G.; McGrady, P.W.

    1989-09-01

    Engineering design work (Reference 1) is underway for intermediate surge systems to be added to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) cascade as part of the Process Inventory Control System (PICS) project. These systems would be located between 000 buildings and lower half 00 buildings and would remove or add inventory during cascade transients in order to protect cascade compressors from overload and surge. Similar systems were operated in the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant cascade and are operated in the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant cascade. A steady state flow analysis of the system to be installed at the PGDP has been made. The flow analysis did not address response of the surge system to the cascade transients, nor did it address automatic control of the system. The need to address these issues prompted development of the transient model described in this report. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Anisotropic intermediate valence in Yb2M3Ga9 (M = Rh, Ir)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christianson, A.D.; Lawrence, J.M.; Lobos, A.M.; Aligia, A.A.; Bauer, E.D.; Moreno, N.O.; Booth, C.H.; Goremychkin, E.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Batista, C.D.; Trouw, F.R.; Hehlen, M.P.

    2005-04-26

    The intermediate valence compounds Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} (M = Rh, Ir) exhibit an anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the temperature dependence of the 4f occupation number, n{sub f}(T), for Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} as well as the magnetic inelastic neutron scattering spectrum S{sub mag}({Delta}E) at 12 and 300 K for Yb{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}. Both n{sub f}(T) and S{sub mag}({Delta}E) were calculated for the Anderson impurity model with crystal field terms within an approach based on the non-crossing approximation. These results corroborate the importance of crystal field effects in these materials; they also suggest that Anderson lattice effects are important to the physics of Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}.

  19. A Quasi-Classical Model of Intermediate Velocity Particle Production in Asymmetric Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chernomoretz; L. Gingras; Y. Larochelle; L. Beaulieu; R. Roy; C. St-Pierre; C. O. Dorso

    2002-03-20

    The particle emission at intermediate velocities in mass asymmetric reactions is studied within the framework of classical molecular dynamics. Two reactions in the Fermi energy domain were modelized, $^{58}$Ni+C and $^{58}$Ni+Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon. The availability of microscopic correlations at all times allowed a detailed study of the fragment formation process. Special attention was paid to the physical origin of fragments and emission timescales, which allowed us to disentangle the different processes involved in the mid-rapidity particle production. Consequently, a clear distinction between a prompt pre- equilibrium emission and a delayed aligned asymmetric breakup of the heavier partner of the reaction was achieved.

  20. Intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation of 104Sn: Moderate E2 strength decrease approaching 100Sn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Doornenbal; S. Takeuchi; N. Aoi; M. Matsushita; A. Obertelli; D. Steppenbeck; H. Wang; L. Audirac; H. Baba; P. Bednarczyk; S. Boissinot; M. Ciemala; A. Corsi; T. Furumoto; T. Isobe; A. Jungclaus; V. Lapoux; J. Lee; K. Matsui; T. Motobayashi; D. Nishimura; S. Ota; E. C. Pollacco; H. Sakurai; C. Santamaria; Y. Shiga; D. Sohler; R. Taniuchi

    2013-05-13

    The reduced transition probability B(E2) of the first excited 2+ state in the nucleus 104Sn was measured via Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at intermediate energies. A value of 0.163(26) e^2b^2 was extracted from the absolute cross-section on a Pb target, while the method itself was verified with the stable 112Sn isotope. Our result deviates significantly from the earlier reported value of 0.10(4) e^2b^2 and corresponds to a moderate decrease of excitation strength relative to the almost constant values observed in the proton-rich, even-A 106-114Sn isotopes. Present state-of-the-art shell-model predictions, which include proton and neutron excitations across the N=Z=50 shell closures as well as standard polarization charges, underestimate the experimental findings

  1. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wei, Guodan (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  2. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  3. Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability: Resources for Instructors, 2nd Edition. Part 4 - Other Direct and Intermediate Marketing Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Unit 4.3 | 211 Additional Marketing Options 212 | Unit4.0? Other Direct & Intermediate Marketing OptionsManagement Council. 2002. Marketing on the Edge: A Marketing

  4. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report, for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Vol. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This report presents the data accumulated during January 1983 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  5. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 1. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during January, February, and March 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  6. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 2 for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during April and May 1982 at this intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  7. Two-State Folding, Folding through Intermediates, and Metastability in a Minimalistic Hydrophobic-Polar Model for Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    parts of the sequence. Moreover, for most proteins, the folding process is relatively slow (microsecTwo-State Folding, Folding through Intermediates, and Metastability in a Minimalistic Hydrophobic-Polar Model for Proteins Stefan Schnabel,* Michael Bachmann, and Wolfhard Janke Institut fu¨r Theoretische

  8. Does the world need yet another solar inverter concept? Intermediate size inverters have grown; now there is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Roger

    of the inverter with respect to the economics of solar generated electricity. Nextronex Energy Systems LLC, formedABSTRACT Does the world need yet another solar inverter concept? Intermediate size inverters have in 2008 from an established design-engineering firm, looked at the offerings, talked with installers

  9. WM '04 Conference, February 29 March 4, 2004, Tucson, AZ WM-4010 VITRIFICATION OF LOW AND INTERMEDIATE LEVEL WASTE: TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    radioactive waste (LILW), may result in significant reduction of transport and disposal costs. Development and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) is becoming increasingly important and large programmes waste from nuclear power plants (NPP) and institutional radioactive waste in borosilicate glass matrices

  10. “Click” Synthesis of Heteroleptic Tris-cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes: Cu(I) Triazolide Intermediates as Transmetalating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    Efficient synthesis of heteroleptic tris-cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes mer-Ir(C/\\N)[subscript 2](trpy) (trpy = 2-(1H-[1,2,3]triazol-4-yl)pyridine) is achieved by using the Cu(I)-triazolide intermediates formed in “click” ...

  11. Scattering of low-to intermediate-energy positrons from molecular hydrogen David D. Reid and William B. Klann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadehra, Jogindra M.

    Scattering of low- to intermediate-energy positrons from molecular hydrogen David D. Reid for positrons scattered from molecular hydrogen. The widely avail- able software package GAUSSIAN is used to generate the radial electronic charge density of the molecule which is used to produce the interaction

  12. THE MAGELLANIC INTER-CLOUD PROJECT (MAGIC). I. EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noeel, N. E. D.; Read, J. I. [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Conn, B. C.; Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Carrera, R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dolphin, A., E-mail: noelia@phys.ethz.ch [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734-1337 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    The origin of the gas in between the Magellanic Clouds (MCs)-known as the ''Magellanic Bridge'' (MB)-is puzzling. Numerical simulations suggest that the MB formed from tidally stripped gas and stars in a recent interaction between the MCs. However, the apparent lack of stripped intermediate- or old-age stars associated with the MB is at odds with this picture. In this paper, we present the first results from the MAGellanic Inter-Cloud program (MAGIC) aimed at probing the stellar populations in the inter-Cloud region. We present observations of the stellar populations in two large fields located in between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), secured using the WFI camera on the 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. Using a synthetic color-magnitude diagram technique, we present the first quantitative evidence for the presence of intermediate-age and old stars in the inter-Cloud region. The intermediate-age stars-which make up {approx}28% of all stars in the region-are not present in fields at a similar distance from the SMC in a direction pointing away from the LMC. This provides potential evidence that these intermediate-age stars could have been tidally stripped from the SMC. However, spectroscopic studies will be needed to confirm or rule out the tidal origin for the inter-Cloud gas and stars.

  13. The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via the Intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via the Intermediate Phase (AgSb)3Te4. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Precipitation of Sb2Te3 in Sb-rich AgSbTe2 via...

  14. Spatial and kinematic distributions of transition populations in intermediate redshift galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Steven M. [SAAO, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Wirth, Gregory D. [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A., E-mail: crawford@saao.ac.za, E-mail: wirth@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the spatial and velocity distributions of confirmed members in five massive clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift (0.5 < z < 0.9) to investigate the physical processes driving galaxy evolution. Based on spectral classifications derived from broad- and narrow-band photometry, we define four distinct galaxy populations representing different evolutionary stages: red sequence (RS) galaxies, blue cloud (BC) galaxies, green valley (GV) galaxies, and luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs). For each galaxy class, we derive the projected spatial and velocity distribution and characterize the degree of subclustering. We find that RS, BC, and GV galaxies in these clusters have similar velocity distributions, but that BC and GV galaxies tend to avoid the core of the two z ? 0.55 clusters. GV galaxies exhibit subclustering properties similar to RS galaxies, but their radial velocity distribution is significantly platykurtic compared to the RS galaxies. The absence of GV galaxies in the cluster cores may explain their somewhat prolonged star-formation history. The LCBGs appear to have recently fallen into the cluster based on their larger velocity dispersion, absence from the cores of the clusters, and different radial velocity distribution than the RS galaxies. Both LCBG and BC galaxies show a high degree of subclustering on the smallest scales, leading us to conclude that star formation is likely triggered by galaxy-galaxy interactions during infall into the cluster.

  15. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT ON VITRIFICATION FACILITY OF LOW-AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN KOREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Kun Jai; Ji, Pyung Kook; Park, Jong Kil; Ha, Jong Hyun; Song, Myung Jae

    2003-02-27

    The usefulness of vitrification technology for low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was demonstrated with high volume reduction capability and good mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms, and commercial vitrification facility is expected to be constructed at Ulchin site of Korean Nuclear Power Plant Ulchin Unit 5 and 6. Hence, overall economic assessment was necessary to find out the economic advantage of the vitrification facility and to predict the construction and operation costs of the facility on the preliminary bases. Additionally, the generation characteristics of radioactive wastes were investigated. The results of the cost analysis showed that the disposal cost of radioactive wastes treated by vitrification facility reduced to 85 percent compared with that by current waste treatment system. And the present worth analysis was performed through the cost-benefit analysis method for the commercial vitrification facility. The results showed that the vitrification facility combining cold crucible melter (CCM) for treatment of combustible DAW, spent resin, and borated liquid waste concentrate and plasma torch melter (PTM) for non-combustible DAW and spent filter is more economical than current waste treatment system when the escalation rate of disposal cost of more than 10 percent per year was applied.

  16. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Physics Department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Backer, D. C., E-mail: robert.ferdman@obs-nancay.f [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-10

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  17. Warm Gas in the Inner Disks around Young Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Brittain; Theodore Simon; Joan Najita; Terrence Rettig

    2006-12-08

    The characterization of gas in the inner disks around young stars is of particular interest because of its connection to planet formation. In order to study the gas in inner disks, we have obtained high-resolution K-band and M-band spectroscopy of 14 intermediate mass young stars. In sources that have optically thick inner disks, i.e. E(K-L)>1, our detection rate of the ro-vibrational CO transitions is 100% and the gas is thermally excited. Of the five sources that do not have optically thick inner disks, we only detect the ro-vibrational CO transitions from HD 141569. In this case, we show that the gas is excited by UV fluorescence and that the inner disk is devoid of gas and dust. We discuss the plausibility of the various scenarios for forming this inner hole. Our modeling of the UV fluoresced gas suggests an additional method by which to search for and/or place stringent limits on gas in dust depleted regions in disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  18. Dwarf Nova-like Outburst of Short Period Intermediate Polar HT Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryoko Ishioka; Taichi Kato; Makoto Uemura; Gary W. Billings; Koichi Morikawa; Ken'ichi Torii; Kenji Tanabe; Arto Oksanen; Harri Hyvonen; Hitoshi Itoh

    2002-06-12

    We report the first time-series observations of the short outburst of the proposed intermediate polar HT Cam (=RX J0757.0+6306). On 2001 December 29, we detected the object was undergoing a bright outburst at the magnitude of $m_{vis}=12.2$. Following this detection, we started international joint observations through VSNET. The light curve showed a gradual decline for the first 0.5 d. Following this short plateau phase, the rate of decline dramatically increased to more than 4 mag d$^{-1}$. Within 1.5 d from the outburst detection, the object almost declined to the quiescent level. During the rapidly declining phase, long-term modulations with a period of 86 min and strong pulses with a period of 8.6 min were observed. We concluded that 86 min and 8.6 min are the orbital period and the spin period of HT Cam, respectively. By the detection of the spin period, we confirmed the IP classification of HT Cam. However, its outburst behavior rather resembles that of dwarf novae. The discrepancy between the declining rates of the total flux and the pulse flux strongly suggests that the disk instabilities were taking place during the outburst.

  19. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  20. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ?2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ?2.44 ± 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ?20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ? 0.09 keV (?10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1? level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ?}) ? 5.5 ± 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  1. Elasticity of polymer vesicles by osmotic pressure: an intermediate theory between fluid membranes and solid shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Tu; L. Q. Ge; J. B. Li; Z. C. Ou-Yang

    2005-08-18

    The entropy of a polymer confined in a curved surface and the elastic free energy of a membrane consisting of polymers are obtained by scaling analysis. It is found that the elastic free energy of the membrane has the form of the in-plane strain energy plus Helfrich's curvature energy [Z. Naturforsch. C \\textbf{28}, 693 (1973)]. The elastic constants in the free energy are obtained by discussing two simplified models: one is the polymer membrane without in-plane strains and asymmetry between its two sides, which is the counterpart of quantum mechanics in curved surface [Jensen and Koppe, Ann. Phys. \\textbf{63}, 586 (1971)]; another is the planar rubber membrane with homogeneous in-plane strains. The equations to describe equilibrium shape and in-plane strains of the polymer vesicles by osmotic pressure are derived by taking the first order variation of the total free energy containing the elastic free energy, the surface tension energy and the term induced by osmotic pressure. The critical pressure, above which spherical polymer vesicle will lose its stability, is obtained by taking the second order variation of the total free energy. It is found that the in-plane mode also plays important role in the critical pressure because it couples with the out-of-plane mode. Theoretical results reveal that polymer vesicles possess the mechanical properties intermediate between fluid membranes and solid shells.

