National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for intermediate wti delivered

  1. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  2. A technical look at the WTI incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    EPA has granted Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) temporary authorization to burn hazardous waste in its new incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio. The approval is based on preliminary data showing that the incinerator was able to meet EPA`s emission standards for dioxins and furans in tests run this summer. WTI is allowed to continue burning waste pending final evaluation of its March 1993 performance tests. The action marks yet another hurdle cleared by WTI in its 11-year effort to construct and operate a commercial hazardous waste incinerator. The facility`s long-standing predicament as a target for environmental and public interest groups has made it the subject of numerous lawsuits and many legal reviews. In this article, however, we focus on the technical aspects of the system. The WTI incinerator is described in {open_quotes}Performance Testing of a Rotary Kiln Incinerator,{close_quotes} a paper by Alfred Sigg of Von Roll, Incorporated (Norcross, Georgia). The paper was presented at the 1993 Incineration Conference, which was held in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 3-7, 1993. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_past_wti.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 - September 2016 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2015 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 Jan 2016 Jul 2016 Jan 2017 Jul 2017 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2015 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 Jan 2016 Jul 2016 Jan 2017 Jul 2017 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2015

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2009_2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    09 - December 2010 January 2009 December 2010 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2009 $180 $200 $120 $140 $160 $80 $100 $120 $20 $40 $60 $0 $20 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2011 2011 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2011_2012.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 - December 2012 January 2011 December 2012 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 1 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul Jan Jul 2 2010 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2011 $250 $150 $200 $100 $150 $50 $0 Jan

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - uncertainty_wti_2013_2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 - December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2013 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2012 Jul 2012 Jan 2013 Jul 2013 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2013 $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 $140 $160 $180 $200 Jan 2012 Jul 2012 Jan 2013 Jul 2013 Jan 2014 Jul 2014 Jan 2015 Jul 2015 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2013 $0

  8. Influence of target structure on film stress in WTi sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, C.F.; Wang, H.; Gilman, P.

    1998-12-31

    In this report, the effect of sputtering target microstructure on the deposited film stress was investigated. By controlling the metallurgical process, two types of W-10wt%Ti target constituents, namely single-phase and multiple-phase WTi, were prepared. The former one was composed of W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phase only, the latter one was with W, W-rich ({beta}Ti,W) and Ti-rich ({beta}Ti,W) phases. The stress of the films deposited on 12.7 cm diameter silicon oxide wafers from the single-phase target tends to be more compressive than that from the multiple-phase target. By increasing wafer temperature, the compressive stress was linearly decreased. In addition, the level of film stress was also affected by the film thickness and other sputtering parameters. To understand the causes for the differences in film stress between the multiple-phase and single-phase derived films, an evaluation of the film structure using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and mechanical testing using a nano-indentation instrument were performed. Finer domains with denser laminar structure were observed on the films deposited from the single-phase target. However, no significant difference in mechanical properties was found between these two from the nano-indentation measurements. It is envisioned that the more uniform solid solution between the W and Ti in the films obtained by sputtering the single-phase targets generates a higher compressive stress when deposited on the silicon oxide wafers resulting in a higher compressive stress.

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  10. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility James Preciado October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES October 2012 James

  11. Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  13. Delivering safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, N.D.; Spooner, K.G.; Walkden, P.

    2007-07-01

    In the United Kingdom there have been significant recent changes to the management of civil nuclear liabilities. With the formation in April 2005 of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), ownership of the civil nuclear licensed sites in the UK, including the Magnox Reactor Stations, passed to this new organisation. The NDAs mission is to seek acceleration of the nuclear clean up programme and deliver increased value for money and, consequently, are driving their contractors to seek more innovative ways of performing work. British Nuclear Group manages the UK Magnox stations under contract to the NDA. This paper summarises the approach being taken within its Reactor Sites business to work with suppliers to enhance working arrangements at sites, improve the delivery of decommissioning programmes and deliver improvements in safety and environmental performance. The UK Magnox stations are 1. generation gas-graphite reactors, constructed in the 1950's and 1960's. Two stations are currently still operating, three are shut-down undergoing defueling and the other five are being decommissioned. Despite the distractions of industry restructuring, an uncompromising policy of demanding improved performance in conjunction with improved safety and environmental standards has been adopted. Over the past 5 years, this policy has resulted in step-changes in performance at Reactor Sites, with increased electrical output and accelerated defueling and decommissioning. The improvements in performance have been mirrored by improvements in safety (DACR of 0 at 5 sites); environmental standards (reductions in energy and water consumption, increased waste recycling) and the overall health of the workforce (20% reduction in sickness absence). These achievements have, in turn, been recognised by external bodies, resulting in several awards, including: the world's first ISRS and IERS level 10 awards (Sizewell, 2006), the NUMEX plant maintenance award (Bradwell, 2006), numerous Ro

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

  15. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  16. Report on the US EPA technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk assessment issues. Held in Washington, DC on January 11, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This report presents information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA`s Risk Assessment Forum for Region 5 and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The subject of the peer review was a draft document prepared by Region 5 assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. This report summarizes the discussions that took place at the peer review workshop. The report opens with an overview of the workshop and a history of EPA`s WTI incinerator risk assessment activities (section 1), then presents the chairperson`s summary (section 2) and the five work group chairs` summaries (section 3). The body of the report ends with highlights of the peer reviewers` preliminary comments and of the comments offered by workshop observers (section 4).

  17. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

  18. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

  19. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

  20. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermediate Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  1. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  2. Delivering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The four organizations are Bechtel National, Inc., the University of California, The Babcock & Wilcox Company, and URS Corporation. Our combined record of accomplishments and ...

  3. Early Edison Users Deliver Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Edison Users Deliver Results Early Edison Users Deliver Results January 31, 2014 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 Before any supercomputer is accepted at NERSC, scientists are invited to put the system through its paces during an "early science" phase. While the main aim of this period is to test the new system, many scientists are able to use the time to significantly advance their work. (»Related story: "Edison Electrifies Scientific

  4. Intermediate future forecasting system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gass, S.I.; Murphy, F.H.; Shaw, S.H.

    1983-12-01

    The purposes of the Symposium on the Department of Energy's Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) were: (1) to present to the energy community details of DOE's new energy market model IFFS; and (2) to have an open forum in which IFFS and its major elements could be reviewed and critiqued by external experts. DOE speakers discussed the total system, its software design, and the modeling aspects of oil and gas supply, refineries, electric utilities, coal, and the energy economy. Invited experts critiqued each of these topics and offered suggestions for modifications and improvement. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the Symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. Intermediate Energy Activation File - 2001.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-08-21

    Version 00 The IEAF-2001 activation library is suitable for activation analyses in fusion technology and intermediate energy applications such as the IFMIF D-Li neutron source.

  6. Maine Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet)...

  7. Table 1. Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode" "Year","Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)","Average Delivered Cost...

  8. North Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million...

  9. Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost ...

  10. AMO Director Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring Meeting AMO Director Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring Meeting June 29, 2016 - 4:40pm Addthis AMO ...

  11. New York Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New York ... Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others New York Natural ...

  12. New Jersey Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New ... Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others New Jersey Natural ...

  13. New Mexico Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New ... Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others New Mexico Natural ...

  14. Kansas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet)...

  15. New Hampshire Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million ...

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota ... Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others Minnesota Natural ...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and Testing Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and Testing Ethanol can be combined with gasoline in blends ...

  18. STATEMENT OF GUY CARUSO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices in December 2015 calculated for the current STEO ranges from 32barrel (b) to 97b. In EIA's latest monthly outlook, WTI prices in 2015 and ...

  19. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodson, S.A. (JHU)

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  20. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  1. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    663 DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity Not for the Birds l o S a l a m o S N a T i o N a l l a B o r a T o r y loS alamoS SCieNCe aND TeChNology magaziNe may 2007 1 663 From Terry Wallace About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. Located on

  2. New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach July 30, 2010 - 3:13pm Addthis Metal halide light fixtures at Pompey Park are...

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Tractors Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner Delivers Goods in Illinois With Natural Gas Tractors on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Foodliner

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane-Powered Trucks Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service Delivers With Propane-Powered Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Schwan's Home Service

  5. Working With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With PNNL Mentorees, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  6. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  7. AMO Director Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting | Department of Energy Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring Meeting AMO Director Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring Meeting June 29, 2016 - 4:40pm Addthis AMO Director Delivers Keynote at Copper Development Association Spring Meeting Industry plays a large role in the work that the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) undertakes. The relationship between AMO, academia, national labs, and industry partners is symbiotic - we each bring

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  9. Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geophysical monitoring of foam used to ...

  10. Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to ...

  11. New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Electricity Advisory Committee Reports Delivered to the Department of Energy November 1, 2011 - 9:50am Addthis The Electricity Advisory Committee approved three new reports at ...

  12. Recovery Act Investment Wraps Up, Delivering Major Benefits to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivering Major Benefits to the Nation October 5, 2015 - 3:21pm Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  13. Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 ...

  14. "Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2...

  15. President Eisenhower Delivers Atoms for Peace Speech | National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eisenhower Delivers Atoms for Peace Speech | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  16. Famur delivers longwall system to Russian coal mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-08-15

    The first complete Polish longwall system that was recently delivered to Russia for mining coal seams with a thickness exceeding 5 m is described. 2 photos.

  17. Secretary Moniz to Deliver Keynote at Washington Auto Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, January 22, 2014, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will deliver the government keynote address at the Washington Auto Show’s Public Policy Day.

  18. Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Minnesota Price of ... Referring Pages: Average Residential Price Minnesota Natural Gas Prices Average ...

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  20. "Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,20...

  1. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Local Distributor Companies (Dollars per ...

  2. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  3. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print Wednesday, 27 July 2005 00:00 For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With

  4. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantities. Because Criegee intermediates have long been thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry, the announcement of a method to directly measure their reactivity...

  5. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    output, high-concentration intermediates, and major products. However, for improving combustion efficiency and controlling pollution, it is necessary to understand flame...

  6. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  7. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 ...

  10. First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    owned wind farm in the country and will provide approximately 60 percent of the average annual electricity need for the Pantex Plant. First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex

  11. Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research | Department of Energy Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research This expert meeting was conducted by Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership and Gas Technology Institute on November 16, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. Meeting objectives included: * Review Building America's

  12. Energy Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to Strengthen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America's Clean Energy Innovation | Department of Energy Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to Strengthen America's Clean Energy Innovation Energy Systems Integration Facility Delivering on Promise to Strengthen America's Clean Energy Innovation September 11, 2015 - 1:42pm Addthis NREL Senior Engineering Project Manager, Pat Moriarty, left and NREL Senior Engineer , Paul Fleming, review velocity (blue) and turbulence (yellow) in a simulation of the Lillgrund Wind Farm in

  13. First Trinity supercomputer test beds delivered to Los Alamos, Sandia |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) First Trinity supercomputer test beds delivered to Los Alamos, Sandia Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 1:41pm NNSA Blog Staff at Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories welcomed the first hardware delivery for NNSA's next generation supercomputer, called Trinity. Test beds for Trinity were delivered (two to Los Alamos and one to Sandia) as part of the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) collaboration. Trinity came out of

  14. Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Entrepreneurs | Department of Energy Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for Entrepreneurs Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for Entrepreneurs November 17, 2011 - 1:59pm Addthis DEP Shape Memory Therapeutics, Inc. is working to treat aneurysms with exclusively licensed LLNL-developed polymer materials that "remember" their shape. LLNL is a leader in the development of shape memory polymers, for use in medical

  15. Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications On November 16, 2009, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Fuel Cell Partnership conducted a workshop on near-term applications of renewable hydrogen. Held in Palm Springs, California, the workshop consisted of several presentations in addition to a special show-and-tell session on hydrogen systems analysis models.

  16. Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Benefit to U.S. | Department of Energy Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering Economic Benefit to U.S. Portsmouth, Paducah Project Leaps Past Shipment Milestone, Delivering Economic Benefit to U.S. September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are railcars carrying tanks of hydrofluoric acid for shipment from the Portsmouth site to Solvay Fluorides for industrial use. Pictured here are railcars carrying tanks of hydrofluoric acid for shipment from

  17. 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 2005 | Department of Energy 5 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 2005 CHP Action Agenda: Innovating, Advocating, and Delivering Solutions, October 2005 More than five years since the CHP Challenge and Industry Roadmap was released, this document is intended to provide the situational context in which the annual roadmap workshop will set its priorities for the upcoming year and complete its goals. 2005_nyc.pdf (449.69 KB) More Documents

  18. Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety April 2, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air

  19. Working With PNNL Mentors, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Safeguards Fixtures | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Working With PNNL Mentors, Engineering Students Deliver Prototype Safeguards Fixtures Friday, December 18, 2015 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Earlier this month, Washington State University mechanical engineering students delivered two prototypes developed as part of their senior design projects to their Pacific Northwest National Laboratory mentors. The design projects were supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative

  20. Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications Agenda for the Delvering Renewable Hydrogen Workshop held Nov. 16, 2010, in Palm Springs, CA renewable_hydrogen_workshop_nov16_agenda.pdf (80.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Agenda

  1. Pantexans deliver 'sunshine' to single parents | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) deliver 'sunshine' to single parents Friday, December 11, 2015 - 4:47pm NNSA Blog Pantexans Caleb Rejino, left, and Danny Caverly, right, and Colin Caverly, Caverly's son deliver meals to the Eveline Rivers Sunshine Cottages in Amarillo. A team of Pantex volunteers provided support to families in the Eveline Rivers' Sunshine Cottages to put healthy meals on the table while the single parents prepared for finals. The cottages are housing for low-income or

  2. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    For example, the posted price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil that the International Energy Agency (IEA) used in its calculations to show that the record...

  3. Relationship Between Crude Oil and Natural Gas Prices, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the time series econometric relationship between the Henry Hub natural gas price and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price.

  4. EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf (1.43 MB) More Documents & Publications Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

  5. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  6. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  7. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  8. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  9. Data requirements for intermediate energy nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1990-01-01

    Several applications that include spallation neutron sources, space radiation effects, biomedical isotope production, accelerator shielding and radiation therapy make use of intermediate energy nuclear data extending to several GeV. The overlapping data needs of these applications are discussed in terms of what projectiles, targets and reactions are of interest. Included is a discussion of what is generally known about these data and what is needed to facilitate their use in intermediate energy applications. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical

  11. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  12. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  13. Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of

  14. Sandia Energy - CRF: First Direct Detection of QOOH Intermediate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of QOOH Intermediate Shows Long Lifetime of Key Species Previous Next CRF: First Direct Detection of QOOH Intermediate Shows Long Lifetime of Key Species Authors J.D....

  15. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and ...

  16. Massachusetts Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 36 14 1990's 32 96 140 1,625 20,132 12,453 24,311 39,539 37,931 26,186 2000's 23,577 23,386 27,605 19,588 16,331 16,693 15,377 21,341 30,435 30,850 2010's 34,058 40,562 37,545 60,474 61,073 -

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 777 731 645 647 647 615 585 1,148 1,101 807 2000's 954 935 707 937 943 895 993 2,327 1,942 1,715 2010's 1,983 2,067 1,958 2,123 2,772 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  18. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,787 12,476 19,406 1990's 27,144 28,528 32,481 29,758 35,514 45,481 45,809 52,464 56,528 61,752 2000's 57,397 50,476 53,048 56,590 52,546 55,148 52,334 60,506 62,616 67,105 2010's 70,514 72,719

  19. South Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) South Carolina Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 153 302 1990's 341 278 239 132 265 688 199 235 412 589 2000's 280 517 310 762 799 843 1,027 1,067 1,137 1,429 2010's 1,748 1,973 2,007 1,969 1,832 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  20. Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii | Department of Energy Than $66 Million for Weatherization Programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization Programs in Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut and Hawaii August 13, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $66 million in funding from the American

  1. Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania | Department of Energy 1 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherization Programs in Guam and Pennsylvania August 25, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $101 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization

  2. Obama Administration Delivers More than $106 Million for Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Conservation Projects in 9 States | Department of Energy 6 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 9 States Obama Administration Delivers More than $106 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 9 States September 24, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $106 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is being awarded to 9 states to support energy efficiency and

  3. Obama Administration Delivers More than $36 Million to Pennsylvania

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects | Department of Energy 6 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects Obama Administration Delivers More than $36 Million to Pennsylvania Communities for Energy Efficiency Projects September 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Bensalem, PA - At a Clean Energy Economy Forum with Governor Rendell in Bensalem today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced that DOE is awarding more than $36 million in funding from the American Recovery

  4. Obama Administration Delivers More than $448 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Thirteen States | Department of Energy 48 Million for Weatherization Programs in Thirteen States Obama Administration Delivers More than $448 Million for Weatherization Programs in Thirteen States July 10, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $448 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in Alabama, Idaho, Maine, Missouri, New

  5. Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in 15 States | Department of Energy 53 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States Obama Administration Delivers More than $453 Million for Weatherization Programs in 15 States June 18, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis COLUMBUS, OHIO - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $453 million in Recovery Act funding to expand weatherization assistance programs in 15 additional states. These funds, along with

  6. Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs in Indiana and New Mexico | Department of Energy 3 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico Obama Administration Delivers More than $63 Million for Weatherization Programs in Indiana and New Mexico July 21, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy is providing more than $63 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to expand weatherization

  7. NNSA Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Delivers Annual Reports to Congress on Progress for Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Nonproliferation April 01, 2016 WASHINGTON, D.C.-The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) today released the annual reports outlining the strategic direction for two of its vital and enduring missions-maintaining a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent and reducing the

  8. Intermediate Temperature SOFC Operation Using Lanthanum Gallate Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elangovan, S.; Balagopal, S. Hartvigsen, J.; Tipmer, M.; Larsen, D.

    2005-01-27

    This presentation discusses intermediate temperature SOFC operation using lanthanum gallate electrolyte.

  9. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.D. Savee, D.L. Osborn, S.S. Vasu, C.J. Percival, D.E. Shallcross, and C.A. Taatjes, "Direct Kinetic Measurements of Criegee Intermediate (CH2OO) Formed by Reaction of CH2I...

  10. Intermediate energy nuclear physics with electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest J.

    1987-10-10

    Inclusive electron scattering has made an enormous contribution to our understanding of hadron and of nuclear structure and to defining the questions which are driving the field in new directions. With intense CW intermediate energy electron beams and with the opportunity to exploit spin observables, central contributions to many of the most crucial questions are anticipated. (AIP)

  11. Apparatus and method for delivering a fluid to a container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for delivering a fluid into a container has a carriage movably associated with a holding mechanism along an axis. A piston is attached to the carriage and a cylinder is slidably attached to the piston along the axis. The cylinder has a hole formed therein that extends along the axis. A needle extending along the axis is attached to the piston and passes through the cylinder hole. The needle has a first operative position relative to the piston when the needle is retracted within the cylinder and a second operative position relative to the piston when the needle extends from the cylinder.