  2. Communication: Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-10-14

    The velocity and angular distributions of O {sup 1}D photofragments arising from UV excitation of the CH{sub 2}OO intermediate on the B {sup 1}A??X {sup 1}A? transition are characterized using velocity map ion imaging. The anisotropic angular distribution yields the orientation of the transition dipole moment, which reflects the ?*?? character of the electronic transition associated with the COO group. The total kinetic energy release distributions obtained at several photolysis wavelengths provide detail on the internal energy distribution of the formaldehyde cofragments and the dissociation energy of CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? to O {sup 1}D + H{sub 2}CO X {sup 1}A{sub 1}. A common termination of the total kinetic energy distributions, after accounting for the different excitation energies, gives an upper limit for the CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? dissociation energy of D{sub 0}? 54 kcal mol{sup ?1}, which is compared with theoretical predictions including high level multi-reference ab initio calculations.

  3. Detection of Intermediates And Kinetic Control During Assembly of Bacteriophage P22 Procapsid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuma, R.; Tsuruta, H.; French, K.H.; Prevelige, P.

    2009-05-26

    Bacteriophage P22 serves as a model for the assembly and maturation of other icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses. P22 coat and scaffolding proteins assemble in vitro into an icosahedral procapsid, which then expands during DNA packaging (maturation). Efficient in vitro assembly makes this system suitable for design and production of monodisperse spherical nanoparticles (diameter {approx} 50 nm). In this work, we explore the possibility of controlling the outcome of assembly by scaffolding protein engineering. The scaffolding protein exists in monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. We address the role of monomers and dimers in assembly by using three different scaffolding proteins with altered monomer-dimer equilibrium (weak dimer, covalent dimer, monomer). The progress and outcome of assembly was monitored by time-resolved X-ray scattering, which allowed us to distinguish between closed shells and incomplete assembly intermediates. Binding of scaffolding monomer activates the coat protein for assembly. Excess dimeric scaffolding protein resulted in rapid nucleation and kinetic trapping yielding incomplete shells. Addition of monomeric wild-type scaffold with excess coat protein completed these metastable shells. Thus, the monomeric scaffolding protein plays an essential role in the elongation phase by activating the coat and effectively lowering its critical concentration for assembly.

  4. Asteroid Spin-Rate Study using the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Ting-Chang; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Prince, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Two dedicated asteroid rotation-period surveys have been carried out using data taken on January 6-9 and February 20-23 of 2014 by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) in the $R$~band with $\\sim 20$-min cadence. The total survey area covered 174~deg$^2$ in the ecliptic plane. Reliable rotation periods for 1,438 asteroids are obtained from a larger data set of 6,551 mostly main-belt asteroids, each with $\\geq 10$~detections. Analysis of 1751, PTF based, reliable rotation periods clearly shows the "spin barrier" at $\\sim 2$~hours for "rubble-pile" asteroids. We also found a new large-sized super-fast rotator, 2005 UW163 (Chang et al., 2014), and other five candidates as well. Our spin-rate distributions of asteroids with $3 < D < 15$~km shows number decrease when frequency greater than 5 rev/day, which is consistent to that of the Asteroid Light Curve Database (LCDB, Warner et al., 2009) and the result of (Masiero et al., 2009). We found the discrepancy in the spin-rate distribution between o...

  5. Layered YSZ/SCSZ/YSZ Electrolytes for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Part I: Design and Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlovskaya, Nina [ORNL; Klimov, Mikhail [University of Central Florida; Huang, Xinyu [University of South Carolina; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Graule, Thomas [EMPA, Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Duebendorf, Switzerland; Kuebler, Jakob [EMPA, Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Duebendorf, Switzerland

    2012-01-01

    (Sc2O3)0.1(CeO2)0.01(ZrO2)0.89 (SCSZ) ceramic electrolyte has superior ionic conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (700 800 C), but it does not exhibit good phase and chemical stability in comparison with 8 mol% Y2O3 ZrO2 (YSZ). To maintain high ionic conductivity and improve the stability in the whole electrolyte, layered structures with YSZ outer layers and SCSZ inner layers were designed. Because of a mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's moduli of SCSZ and YSZ phases, upon cooling of the electrolytes after sintering, thermal residual stresses will arise, leading to a possible strengthening of the layered composite and, therefore, an increase in the reliability of the electrolyte. Laminated electrolytes with three, four, and six layers design were manufactured using tape-casting, lamination, and sintering techniques. After sintering, while the thickness of YSZ outer layers remained constant at 30 m, the thickness of the SCSZ inner layer varied from 30 m for a Y SC Y three-layered electrolyte, 60 m for a Y 2SC Y four-layered electrolyte, and 120 m for a Y 4SC Y six-layered electrolyte. The microstructure, crystal structure, impurities present, and the density of the sintered electrolytes were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and water immersion techniques.

  6. Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers Ian K. Bartol, Paul S. Krueger, William J. Stewart and Joseph T. Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horth, Lisa

    Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers Ian K. Bartol, Paul S of various appendages, squid paralarvae (hatchlings) employ a pulsed jet for locomotion at intermediate Re different propulsive mechanism, i.e. jetting, involves (1) radial expansion of the mantle, resulting

  7. Global $SU(3)_C x SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y$ linear sigma model with Standard Model fermions: axial-vector Ward Takahashi identities, the absence of Higgs mass fine tuning, and the decoupling of certain heavy particles, due to the Goldstone theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Lynn; Glenn D. Starkman

    2015-09-21

    This work is dedicated to the memory of R. Stora. In the Linear Sigma Model (LSM), towers of Ward-Takahashi Identities (WTI) relate both 1-Scalar-Particle-Irreducible Green's functions and I-SP-Reducible T-Matrix elements for external scalars (a doublet: H and 3 pseudoscalars, $\\pi$). We extend these WTI to the $SU(3)_CxSU(2)_LxU(1)_Y$ LSM including Standard Model (SM) fermions -- the ungauged Standard Model -- supplemented with right-handed neutrinos -- to extract powerful constraints on the effective Lagrangian. The crucial observation is that ultraviolet quadratic divergences (UVQD) and all other relevant operators, contribute only to mpi, a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (NGB) mass appearing in intermediate calculations. The Goldstone Theorem enforces m=0 exactly for the true NGB in the theory's spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) mode, causing all relevant operator contributions, to vanish identically to all loop orders! A weak-scale renormalized H pole mass and are therefore not fine-tuned (FT) -- they are Goldstone Exceptional Natural (GEN), a more powerful suppression of FT than accepted naturalness criteria. GEN is another (unfamiliar) consequence of global axial-vector WTI, SSB and the Goldstone Theorem, and is a new exact property of the model's vacuum, spectrum and dynamics. We show that our regularization-scheme-independent, WTI-driven results are unchanged by addition of certain heavy matter. The Goldstone theorem and global axial-vector WTI still cause all UVQD and finite relevant operators to vanish. We demonstrate with two examples: a heavy singlet real scalar field S with discrete $Z_2$ symmetry and =0; and a heavy singlet right-handed Type I See-saw Majorana neutrino. Specifically, we prove that these heavy degrees of freedom decouple completely from the low-energy effective Lagrangian, contributing only irrelevant operators after quartic-coupling renormalization.

  8. A population of relic intermediate-mass black holes in the halo of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashkov, Valery; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-10

    If 'seed' central black holes were common in the subgalactic building blocks that merged to form present-day massive galaxies, then relic intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) should be present in the Galactic bulge and halo. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate the N-body Via Lactea II high-resolution simulation with black holes, and assess the size, properties, and detectability of the leftover population. The method assigns a black hole to the most tightly bound central particle of each subhalo at infall according to an extrapolation of the M {sub BH}-?{sub *} relation, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of Milky Way progenitor dwarfs and their holes in a cosmological 'live' host from high redshift to today. We show that, depending on the minimum stellar velocity dispersion, ? {sub m}, below which central black holes are assumed to be increasingly rare, as many as ?2000 (? {sub m} = 3 km s{sup –1}) or as few as ?70 (? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup –1}) IMBHs may be left wandering in the halo of the Milky Way today. The fraction of IMBHs forced from their hosts by gravitational recoil is ? 20%. We identify two main Galactic subpopulations, 'naked' IMBHs, whose host subhalos were totally destroyed after infall, and 'clothed' IMBHs residing in dark matter satellites that survived tidal stripping. Naked IMBHs typically constitute 40%-50% of the total and are more centrally concentrated. We show that, in the ? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup –1} scenario, the clusters of tightly bound stars that should accompany naked IMBHs would be fainter than m{sub V} = 16 mag, spatially resolvable, and have proper motions of 0.1-10 mas yr{sup –1}. Their detection may provide an observational tool to constrain the formation history of massive black holes in the early universe.

  9. Measurements of the UV Upturn in Local and Intermediate-Redshift Ellipticals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    1999-05-28

    The rest-frame UV contains the most sensitive indicators of age for elliptical galaxies. While the near-UV flux from young ellipticals isolates the main sequence turnoff, the far-UV flux in old ellipticals is dominated by hot horizontal branch (HB) stars. This evolved population was first revealed by early UV observations showing a sharp flux increase shortward of rest-frame 2500 A, subsequently dubbed the "UV upturn." The phenomenon has since been characterized in many local ellipticals, and measurements at intermediate redshifts are now underway. Once ellipticals reach ages of 5-10 Gyr, stellar and galactic evolution theories predict that the UV-to-optical flux ratio can increase by orders of magnitude over timescales of a few Gyr, making the UV upturn the most rapidly evolving feature of these galaxies. It is thus expected to fade dramatically with increasing redshift. I review the imaging and spectroscopic evidence for the nature of the UV upturn in nearby ellipticals, and then present observations that measure the UV upturn at an epoch significantly earlier than our own. Far-UV data from the HUT demonstrate that the spectra of nearby ellipticals are dominated by hot HB stars. FOC UV imaging of M32 and the M31 bulge detected the UV-bright phases of post-HB stars, but did not reach the HB itself. Recent STIS observations were the first to image the hot HB and post-HB stars in the center of the nearest elliptical galaxy, M32; these observations also show a striking lack of UV-bright post-AGB stars. FOC observations of Abell 370, a rich galaxy cluster at z=0.375, show that giant ellipticals at a lookback time of 4 Gyr can exhibit strong UV luminosity, with no evidence of evolution in the UV upturn between this epoch and our own, thus implying a high redshift of formation (z_f > 4).

  10. THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M.; Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P.; Bureau, M.; Leroy, A.; Ostriker, E.; Wong, T.

    2013-05-10

    We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

  11. Gravitational wave observations of galactic intermediate-mass black hole binaries with DECIGO Path Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi

    2012-03-03

    DECIGO Path Finder (DPF) is a space-borne gravitational wave (GW) detector with sensitivity in the frequency band 0.1--100Hz. As a first step mission to DECIGO, it is aiming for launching in 2016--2017. Although its main objective is to demonstrate technology for GW observation in space, DPF still has a chance of detecting GW signals and performing astrophysical observations. With an observable range up to 50 kpc, its main targets are GW signals from galactic intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) binaries. By using inspiral-merger-ringdown phenomenological waveforms, we perform both pattern-averaged analysis and Monte Carlo simulations including the effect of detector motion to find that the masses and (effective) spins of the IMBHs could be determined with errors of a few percent, should the signals be detected. Since GW signals from IMBH binaries with masses above $10^4 M_\\odot$ cannot be detected by ground-based detectors, these objects can be unique sources for DPF. If the inspiral signal of a $10^3M_\\odot$ IMBH binary is detected with DPF, it can give alert to the ringdown signal for the ground-based detectors $10^2$--$10^3$s before coalescence. We also estimate the possible bound on the graviton Compton wavelength from a possible IMBH binary in $\\omega$ Centauri. We obtain a slightly weaker constraint than the solar system experiment and an about 2 orders of magnitude stronger constraint than the one from binary pulsar tests. Unfortunately, the detection rate of IMBH binaries is rather small.

  12. Pore-Water Extraction from Unsaturated Porous Media: Intermediate-Scale Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2014-08-15

    As a remedial approach, vacuum-induced pore-water extraction offers the possibility of contaminant and water removal from the vadose zone, which may be beneficial in reducing the flux of vadose zone contaminants to groundwater. Vadose zone water extraction is being considered at the Hanford Site in Washington State as a means to remove technetium-99 contamination from low permeability sediments with relatively high water contents. A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted to improve the fundamental understanding and limitations of the technique. Column experiments were designed to investigate the relations between imposed suctions, water saturations, and water production. Flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of high-permeability layers and near-well compaction on pore-water extraction efficiency. Results show that water extraction from unsaturated systems can be achieved in low permeability sediments, provided that the initial water saturations are relatively high. The presence of a high-permeability layer decreased the yield, and compaction near the well screen had a limited effect on overall performance. In all experiments, large pressure gradients were observed near the extraction screen. Minimum requirements for water extraction include an imposed vacuum-induced suction larger than the initial sediment capillary pressure, in combination with a fully saturated seepage-face boundary. A numerical multiphase simulator with a coupled seepage-face boundary conditions was used to simulate the experiments. Reasonable matches were obtained between measured and simulated results for both water extraction and capillary pressures, suggesting that numerical simulations may be used as a design tool for field-scale applications of pore-water extraction.

  13. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  14. A CLOSE-PAIR ANALYSIS OF DAMP MERGERS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Richard C. Y.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Bridge, Carrie R. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.ca

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the kinematics of {approx}2800 candidate close-pair galaxies at 0.1 < z < 1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5 m Magellan and 5 m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the 'hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al., we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red, and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al.. Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as 'damp', rather than 'dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z {approx} 0.5. Our data support models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behavior, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.