  12. Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivering Renewable Hydrogen A Focus on Near-Term Applications A One-Day Workshop Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Fuel Cell Partnership Palm Springs, California, November 16, 2009 Palm Springs Convention Center, Wyndham Hotel - Catalina Room, 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM With Modeling Show-and-Tell at 5:15 PM and Reception Presentation at 6:15 PM (Mesquite Room G) AGENDA 8:30 am Registration 9:00 am Welcome and Opening Remarks: Robert Remick, NREL 9:10 am Session

  13. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  14. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  16. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  17. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  18. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  19. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  20. Oklahoma Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,049 1,047 1,048 1,044 1,047 1,046 2013-2016

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 180 216 271 346 450 480 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 14 -8 -11 -11 -5 2009-2014 Revision Increases 23 46 51 79 94 99 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 36 54 42 64 69 123 2009-2014 Sales 5 1 26 9 5 17 2009-2014 Acquisitions 5 2 23 12 9 21 2009-2014 Extensions 46 48 75 90 113 90 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries

  1. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,048 1,045 1,042 1,042 1,042 1,041 2013-2016 Production

    1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 View History Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 0 0 0 2 2 2 1979-1985 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-1985

    Storage

    690 39 206 889 -82 -1,132 1980-2014 Additions 1,681 2,353 2,620 2,651 3,644 3,364 1980-2014 Withdrawals 2,371 2,314 2,415 1,763 3,726 4,496

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5

  2. Texas Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,029 1,028 1,030 1,032 1,029 1,027 2013-2016

    490 682 1,094 1,487 1,536 1,786 1981-2014 Adjustments 32 -18 38 31 69 -40 2009-2014 Revision Increases 109 189 216 257 317 328 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 80 108 206 315 458 223 2009-2014 Sales 9 18 138 24 120 203 2009-2014 Acquisitions 21 48 186 46 76 240 2009-2014 Extensions 51 167 400 523 319 323 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 10 34 1 0 0 1 2009-2014 New Reservoir

  3. Utah Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,046 1,043 1,041 1,042 1,041 1,040 2013-2016

    90 69 78 87 57 51 2007-2014 Adjustments 2 3 -3 2 -19 -3 2009-2014 Revision Increases 36 6 9 27 3 3 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 7 3 3 31 11 5 2009-2014 Sales 1 24 4 0 1 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 10 0 1 0 2009-2014 Extensions 1 0 3 15 0 1 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,092 1,096 1,096 1,096 1,096 1,118 2013-2016 Production

    1 4 30 50 77 174 1979-2014 Adjustments -2 1 -2 -1 3 3 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 1 13 10 13 24 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 6 16 4 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 25 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 1 0 0 60 2009-2014 Extensions 0 1 1 19 32 46 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 14 0 0 1 2009-2014

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,056 1,052 1,071 1,055 1,053 1,048 2013-2016

    272 256 259 226 232 184 2007-2014 Adjustments 7 8 -6 -2 0 2 2009-2014 Revision Increases 56 66 31 23 33 20 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 34 93 27 51 18 67 2009-2014 Sales 1 13 3 2 8 28 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 12 4 4 5 33 2009-2014 Extensions 23 17 17 7 7 4 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 1 0 0 2009-2014

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,029 1,025 1,030 1,028 1,028 1,026 2013-2016

    6 18 19 18 14 13 1979-2014 Adjustments 1 0 3 1 -2 1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 3 4 1 1 1 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 1 1 1 1 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 2 2 2

  7. Arkansas Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,019 1,015 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,020 2013-2016

    2 2 2 1 2 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 1 0 -1 -1 1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 1 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0 0

  8. California Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,038 1,036 1,034 1,035 1,021 1,042 2013-2016 Production

    0 1 4 2 2 20 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 1 0 -1 -1 16 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 3 1 1 4 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 2 0 1 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated

  9. Colorado Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,050 1,052 1,055 1,065 1,066 1,071 2013-2016

    97 115 132 142 275 251 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 4 -1 1 -2 -67 2009-2014 Revision Increases 15 18 34 46 192 95 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 11 17 8 24 57 69 2009-2014 Sales 12 1 10 30 46 5 2009-2014 Acquisitions 1 2 3 2 30 4 2009-2014 Extensions 7 19 7 21 23 34 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 2 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 9 0

  10. Florida Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,015 1,025 1,024 1,023 1,021 1,020 2013-2016

    0 1 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 1 -1 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,027 1,025 1,023 1,026 1,018 1,025 2013-2016

    4 1 5 4 5 5 1979-2014 Adjustments -1 0 1 -1 0 -1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 3 0 4 1 1 1 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 2 3 1 1 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 3 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 3 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0 0

  12. Louisiana Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,024 1,025 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,023 2013-2016

    10 106 108 121 119 115 1981-2014 Adjustments 12 12 -6 10 -1 1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 33 19 30 33 17 13 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 24 33 14 21 16 23 2009-2014 Sales 2 6 20 3 4 26 2009-2014 Acquisitions 2 11 17 2 9 29 2009-2014 Extensions 6 4 7 6 4 8 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 1 0 1 3 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 2 3 1 0 1 2 2009-2014

  13. Michigan Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,040 1,038 1,036 1,040 1,038 1,041 2013-2016

    19 15 15 15 3 2 1979-2014 Adjustments -1 0 0 1 -11 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 17 1 2 1 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 4 1 1 1 1 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 1 1

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,031 1,032 1,039 1,033 1,036 1,030 2013-2016 Production

    8 7 7 10 12 11 1979-2014 Adjustments 2 3 0 -3 3 -1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 3 8 0 2 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 2 3 2 0 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 2 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 1 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 3 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated

  15. Montana Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,033 1,030 1,027 1,023 1,023 1,029 2013-2016

    0 0 0 2 0 1 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 0 0 2 -1 1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 1 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0

  16. Nebraska Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,054 1,054 1,048 1,062 1,064 1,064 2013-2016

    2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 7 7 8 6 2011-2014 Adjustments 4 1 2 -1 2011-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 2011-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 2011-2014

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,095 1,095 1,099 1,108 1,091 1,070 2013-2016 Production

    12 73 9 12 6 2 1979-2014 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 5 1 2009-2014 Revision Increases 9 37 2 4 3 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 1 12 66 1 13 5 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 36 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 1 0 1 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated

  18. Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Delivered to Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 1,038 1,038 1,037 1,037 1,034 1,034 2012-2016 Alabama 1,029 1,025 1,030 1,028 1,028 1,026 2013-2016 Alaska 1,000 1,000 1,001 1,001 1,002 1,003 2013-2016 Arizona 1,046 1,047 1,050 1,042 1,037 1,031 2013-2016 Arkansas 1,019 1,015 1,017

  19. Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis In August 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to assess the potential impacts of higher intermediate ethanol blends on conventional vehicles and other engines that rely on gasoline. The test program focuses specifically on the effects of intermediate blends of E15 and E20-gasoline blended with 15 and 20 percent ethanol,

  20. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 73; APPROXIMATIONS; CROSS SECTIONS; DECAY AMPLITUDES; DEFORMATION; FISSION; FLUCTUATIONS; INTERMEDIATE STRUCTURE; ...

  1. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  2. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E.; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2009-10-27

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  3. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  4. EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol April 19, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis In ...

  5. Secretary Moniz's Remarks Presenting the Department’s FY 2016 Budget Request-- As Delivered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, presenting the Department’s FY 2016 Budget Request on February 2, 2015.

  6. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at he 2014 National Science Bowl-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary's remarks, as delivered, at the National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. on April 28, 2014.

  7. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the AWEA WINDPOWER 2015 Conference and Exhibition-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks -- as delivered -- at the AWEA WINDPOWER 2015 Conference and Exhibition on May 19, 2015.

  8. Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9

  9. Ohio Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,073 1,072 1,070 1,068 1,070 1,069 2013-2016

    2 0 1

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.0 0.9 84.8 2000's 80.6 69.5 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,043 1,044 2013-2016

    47 -53 -25 -16 -50 111 1980-2014 Additions 683 343 336 299 276 822 1980-2014 Withdrawals 436 396 361 315 326 711

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar

  11. Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,032 1,027 1,025 1,034 1,029 1,028 2013-2016 Storage

    256 -230 -7 60 -21 -879 1980-2014 Additions 698 468 430 517 624 0 1980-2014 Withdrawals 954 698 436 457 645 879

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year

  12. South Carolina Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,031 1,031 1,029 1,031 1,030 1,029 2013-2016 Storage

    15 -214 204 -100 -35 119 1980-2014 Additions 1,283 1,360 1,386 391 879 1,371 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,268 1,574 1,183 491 914 1,252

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  13. South Dakota Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,060 1,058 1,053 1,052 1,054 1,058 2013-2016 Storage

    1984-1998 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984-2014 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,035 1,035 1,034 1,031 1,031 1,024 2013-2016

    -882 -1,563 189 65 -1,262 -532 1980-2014 Additions 1,867 1,175 1,688 3,028 2,243 7,227 1980-2014 Withdrawals 2,748 2,738 1,499 2,963 3,505 7,759 1980

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  15. Washington Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,070 1,075 1,077 1,078 1,078 1,080 2013-2016

    532 0 100 16 -77 -1,094 1980-2014 Additions 2,937 1,157 1,664 1,154 905 1 1980-2014 Withdrawals 2,405 1,157 1,564 1,138 981 1,094

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's 100.0

  16. Wisconsin Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,045 1,046 1,038 1,038 1,037 1,033 2013-2016

    -18 -29 20 -67 13 58 1980-2014 Additions 80 63 107 33 103 196 1980-2014 Withdrawals 98 92 87 100 89 138

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 1.0 99.9 2000's 99.9 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  17. Connecticut Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,026 2013-2016

    164 178 129 260 -68 -327 1980-2014 Additions 713 651 655 743 558 1,032 1980-2014 Withdrawals 549 473 526 484 626 1,359

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 99.0 99.0 98.7 98.6 98.8 98.5 98.2 97.7 97.5 2010's 97.3 96.8 96.7 95.3 95.9

  18. Delaware Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,055 1,050 1,043 1,044 1,042 1,042 2013-2016

    3 -2 -31 51 -68 29 1980-2014 Additions 121 73 64 117 63 157 1980-2014 Withdrawals 118 76 96 66 131 128

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  19. Georgia Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,028 1,030 1,027 2013-2016

    1,972 379 2,542 1,378 1,205 3,085 1980-2014 Additions 3,182 2,693 3,306 2,097 1,385 7,130 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,210 2,314 764 719 180 4,046

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 60.2 2000's 13.8 15.8 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  20. Idaho Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,034 1,038 1,044 1,056 1,044 1,035 2013-2016

    387 70 -19 139 -259 -676 1981-2014 Additions 528 142 146 211 13 64 1981-2014 Withdrawals 141 72 166 73 271 740 1981

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb

  1. Illinois Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,031 1,031 1,030 1,032 1,032 1,027 2013-2016

    260 74 127 419 -322 -442 1980-2014 Additions 465 398 657 750 40 61 1980-2014 Withdrawals 726 325 530 331 362 503

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 99.3 1990's 94.9 94.1 93.7 93.5 93.4 93.0 93.5 93.0 0.9 91.8 2000's 91.5 91.4 90.4 89.6 89.7 89.2 89.1 88.7 87.8 87.4 2010's 88.0 88.0 87.9 87.7 87.3

    Year Jan Feb

  2. Indiana Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,030 1,033 1,032 1,034 1,038 1,042 2013-2016

    590 835 -380 -977 -81 771 1980-2014 Additions 691 1,983 609 0 925 2,193 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,281 1,148 989 977 1,005 1,422

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 99.4 2000's 98.3 98.1 98.3 96.9 96.7 96.4 96.3 96.2 95.0 93.6 2010's 94.1 94.6 94.5 95.0

  3. Iowa Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,053 1,052 1,052 1,053 1,057 1,058 2013-2016

    -244 146 14 428 -151 -647 1980-2014 Additions 1,652 1,458 1,858 1,408 2,252 2,054 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,897 1,312 1,844 980 2,403 2,701

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  4. Maine Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,035 1,037 1,030 1,024 1,019 1,023 2013-2016

    -33 -25 -18 2 1 4 1981-2014 Additions 0 0 0 36 46 39 1981-2014 Withdrawals 33 25 18 34 45 35 1981

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's 99.9

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  5. Maryland Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,061 1,055 1,050 1,048 1,047 1,046 2013-2016

    4,488 -13 42 27 -5 41 1980-2014 Additions 4,859 366 394 386 461 604 1980-2014 Withdrawals 371 378 352 359 466 563

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 98.4 96.8 0.9 82.7 2000's 74.5 80.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's 100.0 79.3 77.0 74.3 72.8

  6. Massachusetts Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,031 1,032 1,030 1,029 1,029 1,029 2013-2016 Storage

    -1,221 -963 -753 -1,384 -864 734 1980-2014 Additions 7,244 5,507 7,558 3,805 8,339 10,621 1980-2014 Withdrawals 8,465 6,470 8,311 5,189 9,203 9,887

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.1 1.0 98.3 2000's 98.8 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.9 85.0

  7. Minnesota Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,043 1,035 1,039 1,041 1,042 1,044 2013-2016

    703 54 22 -545 255 4 1980-2014 Additions 2,502 1,059 2,257 918 2,515 3,686 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,798 1,005 2,235 1,463 2,261 3,683

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,024 1,023 1,024 1,024 1,021 1,022 2013-2016

    0 0 1980-2014 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980-2014 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002

  9. Nevada Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,043 1,042 1,037 1,042 1,039 1,038 2013-2016

    -76 -69 -42 -63 -57 16 1982-2014 Additions 106 125 112 82 153 227 1982-2014 Withdrawals 182 195 154 146 210 211 1982

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb

  10. New Hampshire Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,035 1,039 1,031 1,029 1,027 1,028 2013-2016 Storage

    9 -3 4 -6 -0 1973-2013 Additions 82 33 112 65 124 185 1980-2014 Withdrawals 73 35 108 71 124 185

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

  11. New Jersey Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,044 1,043 1,042 1,039 1,037 1,037 2013-2016

    494 -390 613 205 193 515 1980-2014 Additions 4,919 3,304 5,018 3,483 5,401 6,733 1980-2014 Withdrawals 4,425 3,693 4,404 3,278 5,208 6,218

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.7 1.0 97.5 2000's 96.5 97.6 96.8 95.0 94.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's 100.0

  12. New York Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,033 1,034 1,033 1,033 1,029 1,030 2013-2016

    0 0 0

    1 327 -147 -168 578 674 1980-2014 Additions 1,047 1,032 524 416 1,106 1,868 1980-2014 Withdrawals 1,025 705 671 584 528 1,194

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.2 99.2 99.3 99.2 99.3 99.1 99.0 98.8 1.0 91.9 2000's 88.9 87.8 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010's

  13. North Carolina Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,034 1,034 1,037 1,038 1,038 1,034 2013-2016 Storage

    811 -2,643 2,194 -258 449 462 1980-2014 Additions 6,838 4,410 5,500 3,504 7,765 10,765 1980-2014 Withdrawals 6,027 7,052 3,305 3,762 7,315 10,30

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

  14. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  15. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing | Department of Energy Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and Testing Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and Testing Ethanol can be combined with gasoline in blends ranging from E10 (10% or less ethanol, 90% gasoline) up to E85 (up to 85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), with those in-between being called "intermediate blends." The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Renewable Fuels Standard (under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy

  17. Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) Presentation for Intermediate SCADA Security, SS-2 SANS SCADA Summit, September 28-29, 2006. The class enabled attendees to develop an understanding of tools and methods that can be used to discover and identify system vulnerabilities (CIP-005 R3.2, CIP-005 R4, & CIP-007 R8); develop mitigation strategies for resolving these issues

  18. Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement July 1, 2011 - 5:00pm Addthis The Department issued guidance today advising manufacturers, importers and private labelers that DOE will not enforce the energy conservation standards and compliance certification requirements for candelabra and intermediate base lamps until January 1, 2012. Addthis Related Articles New Funding Opportunity:

  19. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll Brian West Wendy Clark...

  20. Kondo universality, energy scales, and intermediate valence in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Kondo universality, energy scales, and intermediate valence in plutonium ... OSTI Identifier: 21443698 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: ...

  1. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-10-18

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  2. Contrasting behavior of intermediate-range order structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Contrasting behavior of intermediate-range order structures in jadeite glass and melt Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Contrasting behavior of ...

  3. Secretary Chu to Deliver Keynote on EV Everywhere Grand Challenge at Washington Auto Show

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thursday, January 31, 2013, Secretary Chu will deliver the government keynote address at the Washington Auto Show’s Public Policy Day

  4. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  5. Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Frontier Research Centers: Solid-State Lighting Science Center for Frontiers of ... diode (LED) driver delivers lighting performance that exceeds that of ...

  6. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the 2015 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference-- As Delivered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, at the 2015 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference in Washington, D.C., on March 23, 2015.

  7. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the White House Tribal Nations Conference-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, at the White House Tribal Nations Conference on the panel on White House Council on Native American Affairs Energy and Climate Work Groups.

  8. Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101), call slides and discussion summary.

  9. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on Project Management Reform at the National Academy of Public Administration-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on Project Management at the National Academy of Public Administration in Washington, DC on January 15, 2015.

  10. Energy Secretary Moniz to Deliver Keynote Remarks at Powering Africa Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will deliver keynote remarks at the Powering Africa Summit in Washington, D.C.

  11. Cree's High-Power White LED Delivers 121 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree's commercial high-power white LEDs can now deliver 121 lm/W at 35A/cm2 current density. These particular Cree XLamp® XP-G LEDs deliver 267 lumens at a drive current of 700 mA and an operating...

  12. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  13. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In particular, an exact expanded R-matrix Monte Carlo calculation of the intermediate structure, deeply mixed with the fluctuations of the class-I and II decay amplitudes, is ...

  14. Intermediate connector for stacked organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Andrade, Brian

    2013-02-12

    A device is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an intermediate connector disposed between the anode and the cathode. A first organic layer including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the anode and the intermediate connector, and a second including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the intermediate connector and the cathode. The intermediate connector includes a first metal having a work function lower than 4.0 eV and a second metal having a work function lower than 5.0 eV. The work function of the first metal is at least 0.5 eV less than the work function of the second metal. The first metal is in contact with a sublayer of the second organic layer that includes a material well adapted to receive holes from a low work function metal.

  15. The Intermediate Higgs (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Intermediate Higgs Citation Details In-Document Search ... 890349 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-11111 hep-ph0504252 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal ...