  15. Parsec-Scale Herbig-Haro Outflows from Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiona McGroarty; Tom Ray; John Bally

    2003-11-04

    While there are many parsec-scale Herbig-Haro (HH) outflows known to be driven by low-mass young stars, few are associated with their intermediate mass counterparts. Here we present the discovery of five such bipolar outflows. Of these, LkHalpha 198, 1548C27 IRS1, LkHalpha 233 and LkHalpha 234 were previously known to possess small-scale HH flows, while no such activity was observed before near IRAS 19395+2313. The largest of the newly discovered outflows are seen in the vicinity of LkHalpha 234 and 1548C27 IRS1, and stretch (in projection) 8pc and 7.5pc respectively. LkHalpha 233 which was previously known to power a spectroscopically detected small-scale (< 10'') jet is now seen to drive a 3pc outflow and LkHalpha 198 is shown here to power a 2pc outflow. Two HH objects in the vicinity of IRAS 19395+2313 lead us to suggest that it may also be responsible for a 5pc outflow. In total, 27 new HH objects/complexes were discovered. Examination of these parsec-scale outflows show that they have similar lengths, morphologies, and dynamical timescales as those from low-mass sources. Many appear to have blown out of the parent cloud, suggesting that their total lengths are much greater than optically observed. The degree of collimation of these outflows is similar to those from low-mass sources suggesting that the transition to more poorly-collimated outflows must occur at higher masses than the sources observed here.

  16. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  17. Numerical simulation of intermediate heat exchanger of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor using COMMIX-1B 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleh, Habeeb H.

    1990-01-01

    Structure Alignment CHAPTER III DESCRIPTION OF THE EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY III. I Description of FFTF The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperarure, fast neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant...NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER OF THE LIQUID METAL FAST BREEDER REACTOR USING COMMIX-1B A Thesis by HABEEB H. SALEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment...

  18. Slow crossover in YbXCu4 ,,XAg, Cd, In, Mg, Tl, Zn... intermediate-valence compounds J. M. Lawrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Jon

    of specific heat (T) C(T)/T, and 4f occupation number nf(T) for the intermediate-valence compounds YbXCu4 (X-Fermi-liquid behavior is neither expected nor observed and the scaling behavior that is ob- served does not reflect of as dispersive or bandlike behavior of the 4f electrons or alternatively as correlations between the 4f electrons

  19. Complete and incomplete fusion competition in 11B-induced fission reaction on medium mass targets at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Demekhina; G. S. Karapetyan; A. R. Balabekyan

    2014-12-22

    The cross sections for the binary fission of 197Au, 181Ta and 209Bi targets induced by 11B ions were measured at intermediate energies. The fission products cross sections were studied by means of activation analysis in off-line regime observed gamma-ray spectra. The fission cross section is reconstructed on the basis of charge and mass distribution of the fission products.

  20. Thioozonide decomposition: sulfur and oxygen atom transfer. Evidence for the formation of a carbonyl O-sulfide intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matturro, M.G.; Reynolds, R.P.; Kastrup, R.V.; Pictroski, C.F.

    1986-05-14

    The chemistry of ozonides is of considerable interest from a practical and theoretical viewpoint. Thioozonide 1, formally the monosulfur-substituted ozonide of dimethylcyclobutadiene, has been proposed as an intermediate in the room temperature photooxidation of 2,5-dimethylthiophene. Subsequent low-temperature studies confirmed this structural assignment. When 1 is allowed to warm to room temperature, it rearranges to a mixture of sulfine 2 and cis- and trans-3-hexene-2,5-diones (3c and 3t). Recent examination of the thermal decomposition of 1 has led to a proposed mechanism involving a carbonyl sulfide 4 as an intermediate along the sulfur expulsion pathway to 3c; however, no experimental support for this hypothesis was given. Carbonyl O-sulfides have also been implicated as intermediates from the photolysis of oxathiiranes. The authors report evidence for the formation of 4 during the decomposition of 1 and that elemental sulfur (S/sub 8/) is formed during the reaction by concatenation of sulfur atoms or fragments (S/sub 2/, S/sub 3/, etc.).

  1. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  2. Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bechtold; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; Szybist, James P; West, Brian H; Theiss, Timothy J; Timbario, Tom; Goodman, Marc

    2007-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

  3. Equivalent Circuit Description of Non-compensated n-p Codoped TiO2 as Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian-Li Feng; Guang-Wei Deng; Yi Xia; Feng-Cheng Wu; Ping Cui; Hai-Ping Lan; Zhen-Yu Zhang

    2010-12-09

    The novel concept of non-compensated n-p codoping has made it possible to create tunable intermediate bands in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, making the codoped TiO2 a promising material for developing intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). Here we investigate the quantum efficiency of such IBSCs within two scenarios - with and without current extracted from the extended intermediate band. Using the ideal equivalent circuit model, we find that the maximum efficiency of 57% in the first scenario and 53% in the second are both much higher than the Shockley-Queisser limit from single gap solar cells. We also obtain various key quantities of the circuits, a useful step in realistic development of TiO2 based solar cells invoking device integration. These equivalent circuit results are also compared with the efficiencies obtained directly from consideration of electron transition between the energy bands, and both approaches reveal the intriguing existence of double peaks in the maximum quantum efficiency as a function of the relative location of IBs.

  4. The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggero Maria Santilli

    2006-02-17

    In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadronic reactor} (patented and international patents pending), consisting of actual equipment specifically intended for the possible industrial production of the clean energy released by representative cases of controlled intermediate fusions for independent scrutiny by interested colleagues.

  5. Tailoring Fe-Base Alloys for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Interconnect Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.H. Zhu; M.P. Brady; H.U. Anderson

    2007-12-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions for our SECA Phase I and II project focused on Cr-free or low Cr Fe-Ni based alloy development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect application. Electrical conductivity measurement on bulk (Fe,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} coupons indicated that this spinel phase possessed a higher electrical conductivity than Cr{sub 1.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} spinel and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was consistent with the low area specific resistance (ASR) of the oxide scale formed on these Fe-Ni based alloys. For Cr-free Fe-Ni binary alloys, although the increase in Ni content in the alloys improved the oxidation resistance, and the Fe-Ni binary alloys exhibited adequate CTE and oxide scale ASR, their oxidation resistance needs to be further improved. Systematic alloy design efforts have led to the identification of one low-Cr (6wt.%) Fe-Ni-Co based alloy which formed a protective, electrically-conductive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} inner layer underneath a Cr-free, highly conductive spinel outer layer. This low-Cr, Fe-Ni-Co alloy has demonstrated a good CTE match with other cell components; high oxidation resistance comparable to that of Crofer; low oxide scale ASR with the formation of electrically-insulating phases in the oxide scale; no scale spallation during thermal cycling; adequate compatibility with cathode materials; and comparable mechanical properties with Crofer. The existence of the Cr-free (Fe,Co,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} outer layer effectively reduced the Cr evaporation and in transpiration testing resulted in a 6-fold decrease in Cr evaporation as compared to a state-of-the-art ferritic interconnect alloy. In-cell testing using an anode supported cell with a configuration of Alloy/Pt/LSM/YSZ/Ni+YSZ indicates that the formation of the Cr-free spinel layer via thermal oxidation was effective in blocking the Cr migration and thus improving the cell performance stability. Electroplating of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys as precursor to synthesize a protective spinel layer on commercial ferritic steels has been initiated to facilitate the utilization of the Cr-free spinel as a surface seal to block Cr evaporation. It is suggested that low-cost Fe-Ni-Co alloy coating on commercial ferritic steels might be the best approach to completely eliminate the Cr poisoning problem in SOFC stacks, while maintaining the relatively low overall cost of the interconnect component.

  6. Magneto thermal conductivity of superconducting Nb with intermediate level of impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.S. Sharath Chandra, M.K. Chattopadhyay, S.B. Roy, V.C. Sahni, G.R. Myneni

    2012-03-01

    Niobium materials with intermediate purity level are used for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities (SCRF), and thermal conductivity is an important parameter influencing the performance of such SCRF cavities. We report here the temperature and magnetic field dependence of thermal conductivity {kappa} for superconducting niobium (Nb) samples, for which the electron mean free path I{sub e}, the phonon mean free path I{sub g}, and the vortex core diameter 2r{sub C} are of the same order of magnitude. The measured thermal conductivity is analyzed using the effective gap model (developed for I{sub e} >> 2r{sub C} (Dubeck et al 1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 98)) and the normal core model (developed for I{sub e} << 2r{sub C} (Ward and Dew-Hughes 1970 J. Phys. C: Solid St. Phys. 3 2245)). However, it is found that the effective gap model is not suitable for low temperatures when I{sub e} {approx} 2r{sub C}. The normal core model, on the other hand, is able to describe {kappa}(T,H) over the entire temperature range except in the field regime between H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} i.e. in the mixed state. It is shown that to understand the complete behavior of {kappa} in the mixed state, the scattering of quasi-particles from the vortex cores and the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling are to be invoked. The quasi-particle scattering from vortices for the present system is understood in terms of the framework of Sergeenkov and Ausloos (1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 3614) extending their approach to the case of Nb. The intervortex tunneling is understood within the framework of Schmidbauer et al (1970 Z. Phys. 240 30). Analysis of the field dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering from vortices dominates in the low fields, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling dominates in high fields. Analysis of the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering is dominant at low temperatures, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling is dominant at high temperatures.

  7. Use of PTFE Stent Grafts for Hemodialysis-related Central Venous Occlusions: Intermediate-Term Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, Sanjoy, E-mail: sanjoy_kundu40@hotmail.com; Modabber, Milad [Scarborough General Hospital-General Division, Department of Medical Imaging (Canada); You, John M. [Scarborough General Hospital-General Division, Department of Vascular Surgery (Canada); Tam, Paul; Nagai, Gordon; Ting, Robert [Scarborough General Hospital-General Division, Department of Nephrology (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the safety and effectiveness of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) encapsulated nitinol stents (Bard Peripheral Vascular, Tempe, AZ) for treatment of hemodialysis-related central venous occlusions. Materials and Methods: Study design was a single-center nonrandomized retrospective cohort of patients from May 2004 to August 2009 for a total of 64 months. There were 14 patients (mean age 60 years, range 50-83 years; 13 male, 1 female). All patients had autogenous fistulas. All 14 patients had central venous occlusions and presented with clinical symptoms of the following: extremity swelling (14%, 2 of 14), extremity and face swelling (72%, 10 of 14), and face swelling/edema (14%, 2 of 14). There was evidence of access dysfunction with decreased access flow in 36% (5 of 14) patients. There were prior interventions or previous line placement at the site of the central venous lesion in all 14 patients. Results were assessed by recurrence of clinical symptoms and function of the access circuit (National Kidney Foundation recommended criteria). Results: Sixteen consecutive straight stent grafts were implanted in 14 patients. Average treated lesion length was 5.0 cm (range, 0.9-7 cm). All 14 patients had complete central venous occlusion (100% stenosis). The central venous occlusions were located as follows: right subclavian and brachiocephalic vein (21%, 3 of 14), right brachiocephalic vein (36%, 5 of 14), left brachiocephalic vein (36%, 5 of 14), and bilateral brachiocephalic vein (7%, 1 of 14). A total of 16 PTFE stent grafts were placed. Ten- or 12-mm-diameter PTFE stent grafts were placed. The average stent length was 6.1 cm (range, 4-8 cm). Technical (deployment), anatomic (<30% residual stenosis), clinical (resolution of symptoms), and hemodynamic (resolution of access dysfunction) success were 100%. At 3, 6, and 9 months, primary patency of the treated area and access circuit were 100% (14 of 14). Conclusions: This PTFE encapsulated stent graft demonstrates encouraging intermediate-term patency results for central vein occlusions. Further prospective studies with long-term assessment and larger patient populations will be required.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2008-04-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

  10. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 5. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during September 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  11. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for October 1982. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during October 1982 at the intermediate project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  12. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 8. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during December 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphiclaly. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  13. Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    intermediate heat exchanger used high pressure helium not asexchanger performance: predictive model for heat transfer and pressurePressure Drop Correlations for the Rectangular Offset Strip Fin Compact Heat Exchanger. ”

  14. Isospin effects on two-nucleon correlation functions in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

    2003-01-01

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we study isospin effects on two-nucleon correlation functions in heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies. We find that these correlation ...

  15. Chemically induced Parkinson's disease: intermediates in the oxidation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine to the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chacon, J.N.; Chedekel, M.R.; Land, E.J.; Truscott, T.G.

    1987-04-29

    Various unstable intermediate oxidation states have been postulated in the metabolic activation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine to the 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium ion. We now report the first direct observation of these free radical intermediates by pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis. Studies are described of various reactions of such species, in particular with dopamine whose autoxidation to dopamine quinone is reported to be potentiated by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3, 6-tetrahydropyridine.

  16. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodríguez, Núria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI.

  17. Two-step Doppler cooling of a three-level ladder system with an intermediate metastable level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Champenois; Gaetan Hagel; Martina Knoop; Marie Houssin; Cedric Zumsteg; Fernande Vedel; Michael Drewsen

    2008-02-14

    Doppler laser cooling of a three-level ladder system using two near-resonant laser fields is analyzed in the case of the intermediate level being metastable while the upper level is short-lived. Analytical as well as numerical results for e.g. obtainable scattering rates and achievable temperatures are presented. When appropriate, comparisons with two-level single photon Doppler laser cooling is made. These results are relevant to recent experimental Doppler laser cooling investigations addressing intercombination lines in alkali-earth metal atoms and quadrupole transitions in alkali-earth metal ions.

  18. Effects of short-range correlation reduced kinetic symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-An Li; Wen-Jun Guo; Zhaozhong Shi

    2015-03-20

    Besides earlier predictions based on both phenomenological models and modern microscopic many-body theories, circumstantial evidence was recently found for a reduced kinetic symmetry energy of isospin-asymmetric nucleonic matter compared to the free Fermi gas model prediction due to the short-range correlation of high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. While keeping the total symmetry energy near the saturation density of nuclear matter consistent with existing experimental constraints, we examine the correspondingly enhanced role of the isospin degree of freedom in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies due to the reduced (enhanced) kinetic (potential) symmetry energy. Important observable consequences are investigated.

  19. Low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol and ethanol-PRF blends: An experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Francis M.; Chaos, Marcos; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-12-15

    In this brief communication, we present new experimental species profile measurements for the low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol under knock-prone conditions. These experiments show that ethanol exhibits no global low temperature reactivity at these conditions, although we note the heterogeneous decomposition of ethanol to ethylene and water. Similar behavior is reported for an E85 blend in n-heptane. Kinetic modeling results are presented to complement these experiments and elucidate the interaction of ethanol and primary reference fuels undergoing cooxidation. (author)

  20. Two-State Folding, Folding through Intermediates, and Metastability in a Minimalistic Hydrophobic-Polar Model for Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Schnabel; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2007-10-24

    Within the frame of an effective, coarse-grained hydrophobic-polar protein model, we employ multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations to investigate free-energy landscapes and folding channels of exemplified heteropolymer sequences, which are permutations of each other. Despite the simplicity of the model, the knowledge of the free-energy landscape in dependence of a suitable system order parameter enables us to reveal complex folding characteristics known from real bioproteins and synthetic peptides, such as two-state folding, folding through weakly stable intermediates, and glassy metastability.

  1. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?' Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered ?' precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  2. SU-E-T-205: Improving Quality Assurance of HDR Brachytherapy: Verifying Agreement Between Planned and Delivered Dose Distributions Using DICOM RTDose and Advanced Film Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, A L; Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy is undergoing significant development, and quality assurance (QA) checks must keep pace. Current recommendations do not adequately verify delivered against planned dose distributions: This is particularly relevant for new treatment planning system (TPS) calculation algorithms (non TG-43 based), and an era of significant patient-specific plan optimisation. Full system checks are desirable in modern QA recommendations, complementary to device-centric individual tests. We present a QA system incorporating TPS calculation, dose distribution export, HDR unit performance, and dose distribution measurement. Such an approach, more common in external beam radiotherapy, has not previously been reported in the literature for brachytherapy. Methods: Our QA method was tested at 24 UK brachytherapy centres. As a novel approach, we used the TPS DICOM RTDose file export to compare planned dose distribution with that measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films placed around clinical brachytherapy treatment applicators. Gamma analysis was used to compare the dose distributions. Dose difference and distance to agreement were determined at prescription Point A. Accurate film dosimetry was achieved using a glass compression plate at scanning to ensure physically-flat films, simultaneous scanning of known dose films with measurement films, and triple-channel dosimetric analysis. Results: The mean gamma pass rate of RTDose compared to film-measured dose distributions was 98.1% at 3%(local), 2 mm criteria. The mean dose difference, measured to planned, at Point A was -0.5% for plastic treatment applicators and -2.4% for metal applicators, due to shielding not accounted for in TPS. The mean distance to agreement was 0.6 mm. Conclusion: It is recommended to develop brachytherapy QA to include full-system verification of agreement between planned and delivered dose distributions. This is a novel approach for HDR brachytherapy QA. A methodology using advanced film dosimetry and gamma comparison to DICOM RTDose files has been demonstrated as suitable to fulfil this need.

  3. Quantification of incidental mediastinal and hilar irradiation delivered during definitive stereotactic body radiation therapy for peripheral non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Kate L.; Gomez, Jorge; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Warren, Graham W.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2012-07-01

    To determine the amount of incidental radiation dose received by the mediastinal and hilar nodes for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Fifty consecutive patients with NSCLC, treated using an SBRT technique, were identified. Of these patients, 38 had a prescription dose of 60 Gy in 20-Gy fractions and were eligible for analysis. For each patient, ipsilateral upper (level 2) and lower (level 4) paratracheal, and hilar (level 10) nodal regions were contoured on the planning computed tomography (CT) images. Using the clinical treatment plan, dose and volume calculations were performed retrospectively for each nodal region. SBRT to upper lobe tumors resulted in an average total ipsilateral mean dose of between 5.2 and 7.8 Gy for the most proximal paratracheal nodal stations (2R and 4R for right upper lobe lesions, 2L and 4L for left upper lobe lesions). SBRT to lower lobe tumors resulted in an average total ipsilateral mean dose of between 15.6 and 21.5 Gy for the most proximal hilar nodal stations (10R for right lower lobe lesions, 10 l for left lower lobe lesions). Doses to more distal nodes were substantially lower than 5 Gy. The often substantial incidental irradiation, delivered during SBRT for peripheral NSCLC of the lower lobes to the most proximal hilar lymph nodes may be therapeutic for low-volume, subclinical nodal disease. Treatment of peripheral upper lobe lung tumors delivers less incidental irradiation to the paratracheal lymph nodes with lower likelihood of therapeutic benefit.

  4. Monte Carlo testing of new cross section data sets for thermal and intermediate highly enriched uranium critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinman, J.P. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the eigenvalue sensitivity to new {sup 235}U, hydrogen, and oxygen cross section data sets by comparing RACER Monte Carlo calculations for several thermal and intermediate spectrum critical experiments. The new {sup 235}U library (Version 107) was derived by L. Leal and H. Derrien by fitting differential experimental data for {sup 235}U while constraining the fit to match experimental capture and fission resonance integrals and Maxwellian averaged thermal K1 (v fission minus absorption). The new hydrogen library (Version 45) consists of the ENDF/B-VI release 3 data with a 332.0 mb 2,200 m/s cross section which replaces the value of 332.6 mb in the current library. The new oxygen library (Version 39) is based on a recent evaluation of {sup 16}O by E. Caro. Nineteen Oak Ridge and Rocky Flats thermal solution benchmark critical assemblies that span a range of hydrogen-to-{sup 235}U (H/U) concentrations (2,052 to 27.1) and above-thermal neutron leakage fractions (0.555 to 0.011) were analyzed. In addition, three intermediate spectrum critical assemblies (UH3-UR, UH3-NI, and HISS-HUG) were studied.

  5. ANTI-CORRELATED SOFT LAGS IN THE INTERMEDIATE STATE OF BLACK HOLE SOURCE GX 339-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Deajeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, A. R., E-mail: astrosriram@yahoo.co.i [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2010-12-10

    We report the few hundred second anti-correlated soft lags between soft and hard energy bands in the source GX 339-4 using RXTE observations. In one observation, anti-correlated soft lags were observed using the ISGRI/INTEGRAL hard energy band and the PCA/RXTE soft energy band light curves. The lags were observed when the source was in hard and soft intermediate states, i.e., in a steep power-law state. We found that the temporal and spectral properties were changed during the lag timescale. The anti-correlated soft lags are associated with spectral variability during which the geometry of the accretion disk is changed. The observed temporal and spectral variations are explained using the framework of truncated disk geometry. We found that during the lag timescale, the centroid frequency of quasi-periodic oscillation is decreased, the soft flux is decreased along with an increase in the hard flux, and the power-law index steepens together with a decrease in the disk normalization parameter. We argue that these changes could be explained if we assume that the hot corona condenses and forms a disk in the inner region of the accretion disk. The overall spectral and temporal changes support the truncated geometry of the accretion disk in the steep power-law state or in the intermediate state.

  6. Communication: Spectroscopic characterization of an alkyl substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO through pure rotational transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki

    2014-01-07

    An alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO was detected in the gas phase through Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. Observed pure rotational transitions show a small splitting corresponding to the A/E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation. The rotational constants and the barrier height of the hindered methyl rotation were determined to be A = 17?586.5295(15) MHz, B = 7133.4799(41) MHz, C = 5229.1704(40) MHz, and V{sub 3} = 837.1(17) cm{sup ?1}. High-level ab initio calculations which reproduce the experimentally determined values well indicate that the in-plane C–H bond in the methyl moiety is trans to the C–O bond, and other two protons are directed to the terminal oxygen atom for the most stable structure of syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO. The torsional barrier of the methyl top is fairly large in syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO, implying a significant interaction between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the methyl moiety, which may be responsible for the high production yields of the OH radical from energized alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates.

  7. Large and small-scale structure of the Intermediate and High Velocity Clouds towards the LMC and SMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smoker, J V; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    We employ CaII K and NaI D interstellar absorption-line spectroscopy of early-type stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to investigate the large- and small-scale structure in foreground Intermediate and High Velocity Clouds (I/HVCs). These data include FLAMES-GIRAFFE CaII K observations of 403 stars in four open clusters, plus FEROS or UVES spectra of 156 stars in the LMC and SMC. The FLAMES observations are amongst the most extensive probes to date of CaII structures on 20 arcsec scales From the FLAMES data within a 0.5 degree field-of-view, the CaII K equivalent width in the I/HVC components towards three clusters varies by factors of >10. There are no detections of molecular gas in absorption at intermediate or high velocities, although molecular absorption is present at LMC and Galactic velocities towards some sightlines. The sightlines show variations in EW exceeding a factor 7 in CH+ towards NGC 1761 over scales of less than 10 arcminutes. The FEROS/UVES data show CaII K I/HVC absorption in $\\...

  8. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Berry, Christopher P L; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of $\\gtrsim 100$ solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above $100 ~ M_\\odot$ with $95\\%$ confidence provided the massive body exceeds $130 ~ M_\\odot$. For source masses above $\\sim200 ~ M_\\odot$, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sen...

  9. Intermediate Energy Infobook and Intermediate Infobook Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    school, save energy and reduce costs Collection of science-based, climate education resources and programs, aligned to national science education standards. Find info on the...

  10. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non?Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); West, Brian H [ORNL; Clark, Wendy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Graves, Ronald L [ORNL; Orban, John [Battelle, Columbus; Przesmitzki, Steve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    In summer 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program is to assess the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20--gasoline blended with 15 and 20% ethanol--on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This first report provides the results available to date from the first stages of a much larger overall test program. Results from additional projects that are currently underway or in the planning stages are not included in this first report. The purpose of this initial study was to quickly investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the following: (1) Regulated tailpipe emissions for 13 popular late model vehicles on a drive cycle similar to real-world driving and 28 small non-road engines (SNREs) under certification or typical in use procedures. (2) Exhaust and catalyst temperatures of the same vehicles under more severe conditions. (3) Temperature of key engine components of the same SNREs under certification or typical in-use conditions. (4) Observable operational issues with either the vehicles or SNREs during the course of testing. As discussed in the concluding section of this report, a wide range of additional studies are underway or planned to consider the effects of intermediate ethanol blends on materials, emissions, durability, and driveability of vehicles, as well as impacts on a wider range of nonautomotive engines, including marine applications, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Section 1 (Introduction) gives background on the test program and describes collaborations with industry and agencies to date. Section 2 (Experimental Setup) provides details concerning test fuels, vehicle and SNRE selection, and test methods used to conduct the studies presented in this report. Section 3 (Results and Discussion) summarizes the vehicle and SNRE studies and presents data from testing completed to date. Section 4 (Next Steps) describes planned future activities. The appendixes provide test procedure details, vehicle and SNRE emissions standards, analysis details, and additional data and tables from vehicle and SNRE tests.

  11. Presented by Petascale Science Delivered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Bland_Jaguar_SC10 Jaguar: World's most productive scientific computer Designed for science from/s Interconnect bandwidth 532 TB/s #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bland-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bland_Jaguar_SC10 Cray SeaStar2+ interconnect Jaguar's Cray XT5 nodes · 12

  12. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trebotich is also working on extending his simulations to shale gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing. The code framework could also be used for other energy applications,...

  13. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    living in poverty in Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and the surrounding area. Ecologically-based IPM

  14. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements Report ofEnergy and ClimateEarly

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications TheScience4.21 4.43 4.65 4.57 4.55 4.001,683,940

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO),7F e b1,683,940 1,728,715

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009 2,851 2,410 2,851 3,84720

  18. Shape-Memory Transformations of NiTi: Minimum-Energy Pathways between Austenite, Martensites, and Kinetically Limited Intermediate States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2014-12-24

    NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated structures and transitions, including their barriers. Using a generalized solid-state nudge elastic band (GSSNEB) method implemented via density-functional theory, we detail the structural transformations in NiTi relevant to shape memory: those between body-centered orthorhombic (BCO) groundstate and a newly identified stable austenite (“glassy” B2-like) structure, including energy barriers (hysteresis) and intermediate structures (observed as a kinetically limited R-phase), and between martensite variants (BCO orientations). All results are in good agreement with available experiment. We contrast the austenite results to those from the often-assumed, butmore »unstable B2. These high- and low-temperature structures and structural transformations provide much needed atomic-scale detail for transitions responsible for NiTi shape-memory effects.« less

  19. Fresnel zone plate stacking in the intermediate field for high efficiency focusing in the hard X-ray regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Wojcik, Michael; Liu, Jie; Roehrig, Chris; Cummings, Marvin; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Li, Kenan; Lai, Barry; Shu, Deming; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-11-05

    Focusing efficiency of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for X-rays depends on zone height, while the achievable spatial resolution depends on the width of the finest zones. FZPs with optimal efficiency and sub-100-nm spatial resolution require high aspect ratio structures which are difficult to fabricate with current technology especially for the hard X-ray regime. A possible solution is to stack several zone plates. To increase the number of FZPs within one stack, we first demonstrate intermediate-field stacking and apply this method by stacks of up to five FZPs with adjusted diameters. Approaching the respective optimum zone height, we maximized efficiencies formore »high resolution focusing at three different energies, 10, 11.8, and 25 keV.« less

  20. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The rangemore »of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  1. Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken; Takahashi, Migaku

    2011-04-01

    During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

  2. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore »combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  3. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-01

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  4. The paraxial approximation: the intermediate-energy electron-impact ionization of the molecular hydrogen and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serov, Vladislav V

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented the paraxial approximation followed by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method with frozen core for the single impact ionization of atoms and two-atomic molecules. It reduces the original scattering problem to the five-dimensional time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation solution. By using this method we calculated the multi-fold differential cross section of the impact single ionization of the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule and the nitrogen molecule by the intermediate energy electrons. Our results for the helium and the hydrogen are quite close to experimental data, but for N$_2$ the agreement is worse apparently because of the insufficiency of the frozen core approximation.