  16. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- High and Intermediate Level Shielded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells High and Intermediate Level Shielded Cells Working with SRNL Our Facilities - High and Intermediate Level Shielded Cells The SRNL Shielded Cells Facility is a special containment facility that provide the shielding and confinement necessary for the safe examination, analysis and testing of highly radioactive materials. Skilled operators stand safely outside of each cell and use manipulator arms to control delicate procedures inside of each cell. The facility consists of sixteen 6x6

  17. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Wednesday, 31 March 2010 00:00 Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is

  18. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory biomass13_foust_2-d.pdf (713.06 KB) More Documents & Publications NABC Webinar Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels

  19. NNSA Delivers All Scheduled W76-1 Units to Navy for 2012 | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Delivers All Scheduled ... NNSA Delivers All Scheduled W76-1 Units to Navy for 2012 Posted: November 19, 2012 - 2:28pm The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that it delivered all of its scheduled W76-1 Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile warhead units to United States Navy in FY 2012. "As our stockpile ages, we have to put ourselves in a position where the president can be certain that it is safe, secure and effective," said NNSA

  20. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Delivers Its First 12 GeV Electrons | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Accelerator Delivers Its First 12 GeV Electrons On December 14, full-energy 12 GeV electron beam was provided for the first time, to the Experimental Hall D complex, located in the upper, left corner of this aerial photo of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. Hall D is the new experimental research facility - added to CEBAF as part of the 12 GeV Upgrade project. Beam was also delivered to Hall A (dome in the lower left). Jefferson Lab Accelerator Delivers Its First 12 GeV

  1. PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a new Berkeley ... Gallery: Interior views of a plasma-source module. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of ...

  2. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis ...

  3. U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress U.S. Nuclear Weapons Strategy Delivered to Congress July 24, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman joined the U.S. Secretaries of Defense and State in sending to Congress the Bush Administration's nuclear weapons strategy. This document not only describes the history of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, but reinforces how deterrence applies to present and future security threats, and what a nuclear

  4. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies | Department of Energy Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies January 25, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman will give the keynote address at the 4th annual IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT 2013) on

  5. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  6. EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of Energy Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol EERE Success Story-Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol April 19, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis In September 2012, scientists at DOE national laboratories successfully demonstrated technical advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic

  7. Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report | Department of Energy Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report Update of Hydrogen from Biomass - Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. 33112.pdf

  8. Under Secretary Klotz delivers remarks at PREP ribbon-cutting | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Under Secretary Klotz delivers remarks at PREP ribbon-cutting Wednesday, June 18, 2014 - 1:23pm Under Secretary Klotz delivered remarks at the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP) ribbon-cutting this week. PREP establishes the largest federally-owned wind farm in the country and will generate approximately 47 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually, more than 60 percent of the electricity needed for Pantex. The project will reduce CO2

  9. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    market are more likely to have access to lower-priced West Texas Intermediate (WTI)-linked crudes, meaning refiners could be seeing small positive margins for gasoline. In this...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7, 2007 (Next Release on October 24, 2007) Fundamentals vs. Speculation On October 16, 2007, the near-month futures contract price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI), the U.S....

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    from storage at 124 Bcf were the largest reported so far during the current heating season. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by over...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from storage at 124 Bcf were the largest reported so far during the current heating season. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by over...

  13. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    example, when the near-month futures price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose by more than 2 per barrel on October 25, traders and analysts stated that the rise...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bcf, which is 5.7 percent above the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 2.64 per barrel on the week to 47.36, or...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell in 4 of 5 trading days, ending the week down by...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose 0.87 per barrel on the week to yesterday's...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell in 4 of 5 trading days, ending the week down by...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 14, which reflects an implied net increase of 75 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 2.02 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 14, which reflects an implied net increase of 75 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 2.02 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between 31.04 and 31.60 per...

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    is 13.9 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded in a narrow range between 31.04 and 31.60 per...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Bcf, which is 5.7 percent above the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 2.64 per barrel on the week to 47.36, or...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Texas Intermediate (WTI), which is the light, sweet crude oil traded at the Cushing, OK delivery point for the NYMEX futures contract. Any premium on light, sweet crude oils...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and 2.4 cents is about 142 of 1.) While there are many crude oils traded around the globe, two of the major benchmark light sweet crudes are West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and...

  5. AmeriFlux US-Wi1 Intermediate hardwood (IHW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiquan

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi1 Intermediate hardwood (IHW). Site Description - The Wisconsin Intermediate Hardwoods site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The intermediate hardwoods site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. In 2001, northern hardwood stands of all ages occupied 45% of the region.

  6. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  7. Heat exchanger with intermediate evaporating and condensing fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraas, Arthur P.

    1978-01-01

    A shell and tube-type heat exchanger, such as a liquid sodium-operated steam generator for use in nuclear reactors, comprises a shell containing a primary fluid tube bundle, a secondary fluid tube bundle at higher elevation, and an intermediate fluid vaporizing at the surface of the primary fluid tubes and condensing at the surface of the secondary fluid tubes.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends Research and Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office supported work to examine the impact of intermediate ethanol blends on passenger vehicles, outdoor equipment and generator sets. Based on this research, the EPA issued waivers allowing vehicles from model year 2001 and beyond to use E15.

  9. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford Waste Treatment Plant | Department of Energy Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Delivers Cost and Schedule Validation for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis Corps Report Validates Cost of $12.2 billion and Construction Completion in November 2019 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) report

  10. Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops Improving the Way We Harvest & Deliver Biofuels Crops May 24, 2013 - 9:40am Addthis The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares Group. The self-propelled baler collects and packages bales of feedstock on-site that can be immediately loaded and sent to a biorefinery for use. | Photo courtesy of Antares

  11. Oregon Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 14 221 353 1990's 464 477 433 504 430 419 431 378 254 337 2000's 336 201 366 428 372 391 418 445 443 479 2010's 707 790 895 1,044 1,129 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. CEBAF Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at Jefferson Lab CEBAF Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at Jefferson Lab Late in the evening on May 7, Jefferson Lab staff successfully threaded the electron beam up the new beamline toward Hall D for the first time Late in the evening on May 7, Jefferson Lab staff successfully threaded the electron beam up the new beamline toward Hall D for the first time. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, May

  13. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Others (Percent) % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential Consumers Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 9 10 11 2010's 12 12 13 14 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  14. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  15. EECBG Success Story: New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delray Beach, Florida, had a good problem: Recovery Act funding to support the city's mission to reduce energy costs – but no seasoned pro to help realize those savings. Through an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), the South Florida city hired a former city manager to oversee projects that would deliver both energy and financial savings. Learn more.

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  17. Delivering pump light to a laser gain element while maintaining access to the laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    A lens duct is used for pump delivery and the laser beam is accessed through an additional component called the intermediate beam extractor which can be implemented as part of the gain element, part of the lens duct or a separate component entirely.

  18. Mode and Intermediate Waters in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnanadesikan, Anand; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2015-12-22

    This report describes work done as part of a joint Princeton-Johns Hopkins project to look at the impact of mode and intermediate waters in Earth System Models. The Johns Hopkins portion of this work focussed on the role of lateral mixing in ventilating such waters, with important implications for hypoxia, the uptake of anthropogenic carbon, the dynamics of El Nino and carbon pumps. The Johns Hopkins group also collaborated with the Princeton Group to help develop a watermass diagnostics framework.

  19. Hydrocyclone Separation of Targeted Algal Intermediates and Products

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Feedstocks Research and Development Richard Brotzman Argonne National Laboratory 1.3.3.100: Hydrocyclone Separation of Targeted Algal Intermediates and Products This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Project Goals  Evaluate an energy-efficient, separation process - Technology: Hydrocyclone separation of components in a fluid mixture - Main application: Dewatering of algal cultures  Program tasks - Establish baseline

  20. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  1. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium in Washington D.C.-- As Delivered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, at the Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium in Washington D.C. on October 1, 2014.

  2. Secretary Moniz's Remarks to the Energy Standing Committee of the U.S. Conference of Mayors-- As Delivered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, to the Energy Standing Committee of the U.S. Conference of Mayors on January 21, 2015.

  3. Remarks by Secretary Ernest Moniz at a U.S.-China Business Council Issues Luncheon-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Remarks, as delivered, by Secretary Moniz at a U.S.-China Business Council Issues Luncheon on April 7, 2015 in Washington, D.C.

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 5,019 9,990 12,241 13,649 12,345 2000's 10,773 6,259 6,271 7,066 8,179 8,251 8,098 4,499 4,274 2,448 2010's 1,951 2,208 1,005 1,022 980 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  5. Arkansas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 1,723 1,870 1990's 1,939 2,198 2,343 2,393 1,351 1,104 1,550 1,699 2,576 2,983 2000's 3,354 4,164 6,336 5,751 5,874 8,173 8,843 9,534 13,112 14,776 2010's 17,862 19,402 24,772 26,797 27,604 - = No

  6. California Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 894 10,862 21,109 1990's 38,337 63,882 72,782 57,781 134,346 133,483 106,531 125,836 144,864 105,079 2000's 105,650 92,011 74,767 69,072 66,778 72,999 86,196 98,776 108,738 111,702 2010's 113,903

  7. Colorado Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 898 1,574 1,789 1990's 1,800 2,763 2,993 3,241 3,403 3,863 4,702 4,998 3,573 1,508 2000's 1,584 2,889 3,139 2,918 3,299 3,010 2,772 2,721 3,132 3,240 2010's 3,118 3,457 4,061 3,142 3,199 - = No Data

  8. Delaware Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 2000's 103 97 1,285 1,450 1,561 1,399 1,833 2,178 2,611 5,438 2010's 6,117 4,879 5,647 6,146 6,389 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  9. District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 417 155 332 1,343 3,954 4,823 8,122 8,045 9,644 2000's 11,420 12,848 14,028 11,879 13,327 13,893 13,695 15,703 15,110 15,550 2010's 15,507 14,029 12,614 13,942

  10. Florida Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 881 1,005 964 911 861 988 1,204 932 1,281 1,998 2000's 15,603 21,386 32,213 31,333 33,106 34,682 28,398 28,805 29,046 29,414 2010's 32,313 32,940 34,441 39,987 42,397 - = No Data Reported;

  11. Georgia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,067 3,418 5,176 1990's 5,721 6,395 6,389 5,487 4,304 3,663 3,646 6,211 9,078 16,996 2000's 48,726 40,531 38,395 39,611 44,025 42,112 38,204 38,967 41,555 43,845 2010's 49,157 46,512 42,971 46,494

  12. Idaho Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 284 1,161 1,121 1990's 1,035 1,192 1,278 1,405 1,427 1,450 1,543 1,593 1,594 1,773 2000's 1,838 1,866 1,912 1,775 1,858 1,911 1,927 2,169 2,285 2,560 2010's 2,713 3,236 3,644 4,181 3,974 - = No Data

  13. Illinois Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 26,117 49,942 60,159 1990's 84,936 79,512 83,264 90,812 93,206 101,211 100,495 92,730 91,872 107,830 2000's 117,228 111,421 120,931 120,455 120,031 118,168 118,383 117,571 126,178 130,862 2010's

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,453 3,473 3,579 1990's 2,906 3,947 2,319 3,724 5,841 10,149 3,255 8,290 15,216 15,967 2000's 19,921 17,990 17,844 17,615 18,539 13,662 14,610 16,566 18,768 20,579 2010's 20,742 22,652 21,758 26,298

  15. Iowa Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 58 774 980 1990's 1,068 1,097 1,974 2,648 4,597 5,394 6,728 5,934 6,129 7,460 2000's 8,629 8,268 8,642 10,596 9,984 9,815 9,840 10,358 13,603 15,574 2010's 14,508 14,475 12,147 15,556 14,714 - = No Data

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,053 1,501 1,828 1990's 1,575 2,035 2,451 2,809 3,171 4,169 3,773 3,860 4,076 4,315 2000's 5,584 6,424 7,590 7,942 7,864 7,488 6,092 6,304 6,673 7,047 2010's 7,163 7,188 6,941 7,919 7,819 - = No Data

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 18 16 1990's 0 233 3,552 479 505 464 451 1,048 1,287 1,528 2000's 948 861 251 299 344 342 350 487 362 1,902 2010's 4,367 4,260 5,778 6,434 6,581 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. Maryland Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 262 800 1,010 1990's 1,052 1,308 1,692 1,497 1,291 1,469 3,734 16,394 36,375 38,722 2000's 33,880 40,313 44,577 48,105 47,747 46,440 43,744 50,220 49,545 48,717 2010's 48,000 49,053 48,271 52,494

  19. Michigan Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 76,846 47,678 52,120 1990's 48,061 52,444 54,248 56,547 62,825 65,266 66,621 69,739 65,843 77,782 2000's 76,988 63,501 65,295 66,689 60,299 60,424 55,425 61,384 62,704 65,685 2010's 67,402 75,019

  20. Missouri Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 142 2,400 4,851 1990's 8,306 8,910 8,817 10,710 11,072 10,880 12,988 14,059 13,463 13,494 2000's 12,512 12,447 12,349 12,000 13,965 13,823 13,373 13,653 14,628 14,325 2010's 14,387 16,750 16,876 17,894

  1. Montana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 41 13 242 1990's 261 327 533 939 1,070 1,131 1,247 1,181 2,957 2,436 2000's 3,582 3,166 3,657 4,714 3,212 2,974 3,045 2,843 2,932 11,972 2010's 9,281 10,426 9,055 9,785 10,021 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 786 894 571 1990's 2,231 3,294 4,063 3,142 7,726 9,181 12,247 8,738 7,941 9,227 2000's 11,235 10,083 10,230 9,820 10,892 9,728 9,795 10,851 14,792 12,292 2010's 12,664 12,649 11,723 13,748 14,128 - =

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 287 725 575 1990's 346 1,563 1,889 1,283 3,276 4,416 5,272 6,305 6,941 8,888 2000's 11,621 5,988 4,885 7,914 8,630 8,479 8,910 9,311 9,540 10,305 2010's 10,197 10,971 11,195 12,442 12,120 - = No Data

  4. North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 103 716 2,082 1990's 2,585 3,223 3,035 2,908 2,199 2,224 1,454 1,207 1,631 1,178 2000's 1,157 1,031 977 617 773 704 653 693 732 776 2010's 764 795 837 981 968 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. Ohio Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18,861 20,433 21,903 1990's 18,258 20,033 23,188 25,345 30,807 41,569 53,609 63,352 70,543 89,746 2000's 97,516 100,462 101,500 109,479 108,693 104,551 95,316 108,943 115,050 119,827 2010's 124,231 132,566

  6. Oklahoma Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 12,217 3,988 1990's 2,944 3,445 4,052 4,095 4,214 5,894 7,165 8,204 11,752 11,218 2000's 11,920 10,549 11,682 10,755 14,253 18,468 17,798 21,216 19,870 22,220 2010's 21,966 21,697 21,258 24,494

  7. Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,742 1,080 1,411 1990's 330 0 0 0 0 0 1,010 2,405 4,679 5,524 2000's 6,070 5,380 3,912 3,176 3,015 2,834 2,673 3,764 3,663 3,430 2010's 4,062 4,669 4,503 5,288 6,295 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 298 321 695 1990's 1,161 1,723 1,603 1,724 1,124 1,406 2,008 1,742 1,466 1,802 2000's 1,711 1,535 1,739 1,832 1,758 1,617 1,703 1,943 1,931 2,059 2010's 2,100 2,030 1,721 2,235 2,268 - = No Data

  9. Tennessee Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 949 1,191 864 1990's 1,092 1,961 1,680 2,129 2,992 3,163 3,316 4,312 6,635 5,885 2000's 3,987 3,403 4,893 5,347 4,232 4,237 4,139 4,115 4,496 5,076 2010's 5,144 5,247 5,029 5,365 5,332 - = No Data

  10. Texas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,402 21,863 16,935 1990's 17,645 19,287 37,443 28,423 31,742 65,911 29,469 83,494 32,280 39,041 2000's 39,939 19,885 63,710 57,523 49,000 32,812 26,523 29,257 29,233 36,338 2010's 44,212 49,056 44,453

  11. Utah Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 4,438 4,892 5,360 5,222 5,427 5,204 2000's 5,052 4,813 5,469 4,837 4,850 4,533 4,510 4,516 5,103 5,338 2010's 5,307 5,392 5,681 7,539 8,283 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  12. Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 590 997 1,274 1990's 2,804 2,826 4,719 5,902 7,039 9,062 8,712 13,705 16,267 20,043 2000's 22,239 20,479 24,189 21,972 23,508 23,790 25,017 27,351 27,379 29,016 2010's 30,179 29,504 28,857 30,949

  13. Washington Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 740 1,022 2,291 1990's 2,462 3,247 4,831 2,671 1,993 3,514 6,795 7,440 6,026 5,405 2000's 3,691 3,439 4,739 5,722 5,557 5,589 5,671 5,797 6,158 6,320 2010's 6,273 6,535 6,732 7,352 7,634 - = No Data

  14. West Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,752 8,904 8,952 1990's 8,955 9,496 10,536 11,134 11,194 12,536 12,263 11,779 12,625 13,157 2000's 11,362 10,006 10,524 10,621 10,804 10,491 10,329 9,360 11,759 11,028 2010's 12,195 12,228

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,652 4,443 5,128 1990's 6,189 6,414 6,229 4,312 5,133 6,760 7,848 15,907 21,172 17,123 2000's 17,742 17,388 20,653 18,178 16,710 18,098 20,679 21,830 22,517 21,186 2010's 19,594 20,576 19,733 22,133

  16. Wyoming Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 7 1990's 21 89 160 207 358 632 1,370 1,705 987 1,070 2000's 974 1,291 5,338 4,824 4,816 4,657 4,963 4,788 3,501 3,581 2010's 3,857 4,210 3,920 4,456 4,772 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  17. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Percent) Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Commercial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10.9 1990's 13.4 14.9 16.8 16.1 20.7 23.3 22.4 29.2 33.0 33.9 2000's 36.1 34.0 36.4 34.9 35.9 35.0 36.3 37.6 38.1 40.8 2010's 42.5 44.2 46.8 46.1 46.2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Percent) Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Industrial Delivered for the Account of Others (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63.1 1990's 64.8 67.3 69.7 70.7 74.8 76.0 80.6 81.9 83.9 81.3 2000's 80.2 79.2 77.3 77.9 76.3 75.9 76.6 77.8 79.6 81.2 2010's 82.8 83.7 83.8 83.4 84.1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Sandia-Developed LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Cost LED Pulser Delivers Laser-Like Performance at Fraction of the Cost - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  20. NREL Shows Heavy Duty Hybrid Trucks Deliver on Fuel Economy - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL NREL Shows Heavy Duty Hybrid Trucks Deliver on Fuel Economy September 11, 2012 A performance evaluation of Class 8 hybrid electric tractor trailers compared with similar conventional vehicles by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) shows significant improvements in fuel economy. "During our 13-month study, the hybrid tractors demonstrated 13.7 percent higher fuel economy than the conventional tractors, resulting in a 12 percent

  1. Sandia California rallies to deliver a record 65 backpacks to children of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    military families | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) California rallies to deliver a record 65 backpacks to children of military families Wednesday, August 24, 2016 - 1:38pm From left, Madeline Burchard, Sandra Funk and Bill McAllister show off backpacks filled with school supplies that were donated by Sandia California employees. For the third year in a row, Sandia National Laboratories California has exceeded expectations by collecting 65 backpacks filled with school

  2. DOE Delivers More than $354 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects in 22 States | Department of Energy More than $354 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 22 States DOE Delivers More than $354 Million for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Projects in 22 States September 14, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that more than $354 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is being awarded to 22 states to support energy efficiency and conservation

  3. DOE Delivers Over $80 Million in Weatherization Funding to First Four

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States | Department of Energy Over $80 Million in Weatherization Funding to First Four States DOE Delivers Over $80 Million in Weatherization Funding to First Four States June 8, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the transfer of nearly $80 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to Arizona, Kansas, Mississippi, and Oregon to expand state weatherization assistance programs. After submitting their

  4. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-04-07

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  5. Method and apparatus for delivering high power laser energy over long distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2013-08-20

    Systems, devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates.

  6. December 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO)  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $110 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2012, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price will average $89 per barrel. The Brent and WTI crude oil spot prices are forecast to average $104 per barrel and $88 per barrel, respectively, in 2013. The projected WTI discount to Brent crude oil, which averaged $23 per barrel in November 2012, falls to an average of $11 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2013. This

  7. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 August 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 11, 2009 Release Highlights Crude oil prices continue to be very volatile. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price fell from $71.47 on June 29 to $59.62 on July 14 and then increased to $71.59 by August 3. EIA expects the price of WTI crude oil to stay roughly flat at an average of $70 per barrel in the fourth quarter of 2009, an increase of about $27 compared with the average for the first quarter of the year. The WTI spot price is

  8. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 July 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 7, 2009 Release Highlights After climbing for much of the year, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hovered around $70 per barrel through most of June. The price of WTI crude oil is expected to average near $70 per barrel through the second half of 2009, an increase of about $18 compared with the average for the first half of the year. The WTI spot price is projected to rise slowly as economic conditions improve, and to average

  9. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2012 1 June 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged more than $100 per barrel over the first 4 months of 2012. The WTI spot price then fell from $106 per barrel on May 1 to $83 per barrel on June 1, reflecting market concerns about world economic and oil demand growth. EIA projects the price of WTI crude oil to average about $95 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost of crude (RAC) to

  10. Microsoft Word - MPUR_June2011_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 1 June 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 June 7, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged $103 per barrel in March, $110 per barrel in April, and $101 per barrel in May. The WTI crude oil price in the beginning of May was $113 per barrel, but by the end of the first week in May, WTI crude oil prices had fallen by nearly $16 per barrel to $97 per barrel (Figure 1 for equivalent futures movement). For the

  11. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 December 7, 2010 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged over $84 per barrel in November, more than $2 per barrel higher than the October average. EIA has raised the average winter 2010-2011 period WTI spot price forecast by $1 per barrel from the last monthʹs Outlook to $84 per barrel. WTI spot prices rise to $89 per barrel by the end of next year, $2 per

  12. Other facts

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 - December 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook 1 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, January 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 2 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, February 2007 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Jan-07 Jul-07 Jan-08 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 3 Historical WTI price and 95% NYMEX Confidence Interval, March 2007 $0 $50

  13. Physical Sciences Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity, and the WTI-Brent Spread Bahattin Büyükşahin Thomas K. Lee James T. Moser Michel A. Robe* Abstract We document that, starting in the Fall of 2008, the benchmark West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil has periodically traded at unheard of discounts to the corresponding Brent benchmark. We further document that this discount is not reflected in spreads between Brent and other benchmarks that are directly comparable to WTI. Drawing on extant

  14. Intermediate band solar cells: Recent progress and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Y. Tamaki, R.; Farrell, D. J.; Yoshida, K.; Ahsan, N.; Shoji, Y.; Sogabe, T.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J. Yoshida, M.; Pusch, A.; Hess, O.; Phillips, C. C.; Kita, T.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-06-15

    Extensive literature and publications on intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs) are reviewed. A detailed discussion is given on the thermodynamics of solar energy conversion in IBSCs, the device physics, and the carrier dynamics processes with a particular emphasis on the two-step inter-subband absorption/recombination processes that are of paramount importance in a successful implementation high-efficiency IBSC. The experimental solar cell performance is further discussed, which has been recently demonstrated by using highly mismatched alloys and high-density quantum dot arrays and superlattice. IBSCs having widely different structures, materials, and spectral responses are also covered, as is the optimization of device parameters to achieve maximum performance.

  15. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  16. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  17. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  18. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  19. Results of intermediate-scale hot isostatic press can experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L.O.; Vinjamuri, K.

    1995-05-01

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) has been managed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for a number of years. Since 1963, liquid HLW has been solidified into a granular solid (calcine). Presently, over 3,800 m{sup 3} of calcine is stored in partially-underground stainless steel bins. Four intermediate- scale HLW can tests (two 6-in OD {times} 12-in tall and two 4-in OD {times} 7-in tall) are described and compared to small-scale HIP can tests (1- to 3-in OD {times} 1- to 4.5-in tall). The intermediate-scale HIP cans were loaded with a 70/30 calcine/frit blend and HIPped at an off-site facility at 1050{degrees}C; and 20 ksi. The dimensions of two cans (4-in OD {times} 7-in tall) were monitored during the HIP cycle with eddy-current sensors. The sensor measurements indicated that can deformation occurs rapidly at 700{degrees}C; after which, there is little additional can shrinkage. HIP cans were subjected to a number of analyses including calculation of the overall packing efficiency (56 to 59%), measurement of glass-ceramic (3.0 to 3.2 g/cc), 14-day MCC-1 leach testing (total mass loss rates < 1 g/m{sup 2} day), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Based on these analyses, the glass-ceramic material produced in intermediate-scale cans is similar to material produced in small-scale cans. No major scale-up problems were indicated. Based on the packing efficiency observed in intermediate- and small-scale tests, the overall packing efficiency of production-scale (24-in OD {times} 36- to 190-in tall) cans would be approximately 64% for a pre-HIP right-circular cylinder geometry. An efficiency of 64% would represent a volume reduction factor of 2.5 over a candidate glass waste prepared at 33 wt% waste loading.

  20. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  1. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins from amino acids. Translation-the conversion of a three letter nucleic acid code (a codon) in a messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence-is essential to gene expression. For this reason, translational accuracy is imperative, and has a very low error rate of 10-3 to 10-4. Translation and other manipulations of

  2. Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Tran, Binh-Nien

    2008-05-27

    The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

  3. Kondo universality, energy scales, and intermediate valence in plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clementyev, E. S.; Mirmelstein, A. V.

    2009-07-15

    On the basis of the concepts of an intermediate-valence (IV) regime, an analysis is carried out of macroscopic properties of the {alpha} and {delta} phases of plutonium, as well as of several model systems based on rare earth elements. Within a single-site approximation (SSA), the characteristic Kondo interaction energy, the f-electron shell occupation number, the effective degeneracy of the ground-state f multiplet, and the crystal field splitting energy are estimated. The ground state in plutonium is considered as a quantum-mechanical superposition of states with different valences. The temperature dependence of the static magnetic susceptibility of {delta} plutonium is calculated. It is shown that {delta} plutonium satisfies the Wilson and Kadowaki-Woods universal relations, whereby it can be classified as a Kondo system. At the same time, the problem of the position of plutonium in the general classification of solids, as well as the problem of the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of {delta} plutonium, remains open. The concept of multiple intermediate valence (MIV) is put forward as a possible means for solving the above problems. The MIV regime is characterized by fluctuations from the basic configuration 3+ to the states 4+ and 2+, which make a fundamental difference between plutonium and 4f electron systems based, say, on samarium.

  4. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  5. The 1994 intermediate reline of H-3 furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J.D.; Nanavati, K.S.; Spirko, E.J.; Wakelin, D.H.

    1995-12-01

    LTV Steel`s Indiana Harbor Works H-3 Blast Furnace was rebuilt in 1988 to provide reliable operations at high production rates without damage to the shell for an overall campaign. This Rebuild included: (1) complete bosh and partial stack shell replacement; (2) a spray cooled carbon bosh; (3) a row of staves at the mantle and six rows of stack staves, all stack staves had noses (ledges at the top of the stave) with the exception of row 5; (4) silicon carbide filled semi graphite brick for the bosh, silicon carbide brick from the mantle area and to the top of stave row No. 1, super duty brick in front of the remaining staves and phosphate bonded high alumina brick in the upper stack; (5) movable throat armor; (6) upgraded instrumentation to follow furnace operation and lining wear occurring in the furnace. No work was done to the hearth walls and bottom, since these had been replaced in 1982 with a first generation graphite cooled design and has experienced 7.7 million NTHM. The furnace was blown in November 18, 1988 and operated through September 3, 1994, at which time it was blown down for its first intermediate repair after 7.85 million NTHM. This paper summarizes the operation of the furnace and then discusses the major aspects of the 1994 intermediate repair.

  6. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  7. PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new Berkeley Lab accelerator | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam pulses in a new Berkeley Lab accelerator March 19, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) Erik Gilson with a copper-clad module and chamber for testing the units. Gallery: Interior views of a plasma-source module. (Photo by Elle

  8. An Organophosphine Oxide Redox Shuttle Additive that Delivers Long-term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium-ion Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 4, 2015, Research Highlights An Organophosphine Oxide Redox Shuttle Additive that Delivers Long-term Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium-ion Batteries Organophosphine oxide groups not only can provide suitable steric protection of the generated radical cation, but also can increase the redox potential to 4.5 V, which is suitable for overcharge protection of LiMn2O4 cathode material Scientific

  9. District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Sectors by Marketers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 14.26 2010's 12.12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  10. Summer Tables.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 September 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 9, 2008 Release Highlights The monthly average price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased from over $133 per barrel in June and July to about $117 per barrel in August, reflecting expectations of a slowdown in world petroleum demand growth. WTI, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, is projected to average $116 per barrel in 2008. Projected stronger growth in world petroleum demand is expected to increase the annual average

  11. Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

  12. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(E{sub T}), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  13. Elastic Hadron Scattering on Li Isotopes at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O.; Ibraeva, E.T.

    2005-01-01

    The elastic scattering of hadrons (protons, charged pions, and positively charged kaons) on {sup 6,7,8}Li nuclei is analyzed on the basis of Glauber-Sitenko diffraction theory. A few nuclear-wave-function versions found within two- and three-particle potential cluster models are used in the calculations. It is shown that the application of these wave functions in diffraction theory makes it possible to describe adequately the experimental differential cross sections and analyzing powers in hadron scattering at intermediate energies. In this study, particular attention is given to a comparison of the scattering of different particles on the same target nucleus, as well as to a comparison of scattering of particles of the same sort on different target nuclei.

  14. Dynamics of the Wolff Rearrangement: spectroscopic evidence of oxirene intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanigaki, K.; Ebbesen, T.W.

    1987-09-16

    The Wolff rearrangement, involving the decomposition of an ..cap alpha..-diazoketone to yield a ketene, is of great interest and importance in chemistry. Although it has been studied for many years by various techniques, the dynamics of this reaction from excitation of a diazoketone to the formation of the final product(s) have eluded direct observation. Only the last intermediate ketene has been observed to react with solvents to yield stable products. Ketene is postulated to be formed from other precursors, ketocarbene and/or oxirene. Ketocarbenes were finally detected by Chapman and his co-workers, very recently, in solid matrices at 15 K by using strained diazoketones. Here the authors report the direct observation of the dynamics of the Wolff rearrangement for an unstrained diazoketone in water at 298 K. The precursor to ketene is observed and assigned to be an oxirine, an important chemical species that had yet be unambiguously detected. Both spectral and dynamic features are presented.

  15. EVALUATION OF TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INTERMEDIATE NON DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.”

  16. Intermediate-age globular clusters in four galaxy merger remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trancho, Gelys; Miller, Bryan W.; Schweizer, François; Burdett, Daniel P.; Palamara, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based K{sub s} -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIK{sub s} GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ∼1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  17. Intermediate hearth repair technique at Thyssen Stahl AG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, W.; Bachhofen, H.J.; Ruether, P.; Ballewski, T.

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays various techniques for the fastest possible intermediate repair and/or emplacement of refractory materials above the tuyere level allow a significant extension of furnace campaign life. The latter are hence now exclusively determined by the service life of the hearth. The improvement of hearth monitoring and the estimation of residual brick strength of the refractory lining on the basis of temperature measurements in the hearth enable the location of individual zones of premature wear. These measurement methods, which were developed by Thyssen Stahl AG, aid the decision to undertake selective repair of the hearth. Three areas of repair are differentiated: taphole zone; hearth wall, localized; and hearth wall, extensive. This hearth repair method is described in this report using the example of hearth refurbishing blast furnace 8, Hamborn.

  18. Phase slips and dissipation of Alfvenic intermediate shocks and solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laveder, D.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    2012-09-15

    The time evolution of a rotational discontinuity, characterized by a change of the magnetic-field direction by an angle {Delta}{theta} such that {pi}<|{Delta}{theta}|<2{pi} and no amplitude variation, is considered in the framework of asymptotic models that, through reductive perturbative expansions, isolate the dynamics of parallel or quasi-parallel Alfven waves. In the presence of viscous and Ohmic dissipation, and for a zero or sufficiently weak dispersion (originating from the Hall effect), an intermediate shock rapidly forms, steepens and undergoes reconnection through a quasi gradient collapse, leading to a reduction of |{Delta}{theta}| by an amount of 2{pi}, which can be viewed as the breaking of a topological constraint. Afterwards, as |{Delta}{theta}|<{pi}, the intermediate shock broadens and slowly dissipates. In the case of a phase jump |{Delta}{theta}|>3{pi}, which corresponds to a wave train limited on both sides by uniform fields, a sequence of such reconnection processes takes place. Differently, in the presence of a strong enough dispersion, the rotational discontinuity evolves, depending on the sign of {Delta}{theta}, to a dark or bright soliton displaying a 2{pi} phase variation. The latter is then eliminated, directly by reconnection in the case of a dark soliton, or through a more complex process involving a quasi amplitude collapse in that of a bright soliton. Afterwards, the resulting structure is progressively damped. For a prescribed initial rotational discontinuity, both quasi gradient and amplitude collapses lead to a sizeable energy decay that in the collisional regime is independent of the diffusion coefficient {eta} but requires a time scaling like 1/{eta}. In the non-collisional regime where dissipation originates from Landau resonance, the amount of dissipated energy during the event is independent of the plasma {beta}, but the process becomes slower for smaller {beta}.

  19. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, Eduard; Taylor, Roger W.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

  20. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

    1998-05-05

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 167,413 247,051 295,604 1990's 352,521 405,919 471,009 460,097 599,058 706,139 706,667 939,332 990,265 1,031,794 2000's 1,147,565 1,026,557 1,144,456 1,109,648 1,124,212 1,049,990 1,028,248 1,132,106 1,201,169

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers for the Account of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Industrial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Industrial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 867,124 1,087,737 1,559,503 1,839,611 2,240,381 3,128,899 3,663,187 4,297,693 1990's 4,544,535 4,863,923 5,248,609 5,644,894 6,112,919 6,517,352 7,151,885 6,969,318 6,984,012 6,564,492 2000's 6,529,240 5,813,726

  3. U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers for the Account of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Others (Million Cubic Feet) Residential Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 3,497 1990's 31,302 36,440 41,433 44,314 42,338 45,269 49,148 61,013 105,128 225,198 2000's 371,972 361,903 423,754 472,315 435,536 421,124 378,974 444,010 491,940 519,466 2010's 552,116 550,444 534,298 676,657

  4. Synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry study of intermediates in fuel-rich 1,2-dimethoxyethane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Z. K.; Han, D. L.; Li, S. F.; Li, Y. Y.; Yuan, T.

    2009-04-21

    Intermediates in a fuel-rich premixed laminar 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) flame are studied by molecular beam mass spectrometry combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. About 30 intermediate species are identified in the present work, and their mole fraction profiles are evaluated. The experimental results show that the formations of intermediates, both hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons, are closely linked to the structure of fuel, which is consistent with the previous reports. Species produced from H atom abstraction and beta scission of DME usually have much higher concentrations than others. The oxygen atoms in DME are considered to act as partitions of the primary intermediates; therefore farther reactions among these primary intermediates are difficult to occur, resulting in absence of most large intermediate species.

  5. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  6. Syngas Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels through Mixed Alcohol Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Jinjing; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-13

    Synthesis gas (syngas) can be used to synthesize a variety of fuels and chemicals. Domestic transportation and military operational interests have driven continued focus on domestic syngas-based fuels production. Liquid transportation fuels may be made from syngas via four basic processes: 1) higher alcohols, 2) Fischer-Tropsch (FT), 3) methanol-to-gasoline (MTG), and 4) methanol-to-olefins (MTO) and olefins-to-gasoline/distillate (MOGD). Compared to FT and higher alcohols, MTG and MTO-MOGD have received less attention in recent years. Due to the high capital cost of these synthetic fuel plants, the production cost of the finished fuel cannot compete with petroleum-derived fuel. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has recently evaluated one way to potentially reduce capital cost and overall production cost for MTG by combining the methanol and MTG syntheses in a single reactor. The concept consists of mixing the conventional MTG catalyst (i.e. HZSM-5) with an alcohol synthesis catalyst. It was found that a methanol synthesis catalyst, stable at high temperature (i.e. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3) [1], when mixed with ZSM-5, was active for syngas conversion. Relatively high syngas conversion can be achieved as the equilibrium-driven conversion limitations for methanol and dimethyl ether are removed as they are intermediates to the final hydrocarbon product. However, selectivity control was difficult to achieve as formation of undesirable durene and light hydrocarbons was problematic [2]. The objective of the present study was thus to evaluate other potential composite catalyst systems and optimize the reactions conditions for the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon fuels, through the use of mixed alcohol intermediates. Mixed alcohols are of interest as they have recently been reported to produce higher yields of gasoline compared to methanol [3]. 1. Lebarbier, V.M., Dagle, R.A., Kovarik, L., Lizarazo-Adarme, J.A., King, D.L., Palo, D.R., Catalyst Science & Technology, 2012, 2

  7. INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Jessica McChesney, APS beamline scientist, connecting the transition edge sensor (TES) detector to the...