  5. A Study on Optimized Management Options for the Wolsong Low- and Intermediate - Level Waste Disposal Center in Korea - 13479

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, JooWan; Kim, DongSun; Choi, DongEun [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Korea 89, Bukseongno, Gyeongju, 780-050 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Korea 89, Bukseongno, Gyeongju, 780-050 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The safe and effective management of radioactive waste is a national task required for sustainable generation of nuclear power and for energy self-reliance in Korea. Currently, for permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW), the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center (WLDC) is under construction. It will accommodate a total of 800,000 drums at the final stage after stepwise expansion. As an implementing strategy for cost-effective development of the WLDC, various disposal options suitable for waste classification schemes would be considered. It is also needed an optimized management of the WLDC by taking a countermeasure of volume reduction treatment. In this study, various management options to be applied to each waste class are analyzed in terms of its inventory and disposal cost. For the volume reduction and stabilization of waste, the vitrification and plasma melting methods are considered for combustible and incombustible waste, respectively. (authors)

  6. Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

  7. Natural succession impeded by smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium) in an abandoned agricultural field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J.K.

    1997-11-01

    In 1975, an abandoned agricultural field at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) that had been cultivated for more than 38 years, was seeded with smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium). Although these species are commonly planted in reclamation and roadside seed mixtures, few studies have documented their impact on the re-establishment of native plant communities. In 1994, species richness, cover, and biomass were sampled in the agricultural field and compared to the surrounding mixed-grass prairie at the Site. The agricultural field contained only 61 plant species (62% native), compared to 143 species (81% native) in the surrounding mixed-grass prairie. Community similarity based on species presence/absence was 0.47 (Sorensen coefficient of similarity). Basal vegetative cover was 11.2% in the agricultural field and 29.1% in the mixed-grass prairie. Smooth brome and intermediate wheatgrass accounted for 93% of the relative foliar cover and 96% of the biomass in the agricultural field. The aggressive nature of these two planted species has impeded the natural succession of the agricultural field to a more native prairie community. Studies of natural succession on abandoned fields and roads in northeastern Colorado have indicated that if left alone, fields would return to their native climax state in approximately 50 years and would be approaching their native state after 20--25 years. Based on the results of this study, this agricultural field may take more than 100 years to return to a native mixed-grass prairie state and it may never achieve a native state without human intervention.

  8. Identification of combustion intermediates in a low-pressure premixed laminar 2,5-dimethylfuran/oxygen/argon flame with tunable synchrotron photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xuesong; Huang, Zuohua; Wei, Lixia [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Yuan, Tao; Zhang, Kuiwen [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Low-pressure (4.0 kPa) premixed laminar 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF)/oxygen/argon flame with an equivalence ratio of 2.0 was studied with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry. Photoionization mass spectra of DMF/O{sub 2}/Ar flame were recorded and the photoionization efficiency curves of the combustion intermediates were measured. Flame species, including isomeric intermediates, are identified by comparing the measured ionization energies with those reported in literatures or those calculated with Gaussian-3 procedure. More than 70 species have been detected, including furan and its derivatives, aromatics, and free radicals. Possible reaction pathways of DMF, 2-methylfuran, and furan are proposed based on the intermediates identified. DMF can be consumed by H-abstraction and pyrolysis reactions. 2-Methylfuran and furan can be consumed by H-abstraction, H-addition and pyrolysis reactions. (author)

  9. InAs quantum dot growth on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy for intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakomin, R.; Kawabata, R. M. S.; Souza, P. L.; Mourão, R. T.; Pires, M. P.; Micha, D. N.

    2014-09-07

    InAs quantum dot multilayers have been grown using Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As spacers with dimensions and compositions near the theoretical values for optimized efficiencies in intermediate band photovoltaic cells. Using an aluminium composition of x?=?0.3 and InAs dot vertical dimensions of 5?nm, transitions to an intermediate band with energy close to the ideal theoretical value have been obtained. Optimum size uniformity and density have been achieved by capping the quantum dots with GaAs following the indium-flush method. This approach has also resulted in minimization of crystalline defects in the epilayer structure.

  10. YESI's mission is to deliver world-class interdisciplinary research on environmental sustainability for the research community, industry and policy makers. Our innovative approach is based on an equal partnership between physical, natural and social scien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pumfrey, David

    solutions to global environmental problems." Professor Sue Hartley, Director of YESI #12;Food production-derived products including ecological impacts of biofuels and oil palm plantations · Conserving ecosystem servicesYESI's mission is to deliver world-class interdisciplinary research on environmental sustainability

  11. Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., worldwide leader in securing the Internet, is the only vendor to deliver Total Security for networks, data and endpoints, unified under a single management framework.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levit, Anna

    with the development of the Software Blade architecture. The dynamic Software Blade architecture delivers secure open positions at Check Point: User Experience: Major Responsibilities: Leading user-centered design specifications and design concepts for applications. Design and execute usability test procedures, including

  12. The Department of Finance and Real Estate is committed to delivering cutting-edge education in finance and real estate. It values strong connections to the community and offers excellent opportunities to interact with businesses at all levels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Department of Finance and Real Estate is committed to delivering cutting-edge education in finance and real estate. It values strong connections to the community and offers excellent opportunities engage in financial planning at the institutional level. Real estate finance is an exciting multifaceted

  13. The Department of Finance and Real Estate is committed to delivering cutting-edge education in finance and real estate. It values strong connections to the community and offers excellent opportunities to interact with businesses at all levels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Department of Finance and Real Estate is committed to delivering cutting-edge education in finance and real estate. It values strong connections to the community and offers excellent opportunities confidential Understands and enjoys working with technology Detail-oriented Finance / Real Estate Department

  14. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

  15. V&V of MCNP 6.1.1 Beta Against Intermediate and High-Energy Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2014-09-08

    This report presents a set of validation and verification (V&V) MCNP 6.1.1 beta results calculated in parallel, with MPI, obtained using its event generators at intermediate and high-energies compared against various experimental data. It also contains several examples of results using the models at energies below 150 MeV, down to 10 MeV, where data libraries are normally used. This report can be considered as the forth part of a set of MCNP6 Testing Primers, after its first, LA-UR-11-05129, and second, LA-UR-11-05627, and third, LA-UR-26944, publications, but is devoted to V&V with the latest, 1.1 beta version of MCNP6. The MCNP6 test-problems discussed here are presented in the /VALIDATION_CEM/and/VALIDATION_LAQGSM/subdirectories in the MCNP6/Testing/directory. README files that contain short descriptions of every input file, the experiment, the quantity of interest that the experiment measures and its description in the MCNP6 output files, and the publication reference of that experiment are presented for every test problem. Templates for plotting the corresponding results with xmgrace as well as pdf files with figures representing the final results of our V&V efforts are presented. Several technical “bugs” in MCNP 6.1.1 beta were discovered during our current V&V of MCNP6 while running it in parallel with MPI using its event generators. These “bugs” are to be fixed in the following version of MCNP6. Our results show that MCNP 6.1.1 beta using its CEM03.03, LAQGSM03.03, Bertini, and INCL+ABLA, event generators describes, as a rule, reasonably well different intermediate- and high-energy measured data. This primer isn’t meant to be read from cover to cover. Readers may skip some sections and go directly to any test problem in which they are interested.

  16. ISO standardization of scaling factor method for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes generated at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Makoto; Masui, Hideki; Denda, Yasutaka; James, David; Lantes, Bertrand; Mueller, Wolfgang; Garamszeghy, Mike; Leganes, Jose Luis; Maxeiner, Harald; Van Velzen, Leo

    2007-07-01

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (L-ILW ) generated at nuclear power plants are disposed of in various countries. In the disposal of such wastes, it is required that the radioactivity concentrations of waste packages should be declared with respect to difficult-to-measure nuclides (DTM nuclides), such as C-14, Ni-63 and a-emitting nuclides, which are often limited to maximum values in disposal licenses, safety cases and/or regulations for maximum radioactive concentrations. To fulfill this requirement, the Scaling Factor method (SF method) has been applied in various countries as a principal method for determining the concentrations of DTM nuclides. In the SF method, the concentrations of DTM nuclides are determined by multiplying the concentrations of certain key nuclides by SF values (the determined ratios of radioactive concentration between DTM nuclides and those key nuclides). The SF values used as conversion factors are determined from the correlation between DTM nuclides and key nuclides such as Co-60. The concentrations of key nuclides are determined by {gamma} ray measurements which can be made comparatively easily from outside the waste package. The SF values are calculated based on the data obtained from the radiochemical analysis of waste samples. The use of SFs, which are empirically based on analytical data, has become established as a widely recognized 'de facto standard'. A number of countries have independently collected nuclide data by analysis over many years and each has developed its own SF method, but all the SF methods that have been adopted are similar. The project team for standardization had been organized for establishing this SF method as a 'de jure standard' in the international standardization system of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The project team for standardization has advanced the standardization through technical studies, based upon each country's study results and analysis data. The conclusions reached by the project team was published as ISO International Standard 21238:2007 'The Scaling Factor method to determine the radioactivity of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants'. This paper gives an introduction to the international standardization process for the SF method and the contents of the recently published International Standard. (authors)

  17. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 4. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for June, July, and August 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during June, July, and August 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weater are provided.

  18. Four-State Folding of a SH3 Domain: Salt-Induced Modulation of the Stabilities of the Intermediates and Native State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the late intermediate M that forms after the rate-limiting transition of folding. Protein folding reactions. This simplistic picture of protein folding is supported by and in turn reinforces simplified computer simulations structure gradually over many small distributed barriers.29,30 This complexity of protein folding reactions

  19. Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 1 BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms Ole Rathmann1, 3 , Sten Frandsen1 , and Rebecca Barthelmie2, 1 1 Wind Energy.rathmann@risoe.dk Summary Modern, very large wind farms require large-scale effects to be taken into account when evaluating

  20. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104, NO. C9, PAGES 21,063-21,082, SEPTEMBER 15, 1999 Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone: A Lagrangian view Olaf Boebel,· Claudia Schmid,2 subtropicalregionsaroundthe Brazil-Malvinas(Falkland)ConfluenceZone is studied,usingdailyhydrographicand kinematicdata from-frontalprocesseswere observedcloseto meander crests.The limited numberof floatsof this studyand the complexstructureof the Brazil

  1. Thermochemistry for Hydrocarbon Intermediates Chemisorbed on Metal Surfaces: CHn-m(CH3)m with n ) 1, 2, 3 and m e n on Pt, Ir,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Thermochemistry for Hydrocarbon Intermediates Chemisorbed on Metal Surfaces: CHn-m(CH3)m with n ) 1 hydrocarbon rearrangements on transition metal surfaces, we report systematic studies of hydrocarbon radicals for hydrocarbons on metal surfaces similar to the Benson scheme so useful for gas-phase hydrocarbons. This is used

  2. Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

  3. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M . G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K. Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley

    2014-05-22

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, $\\ell=m=2$, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  4. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Goggin, L M; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs,...

  5. Implementation of Treatment Systems for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste at Site Radwaste Treatment Facility (SRTF), PR China - 12556

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann, Peter; Nasarek, Ralph; Aign, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000 reactors being built in the People's Republic of China require a waste treatment facility to process the low and intermediate radioactive waste produced by these nuclear power stations. Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH was successful in being awarded a contract as to the planning, delivery and commissioning of such a waste treatment facility. The Site Radwaste Treatment Facility (SRTF) is a waste treatment facility that can meet the AP1000 requirements and it will become operational in the near future. The SRTF is situated at the location of Sanmen, People's Republic of China, next to one of the AP1000 and is an adherent building to the AP1000 comprising different waste treatment processes for radioactive spent filter cartridges, ion-exchange resins and radioactive liquid and solid waste. The final product of the SRTF-treatment is a 200 l drum with cemented waste or grouted waste packages for storage in a local storage facility. The systems used in the SRTF are developed for these special requirements, based on experience from similar systems in the German nuclear industry. The main waste treatment systems in the SRTF are: - Filter Cartridge Processing System (FCS); - HVAC-Filter and Solid Waste Treatment Systems (HVS); - Chemical Liquid Treatment Systems (CTS); - Spent Resin Processing Systems (RES); - Mobile Treatment System (MBS). (authors)

  6. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment: Semiscale Mod-2A intermediate break test S-IB-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L N

    1986-02-01

    The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment project at Sandia National Laboratories is part of an overall effort funded by the NRC to determine the ability of various system codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of light water reactors during accident and off-normal conditions. The TRAC code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, an intermediate break test (S-IB-3), performed at the Semiscale Mod-2A facility, has been analyzed. Using an input model with a 3-D VESSEL component, the vessel and downcomer inventories during 3-IB-3 were generally well predicted, but the core heatup was underpredicted compared to data. An equivalent calculation with an all 1-D input model ran about twice as fast as our basecase analysis using a 3-D VESSEL in the input model, but the results of the two calculations diverged significantly for many parameters of interest, with the 3-D VESSEL model results in better agreement with data. 22 refs., 100 figs.