  8. Effects of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and small non-road engines, report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian; Knoll, Keith; Clark, Wendy; Graves, Ronald; Orban, John; Przesmitzki, Steve; Theiss, Timothy

    2008-10-01

    Report on the test program to assess the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels.

  9. Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound CePd3 Citation Details ... We report inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a ...

  10. Tandem photovoltaic cells with a composite intermediate layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travkin, V. V. Pakhomov, G. L.; Luk’anov, A. Yu.; Stuzhin, P. A.

    2015-11-15

    We have fabricated and tested tandem photovoltaic cells containing series-connected subcells of the “oxide–organic semiconductor–metal” type. The organic semiconductors were two phthalocyanine dyes (SubPc and PcVO); Al or Ag:Mg were used as capping metallic electrodes. A semitransparent composite metal–oxide layer formed by molybdenum oxide MoO{sub x} deposited over an ultrathin Al layer is used to join the subcells. Additionally, a MoO{sub x} layer deposited onto glass/ITO substrates serves as an anode buffer in the front subcell, and LiF deposited onto the dye layers serves as a cathode buffer in the front or rear subcells. Upon optimization of the thickness and composition of the intermediate layer, the open circuit voltage U{sub oc} amounts to 1.6 V reflecting total summation of the contributions from the each of the subcells at a wide spectral coating from 300–1000 nm. The fill factor in the tandem cell is not worse than in individually made single cells with the same scheme or in disconnected subcells.

  11. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. ); Barron, W.F. ); Kamel, A.M. ); Santiago, H.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  12. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B.; Barron, W.F.; Kamel, A.M.; Santiago, H.T.

    1992-09-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  13. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  14. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Ng, C.; Levin, L.; and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15°

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  16. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  17. Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schienle, James L.; Strangman, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures.

  18. Packet spacing : an enabling mechanism for delivering multimedia content in computational grids /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, A. C.; Feng, W. C.; Belford, Geneva G.

    2001-01-01

    Streaming multimedia with UDP has become increasingly popular over distributed systems like the Internet. Scientific applications that stream multimedia include remote computational steering of visualization data and video-on-demand teleconferencing over the Access Grid. However, UDP does not possess a self-regulating, congestion-control mechanism; and most best-efort traflc is served by congestion-controlled TCF! Consequently, UDP steals bandwidth from TCP such that TCP$ows starve for network resources. With the volume of Internet traffic continuing to increase, the perpetuation of UDP-based streaming will cause the Internet to collapse as it did in the mid-1980's due to the use of non-congestion-controlled TCP. To address this problem, we introduce the counterintuitive notion of inter-packet spacing with control feedback to enable UDP-based applications to perform well in the next-generation Internet and computational grids. When compared with traditional UDP-based streaming, we illustrate that our approach can reduce packet loss over SO% without adversely afecting delivered throughput. Keywords: network protocol, multimedia, packet spacing, streaming, TCI: UDlq rate-adjusting congestion control, computational grid, Access Grid.

  19. Final Scientific and Technical Report - Practical Fiber Delivered Laser Ignition Systems for Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yalin, Azer

    2014-03-30

    Research has characterized advanced kagome fiber optics for their use in laser ignition systems. In comparison to past fibers used in laser ignition, these fibers have the important advantage of being relatively bend-insensitivity, so that they can be bent and coiled without degradation of output energy or beam quality. The results are very promising for practical systems. For pulse durations of ~12 ns, the fibers could deliver >~10 mJ pulses before damage onset. A study of pulse duration showed that by using longer pulse duration (~20 – 30 ns), it is possible to carry even higher pulse energy (by factor of ~2-3) which also provides future opportunities to implement longer duration sources. Beam quality measurements showed nearly single-mode output from the kagome fibers (i.e. M2 close to 1) which is the optimum possible value and, combined with their high pulse energy, shows the suitability of the fibers for laser ignition. Research has also demonstrated laser ignition of an engine including reliable (100%) ignition of a single-cylinder gasoline engine using the laser ignition system with bent and coiled kagome fiber. The COV of IMEP was <2% which is favorable for stable engine operation. These research results, along with the continued reduction in cost of laser sources, support our commercial development of practical laser ignition systems.

  20. District of Columbia Natural Gas Delivered for the Account of Others

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,051 1,049 1,043 1,040 1,035 1,034 2013-2016

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 93.2 2000's 82.8 75.4 74.5 70.7 75.4 79.8 76.7 76.2 76.3 76.1 2010's 75.5 75.0 73.9 75.0 73.8 73.2

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 76.0 76.2 75.3 73.4 81.1 82.2 72.9 80.3 74.6 72.2 72.3 71.0

  1. Impact of leaf motion constraints on IMAT plan quality, deliver accuracy, and efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Fan; Rao Min; Ye Jinsong; Shepard, David M.; Cao Daliang

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a radiation therapy delivery technique that combines the efficiency of arc based delivery with the dose painting capabilities of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A key challenge in developing robust inverse planning solutions for IMAT is the need to account for the connectivity of the beam shapes as the gantry rotates from one beam angle to the next. To overcome this challenge, inverse planning solutions typically impose a leaf motion constraint that defines the maximum distance a multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf can travel between adjacent control points. The leaf motion constraint ensures the deliverability of the optimized plan, but it also impacts the plan quality, the delivery accuracy, and the delivery efficiency. In this work, the authors have studied leaf motion constraints in detail and have developed recommendations for optimizing the balance between plan quality and delivery efficiency. Methods: Two steps were used to generate optimized IMAT treatment plans. The first was the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) inverse planning module in the Pinnacle{sup 3} planning system. Then, a home-grown arc sequencer was applied to convert the optimized intensity maps into deliverable IMAT arcs. IMAT leaf motion constraints were imposed using limits of between 1 and 30 mm/deg. Dose distributions were calculated using the convolution/superposition algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} planning system. The IMAT plan dose calculation accuracy was examined using a finer sampling calculation and the quality assurance verification. All plans were delivered on an Elekta Synergy with an 80-leaf MLC and were verified using an IBA MatriXX 2D ion chamber array inserted in a MultiCube solid water phantom. Results: The use of a more restrictive leaf motion constraint (less than 1-2 mm/deg) results in inferior plan quality. A less restrictive leaf motion constraint (greater than 5 mm/deg) results in improved plan

  2. Senator Dorgan and Under Secretary Orr to Deliver Remarks at 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the Vehicle Technologies Office announce that Senator Byron L. Dorgan (ret.) and DOE’s Under Secretary for Science and Energy Franklin Orr will deliver remarks at the 2015 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on Monday, June 8.

  3. Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CePd3 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound CePd3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound CePd3 We report inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal of the intermediate valence compound CePd3. At 300 K the magnetic scattering is quasielastic, with half-width G = 23 meV, and is independent of momentum transfer

  4. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

  5. Statistical line-by-line model for atomic spectra in intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical line-by-line model for atomic spectra in intermediate coupling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Statistical line-by-line model for atomic spectra in ...

  6. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunets, Vas. P. Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J.; Mortazavi, M.

    2014-08-28

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  7. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of ...

  8. Helicity amplitudes of di-photons production at the LHC with scalar unparticles intermediate states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliane, I.; Mebarki, N.; Haouchine, M.

    2012-06-27

    The helecity amplitudes of the subprocess gg{yields}{gamma}{gamma} via scalar unparticles intermediate states are calculated. The differential cross section is compared to that of the standard model. Phenomenological implications are also discussed.

  9. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  10. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  11. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  12. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2012-03-06

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  13. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  14. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2008-02-19

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  15. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  16. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, Keith; West, Brian; Clark, Wendy; Graves, Ronald; Orban, John; Przesmitzki, Steve; Theiss, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    This report (February 2009) is an update of the original version, which was published in October 2008. This report is the result of the U.S. Department of Energy's test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program is to assess the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels.

  17. Development of stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Bo; Tong, Xin; Jiang, Chenyang; Brown, Daniel R.; Robertson, Lee

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we developed a stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping. An optimized external cavity equipped with an off-the-shelf volume holographic grating narrowed the spectral line-width of a 100 W high-power diode laser and stabilized the laser spectrum. The laser spectrum showed a high side mode suppression ratio of >30 dB and good long-term stability (center wavelength drifting within ±0.002 nm during 220 h of operation). Finally, our laser is delivered by a multimode fiber with power ~70 W, center wavelength of 794.77 nm, and spectral bandwidth of ~0.12 nm.

  18. NREL Delivers In-Home HVAC Efficiency Testing Solutions (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivers In-Home HVAC Efficiency Testing Solutions Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have recently developed two simple in-home efficiency test methods that can be used by technicians, researchers, or interested homeowners to verify the correct opera- tion and energy efficiency of a home's air conditioning and heating equipment. An efficiency validation method for mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs)-highly efficient refrigerant-based air conditioning and heating systems

  19. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Dec2011_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration December 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 December 6, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. Prices for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved higher at the end of November with West Texas Intermediate (WTI) closing at $100.20 on November 30; near its highest price since June 9 and only the second time the benchmark has settled over $100 since then (Figure 1). Brent prices

  20. Evaluation of delivered monitor unit accuracy of gated step-and-shoot IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Lee, MeYeon; Kim, Su SSan; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To overcome the problem of organ motion in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), gated IMRT is often used for the treatment of lung cancer. In this study, the authors investigated the accuracy of the delivered monitor units (MUs) from each segment during gated IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array for user-specific verification purpose. Methods: The authors planned a 6 MV photon, seven-port step-and-shoot lung IMRT delivery. The respiration signals for gated IMRT delivery were obtained from the one-dimensional moving phantom using the real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The beams were delivered using a Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with the Millennium 120 MLC. The MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Germany) was validated through consistency and reproducibility tests as well as comparison with measurements from a Farmer-type ion chamber. The authors delivered beams with varying dose rates and duty cycles and analyzed the MatriXX data to evaluate MU delivery accuracy. Results: There was quite good agreement between the planned segment MUs and the MUs computed from the MatriXX within {+-}2% error. The beam-on times computed from the MatriXX data were almost identical for all cases, and they matched well with the RPM beam-on and beam-off signals. A slight difference was observed between them, but it was less than 40 ms. The gated IMRT delivery demonstrated an MU delivery accuracy that was equivalent to ungated IMRT, and the delivered MUs with a gating signal agreed with the planned MUs within {+-}0.5 MU regardless of dose rate and duty cycle. Conclusions: The authors can conclude that gated IMRT is able to deliver an accurate dose to a patient during a procedure. The authors believe that the methodology and results can be transferred to other vendors' devices, particularly those that do not provide MLC log data for a verification purpose.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Wi2 Intermediate red pine (IRP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chen, Jiquan [Michigan State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wi2 Intermediate red pine (IRP). Site Description - The Wisconsin Intermediate Red Pine site is located in the Washburn Ranger District of the northeastern section of Chequamegon National Forest. A member of the northern coniferous-deciduous biome, surveys from the mid-19th century indicate the region consisted of a mixed stand of red, white, and jack pines. After extensive timber harvesting, wildfires, and farming activity, the region turned into a fragmented mosaic of stands of various ages and composition. The intermediate red pine site is one of ten sites that collectively represent the successional stages of development in the predominant stand types of a physically homogeneous landscape. Thinned every 7 years until they reach 100 to 150 years of age, the red pine plantations of all ages occupy approximately 25% of the region.

  2. Long G2 accumulates recombination intermediates and disturbs chromosome segregation at dysfunction telomere in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, Ahmed G.K.; Masuda, Kenta; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2015-08-14

    Protection of telomere (Pot1) is a single-stranded telomere binding protein which is essential for chromosome ends protection. Fission yeast Rqh1 is a member of RecQ helicases family which has essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of homologous recombination. Double mutant between fission yeast pot1Δ and rqh1 helicase dead (rqh1-hd) maintains telomere by homologous recombination. In pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant, recombination intermediates accumulate near telomere which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to microtubule inhibitors thiabendazole (TBZ). Deletion of chk1{sup +} or mutation of its kinase domain shortens the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant and suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of that double mutant. In this study, we asked whether the long G2 is the reason for the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. We found that shortening the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant by additional mutations of wee1 and mik1 or gain of function mutation of Cdc2 suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. Our results suggest that long G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant may allow time for the accumulation of recombination intermediates which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to TBZ. - Ηighlights: • We show link between long G2 and accumulation of toxic recombination intermediates. • Accumulation of recombination intermediates at telomere results in TBZ sensitivity. • Activation of DNA damage checkpoint worsens cells' viability in presence of TBZ.

  3. Energy Management in Small Commercial Buildings: A Look at How HVAC Contractors Can Deliver Energy Efficiency to this Segment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hult, Erin; Granderson, Jessica; Mathew, Paul

    2014-07-01

    While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hour onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.

  4. SU-E-T-506: Dosimetric Verification of Photon MLC Delivered Electron Fields for Implementing MERT On An Artiste Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Wang, L; Ma, C; Fan, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of photon MLC delivered electron fields for implementing energy-intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) on an Artiste linac. Methods: It was proposed to deliver MERT on an Artiste linac at a short SSD (60 cm) to reduce beam penumbra caused by electron scatters. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning code was used for treatment planning. Our previous study showed that the measured dose distribution of a breast plan showed good agreement with the calculations in low-medium dose regions while the differences in high dose regions were outstanding. A continuous work found that the discrepancy is mainly caused by improper modeling in MC for the single focused MLC in the Artiste which was simplified as double focused in the previous MC simulations. With this remodeled MLC in the calculations, an energy-intensity modulated electron plan using 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV was generated for a breast treatment on a breast phantom at a 60 cm SSD and recalculated regarding a solid water phantom. For a test study, four of MLC segments (each with a different energy) generated in the plan were delivered to the phantom and a film measurement was performed at the depth of 2 cm. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: For composite doses of the four segments, measured 2D dose distributions overall agree well with the calculations (3mm/3%) in most area. The separate measurement for a single MLC segment for each of energies also showed the consistence with the calculations. Conclusion: After remodeling MLC in the MC calculations, the measured dose distribution for a subset of MLC segments from a MERT plan showed good agreement. Further detailed verification for the full plan will be the work in the next step.

  5. Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

    2008-08-01

    A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

  6. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 3. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the project description, list of participants, and system specifications for the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii.

  7. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavy or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.

  8. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.

    1996-11-05

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  9. Sustainable Thorium Nuclear Fuel Cycles: A Comparison of Intermediate and Fast Neutron Spectrum Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.; Zhang, G.; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew; Gehin, Jess C.; Kim, T. K.; et al

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavymore » or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this selfsustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.« less

  10. Analysis of the efficiency of intermediate band solar cells based on quantum dot supercrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heshmati, S; Golmohammadi, S; Abedi, K; Taleb, H

    2014-03-28

    We have studied the influence of the quantum-dot (QD) width and the quantum-dot conduction band (QD-CB) offset on the efficiency of quantum-dot intermediate band solar cells (QD-IBSCs). Simulation results demonstrate that with increasing QD-CB offset and decreasing QD width, the maximum efficiency is achieved. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Damped spin waves in the intermediate ordered phases in Ni3V2O8

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Frontzek, Matthias D.; Pushkarev, A. V.; Shiryaev, Sergie V.; Barilo, Sergie

    2015-06-09

    Here, spin dynamics in the intermediate ordered phases (between 4 and 9 K) in Ni3V2O8 have been studied with inelastic neutron scattering. It is found that the spin waves are very diffuse, indicative of short lived correlations and the coexistence of paramagnetic moments with the long-range ordered state.

  12. Structure and Electronic Configurations of the Intermediates of Water Oxidation in Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Zakharova, Taisiya; Alperovich, Igor; Meyer, Thomas J.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-04-08

    Catalytic O{sub 2} evolution with cis,cis-[(bpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)Ru{sup III}ORu{sup III}(OH{sub 2})(bpy){sub 2}]{sup 4+} (bpy is 2,2-bipyridine), the so-called blue dimer, the first designed water oxidation catalyst, was monitored by UV-vis, EPR, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with ms time resolution. Two processes were identified, one of which occurs on a time scale of 100 ms to a few seconds and results in oxidation of the catalyst with the formation of an intermediate, here termed [3,4]'. A slower process occurring on the time scale of minutes results in the decay of this intermediate and O{sub 2} evolution. Spectroscopic data suggest that within the fast process there is a short-lived transient intermediate, which is a precursor of [3,4]'. When excess oxidant was used, a highly oxidized form of the blue dimer [4,5] was spectroscopically resolved within the time frame of the fast process. Its structure and electronic state were confirmed by EPR and XAS. As reported earlier, the [3,4]' intermediate likely results from reaction of [4,5] with water. While it is generated under strongly oxidizing conditions, it does not display oxidation of the Ru centers past [3,4] according to EPR and XAS. EXAFS analysis demonstrates a considerably modified ligand environment in [3,4]'. Raman measurements confirmed the presence of the O-O fragment by detecting a new vibration band in [3,4]' that undergoes a 46 cm{sup -1} shift to lower energy upon {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O exchange. Under the conditions of the experiment at pH 1, the [3,4]' intermediate is the catalytic steady state form of the blue dimer catalyst, suggesting that its oxidation is the rate-limiting step.

  13. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, at the Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy on December 18, 2014 in Washington, DC.

  14. Secretary Moniz’s Remarks at COP-21 on the Clean Energy Ministerial: Implementation and Increasing Ambition Beyond Paris-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz’s remarks at COP-21 on the Clean Energy Ministerial: Implementation and Increasing Ambition Beyond Paris as delivered on Tuesday, December 8, 2015 in Paris, France.

  15. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Wilson Center on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges”-- As Delivered

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges” at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC on January 7, 2015.

  16. Partnering with Utilities Part 2: Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation; given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP); is part 2 in the series; Partnering with Utilities:Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs.

  17. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup- Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment of contaminated groundwater near the Columbia River at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state.

  18. Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2010-2014, and by state and sector, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Table 16. Natural gas delivered to consumers by sector, 2010-2014, and by state and sector, 2014 2010 Total 4,782,412 65,542,345 3,102,593 5,301,576 6,826,192 192,730 2011 Total 4,713,777 65,940,522 3,155,319 5,319,817 6,994,120 189,301 2012 Total 4,149,519 66,375,134 2,894,926 5,356,397 7,226,215 189,372 2013 Total R 4,897,372 R 66,812,393 R 3,295,301 R 5,372,522 R 7,425,452 R 192,288 2014 Total 5,087,314 67,227,762 3,466,600 5,418,986 7,623,826 192,135 Alabama 38,971 769,418 27,515 67,806

  19. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

  20. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

  1. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  2. Intermediate band solar cell simulation use InAs quantum dot in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendra P, I. B. Rahayu, F.; Sahdan, M. F.; Darma, Y.