  7. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in pre-filled and photo-filled intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2014-08-18

    In this work, we study how Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination via energy levels in the bandgap, caused by defects or impurities, affects the performance of both photo-filled and pre-filled intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). For a pre-filled cell, the IB is half-filled in equilibrium, while it is empty for the photo-filled cell in equilibrium. The energy level, density, and capture cross-sections of the defects/impurities are varied systematically. We find that the photo-filled cells are, in general, less efficient than pre-filled cells, except when the defect level is between the conduction band and the IB. In that case, for a range of light intensities, the photo-filled cell performs better than the pre-filled. When the defect level is at the same energy as the IB, the efficiency is above 82% of the defect-free case, when less than 50% of the states at the IB lead to SRH recombination. This shows that even if SRH recombination via the IB takes place, high efficiencies can be achieved. We also show that band gap optimization can be used to reduce the SRH recombination.

  8. The powerful jet of an off-nuclear intermediate-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 2276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezcua, M; Lobanov, A P; Sutton, A D

    2015-01-01

    Jet ejection by accreting black holes is a mass invariant mechanism unifying stellar and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that should also apply for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), which are thought to be the seeds from which SMBHs form. We present the detection of an off-nuclear IMBH of $\\sim$5 $\\times$ 10$^{4}$ M$_\\odot$ located in an unusual spiral arm of the galaxy NGC 2276 based on quasi-simultaneous \\textit{Chandra} X-ray observations and European VLBI Network (EVN) radio observations. The IMBH, NGC2276-3c, possesses a 1.8 pc radio jet that is oriented in the same direction as large-scale ($\\sim$650 pc) radio lobes and whose emission is consistent with flat to optically thin synchrotron emission between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. Its jet kinetic power ($4 \\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is comparable to its radiative output and its jet efficiency ($\\geq$ 46\\%) is as large as that of SMBHs. A region of $\\sim$300 pc along the jet devoid of young stars could provide observational evidence of jet feedback from...

  9. Radio-optical flux behavior and spectral energy distribution of the intermediate blazar GC 0109+224

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Ciprini; Gino Tosti; Harri Teräsranta; Hugh D. Aller

    2004-01-15

    About twenty years of radio observations in five bands (from 4.8 to 37 GHz) of the BL Lac object GC 0109+224 (S2 0109+22, RGB J0112+227), are presented and analysed together with the optical data. Over the past ten years this blazar has exhibited enhanced activity. There is only weak correlation between radio and optical flares delays, usually protracted on longer timescales in the radio with respect to the optical. In some cases no radio flare counterpart was observed for the optical outbursts. The radio variability, characterised by peaks superposition, shows hints of some characteristic timescales (around the 3-4 years), and a fluctuation mode between the flickering and the shot noise. The reconstructed spectral energy distribution, poorly monitored at high energies, is preliminarily parameterised with a synchrotron-self Compton description. The smooth synchrotron continuum, peaked in the near-IR-optical bands, strengthens the hypothesis that this source could be an intermediate blazar. Moreover the intense flux in millimetre bands, and the optical and X-ray brightness, might suggest a possible detectable gamma-ray emission.

  10. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  11. A populous intermediate-age open cluster and evidence of an embedded cluster among the FSR globular cluster candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bica, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    We study the nature of the globular cluster (GC) candidates FSR 1603 and FSR 1755 selected from the catalogue of \\citet{FSRcat}. Their properties are investigated with 2MASS field-star decontaminated photometry, which is used to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). FSR 1603 has the open cluster (OC) Ruprecht 101 as optical counterpart, and we show it to be a massive intermediate age cluster (IAC). Relevant parameters of FSR 1603 are the age $\\approx1$ Gyr, distance from the Sun $\\ds\\approx2.7$ kpc, Galactocentric distance $\\dgc\\approx6.4$ kpc, core radius $\\rc\\approx1.1$ pc, mass function slope $\\chi\\approx1.8$, observed stellar mass (for stars with mass in the range $\\rm 1.27 \\ms\\leq m\\leq2.03 \\ms$) $\\mObs\\approx500 \\ms$, and a total (extrapolated to $\\rm m=0.08 \\ms$) stellar mass $\\mTot\\approx2300 \\ms$. FSR 1755, on the other hand, is not a populous cluster. It may be a sparse young cluster embedded in the H II region Sh2-3, subject to an absorption $\\aV\\approx...

  12. Physical and Mathematical Properties of a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Intermediate Complexity of the Mid-Latitudes Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio Lucarini; Antonio Speranza; Renato VItolo

    2005-11-24

    A quasi-geostrophic intermediate complexity model is considered, providing a schematic representation of the baroclinic conversion processes which characterize the physics of the mid-latitudes atmospheric circulation. The model is relaxed towards a given latitudinal temperature profile, which acts as baroclinic forcing, controlled by a parameter TE determining the forced equator-to-pole temperature gradient. As TE increases, a transition takes place from a stationary regime to a periodic regime, and eventually to an earth-like chaotic regime where evolution takes place on a strange attractor. The dependence of the attractor dimension, metric entropy, and bounding box volume in phase space is studied by varying both TE and model resolution. The statistical properties of observables having physical relevance, namely the total energy of the system and the latitudinally averaged zonal wind, are also examined. It is emphasized that while the attractor's properties are quite sensitive to model resolution, the global physical observables depend less critically on it. For more detailed physical observables, such as the latitudinal profiles of the zonal wind, model resolution again may be critical: the effectiveness of the zonal wind convergence, acting as barotropic stabilization of the baroclinic waves, heavily relies on the details of the latitudinal structure of the fields. The necessity and complementarity of both the dynamical systems and physical approach is underlined.

  13. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  14. Dynamical effects of spin-dependent interactions in low- and intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Shen, Wen-Qing; Xia, Yin

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that non-central nuclear forces, such as the spin-orbital coupling and the tensor force, play important roles in understanding many interesting features of nuclear structures. However, their dynamical effects in nuclear reactions are poorly known since only the spin-averaged observables are normally studied both experimentally and theoretically. Realizing that spin-sensitive observables in nuclear reactions may carry useful information about the in-medium properties of non-central nuclear interactions, besides earlier studies using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach to understand effects of spin-orbital coupling on the threshold energy and spin polarization in fusion reactions, some efforts have been made recently to explore dynamical effects of non-central nuclear forces in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions using transport models. The focuses of these studies have been on investigating signatures of the density and isospin dependence of the form factor in the spin-dependent sing...

  15. Essays on financial intermediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Javed

    2011-01-01

    investors in leveraged buyouts are skilled in acquisitions,on acquirers in leveraged buyouts (“LBO”s), who are likelythe transaction is a leveraged buyout. I present regression

  16. Essays on financial intermediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Javed

    2011-01-01

    M. , 2009, “Bank loan supply, lender choice, and corporateto competition from private lenders. I model a monopolisticof competition from private lenders. With competition from

  17. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGP Related Links

  18. Medicine Lodge Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING Release date: ToddMedical6

  19. Meeker Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING Release date: ToddMedical6Medicine

  20. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01

    This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

  1. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  2. Early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift observed with Hubble space telescope WFC3: perspectives on recent star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Ryan, Russell E. Jr.; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish P.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of the stellar populations of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) with spectroscopic redshifts (0.35 ? z ? 1.5) from observations in the Early Release Science program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We fit one- and two-component synthetic stellar models to the ETGs UV-optical-near-IR spectral energy distributions and find that a large fraction (?40%) are likely to have experienced a minor (f{sub YC} ? 10% of stellar mass) burst of recent (t{sub YC} ? 1 Gyr) star formation. The measured age and mass fraction of the young stellar populations do not strongly trend with measurements of galaxy morphology. We note that massive (M > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?}) recent star-forming ETGs appear to have larger sizes. Furthermore, high-mass, quiescent ETGs identified with likely companions populate a distinct region in the size-mass parameter space, in comparison with the distribution of massive ETGs with evidence of recent star formation (RSF). We conclude that both mechanisms of quenching star formation in disk-like ETGs and (gas-rich, minor) merger activity contribute to the formation of young stars and the size-mass evolution of intermediate redshift ETGs. The number of ETGs for which we have both HST WFC3 panchromatic (especially UV) imaging and spectroscopically confirmed redshifts is relatively small, therefore, a conclusion about the relative roles of both of these mechanisms remains an open question.

  3. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and ?-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solvedmore »NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.« less

  4. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formationmore »of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.« less

  5. Probing the HHH vertex in e+e-, e-gamma and gamma-gamma collisions for light and intermediate Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Ilyin; T. Kaneko; Y. Kurihara; A. E. Pukhov; Y. Shimizu

    1995-06-14

    We have studied double Higgs production at future linear colliders while paying special attention to the option of high-energy and high-luminosity photon beams. The main purpose was to examine the feasibility of e+e-, e-gamma and gamma-gamma colliders in order to probe the anomalous triple Higgs coupling, which is crucial for understanding the Standard Model. We considered mainly the cases of light and intermediate Higgs bosons. Double Higgs production is almost background free, except in the MH=MZ mass range, which is discussed separately. It is shown that for a light Higgs boson the HHH coupling can be measured even at e+e- collider at 500 GeV. For a intermediate Higgs boson a collider in the TeV region is suitable for such an investigation. We have estimated the bounds on the anomalous HHH coupling, which can be experimentally established using future linear colliders.

  6. HUD (Housing and Urban Development) Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2 (1989 edition). Solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1 were developed to provide a sound technical basis for housing under numerous programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These Intermediate Minimum Property Standards for Solar Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems are intended to provide a companion technical basis for the planning and design of solar heating and domestic hot water systems. These standards have been prepared as a supplement to the Minimum Property Standards (MPS) and deal only with aspects of planning and design that are different from conventional housing by reason of the solar systems under consideration. The document contains requirements and standards applicable to one- and two-family dwellings, multifamily housing, and nursing homes and intermediate care facilities references made in the text to the MPS refer to the same section in the Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1.

  7. Highly stable and efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices with intermediate connectors using lithium amide as n-type dopant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dong-Ying; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Aziz, Hany E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-25

    In this work, we report thermally decomposable lithium amide (LiNH{sub 2}) feasible to function as an effective n-type dopant for intermediate connectors in tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Metallic lithium, which is released from the decomposition process of LiNH{sub 2}, is proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and responsible for n-type electrical doping of electron transporting materials. We demonstrate that tandem OLEDs using LiNH{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as n-type dopants, respectively, give a comparable electroluminescence efficiency and, moreover, the device with LiNH{sub 2} has far longer operational lifetime. The results therefore highlight the significance of selecting suitable n-type dopant in intermediate connectors to fabricate high-stability tandem OLEDs.

  8. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

  9. The transition phase in Nova Muscae 1998, the dust formation in classical novae and a possible link to intermediate polar systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Retter; W. Liller; G. Garradd

    1999-05-28

    We present results of continuous CCD photometry of Nova Muscae 1998 during 17 nights obtained mainly during the transition phase in the light curve of the young nova. We discovered a periodical oscillation with the period 0.16930 day. This result is important for understanding this peculiar stage in the light curve of certain classical novae. We also note a possible connection between the transition / dust phase in nova light curves and intermediate polar systems.

  10. Intermediate Mass Fragment Emission in ${^{32}}$S +${^{51}}$V, ${^{109}}$Ag, and ${^{238}}$U Collisions at E~=~31.6~MeV~A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machner, H; Palarczyk, M; Kutsarova, T

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate mass fragment emission for reactions of $^{32}\\text{S} +\\,^{51}\\text{V},\\,^{109}$Ag, and $^{238}\\text{U}$ has been studied. Double differential cross sections were analysed in terms of the generalised moving source model yielding charge distributions. Isotope ratios show strong fragment mass dependencies. The data were successfully reproduced by the coalescence model as well as by statistical multifragmentation model calculations. Quantum molecular dynamics model calculations were not so successful.

  11. Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors and intermediate products formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

    2012-12-04

    Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

  12. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  13. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  14. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  15. Fuel-Specific Influences on the Composition of Reaction Intermediates in Premixed Flames of Three C5H10O2 Ester Isomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, B.; Cool, T. A.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Hansen, N.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the composition of reaction intermediates in low-pressure premixed flat flames of three simple esters, the methyl butanoate (MB), methyl isobutanoate (MIB), and ethyl propanoate (EP) isomers of C{sub 5}H{sub 10}O{sub 2}, enable further refinement and validation of a detailed chemical reaction mechanism originally developed in modeling studies of similar flames of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate, and ethyl acetate. Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS), using monochromated synchrotron radiation, reveals significant differences in the compositions of key reaction intermediates between flames of the MB, MIB, and EP isomers studied under identical flame conditions. Detailed kinetic modeling describes how these differences are related to molecular structures of each of these isomers, leading to unique fuel destruction pathways. Despite the simple structures of these small esters, they contain structural functional groups expected to account for fuel-specific effects observed in the combustion of practical biodiesel fuels. The good agreement between experimental measurements and detailed reaction mechanisms applicable to these simple esters demonstrates that major features of each flame can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by building a hierarchical reaction mechanism based on three factors: (1) unimolecular decomposition of the fuel, especially by complex bond fission; (2) H-atom abstraction reactions followed by ?-scission of the resulting radicals, leading to nearly all of the intermediate species observed in each flame; (3) the rates of H-atom abstraction reactions for each alkoxy or alkyl group (i.e., methoxy, ethoxy, methyl, ethyl, propyl) are effectively the same as in other ester fuels with the same structural groups.

  16. Housing standards: change to HUD 4930. 2 Intermediate Minimum Property Standard (IMPS) supplement for solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-17

    This rule is made to provide an updating, clarification, and improvement of requirements contained in HUD Handbook 4930.2, Intermediate Minimum Property Standards (IMPS) Supplement concerning solar heating and domestic hot water systems. Changes pertain to fire protection, penetration, roof covering, conditions of use, thermal stability, rain resistance, ultraviolet stability, and compatibility with transfer medium. Additional changes cover applicable standards, labeling, flash point, chemical and physical commpatibility, flame spread classification, lightening protection, and parts of a solar energy system. Altogether, there are over 50 changes, some of which apply to tables and worksheets. Footnotes are included.