    2015-04-16

    Intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) has become a new approach in increasing solar cell efficiency significantly. One way to create intermediate band is by proposing quantum dots (QD) technology. One of the important aspects in utilizing IBSC is the absorption of light. In this work we simulated the influence of QD arrangement in order to increase absorption coefficient and solar cell efficiency. We also simulated the influence of QD size to capture a wider light spectrum. We present a simple calculation method with low computing power demand. Results show that the increasing in quantum dot size can increase in capturing wider spectrum of light. Arrangement InAs QD in bulk material GaAs can capture wider spectrum of light and increase the absorption coefficient. The arrangement InAs QD 2 nm in GaAs bulk can increase solar cell efficiency up to 49.68%.

  3. Effects of metal impregnation on ZSM-5 for catalytic upgrading of biofuel intermediates.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABSTRACT The creation of biofuels via pyrolysis results in an unstable, low quality product, which must be deoxygenated for use as a transportation fuel. Metal impregnation has been studied as a method to develop improved catalysts for use in catalytic upgrading of biofuel intermediates. To investigate the effectiveness of metal impregnation, metal-modified catalysts were prepared via incipient wetness impregnation using Ni, Cu, Pt, Co, and Ga precursors on the zeolite ZSM-5. The

  4. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces Working title - Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate in the alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Halogenase CytC3 from Streptomyces There are over 4,500 known halogenated natural products. The presence of a halogen in the molecular framework tunes a compound's chemical reactivity or biological activity in these natural fungicides and antibiotics. Four classes of enzymes are now known to catalyze

  5. Catalytic Upgrading of Thermochemical Intermediates to Hydrocarbons Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RTI International RTI International is a trade name of Research Triangle Institute. www.rti.org 2015 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review WBS 2.5.4.405 - Catalytic Upgrading of Thermochemical Intermediates to Hydrocarbons March 24, 2015 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review David C. Dayton, PI RTI International This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information RTI International Goals and Objectives Objective: Demonstrate an

  6. IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3: A DEEPLY ECLIPSING INTERMEDIATE POLAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aungwerojwit, A.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Wheatley, P. J.; Pyrzas, S.; Staels, B.; Krajci, T.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.

    2012-10-20

    We present time-resolved photometry of a cataclysmic variable discovered in the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H{alpha} Survey of the northern galactic plane, IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3, and classify the system as the fourth deeply eclipsing intermediate polar known with an orbital period of P {sub orb} = 8.16 hr and a spin period of P {sub spin} = 2210 s. The system shows mild variations of its brightness that appear to be accompanied by a change in the amplitude of the spin modulation at optical wavelengths and a change in the morphology of the eclipse profile. The inferred magnetic moment of the white dwarf is {mu}{sub wd} {approx} (6-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} G cm{sup 3}, and in this case IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3 will evolve either into a short-period EX Hya-like intermediate polar with a large P {sub spin}/P{sub orb} ratio or, perhaps more likely, into a synchronized polar. Swift observations show that the system is an ultraviolet and X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum that is consistent with those seen in other intermediate polars. The ultraviolet light curve shows orbital modulation and an eclipse, while the low signal-to-noise ratio X-ray light curve does not show a significant modulation on the spin period. The measured X-ray flux is about an order of magnitude lower than would be expected from scaling by the optical fluxes of well-known X-ray-selected intermediate polars.

  7. Characteristics and sources of intermediate size particles in recovery boilers : final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Larry L.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Verrill, Christopher L.; Wessel, Richard A.

    2005-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) Forest Products research program, a collaborative investigation was conducted on the sources, characteristics, and deposition of particles intermediate in size between submicron fume and carryover in recovery boilers. Laboratory experiments on suspended-drop combustion of black liquor and on black liquor char bed combustion demonstrated that both processes generate intermediate size particles (ISP), amounting to 0.5-2% of the black liquor dry solids mass (BLS). Measurements in two U.S. recovery boilers show variable loadings of ISP in the upper furnace, typically between 0.6-3 g/Nm{sup 3}, or 0.3-1.5% of BLS. The measurements show that the ISP mass size distribution increases with size from 5-100 {micro}m, implying that a substantial amount of ISP inertially deposits on steam tubes. ISP particles are depleted in potassium, chlorine, and sulfur relative to the fuel composition. Comprehensive boiler modeling demonstrates that ISP concentrations are substantially overpredicted when using a previously developed algorithm for ISP generation. Equilibrium calculations suggest that alkali carbonate decomposition occurs at intermediate heights in the furnace and may lead to partial destruction of ISP particles formed lower in the furnace. ISP deposition is predicted to occur in the superheater sections, at temperatures greater than 750 C, when the particles are at least partially molten.

  8. Microsoft Word - MPW_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4820P_updated_format.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 1 April 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 April 12, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged $88.58 per barrel in February then rose to $108 per barrel by the end of March (Figure 1). Projected WTI prices average $106 in 2011 and $114 per barrel in 2012, increases of $5 per barrel and $9 per barrel, respectively, from last month's Outlook. Growing volumes of Canadian crude oil imported into the United

  9. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil futures prices rebounded in April and approached the top of their recent trading range. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.76 per barrel (bbl) on May 1, an increase of $2.14/bbl from April 1 (Figure 1). West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices at the start of May were near the same levels as the beginning of April. The front month WTI contract settled at $99.42/bbl on May 1, a slight decrease

  10. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: North Sea Brent and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures contracts continued their recent decline in October and the first week of November as a larger-than-normal seasonal decrease in global refinery runs from August through October lessened demand for crude oil. The Brent contract settled at $103.46 per barrel on November 7, a decline of $4.48 per barrel compared to October 1 (Figure 1). The decreases in WTI futures prices

  11. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Front month futures prices for the Brent and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil benchmarks fell in September. The Brent contract settled at $109.00 per barrel on October 3, a decline of $6.68 per barrel since September 3, and WTI settled at $103.31 per barrel on October 3, falling by $5.23 per barrel over the same period (Figure 1). These changes marked the first month-over-month declines in

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - ghate_flare_present.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2010 1 March 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 9, 2010 Release Highlights  Although spot crude oil prices continue to fluctuate on a daily basis, EIA's projections for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices have remained relatively stable over the last 4 Outlooks. EIA expects WTI prices to average above $80 per barrel this spring, rising to an average of about $82 per barrel by the end of the year and to $85 per barrel by the end of 2011.  Projected economic growth

  13. Microsoft Word - 2013-2014 Final MSA Report.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast 1 July 10, 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast Since the mid-1980s, benchmark crude oil prices such as West Texas Intermediate (WTI) in the United States and Brent crude oil in Europe have served as reference points that the market uses for pricing other crude oils. The historically close relationships between the major benchmarks made WTI prices a reliable indicator of the average cost of crude oil to U.S. refiners,

  14. Microsoft Word - 2012_sp_02.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast 1 July 10, 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Brent Crude Oil Spot Price Forecast Since the mid-1980s, benchmark crude oil prices such as West Texas Intermediate (WTI) in the United States and Brent crude oil in Europe have served as reference points that the market uses for pricing other crude oils. The historically close relationships between the major benchmarks made WTI prices a reliable indicator of the average cost of crude oil to U.S. refiners,

  15. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2005 Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Figures 1 to 7) The projected average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price for the first quarter of 2005 has been revised upward to about $48.70 per barrel, approximately $13 per barrel higher than in the first quarter of 2004 and $2 per barrel above the first quarter 2005 projection in the previous Outlook. EIA projects that WTI prices are likely to remain near the high-to-mid-$40's (or higher) per barrel range

  16. Microsoft Word - Highlights rev.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 April 2009 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook April 14, 2009 Release Highlights The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil averaged $100 per barrel in 2008. The global economic slowdown is projected to reduce the average price to $53 per barrel this year. Assuming an economic recovery next year, WTI prices are expected to average $63 in 2010. Regular-grade gasoline prices have increased to more than $2 per gallon, rising slowly but steadily since the beginning of the year

  17. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    April 2010 1 April 2010 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook April 6, 2010 Release Highlights  EIA's projections for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices have changed very little over the last five Outlooks even as spot crude oil prices continue to fluctuate on a daily basis. EIA expects WTI prices to average above $81 per barrel this summer, slightly less than $81 per barrel for 2010 as a whole, and $85 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2011.  EIA forecasts that

  18. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices for July were little changed from June. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot average for July was $30.75 per barrel compared to $30.66 in June. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm through the rest of 2003, or at least until autumn, when OECD oil inventories may rebuild above observed 5-year lows. Once inventories have been rebuilt, WTI oil prices may slide gradually to $26 per barrel during

  19. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 August 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 12, 2008 Release Highlights The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased from $122 per barrel on June 4 to $145 per barrel on July 3, in part because of perceptions of tenuous supply in several of the major exporting countries. By August 5, the price fell back to less than $120 per barrel. WTI prices, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, are projected to average $119 per barrel in 2008 and $124 per barrel in 2009. The

  20. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10 1 December 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 7, 2010 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to average about $84 per barrel this winter (October 1 to March 31), more than $6 higher than the average price last winter. Projected WTI prices rise to $89 per barrel by the end of 2011, a $2 per barrel increase from last month's Outlook, as U.S. and global economic conditions improve. EIA's forecast assumes U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP)

  1. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1 January 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 11, 2011 Release Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts (monthly, quarterly and annual) through December 2012.  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to average about $93 per barrel in 2011, $14 higher than the average price last year. For 2012, EIA expects WTI prices to continue to rise, with a forecast average price of $99 per barrel in the fourth quarter

  2. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 July 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 8, 2008 Release Highlights The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased from $122 per barrel on June 4 to $145 per barrel on July 3. Global supply uncertainties, combined with significant demand growth in China, the Middle East, and Latin America are expected to continue to pressure oil markets. WTI prices, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, are projected to average $127 per barrel in 2008 and $133 per barrel in 2009.

  3. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 1 May 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 6, 2008 Release Highlights West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices increased from $101 to $120 per barrel over the first 3 weeks of April as supply disruptions in Nigeria and the North Sea and continuing strong demand growth in the emerging market countries pressured oil markets. WTI crude oil prices, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, are projected to average $110 per barrel in 2008 and $103 per barrel in 2009. These projections are

  4. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 1 November 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 10, 2009 Release Highlights  EIA is raising the forecast price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil by $7 per barrel compared with the last Outlook, to average about $77 per barrel this winter (October-March). The forecast for monthly average WTI prices rises to about $81 per barrel by December 2010, assuming U.S. and world economic conditions continue to improve, particularly in Asia, where current growth has been stronger than

  5. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10 1 November 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 9, 2010 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to average about $83 per barrel this winter (October 1 to March 31), a $5.50-per-barrel increase over last winter and $3 per barrel more than in last month's Outlook. Projected WTI prices rise gradually to $87 per barrel by the fourth quarter of 2011 as U.S. and global economic conditions improve. EIA's forecast assumes U.S. gross domestic product

  6. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration April 2011 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook April 12, 2011 Release Highlights  West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged $89 per barrel in February and $103 per barrel in March. The WTI price has continued to rise in recent days, reaching $112 on April 8. Crude oil prices are currently at their highest level since 2008. EIA expects oil markets to continue to tighten over the next two

  7. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2012 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration February 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 7, 2012 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to average about $100 per barrel in 2012, almost $6 per barrel higher than the average price last year. Based on recent futures and options data, the market believes there is about a one-in-fifteen chance that the average WTI price in June 2012 will exceed $125

  8. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    January 2012 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration January 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 10, 2012 Release Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2013.  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to average about $100 per barrel in 2012, $5 per barrel higher than the average price last year. For 2013, EIA expects WTI prices to continue to rise, reaching $106 per

  9. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration May 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 10, 2011 Release Highlights  West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged $89 per barrel in February, $103 per barrel in March, and $110 per barrel in April. During the first week of May WTI crude oil prices fell by nearly $17 per barrel to $97 per barrel, along with a broad set of commodities, and then rebounded by almost $6 per barrel yesterday. However,

  10. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Apr2011_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11 1 April 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 April 12, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged $88.58 per barrel in February then rose to $108 per barrel by the end of March (Figure 1). Projected WTI prices average $106 in 2011 and $114 per barrel in 2012, increases of $5 per barrel and $9 per barrel, respectively, from last month's Outlook. Growing volumes of Canadian crude oil imported into the United

  11. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Apr2013_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Brent crude oil prices moved lower from the beginning of March to the first week in April. The Brent front month crude oil futures price settled at $106.34 per barrel on April 4, $4.06 per barrel lower than on March 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil benchmark, on the other hand, rose over the last month, nearly reaching its 2013 high in March. The WTI front month futures price settled at $93.26 on April 4, an

  12. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Aug2011_review.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 1 August 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 August 9, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil front month futures prices remained in a tight range for the month of July, rising from a low of $94.94 at the beginning of the month to just under $100 on July 22 (Figure 1). However, after downward revisions to first half U.S. GDP, released on July 29, WTI prices fell dramatically to settle at $86.63 on August 4. The first quarter

  13. Microsoft Word - MPUR_Feb2012_final.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    February 2012 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration February 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Market Prices and Uncertainty Report 1 February 7, 2012 Release Crude Oil Prices: On February 2, Brent settled at $112.07 per barrel, unchanged from its closing price on January 3, and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) settled at $96.36 per barrel, a decrease of $6.30 per barrel over the same time period. Both Brent and WTI traded in narrow ranges of $4 and $7 per

  14. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement .docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 1 January 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 January 11, 2011 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged over $89 per barrel in December, about $5 per barrel higher than the November average. Expectations of higher oil demand, combined with unusually cold weather in both Europe and the U.S. Northeast, contributed to prices. EIA has raised the first quarter 2011 WTI spot price forecast by $8 per barrel

  15. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 1 August 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 August 10, 2010 Release WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $76.32 per barrel in July 2010 or about $1 per barrel above the prior month's average, and close to the $77 per barrel projected in last month's Outlook. EIA projects WTI prices will average about $80 per barrel over the second half of this year and rise to $85 by the end of next year (West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price Chart). Energy price

  16. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 1 July 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 July 7, 2010 Release Crude Oil Prices. WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $75.34 per barrel in June 2010 ($1.60 per barrel above the prior month's average), close to the $76 per barrel projected in the forecast in last month's Outlook. EIA projects WTI prices will average about $79 per barrel over the second half of this year and rise to $84 by the end of next year (West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price

  17. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 1 September 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 September 8, 2010 Release Crude Oil Prices. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot prices averaged about $77 per barrel in August 2010, very close to the July average, but $3 per barrel lower than projected in last month's Outlook. WTI spot prices averaged almost $82 per barrel over the first 10 days of August but then fell by $9 per barrel over the next 2 weeks as the market reacted to a series

  18. Nov 2007 STEO Supplement

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    07 1 November 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Why Are Oil Prices So High? 1 Crude oil prices have increased dramatically in recent years. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices, which remained around $20 per barrel during the 1990's, rose, on average, from about $31 per barrel in 2003 to $57 per barrel in 2005, and to $66 per barrel in 2006. In 2007, WTI crude oil prices have climbed further, to average over $85 per barrel in October, topping $90 per barrel at the end of the month. The

  19. Short-Term Arctic Cloud Statistics at NSA from the Infrared Cloud Imager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below

  20. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  2. The Impact of Biomass Feedstock Supply Variability on the Delivered Price to a Biorefinery in the Peace River Region of Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen, Jamie; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Sowlati, T.; Kloeck, T.; Townley-Smith, Lawrence; Stumborg, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural residue feedstock availability in a given region can vary significantly over the 20 25 year lifetime of a biorefinery. Since delivered price of biomass feedstock to a biorefinery is related to the distance travelled and equipment optimization, and transportation distance increases as productivity decreases, productivity is a primary determinant of feedstock price. Using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) modeling environment and a standard round bale harvest and delivery scenario, harvest and delivery price were modelled for minimum, average, and maximum yields at four potential biorefinery sites in the Peace River region of Alberta, Canada. Biorefinery capacities ranged from 50,000 to 500,000 tonnes per year. Delivery cost is a linear function of transportation distance and can be combined with a polynomial harvest function to create a generalized delivered cost function for agricultural residues. The range in delivered cost is substantial and is an important consideration for the operating costs of a biorefinery.

  3. Energy barriers, cooperativity, and hidden intermediates in the folding of small proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 37, Room 6114E, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: yawen@helix.nih.gov

    2006-02-17

    Current theoretical views of the folding process of small proteins (<{approx}100 amino acids) postulate that the landscape of potential mean force (PMF) for the formation of the native state has a funnel shape and that the free energy barrier to folding arises from the chain configurational entropy only. However, recent theoretical studies on the formation of hydrophobic clusters with explicit water suggest that a barrier should exist on the PMF of folding, consistent with the fact that protein folding generally involves a large positive activation enthalpy at room temperature. In addition, high-resolution structural studies of the hidden partially unfolded intermediates have revealed the existence of non-native interactions, suggesting that the correction of the non-native interactions during folding should also lead to barriers on PMF. To explore the effect of a PMF barrier on the folding behavior of proteins, we modified Zwanzig's model for protein folding with an uphill landscape of PMF for the formation of transition states. We found that the modified model for short peptide segments can satisfy the thermodynamic and kinetic criteria for an apparently two-state folding. Since the Levinthal paradox can be solved by a stepwise folding of short peptide segments, a landscape of PMF with a locally uphill search for the transition state and cooperative stabilization of folding intermediates/native state is able to explain the available experimental results for small proteins. We speculate that the existence of cooperative hidden folding intermediates in small proteins could be the consequence of the highly specific structures of the native state, which are selected by evolution to perform specific functions and fold in a biologically meaningful time scale.

  4. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy {sup 129}Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions on {sup nat}Cu, {sup 89}Y, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the {sup 129}Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  5. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

    2009-02-01

    Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

  6. The nature and role of bridged carbonyl intermediates in theultrafast photo-induced rearrangement of Ru3(CO)12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Kling, Matthias F.; Shanoski, Jennifer E.; Harris, Charles B.

    2005-09-18

    The photochemistry of the trimetal cluster,Ru(3)(CO)12, was investigated on the ultrafast timescale using UV-vis pump, infrared probe spectroscopy in order to study the transient intermediates formed upon photoexcitation.

  7. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, for November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The data accumulated during November 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii, are presented. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  8. Time-resolved serial crystallography captures high-resolution intermediates of photoactive yellow protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Zatsepin, Nadia; Pande, Kanupriya; Milathianaki, Despina; Frank, Matthias; Hunter, Mark; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; et al

    2014-12-05

    We report that serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) offers the possibility to study light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. Using microcrystals of the blue light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, as a model system, we present high resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features, which allow the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to 1.6 Å resolution. These results open the way to the study of reversible and non-reversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions which maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal.

  9. Titanium alloy 5111 brings intermediate strength, excellent toughness, and corrosion resistance to naval operating environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Been, J.

    1999-07-01

    Ti-5Al-1Sn-1Zr-1V-O.8M0 is a near alpha titanium alloy of intermediate strength, designed for high toughness, good weldability, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, and room temperature creep resistance. Ideally suited for marine environments, Ti 5111 offers the means to aid the navy in fulfilling their goals of reducing maintenance and life cycle costs, reducing topside and overall weight, improve survivability and increase reliability. The alloy was recently included in the ASTM bar and plate specifications as ASTM Grade 32.

  10. Collective flow properties of intermediate mass fragments and isospin effects in fragmentation at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baran, V.; Zus, R.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.

    2013-11-13

    Within a microscopic transport model (Stochastic Mean Field) we analyze the collective flow properties associated to the intermediate mass fragments produced in nuclear fragmentation. We study the transverse and elliptic flow parameters for each rank in mass hierarchy. The results are plotted for {sup 124}Sn + {sup 124}Sn systems at an energy of 50AMeV and for an impact parameter b=4fm. The correlation with the dynamics of the isospin degree of freedom is also discussed and the results are presented for the same systems.

  11. Feedstock selection for small- and intermediate-scale fuel ethanol distilleries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meo, M.

    1985-07-01

    A variety of commercial and experimental starch- and sugar-rich crops were evaluated for their suitability as feedstocks for both small-scale, on-farm and intermediate-scale, off-farm fuel ethanol production in California's Sacramento Valley. Solutions of linear programming models indicated that sweet sorghum is the least-cost feedstock for on-farm production of 50,000 gallons of fuel ethanol per year. Fodder beet proved to be the least-cost feedstock for off-farm production of 1 million gallons of fuel ethanol per year.

  12. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175°C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  13. Excitation of the 3p states in electron-sodium scattering at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamali, M. Z. M.; Wong, B. R.; Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    A coupled-channel-optical method (CCOM), to investigate the excitation of the 3p states for e{sup ?}-Na scattering at intermediate energies, is reported. Nine atomic states( Na(3s), Na(3p), Na(4s), Na(3d), Na(4p), Na(5s), Na(4d), Na(5p), Na(5d) ) together with three optical potentials are used in this work. The inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) as well as the reduced Stokes parameters are compared with latest theoretical data and experimental measurements.

  14. A brief review of intermediate controlled nuclear syntheses (ICNS) without harmful radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanjewar, R. B.

    2015-03-10

    Hadronic mechanics gave birth to new magnecular fuels. The present day demand is of clean energy source that is cheap and abundant. Clean energy can be obtained by harnessing renewable energy sources like solar, wind etc. Nuclear energy conventionally produced by fission reactions emits hazardous radiation and radioactive waste. The requirements of clean and safe energy gets fulfilled by novel fuel that achieved by elevating the traditional quantum mechanics to hadronic mechanics and to hadronic chemistry. In the present paper, a comprehensive review on both the theoretical and experimental aspect of the Intermediate Controlled Nuclear Synthesis (ICNS) as developed by Italian American Scientist Professor R. M. Santilli.

  15. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ?6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ?T2b or GS 3+4, ?T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease. In

  16. Solid-state graphene formation via a nickel carbide intermediate phase [Nickel carbide (Ni3C) as an intermediate phase for graphene formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, W; Zhou, Yunshen; Hou, Wenjia; Guillemet, Thomas; Silvain, Jean-François; Lahaye, Michel; Lebraud, Eric; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei; Cullen, David A; et al

    2015-01-01

    Direct formation of graphene with controlled number of graphitic layers on dielectric surfaces is highly desired for practical applications. Despite significant progress achieved in understanding the formation of graphene on metallic surfaces through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbons, very limited research is available elucidating the graphene formation process via rapid thermal processing (RTP) of solid-state amorphous carbon, through which graphene is formed directly on dielectric surfaces accompanied by autonomous nickel evaporation. It is suggested that a metastable hexagonal nickel carbide (Ni3C) intermediate phase plays a critical role in transforming amorphous carbon to 2D crystalline graphene and contributing to themore » autonomous Ni evaporation. Temperature resolved carbon and nickel evolution in the RTP process is investigated using Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) depth profiling and glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Formation, migration and decomposition of the hexagonal Ni3C are confirmed to be responsible for the formation of graphene and the evaporation of Ni at 1100 °C. The Ni3C-assisted graphene formation mechanism expands the understanding of Ni-catalyzed graphene formation, and provides insightful guidance for controlled growth of graphene through the solid-state transformation process.« less

  17. Phenomenology of dark matter annihilation into a long-lived intermediate state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothstein, Ira Z.; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure E-mail: schwetz@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2009-07-01

    We propose a scenario where Dark Matter (DM) annihilates into an intermediate state which travels a distance λ ≡ v/Γ on the order of galactic scales and then decays to Standard Model (SM) particles. The long lifetime disperses the production zone of the SM particles away from the galactic center and hence, relaxes constraints from gamma ray observations on canonical annihilation scenarios. We utilize this set up to explain the electron and positron excesses observed recently by PAMELA, ATIC and FERMI. While an explanation in terms of usual DM annihilations seems to conflict with gamma ray observations, we show that within the proposed scenario, the PAMELA/ATIC/FERMI results are consistent with the gamma ray data. The distinction from decay scenarios is discsussed and we comment on the prospects for DM production at LHC. The typical decay length λ ∼> 10 kpc of the intermediate state can have its origin from a dimension six operator suppressed by a scale Λ ∼ 10{sup 13} GeV, which is roughly the seesaw scale for neutrino masses.

  18. Reservoir Modeling by Data Integration via Intermediate Spaces and Artificial Intelligence Tools in MPS Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, Rouhollah; Khamehchi, Ehsan

    2013-12-15

    Conditioning stochastic simulations are very important in many geostatistical applications that call for the introduction of nonlinear and multiple-point data in reservoir modeling. Here, a new methodology is proposed for the incorporation of different data types into multiple-point statistics (MPS) simulation frameworks. Unlike the previous techniques that call for an approximate forward model (filter) for integration of secondary data into geologically constructed models, the proposed approach develops an intermediate space where all the primary and secondary data are easily mapped onto. Definition of the intermediate space, as may be achieved via application of artificial intelligence tools like neural networks and fuzzy inference systems, eliminates the need for using filters as in previous techniques. The applicability of the proposed approach in conditioning MPS simulations to static and geologic data is verified by modeling a real example of discrete fracture networks using conventional well-log data. The training patterns are well reproduced in the realizations, while the model is also consistent with the map of secondary data.

  19. Engineering report on drilling in the Sand Wash Basin intermediate grade project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    The Sand Wash Basin Intermediate Grade Drilling Project was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. This project consisted of 19 drill holes ranging in depth from 275 to 1220 feet (83.9 to 372.1 m). A total of 11,569 feet (3528.5 m) was rotary drilled and 130 feet (39.7 m) were cored for a total of 11,699 feet (3568.2 m) for the project. The project objective was to provide comprehensive subsurface geologic data relevant to Intermediate Grade uranium mineralization of the Browns Park Formation in the Sugar Loaf Peak Site A, and the Little Juniper Mountain Site B areas. All boreholes are located on the USGS Juniper Hot Springs and the Lay 7.5-Minute Series (Topographic) Quadrangles. The project began May 2, 1980; drilling was completed June 3, 1980. Site restoration and clean up was initiated immediately upon the completion of the last borehole and was completed June 8, 1980.

  20. THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEPTUNE TROJANS AND THE MISSING INTERMEDIATE-SIZED PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Trujillo, Chadwick A.

    2010-11-10

    We present an ultra-deep survey for Neptune Trojans using the Subaru 8.2 m and Magellan 6.5 m telescopes. The survey reached a 50% detection efficiency in the R band at m{sub R} = 25.7 mag and covered 49 deg{sup 2} of sky. m{sub R} = 25.7 mag corresponds to Neptune Trojans that are about 16 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.05). A paucity of smaller Neptune Trojans (radii < 45 km) compared with larger ones was found. The brightest Neptune Trojans appear to follow a steep power-law slope (q = 5 {+-} 1) similar to the brightest objects in the other known stable reservoirs such as the Kuiper Belt, Jupiter Trojans, and main belt asteroids. We find a roll-over for the Neptune Trojans that occurs around a radius of r = 45 {+-} 10 km (m{sub R} = 23.5 {+-} 0.3), which is also very similar to the other stable reservoirs. All the observed stable regions in the solar system show evidence for Missing Intermediate-Sized Planetesimals (MISPs). This indicates a primordial and not collisional origin, which suggests that planetesimal formation proceeded directly from small to large objects. The scarcity of intermediate- and smaller-sized Neptune Trojans may limit them as being a strong source for the short period comets.

  1. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of {sigma}(700)-meson exchange in {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} transition; pion photoproduction and the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson`s theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}{sup o}) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and {Nu} {yields} {Nu}{gamma} and {Delta} {yields} {gamma}{Nu} transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the {Nu} {yields} {Delta} transition at bates and CEBAF.

  2. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee -Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at anmore » intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.« less

  3. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ? z ? 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 ?m, as well as the molecular gas of z ? 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z

  4. Microsoft Word - Highlights final.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 1 March 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 7, 2006 Release Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity, and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil is projected to average $64 per barrel in 2006 and $61 in 2007 (Figure 1. West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price). While the average retail price

  5. Alternatives generation and analysis for the Phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claghorn, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06

    This alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) addresses the question: What is the design basis for the facilities required to stage low-level waste (LLW) feed to the Phase I private contractors? Alternative designs for the intermediate waste feed staging system were developed, analyzed, and compared. Based on these analyses, this document recommends installing mixer pumps in the central pump pit of double-shell tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Also recommended is installing decant/transfer pumps at these tanks. These recommendations have clear advantages in that they provide a low shedule impact/risk and the highest operability of all the alternatives investigated. This revision incorporates comments from the decision board.

  6. Atom detection in a two-mode optical cavity with intermediate coupling: Autocorrelation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, D. G.; Cahoon, E. J.; Orozco, L. A.

    2009-10-15

    We use an optical cavity in the regime of intermediate coupling between atom and cavity mode to detect single moving atoms. Degenerate polarization modes allow excitation of the atoms in one mode and collection of spontaneous emission in the other while keeping separate the two sources of light; we obtain a higher confidence and efficiency of detection by adding cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation. Both methods greatly benefit from coincidence detection of photons, attaining fidelities in excess of 99% in less than 1 {mu}s. Detailed studies of the second-order intensity autocorrelation function of light from the signal mode reveal evidence of antibunched photon emissions and the dynamics of single-atom transits.

  7. Cross sections for electron scattering by propane in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, G. L. C. de; Lee, M.-T.; Sanches, I. P.; Rawat, P.; Iga, I.; Santos, A. S. dos; Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Brescansin, L. M.; Homem, M. G. P.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2010-07-15

    We present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron scattering by propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer as well as total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 2 to 500 eV. Also, experimental absolute elastic cross sections are reported in the 40- to 500-eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Pade approximant is used to solve the scattering equations. The experimental angular distributions of the scattered electrons are converted to absolute cross sections using the relative flow technique. The comparison of our calculated with our measured results, as well as with other experimental and theoretical data available in the literature, is encouraging.

  8. Geo-polymers as Candidates for the Immobilisation of Low- and Intermediate-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Dan; Vance, Eric; Kiyama, Satoshi; Aly, Zaynab; Yee, Patrick

    2007-07-01

    Geo-polymers should be serious waste form candidates for intermediate level waste (ILW), insofar as they are more durable than Portland cement and can pass the PCT-B test for high-level waste. Thus an alkaline ILW could be considered to be satisfactorily immobilised in a geo-polymer formulation. However a simulated Hanford tank waste was found to fail the PCT-B criterion even for a waste loading as low as 5 wt%, very probably due to the formation of a soluble sodium phosphate compound(s). This suggests that it could be worth developing a 'mixed' GP waste form in which the amorphous material can immobilize cations and a zeolitic component to immobilize anions. The PCT-B test is demonstrably subject to significant saturation effects, especially for relatively soluble waste forms. (authors)

  9. LIMITS ON UNRESOLVED PLANETARY COMPANIONS TO WHITE DWARF REMNANTS OF 14 INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gould, Andrew; Koester, Detlev

    2009-11-10

    We present Spitzer IRAC photometry of white dwarf remnants of 14 stars with M = 3-5 M{sub sun}. We do not detect mid-infrared excess around any of our targets. By demanding a 3sigma photometric excess at 4.5 mum for unresolved companions, we rule out planetary mass companions down to 5, 7, or 10 M {sub J} for 13 of our targets based on the Burrows et al. substellar cooling models. Combined with previous IRAC observations of white dwarf remnants of intermediate-mass stars, we rule out >=10M {sub J} companions around 40 white dwarfs and >=5M {sub J} companions around 10 white dwarfs.

  10. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  11. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  12. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of [sigma](700)-meson exchange in [gamma][gamma][yields][pi][pi] processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] transition; pion photoproduction and the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p([rvec [gamma

  13. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  14. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  15. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of the intermediate field dynamics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants. Progress report 1978-1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jirka, G.H.; Jones, J.M.; Sargent, F.E.

    1980-03-01

    Results are described of a two-year research effort which has been conducted with the following objectives: (1) investigate analytically and experimentally the intermediate field spreading in a steady ocean current; (2) investigate analytically and experimentally the transient intermediate field spreading in a stagnant ocean; (3) compare the results with other available data on buoyancy driven currents in stratified surroundings, including the concurrent experimental program at MIT Parsons Laboratory; and (4) use the results in the formulation of preliminary siting guidelines for multiple OTEC plant interactions. The theoretical background for the intermediate field spreading is given including both steady-state and transient results. The experiments performed in the Stratified Flow Modeling Basin at Cornell University are described, and the data are compared to the theoretical results and to available experimental data from other sources. The application of the intermediate field results to the OTEC design problem is discussed. Typical intermediate field behavior is predicted for different plant sizes (100 MW/sub e/ and 1 MW/sub e/), designs and ambient ocean conditions. (WHK)

  17. THE EVOLUTION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS SURROUNDING INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS: IC 1805

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, S. C.; Strom, S. E.; Rebull, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the intermediate- and high-mass stars in the young, rich star-forming complex IC 1805, based on a combination of optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared photometry, and classification spectra. These data provide the basis for characterizing the masses and ages for stars more massive than {approx}2 M{sub sun} and enable a study of the frequency and character of circumstellar disks associated with intermediate- and high-mass stars. Optically thick accretion disks among stars with masses 2 < M/M{sub sun} < 4 are rare ({approx}2% of members) and absent among more massive stars. A larger fraction ({approx}10%) of stars with masses 2 < M/M{sub sun} < 4 appear to be surrounded by disks that have evolved from the initial optically thick accretion phase. We identify four classes of such disks. These classes are based on spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of excess emission above photospheric levels: disks that are (1) optically thin based on the magnitude of the observed excess emission from 2 to 24 {mu}m, (2) optically thin in their inner regions (r < 20 AU) and optically thick in their outer regions, (3) exhibit empty inner regions (r < 10 AU) and optically thin emission in their outer regions, and (4) exhibit empty inner regions and optically thick outer regions. We discuss, and assess the merits and liabilities of, proposed explanations for disks exhibiting these SED types and suggest additional observations that would test these proposals.

  18. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  19. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-INFRARED COOLING LINES IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT (ULTRA)-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G. E.; Thatte, N.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Pearson, C.; Farrah, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A.; Wang, L.; Riechers, D.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.

    2014-01-20

    We report the first results from a spectroscopic survey of the [C II] 158?m line from a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}), using the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver-Fourier Transform Spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the first survey of [C II] emission, an important tracer of star formation, at a redshift range where the star formation rate density of the universe increases rapidly. We detect strong [C II] 158?m line emission from over 80% of the sample. We find that the [C II] line is luminous, in the range (0.8-4) 10{sup 3} of the far-infrared continuum luminosity of our sources, and appears to arise from photodissociation regions on the surface of molecular clouds. The L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} ratio in our intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs is on average ?10times larger than that of local ULIRGs. Furthermore, we find that the L{sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub IR} and L{sub [CII]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios in our sample are similar to those of local normal galaxies and high-z star-forming galaxies. ULIRGs at z ? 0.5 show many similarities to the properties of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Our findings strongly suggest that rapid evolution in the properties of the star-forming regions of (U)LIRGs is likely to have occurred in the last 5 billion years.

  20. EXPLORING INTERMEDIATE (5-40 AU) SCALES AROUND AB AURIGAE WITH THE PALOMAR FIBER NULLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kühn, J.; Mennesson, B.; Liewer, K.; Martin, S.; Loya, F.; Serabyn, E.; Millan-gabet, R.

    2015-02-10

    We report on recent K{sub s} -band interferometric observations of the young pre-main-sequence star AB Aurigae obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller (PFN). Reaching a contrast of a few 10{sup –4} inside a field of view extending from 35 to 275 mas (5-40 AU at AB Aur's distance), the PFN is able to explore angular scales that are intermediate between those accessed by coronagraphic imaging and long baseline interferometry. This intermediate region is of special interest given that many young stellar objects are believed to harbor extended halos at such angular scales. Using destructive interference (nulling) between two sub-apertures of the Palomar 200 inch telescope and rotating the telescope pupil, we measured a resolved circumstellar excess at all probed azimuth angles. The astrophysical null measured over the full rotation is fairly constant, with a mean value of 1.52%, and a slight additional azimuthal modulation of ±0.2%. The isotropic astrophysical null is indicative of circumstellar emission dominated by an azimuthally extended source, possibly a halo, or one or more rings of dust, accounting for several percent of the total K{sub s}-band flux. The modest azimuthal variation may be explained by some skewness or anisotropy of the spatially extended source, e.g., an elliptical or spiral geometry, or clumping, but it could also be due to the presence of a point source located at a separation of ∼120 mas (17 AU) with ∼6 × 10{sup –3} of the stellar flux. We combine our results with previous Infrared Optical Telescope Array observations of AB Aur at H band, and demonstrate that a dust ring located at ∼30 mas (4.3 AU) represents the best-fitting model to explain both sets of visibilities. We are also able to test a few previously hypothesized models of the incoherent component evident at longer interferometric baselines.