  17. Understanding the Role of Histidine in the GHSxG Acyltransferase Active Site Motif: Evidence for Histidine Stabilization of the Malonyl-Enzyme Intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poust, S; Yoon, I; Adams, PD; Katz, L; Petzold, CJ; Keasling, JD

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. The ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-like subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.

  18. Evolution, nucleosynthesis and yields of AGB stars at different metallicities (III): intermediate mass models, revised low mass models and the ph-FRUITY interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristallo, S; Piersanti, L; Gobrecht, D

    2015-01-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate mass AGB stars (4.0, 5.0 and, 6.0 Msun) at different metallicities (-2.15database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the Main Sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. The latter is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, then, Thermal Pulses are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it to deeply penetrate the radiative underlying layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy elements nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the \

  19. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; Katz, Leonard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-likemore »subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.« less

  20. Electron-impact excitation of Fe{sup 2+}: A comparison of intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit-Pauli and Dirac R-matrix calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badnell, N. R.; Ballance, C. P.

    2014-04-20

    Modeling the spectral emission of low-charge iron group ions enables the diagnostic determination of the local physical conditions of many cool plasma environments such as those found in H II regions, planetary nebulae, active galactic nuclei, etc. Electron-impact excitation drives the population of the emitting levels and, hence, their emissivities. By carrying-out Breit-Pauli and intermediate coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculations for the electron-impact excitation of Fe{sup 2+}, which both use the exact same atomic structure and the same close-coupling expansion, we demonstrate the validity of the application of the powerful ICFT method to low-charge iron group ions. This is in contradiction to the finding of Bautista et al., who carried-out ICFT and Dirac R-matrix calculations for the same ion. We discuss possible reasons.

  1. Simulation of quantum dots size and spacing effect for intermediate band solar cell application based on InAs quantum dots arrangement in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendra, P. I. B. Rahayu, F. Darma, Y.

    2014-03-24

    Intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) has become a promising technology in increasing solar cell efficiency. In this work we compare absorption coefficient profile between InAs quantum dots with GaAs bulk. We calculate the efficiency of GaAs bulk and GaAs doped with 2, 5, and 10 nm InAs quantum dot. Effective distances in quantum dot arrangement based on electron tunneling consideration were also calculated. We presented a simple calculation method with low computing power demand. Results showed that arrangement of quantum dot InAs in GaAs can increase solar cell efficiency from 23.9 % initially up to 60.4%. The effective distance between two quantum dots was found 2 nm in order to give adequate distance to prevent electron tunneling and wave functions overlap.

  2. Large-Scale Variability Characterization and Robust Design Techniques for Nanoscale SRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    2.22 Definition of WTV and WTI from measured N-61]. The write trip voltage (WTV) is defined as the voltageillustrates the definitions of WTV and WTI on the N-curve.

  3. Analysis and Modeling of Large-Scale Variation on DACs and SRAMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Henry Arnold

    2013-01-01

    a) Test setups for SVNM and SINM (plus WTV and WTI). (b)SVNM, SINM, WTV, and WTI. . 58as write trip voltage (WTV) while the peak current is

  4. Delivered by Ingenta to: University of Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    under fuel lean condition of engine emissions. Novel NOx storage-reduction catalysts were developed over K2Ti2O5-based catalysts. Keywords: Soot Oxidation, NOx Storage and Reduction, Oxygen Vacancy towards practical application are still going on.2­9 For NOx abatement, the NOx storage and reduction (NSR

  5. Delivered by Ingenta to: hans de raedt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -beam interference, double-slit, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments. Keywords: Computational Techniques, Quantum Optics, Interference, Double-Slit Experiment, EPR-Experiment, Hanbury Brown-Twiss

  6. Delivered by Ingenta to: Southeast University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    University-Gaza, P.O.Box 1277, Gaza, Palestine ABSTRACT The influences of thermal annealing energy intensive with continuous rising of oil prices and the pollution concerns, particularly after would affect the device performance. Thermal annealing of TiO2 film is one of the factors explored

  7. EM Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    more than 8 million square feet of floor space (equivalent to the area of about 200 football fields), efforts continue to characterize equipment for waste disposition and...

  8. Webinar: Delivering Transformational HPC Solutions to Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streitz, Frederick

    2014-04-15

    Dr. Frederick Streitz, director of the High Performance Computing Innovation Center, discusses Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory computational capabilities and expertise available to industry in this webinar.

  9. Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was conducted by Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership and Gas Technology Institute on November 16, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. Meeting objectives included: * Review...

  10. JOHN MAKEPEACE A SPEECH DELIVERED AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seberry, Jennifer

    in the world became operational in 1952 and was heavily used in Radiophysics. The politics surrounding,000 to the Nuclear Re- search foundation \\to help Australia retain its leading, hard won position in the #12;eld Molnar material for one of his best cartoons. From the very beginning the Nuclear Science Foundation saw

  11. Proud to deliver Cardiff City Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    (Wood Street) 520 4 Adam Street 427 20 Rapports 130 2 Central Station Pay and Display 426 20 Quay Street (Westgate Street) 336 4 Greyfriars Road 244 4 Dumfries Place 954 14 Pellet Street 297 4 Page 6 #12;Cardiff

  12. Delivered by Ingenta to: Shanhui Fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    and magnetic permeability tensor in the low frequency limit, it has been recently recognized be realized. 2. THEORY AND NUMERICAL ANALYSIS As a concrete example, we consider the structure depicted

  13. Delivered by Ingenta to: hans de raedt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    algebra suffices to prove inequalities that have the same structure as those of Boole and impose to those of Boole, again by using only linear algebra and the prop- erties of non negative functions Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience Vol. 8, 1011­1039, 2011 Extended Boole

  14. Webinar: Delivering Transformational HPC Solutions to Industry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Streitz, Frederick

    2014-07-22

    Dr. Frederick Streitz, director of the High Performance Computing Innovation Center, discusses Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory computational capabilities and expertise available to industry in this webinar.

  15. Delivered by Ingenta to: IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    optical materials that can convert low energy radiation into higher energy radiation. Recent advances. Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.1. Solar Cells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 6.2. Data Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 6

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan FebYear Jan Feb Mar Apr3,118,592

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan FebYear Jan Feb Mar

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear JanFuel)(Million Cubic

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear JanFuel)(Million Cubic4,778,907 4,782,412

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear JanFuel)(Million Cubic4,778,907

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear JanFuel)(Million Cubic4,778,90727,262

  2. Smart Grid: Creating Jobs while Delivering Reliable,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSlough Heat and PowerSmallfoot, LLC

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO),7F e b r61-£661.loading161,124

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO),7F e b1,683,940

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO),7F e b1,683,940601,355 574,604

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO),7F e b1,683,940601,355

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009 2,851 2,410 2,851 3,8472020,964,665

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009 2,851 2,410 2,851

  9. Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions Liang Fu, C. L. Kane, and E. J. Mele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Charles

    ) effect. Unlike two dimensions, where a single Z2 topological invariant governs the effect, in three (STI) topological insulators. The WTI are like layered 2D QSH states, but are destroyed by disorder will refer to as weak (WTI) and strong (STI) topological insulators. With disorder, the WTI is equivalent

  10. Expression of low-, intermediate-, and high-affinity IL-2 receptors on B cell lines derived from patients with undifferentiated lymphoma of Burkitt's and non-Burkitt's types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, D.; Rosolen, A.; Wormsley, S.B.; DeBault, L.E.; Colamonici, O.R. )

    1990-08-01

    IL-2 receptors on T cells exist in at least three forms which differ in their ligand-binding affinity. The low-affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) consists of the 55-kDa Tac protein (p55 alpha), the intermediate-affinity site corresponds to the 70-kDa molecule (p70 beta), and the high-affinity IL-2R consists of a noncovalent heterodimeric structure involving both p55 alpha and p70 beta. We studied 24 B cell lines (8 EBV-negative and 16 EBV-positive) for IL-2R expression in the presence or absence of the tumor promoter, teleocidin. 125I-IL-2 radioreceptor binding assays and crosslinking studies demonstrated the sole expression of p55 alpha in EBV-negative cell lines only, whereas p55 alpha present in EBV-positive cell lines was always associated with p70 beta to construct high-affinity IL-2R. p70 beta was not detected in any of the EBV-negative cell lines, but was expressed on most of the EBV-positive cell lines (13 of 16). Our data also indicate that the expression of p55 alpha and p70 beta by radiolabeling correlates with their expression in flow cytometry, and that a large excess of p55 alpha is required to construct high-affinity IL-2R. Coexpression of p55 alpha and p70 beta on human B cells contributed to constructing high-affinity IL-2R hybrid complex as shown by rapid association rate contributed by p55 alpha and slow dissociation rate by p70 beta; teleocidin's ability to induce p55 alpha on cell lines which express p70 beta only, resulting in appearance of high-affinity IL-2R; and blocking p55 alpha by anti-Tac mAb in cell lines which constitutively express high-affinity IL-2R eliminated both high- and low-affinity components. The existence of low, intermediate, and high IL-2R on human B cells bears important future implications for understanding the mechanism of IL-2 signaling and the role of IL-2 in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation.

  11. Intermediate Energy Infobook and Intermediate Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    The Teacher Infobook provides fact sheets about energy, the major energy sources, electricity, energy consumption, and energy efficiency and conservation. The background section includes an introduction to energy and details about individual energy sources. There are also sections on global climate change and several detailed fact sheets on electricity and energy consumption and efficiency. The companion student activities book reinforces the general information and facts about the energy sources.

  12. Search for gravitational radiation from intermediate mass black hole binaries in data from the second LIGO-Virgo joint science run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an unmodeled, all-sky search for gravitational waves from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHB). The search was performed on data from the second joint science run of the LIGO and Virgo detectors (July 2009 - October 2010) and was sensitive to IMBHBs with a range up to $\\sim 200$ Mpc, averaged over the possible sky positions and inclinations of the binaries with respect to the line of sight. No significant candidate was found. Upper limits on the coalescence-rate density of non-spinning IMBHBs with total masses between 100 and $450 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ and mass ratios between $0.25$ and $1\\,$ were placed by combining this analysis with an analogous search performed on data from the first LIGO-Virgo joint science run (November 2005 - October 2007). The most stringent limit was set for systems consisting of two $88 \\ \\mbox{M}_{\\odot}$ black holes and is equal to $0.12 \\ \\mbox{Mpc}^{-3} \\ \\mbox{Myr}^{-1}$ at the $90\\%$ confidence level. This paper also presents the first esti...

  13. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  14. Tracing the propagation of cosmic rays in the Milky Way halo with Fermi-LAT observations of high- and intermediate-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibaldo, L

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays up to at least PeV energies are usually described in the framework of an elementary scenario that involves acceleration by objects that are located in the disk of the Milky Way, such as supernova remnants or massive star-forming regions, and then diffusive propagation throughout the Galaxy. Details of the propagation process are so far inferred mainly from the composition of cosmic rays measured near the Earth and then extrapolated to the whole Galaxy. The details of the propagation in the Galactic halo and the escape into the intergalactic medium remain uncertain. The densities of cosmic rays in specific locations can be traced via the gamma rays they produce in inelastic collisions with clouds of interstellar gas. Therefore, we analyze 73 months of Fermi-LAT data from 300 MeV to 10 GeV in the direction of several high- and intermediate-velocity clouds that are located in the halo of the Milky Way. These clouds are supposed to be free of internal sources of cosmic rays and hence any gamma-ray emi...

  15. The Abundance Evolution of Oxygen, Sodium and Magnesium in Extremely Metal-Poor Intermediate Mass Stars: Implications for the Self-Polution Scenario in Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denissenkov, P A

    2003-01-01

    We present full stellar evolution and parametric models of the surface abundance evolution of O16, Ne22, Na23 and the magnesium isotopes in an extremely metal-poor intermediate mass star M_ZAMS=5M_sun, Z=0.0001. O16 and Ne22 are injected into the envelope by the third dredge-up following thermal pulses on the asymptotic giant branch. These species and the initially present Mg24 are depleted by hot bottom burning (HBB) during the interpulse phase. As a result, Na23, Mg25 and Mg26 are enhanced. If the HBB temperatures are sufficiently high for this process to deplete oxygen efficiently, Na23 is first produced and then depleted during the interpulse phase. Although the simultaneous depletion of O16 and enhancement of Na23 is possible, the required fine tuning of the dredge-up and HBB casts some doubt on the robustness of this process as the origin of the O-Na anti-correlation observed in globular cluster stars. However, a very robust prediction of our models are low Mg24/Mg25 and Mg24/Mg26 ratios whenever signif...

  16. The Abundance Evolution of Oxygen, Sodium and Magnesium in Extremely Metal-Poor Intermediate Mass Stars: Implications for the Self-Polution Scenario in Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel A. Denissenkov; Falk Herwig

    2003-05-26

    We present full stellar evolution and parametric models of the surface abundance evolution of O16, Ne22, Na23 and the magnesium isotopes in an extremely metal-poor intermediate mass star M_ZAMS=5M_sun, Z=0.0001. O16 and Ne22 are injected into the envelope by the third dredge-up following thermal pulses on the asymptotic giant branch. These species and the initially present Mg24 are depleted by hot bottom burning (HBB) during the interpulse phase. As a result, Na23, Mg25 and Mg26 are enhanced. If the HBB temperatures are sufficiently high for this process to deplete oxygen efficiently, Na23 is first produced and then depleted during the interpulse phase. Although the simultaneous depletion of O16 and enhancement of Na23 is possible, the required fine tuning of the dredge-up and HBB casts some doubt on the robustness of this process as the origin of the O-Na anti-correlation observed in globular cluster stars. However, a very robust prediction of our models are low Mg24/Mg25 and Mg24/Mg26 ratios whenever significant O16 depletion can be achieved. This seems to be in stark contrast with recent observations of the magnesium isotopic ratios in the globular cluster NGC6752.

  17. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard ? -Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study of Mammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    James, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard ? -keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard ? -keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, includingmore »multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard ? -keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid ? -keratin structure. « less

  18. Spectroscopic study of reaction intermediates and mechanisms in nitramine decomposition and combustion. Final report, 20 March 1992-19 March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacox, M.B.

    1995-05-20

    The infrared spectra of reaction intermediates trapped in solid neon were studied in order to support the development of diagnostics for short-lived species which are reaction carriers in nitramine decomposition and combustion and to derive information about reactions which are important in the condensed-phase decomposition of nitramines. Nitromethane and monomethylnitramine were used as model compounds in these studies. Evidence was obtained for the formation of water complexes with both of these species. The results support the water-catalyzed decomposition mechanism for nitramines that was proposed by Melius. Studies of the photodecomposition of isotopically substituted monomethylnitramine demonstrate that four different groups of products are formed. Tentative spectral assignments are made for the aci-isomer of monomethylnitramine and for CH3NHONO. The final photodecomposition products are CH4, NO, CH3OH, and N20. Other studies have provided evidence for the formation of a weakly bonded complex of H2 with H20, as well as spectral data for the HCC free radical and for the H20+, N02+, NO(2-), and NO(3-), molecular ions.

  19. Revisions included in HUD Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2, 1977 edition: solar heating and domestic hot-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This addendum to a 1977 HUD publication contains revisions and additions to the existing intermediate minimum property standards supplment for solar heating and cooling systems. Building design revisions cover fire protection, penetrations, and roof coverings. Changes to guidelines for materials, such as those for thermal and ultraviolet stability and moisture resistance, are detailed. Flash points of toxic and combustive fluids, chemical and physical compatibility, and flame spread and resistance of insulation materials are also explained. Construction standards were revised for hail loads; waterproofing insulated exterior storage containers, pipes, and ducts; and for passive systems. Standards also were revised for power-operated protection, dust and dirt prevention, and chimney and vent heights. Radiation temperature, draft control, and thermal energy storage and loss standards were deleted. Other standards for insulation values for thermal devices, lighting protection, and sealing and testing air distribution systems were added. Appended materials contain revisions to calculation procedures for determining the thermal performance of active, solar space heating, and domestic hot water systems. A revised materials list for properties of typical cover materials, absorptive coatings, thermal storage unit containers, and heat-transfer liquids is provided. Revisions to acceptable engineering practice standards are also included.

  20. Neutral pion cross section and spin asymmetries at intermediate pseudorapidity in polarized proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; B. Barber; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; W. He; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; P. M. Nord; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; W. Pochron; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2013-12-09

    The differential cross section and spin asymmetries for neutral pions produced within the intermediate pseudorapidity range 0.8 < {\\eta} < 2.0 in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV are presented. Neutral pions were detected using the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter in the STAR detector at RHIC. The cross section was measured over a transverse momentum range of 5 < p_T < 16 GeV/c and is found to be within the scale uncertainty of a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculation. The longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_LL, is measured in the same pseudorapidity range. This quantity is sensitive to the gluonic contribution to the proton spin, {\\Delta}g(x), at low Bjorken-x (down to x approx 0.01), where it is less constrained by measurements at central pseudorapidity. The measured A_LL is consistent with model predictions. The parity-violating asymmetry, A_L, is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. The transverse single-spin asymmetry, A_N, is measured within a previously unexplored kinematic range in Feynman-x and p_T. Such measurements may aid our understanding of the on-set and kinematic dependence of the large asymmetries observed at more forward pseudorapidity ({\\eta} approx 3) and their underlying mechanisms. The A_N results presented are consistent with a twist-3 model prediction of a small asymmetry within the present kinematic range.

  1. The structure of disks around intermediate-mass young stars from mid-infrared interferometry. Evidence for a population of group II disks with gaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menu, J; Henning, Th; Leinert, Ch; Waelkens, C; Waters, L B F M

    2015-01-01

    The disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars are commonly divided into group I and group II based on their far-infrared spectral energy distribution, and the common interpretation for that is flared and flat disks. Recent observations suggest that many flaring disks have gaps, whereas flat disks are thought to be gapless. The different groups of objects can be expected to have different structural signatures in high-angular-resolution data. Over the past 10 years, the MIDI instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer has collected observations of several tens of protoplanetary disks. We model the large set of observations with simple geometric models. A population of radiative-transfer models is synthesized for interpreting the mid-infrared signatures. Objects with similar luminosities show very different disk sizes in the mid-infrared. Restricting to the young objects of intermediate mass, we confirm that most group I disks are in agreement with being transitional. We find that several group II objects have ...

  2. Comparison of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water formation rates in the South Pacific between NCAR-CCSM4 and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Fine, Rana A.; Kamenkovich, Igor; Sloyan, Bernadette M.

    2014-01-28

    Average formation rates for Subantarctic Mode (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) in the South Pacific are calculated from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 4 (NCAR-CCSM4), using chlorofluorocarbon inventories. CFC-12 inventories and formation rates are compared to ocean observations. CCSM4 accurately simulates the southeast Pacific as the main formation region for SAMW and AAIW. CCSM4 formation rates for SAMW are 3.4 Sv, about half of the observational rate. Shallow mixed layers and a thinner SAMW in CCSM4 are responsible for lower formation rates. A formation rate of 8.1 Sv for AAIW in CCSM4 is higher than observations. Higher inventories in CCSM4 in the southwest and central Pacific, and higher surface concentrations are the main reasons for higher formation rates of AAIW. This comparison of model and observations is useful for understanding the uptake and transport of other gases, e.g., CO2 by the model.

  3. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2011-01-01

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  4. THE CENTRAL ENGINES OF TWO UNUSUAL RADIO-INTERMEDIATE/QUIET ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: III Zw 2 AND PG 1407+265

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Liang; Cao Xinwu; Bai, J. M. E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-04-01

    We use the accretion disk/corona+jet model to fit the multi-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of two unusual radio-intermediate/quiet quasars. It is found that the optical/UV emission of III Zw 2 is probably dominated by the emission from the accretion disk. The X-ray emission should be dominated by the radiation from the jet, while the contribution of the disk corona is negligible. The optical/UV component in the SED of PG 1407+265 can be well modeled as the emission from the accretion disk, while the IR component is attributed to the thermal radiation from the dust torus with an opening angle of {approx}50 Degree-Sign . If the X-ray continuum emission is dominated by the synchrotron emission of the jet, the source should be a 'high peak frequency blazar', which obviously deviates from the normal blazar sequence. The observed SED can also be fitted quite well by the accretion disk/corona model with the viscosity parameter {alpha} = 0.5. The spectrum of the accretion disk/corona in PG 1407+265 satisfies the weak-line quasar criterion suggested in Laor and Davis.

  5. Re-processing the Hipparcos Transit Data and Intermediate Astrometric Data of spectroscopic binaries; 1, Ba, CH and Tc-poor S stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Jorissen, Alain

    2000-01-01

    The Intermediate Astrometric Data (IAD) and Transit Data (TD) made available by ESA after the Hipparcos mission make it possible to re-process the observations of any Hipparcos entry. This paper illustrates how TD and IAD may be used in conjunction with the orbital parameters of spectroscopic binaries to improve the astrometric parameters of binaries considered as single stars in the original reduction process. That approach has been applied to 81 dwarf barium stars, strong and mild barium stars, CH stars, and Tc-poor S stars for which spectroscopic orbits became available recently. Among these 81 systems, 23 yield reliable astrometric orbits, thus making it possible to evaluate on real data the impact of an unrecognized orbital motion on the proper motion (Wielen, 1997, A&A 325, 367). Comparison of the proper motion from the Hipparcos catalogue with that re-derived in the present work indicates that the former are indeed far off the present value for binaries with periods in the range 3 to about 8 years....

  6. The X-ray spectra and spectral variability of intermediate type Seyfert galaxies: ASCA observations of NGC 4388 and ESO 103-G35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Forster; Karen M. Leighly; Laura E. Kay

    1999-03-28

    The X-ray spectra of two intermediate type Seyfert galaxies are investigated using ASCA observations separated by more than a year. Both NGC 4388 and ESO 103-G35 exhibit strong, narrow Fe K alpha line emission and absorption by cold neutral gas with a column density ~ 10^23 cm^-2, characteristic of the X-ray spectra of type 2 Seyfert galaxies. The power law continuum flux has changed by a factor of 2 over a time-scale of ~ 2 years for both objects, declining in the case of NGC 4388 and rising in ESO 103-G35. No variation was observed in the equivalent width of the Fe K alpha line in the spectra of NGC 4388, implying that the line flux declined with the continuum. We find that the strength of the line cannot be accounted for by fluorescence in line-of-sight material with the measured column density unless a `leaky-absorber' model of the type favored for IRAS 04575-7537 is employed. The equivalent width of the Fe K alpha emission line is seen to decrease between the observations of ESO 103-G35 while the continuum flux increased. The 1996 observation of ESO 103-G35 can also be fitted with an absorption edge at 7.4 $\\pm$ 0.2 keV due to partially ionized iron, and when an ionized absorber model is fitted to the data it is found that the equivalent column of neutral hydrogen rises to 3.5 x 10^23 cm^-2. The Fe K alpha line flux can be accounted by fluorescence in this material alone and this model is also a good representation of the 1988 and 1991 Ginga observations. There is then no requirement for a reflection component in the ASCA spectra of ESO 103-G35 or NGC 4388.

  7. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]{sup +} (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reineri, F.; Aime, S.; Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C.

    2014-03-07

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained.

  8. New Solicitation Supports U.S. Innovation with Renewable Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    intermediate fuel feedstocks that can be delivered to and integrated into existing oil petroleum refineries. Waste-to-Energy: This area focuses on projects harnessing waste...

  9. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Schaidle, Josh; Biddy, Mary; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to DME, which is subsequently converted via homologation reactions to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon products.

  10. ARE Update Volume 11, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Wit, Joeri; Smith, Aaron; Kovacs, Kent; Simon, Leo K.; Stratton, Susan

    2008-01-01

    describes how the crude oil prices reported in the mediarelates to world crude oil prices and California gasolinebetween WTI and Brent crude oil prices. Brent crude is

  11. Department Liaison email Liaison Phone Liaison Name Dept # Intermediate Unit Name Major Unit eLC Course Name 4-H and Youth abone@uga.edu 706-484-2859 Angela Bone 359 COLLEGE OF AGRIC & ENVIRON SCI AG Public Service & Outreach Ag Public Service & Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Department Liaison email Liaison Phone Liaison Name Dept # Intermediate Unit Name Major Unit e ACADEMIC PLANNING cgchrist@uga.edu (706) 425-3183 Connie Christian 18 SR VP ACADEMIC AFFAIRS UNITS SR VP & Administration ADMISSIONS OFFICE scl@uga.edu (706) 542-8726 Sondra Lange 141 VP FOR INSTRUCTION UNITS VP

  12. VOLUME 76, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 MAY 1996 Current-Loop Model for the Intermediate State of Type-I Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    currents encircling each region and the superconductor-normal surface energy. The energy of a set-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model [6] yield a free-boundary dynamics of superconductor-normal (S-N) interfaces nearly for the Intermediate State of Type-I Superconductors Raymond E. Goldstein,1 David P. Jackson,1, * Alan T. Dorsey2 1

  13. Raven and the Center of Maffei 1: Multi-Object Adaptive Optics Observations of the Center of a Nearby Elliptical Galaxy and the Detection of an Intermediate Age Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidge, T J; Lardiere, O; Bradley, C; Blain, C; Oya, S; Akiyama, M; Ono, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectra that have an angular resolution of ~ 0.15 arcsec are used to examine the stellar content of the central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. The spectra were recorded at the Subaru Telescope, with wavefront distortions corrected by the RAVEN Multi-Object Adaptive Optics science demonstrator. The Ballick-Ramsey C_2 absorption bandhead near 1.76 microns is detected, and models in which 10 - 20% of the light near 1.8 microns originates from stars of spectral type C5 reproduce this feature. Archival NIR and mid-infrared images are also used to probe the structural and photometric properties of the galaxy. Comparisons with models suggest that an intermediate age population dominates the spectral energy distribution between 1 and 5 microns near the galaxy center. This is consistent not only with the presence of C stars, but also with the large HBeta index that has been measured previously for Maffei 1. The J-K color is more-or-less constant within 15 arcsec of the galaxy cen...

  14. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect ImagingDirect

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect

  16. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirect Kinetic

  17. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirect

  18. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirectDirect

  19. Reverse osmosis desalination with osmotic polyelectrolyte intermediate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Thomas Theodore

    1967-01-01

    by Loeb (27, 29) is the most promising membrane produced to date for reverse osmosis desalination. For production of potable water from saline water a salt rejection of 98. 6 per cent is necessary (15). In ac- tual pra-t. i. ce a greater salt... in comparison to a conventional reverse osmoti- cell with the same water flux. CHAP TER I I SURVEY OF THE LTTERATURE Research on desalination by reverse. osmotic means i. s a relatively new area of study. Most of the work in this field has been done...

  20. Electrochemical Cells with Intermediate Capacitor Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebel, Haim

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to electronically regulate electrochemical cells. For this, we introduced a third element, called the gate, which was placed between the cathode and the anode electrodes of the cell. Voltage applied to this element controlled the local potential of the electrolyte, thus impacting the flow of ions within the cell. The flow of ions was monitored by the electronic current in the external cell's circuit. We provide simulations and experimental data as proof to the validity of this concept. This is but the first step towards a demonstration of a two-dimensional, bi-carrier ion transistors.