  1. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101) June 2, 2016 Call Slides and Discussion Summary Call Attendee Locations 2 Agenda  Agenda Review and Ground Rules  Opening Poll  Brief Residential Network Overview  Featured Speakers  Melanie Paskevich, Program Manager, NeighborWorks of Western Vermont (Network Member)  Frank Rapley, Senior Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority  Discussion  What approaches has your organization

  2. Structures of two intermediate phases between the B1 and B2 phases of PbS under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yanchun E-mail: liuj@ihep.ac.cn; Lin, Chuanlong; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing E-mail: liuj@ihep.ac.cn; Xu, Jian; Li, Gong

    2014-12-15

    The structural transitions of PbS were investigated at pressures up to 50 GPa using synchrotron powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods in diamond anvil cells. We found two intermediate phases between the B1 phase under atmospheric pressure and the B2 phase at 21.1 GPa, which is different to previous reports. The structures of these two intermediate phases were indexed as B27 and B33, respectively. Their structural parameters were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the transition pathway between the B1 and B2 phases in PbS.

  3. Surface-Bound Intermediates in Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis on Copper. Participants and Spectators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles H.F.; Campbell, Charles T.; Mims, Charles A.

    2015-11-03

    The reactivity of surface adsorbed species present on copper catalysts during methanol synthesis at low temperatures was studied by simultaneous infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) measurements during “titration” (transient surface reaction) experiments with isotopic tracing. The results show that adsorbed formate is a major bystander species present on the surface under steady-state methanol synthesis reaction conditions, but it cannot be converted to methanol by reaction with pure H2, nor with H2 plus added water. Formate-containing surface adlayers for these experiments were produced during steady state catalysis in (a) H2:CO2 (with substantial formate coverage) and (b) moist H2:CO (with no IR visible formate species). Both these reaction conditions produce methanol at steady state with relatively high rates. Adlayers containing formate were also produced by (c) formic acid adsorption. Various "titration" gases were used to probe these adlayers at modest temperatures (T = 410-450K) and 6 bar total pressure. Methanol gas (up to ~1% monolayer equivalent) was produced in "titration" from the H2:CO2 catalytic adlayers by H2 plus water, but not by dry hydrogen. The decay in the formate IR features accelerated in the presence of added water vapor. The H2:CO:H2O catalytic adlayer produced similar methanol titration yields in H2 plus water but showed no surface formate features in IR (less than 0.2% monolayer coverage). Finally, formate from formic acid chemisorption produced no methanol under any titration conditions. Even under (H2:CO2) catalytic reaction conditions, isotope tracing showed that pre-adsorbed formate from formic acid did not contribute to the methanol produced. Although non-formate intermediates exist during low temperature methanol synthesis on copper which can be converted to methanol gas

  4. Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K.; Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.

    2005-06-01

    The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B.

    1980-05-01

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

  6. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report, for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Vol. 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This report presents the data accumulated during January 1983 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  7. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 1. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during January, February, and March 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  8. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 2 for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during April and May 1982 at this intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  9. Analysis of an AP600 intermediate-size loss-of-coolant accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.; Lime, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    A postulated double-ended guillotine break of an AP600 direct-vessel-injection line has been analyzed. This event is characterized as an intermediate-break loss-of-coolant accident. Most of the insights regarding the response of the AP600 safety systems to the postulated accident are derived from calculations preformed with the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 code. However, complementary insights derived from a scaled experiment conducted in the ROSA facility, as well as insights based upon calculations by other codes, are also presented. Based upon the calculated and experimental results, the AP600 will not experience a core heat up and will reach a safe shutdown state using only safety-class equipment. Only the early part of the long-term cooling period initiated by In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank injection was evaluated. Thus, the observation that the core is continuously cooled should be verified for the later phase of the long-term cooling period when sump injection and containment cooling processes are important.

  10. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT ON VITRIFICATION FACILITY OF LOW-AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN KOREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Kun Jai; Ji, Pyung Kook; Park, Jong Kil; Ha, Jong Hyun; Song, Myung Jae

    2003-02-27

    The usefulness of vitrification technology for low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was demonstrated with high volume reduction capability and good mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms, and commercial vitrification facility is expected to be constructed at Ulchin site of Korean Nuclear Power Plant Ulchin Unit 5 and 6. Hence, overall economic assessment was necessary to find out the economic advantage of the vitrification facility and to predict the construction and operation costs of the facility on the preliminary bases. Additionally, the generation characteristics of radioactive wastes were investigated. The results of the cost analysis showed that the disposal cost of radioactive wastes treated by vitrification facility reduced to 85 percent compared with that by current waste treatment system. And the present worth analysis was performed through the cost-benefit analysis method for the commercial vitrification facility. The results showed that the vitrification facility combining cold crucible melter (CCM) for treatment of combustible DAW, spent resin, and borated liquid waste concentrate and plasma torch melter (PTM) for non-combustible DAW and spent filter is more economical than current waste treatment system when the escalation rate of disposal cost of more than 10 percent per year was applied.

  11. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heidi; Johnson, David K.

    2015-03-22

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. The high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.

  12. Communication: Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-10-14

    The velocity and angular distributions of O {sup 1}D photofragments arising from UV excitation of the CH{sub 2}OO intermediate on the B {sup 1}A??X {sup 1}A? transition are characterized using velocity map ion imaging. The anisotropic angular distribution yields the orientation of the transition dipole moment, which reflects the ?*?? character of the electronic transition associated with the COO group. The total kinetic energy release distributions obtained at several photolysis wavelengths provide detail on the internal energy distribution of the formaldehyde cofragments and the dissociation energy of CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? to O {sup 1}D + H{sub 2}CO X {sup 1}A{sub 1}. A common termination of the total kinetic energy distributions, after accounting for the different excitation energies, gives an upper limit for the CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? dissociation energy of D{sub 0}? 54 kcal mol{sup ?1}, which is compared with theoretical predictions including high level multi-reference ab initio calculations.

  13. UV absorption spectrum of the C2 Criegee intermediate CH{sub 3}CHOO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Mica C.; Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2014-08-21

    The UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO was measured by transient absorption in a flow cell at 295 K. The absolute absorption cross sections of CH{sub 3}CHOO were measured by laser depletion in a molecular beam to be (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 308 nm and (9.7 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 352 nm. After scaling the UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO to the absolute cross section at 308 nm, the peak UV cross section is (1.27 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 328 nm. Compared to the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO, the UV absorption band of CH{sub 3}CHOO is similar in intensity but blue shifted by 14 nm, resulting in a 20% slower photolysis rate estimated for CH{sub 3}CHOO in the atmosphere.

  14. A MULTIPLICITY CENSUS OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS IN SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janson, Markus; Lafreniere, David; Jayawardhana, Ray; Bonavita, Mariangela; Girard, Julien H.; Brandeker, Alexis; Gizis, John E.

    2013-08-20

    Stellar multiplicity properties have been studied for the lowest and the highest stellar masses, but intermediate-mass stars from F-type to late A-type have received relatively little attention. Here, we report on a Gemini/NICI snapshot imaging survey of 138 such stars in the young Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen) region, for the purpose of studying multiplicity with sensitivity down to planetary masses at wide separations. In addition to two brown dwarfs and a companion straddling the hydrogen-burning limit which we reported previously, here we present 26 new stellar companions and determine a multiplicity fraction within 0.''1-5.''0 of 21% {+-} 4%. Depending on the adopted semimajor axis distribution, our results imply a total multiplicity in the range of {approx}60%-80%, which further supports the known trend of a smooth continuous increase in the multiplicity fraction as a function of primary stellar mass. A surprising feature in the sample is a distinct lack of nearly equal-mass binaries, for which we discuss possible reasons. The survey yielded no additional companions below or near the deuterium-burning limit, implying that their frequency at >200 AU separations is not quite as high as might be inferred from previous detections of such objects within the Sco-Cen region.

  15. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ?2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ?2.44 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ?20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ? 0.09 keV (?10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1? level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ?}) ? 5.5 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  16. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  17. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  18. Structure of intermediate shocks in collisionless anisotropic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics plasma models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Arriaga, G.

    2013-10-15

    The existence of discontinuities within the double-adiabatic Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model is discussed. These solutions are transitional layers where some of the plasma properties change from one equilibrium state to another. Under the assumption of traveling wave solutions with velocity C and propagation angle ? with respect to the ambient magnetic field, the Hall-MHD model reduces to a dynamical system and the waves are heteroclinic orbits joining two different fixed points. The analysis of the fixed points rules out the existence of rotational discontinuities. Simple considerations about the Hamiltonian nature of the system show that, unlike dissipative models, the intermediate shock waves are organized in branches in parameter space, i.e., they occur if a given relationship between ? and C is satisfied. Electron-polarized (ion-polarized) shock waves exhibit, in addition to a reversal of the magnetic field component tangential to the shock front, a maximum (minimum) of the magnetic field amplitude. The jumps of the magnetic field and the relative specific volume between the downstream and the upstream states as a function of the plasma properties are presented. The organization in parameter space of localized structures including in the model the influence of finite Larmor radius is discussed.

  19. Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

  20. Sensor and numerical simulator evaluation for porous medium desiccation and rewetting at the intermediate laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    Soil desiccation, in conjunction with surface infiltration control, is considered at the Hanford Site as a potential technology to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. An intermediate-scale experiment was conducted to test the response of a series of instruments to desiccation and subsequent rewetting of porous media. The instruments include thermistors, thermocouple psychrometers, dual-probe heat pulse sensors, heat dissipation units, and humidity probes. The experiment was simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. All instrument types used for this experiment were able to indicate when the desiccation front passed a certain location. In most cases the changes were sharp, indicating rapid changes in moisture content, water potential, or humidity. However, a response to the changing conditions was recorded only when the drying front was very close to a sensor. Of the tested instruments, only the heat dissipation unit and humidity probes were able to detect rewetting. The numerical simulation results reasonably match the experimental data, indicating that the simulator captures the pertinent gas flow and transport processes related to desiccation and rewetting and may be useful in the design and analysis of field tests.

  1. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  2. AmeriFlux US-Me2 Metolius-intermediate aged ponderosa pine

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Me2 Metolius-intermediate aged ponderosa pine. Site Description - The mean stand age is 64 years old and the stand age of the oldest trees is about 100 years old. This site is one of the Metolius cluster sites with different age and disturbance classes and part of the AmeriFlux network (http://ameriflux.ornl.gov/fullsiteinfo.php?sid=88). The overstory is almost exclusively composed of ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa Doug. Ex P. Laws) with a few scattered incense cedars (Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin) and has a peak leaf area index (LAI) of 2.8 m2 m-2. Tree height is relatively homogeneous at about 16 m, and the mean tree density is approximately 325 trees ha-1 (Irvine et al., 2008). The understory is sparse with an LAI of 0.2 m2 m-2 and primarily composed of bitterbrush (Purshia tridentate (Push) DC.) and Manzanita (Arctostaphylos patula Greene). Soils at the site are sandy (69%/24%/7% sand/silt/clay at 0–0.2 m depth and 66%/27%/7% at 0.2–0.5 m depth, and 54%/ 35%/11% at 0.5–1.0 m depth), freely draining with a soil depth of approximately 1.5 m (Irvine et al., 2008; Law et al., 2001b; Schwarz et al., 2004).

  3. Spatial and kinematic distributions of transition populations in intermediate redshift galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Steven M.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: wirth@keck.hawaii.edu

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the spatial and velocity distributions of confirmed members in five massive clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift (0.5 < z < 0.9) to investigate the physical processes driving galaxy evolution. Based on spectral classifications derived from broad- and narrow-band photometry, we define four distinct galaxy populations representing different evolutionary stages: red sequence (RS) galaxies, blue cloud (BC) galaxies, green valley (GV) galaxies, and luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs). For each galaxy class, we derive the projected spatial and velocity distribution and characterize the degree of subclustering. We find that RS, BC, and GV galaxies in these clusters have similar velocity distributions, but that BC and GV galaxies tend to avoid the core of the two z ? 0.55 clusters. GV galaxies exhibit subclustering properties similar to RS galaxies, but their radial velocity distribution is significantly platykurtic compared to the RS galaxies. The absence of GV galaxies in the cluster cores may explain their somewhat prolonged star-formation history. The LCBGs appear to have recently fallen into the cluster based on their larger velocity dispersion, absence from the cores of the clusters, and different radial velocity distribution than the RS galaxies. Both LCBG and BC galaxies show a high degree of subclustering on the smallest scales, leading us to conclude that star formation is likely triggered by galaxy-galaxy interactions during infall into the cluster.

  4. Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivard, C.J.

    1995-02-01

    Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

  5. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  6. Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-04-05

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made a preliminary assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. Two IHX designs namely, shell and tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in the assessment. Printed circuit heat exchanger, among various compact heat exchanger (HX) designs, was selected for the analysis. Irrespective of the design, the material considerations for the construction of the HX are essentially similar, except may be in the fabrication of the units. As a result, we have reviewed in detail the available information on material property data relevant for the construction of HX and made a preliminary assessment of several relevant factors to make a judicious selection of the material for the IHX. The assessment included four primary candidate alloys namely, Alloy 617 (UNS N06617), Alloy 230 (UNS N06230), Alloy 800H (UNS N08810), and Alloy X (UNS N06002) for the IHX. Some of the factors addressed in this report are the tensile, creep, fatigue, creep fatigue, toughness properties for the candidate alloys, thermal aging effects on the mechanical properties, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code compliance

  7. THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M.; Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P.; Bureau, M.; Leroy, A.; Ostriker, E.; Wong, T.

    2013-05-10

    We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

  8. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  9. A population of relic intermediate-mass black holes in the halo of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashkov, Valery; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-10

    If 'seed' central black holes were common in the subgalactic building blocks that merged to form present-day massive galaxies, then relic intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) should be present in the Galactic bulge and halo. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate the N-body Via Lactea II high-resolution simulation with black holes, and assess the size, properties, and detectability of the leftover population. The method assigns a black hole to the most tightly bound central particle of each subhalo at infall according to an extrapolation of the M {sub BH}-?{sub *} relation, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of Milky Way progenitor dwarfs and their holes in a cosmological 'live' host from high redshift to today. We show that, depending on the minimum stellar velocity dispersion, ? {sub m}, below which central black holes are assumed to be increasingly rare, as many as ?2000 (? {sub m} = 3 km s{sup 1}) or as few as ?70 (? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup 1}) IMBHs may be left wandering in the halo of the Milky Way today. The fraction of IMBHs forced from their hosts by gravitational recoil is ? 20%. We identify two main Galactic subpopulations, 'naked' IMBHs, whose host subhalos were totally destroyed after infall, and 'clothed' IMBHs residing in dark matter satellites that survived tidal stripping. Naked IMBHs typically constitute 40%-50% of the total and are more centrally concentrated. We show that, in the ? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup 1} scenario, the clusters of tightly bound stars that should accompany naked IMBHs would be fainter than m{sub V} = 16 mag, spatially resolvable, and have proper motions of 0.1-10 mas yr{sup 1}. Their detection may provide an observational tool to constrain the formation history of massive black holes in the early universe.

  10. A CLOSE-PAIR ANALYSIS OF DAMP MERGERS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Richard C. Y.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Bridge, Carrie R. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.ca

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the kinematics of {approx}2800 candidate close-pair galaxies at 0.1 < z < 1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5 m Magellan and 5 m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the 'hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al., we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red, and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al.. Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as 'damp', rather than 'dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z {approx} 0.5. Our data support models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behavior, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.

  11. INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORES AT {approx}500 AU: DISKS OR OUTFLOWS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asuncion; Alonso-Albi, Tomas; Fontani, Francesco; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Boissier, Jeremie; Pietu, Vincent; Neri, Roberto; Busquet, Gemma; Estalella, Robert; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P.; Audard, Marc

    2011-12-20

    Observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration toward two intermediate-mass star-forming regions, IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, reveal the presence of several complex organic molecules at {approx}500 AU scales, confirming the presence of hot cores in both regions. The hot cores are not rich in CN-bearing molecules, as often seen in massive hot cores, and are mainly traced by CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH, with, additionally, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}OD, and HCOOD for IRAS 22198+6336, and C{sub 6}H and O{sup 13}CS for AFGL 5142. The emission of complex molecules is resolved down to sizes of {approx}300 and {approx}600 AU, for IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, respectively, and most likely is tracing protostellar disks rather than flattened envelopes or toroids as is usually found. This is especially clear for the case of IRAS 22198+6336, where we detect a velocity gradient for all the mapped molecules perpendicular to the most chemically rich outflow of the region, yielding a dynamic mass {approx}> 4 M{sub Sun }. As for AFGL 5142, the hot core emission is resolved into two elongated cores separated {approx}1800 AU. A detailed comparison of the complex molecule peaks to the new CO (2-1) data and H{sub 2}O maser data from the literature suggests also that for AFGL 5142 the complex molecules are mainly associated with disks, except for a faint and extended molecular emission found to the west, which is possibly produced in the interface between one of the outflows and the dense surrounding gas.

  12. Pore-Water Extraction from Unsaturated Porous Media: Intermediate-Scale Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2014-08-15

    As a remedial approach, vacuum-induced pore-water extraction offers the possibility of contaminant and water removal from the vadose zone, which may be beneficial in reducing the flux of vadose zone contaminants to groundwater. Vadose zone water extraction is being considered at the Hanford Site in Washington State as a means to remove technetium-99 contamination from low permeability sediments with relatively high water contents. A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted to improve the fundamental understanding and limitations of the technique. Column experiments were designed to investigate the relations between imposed suctions, water saturations, and water production. Flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of high-permeability layers and near-well compaction on pore-water extraction efficiency. Results show that water extraction from unsaturated systems can be achieved in low permeability sediments, provided that the initial water saturations are relatively high. The presence of a high-permeability layer decreased the yield, and compaction near the well screen had a limited effect on overall performance. In all experiments, large pressure gradients were observed near the extraction screen. Minimum requirements for water extraction include an imposed vacuum-induced suction larger than the initial sediment capillary pressure, in combination with a fully saturated seepage-face boundary. A numerical multiphase simulator with a coupled seepage-face boundary conditions was used to simulate the experiments. Reasonable matches were obtained between measured and simulated results for both water extraction and capillary pressures, suggesting that numerical simulations may be used as a design tool for field-scale applications of pore-water extraction.

  13. Ion binding compounds, radionuclide complexes, methods of making radionuclide complexes, methods of extracting radionuclides, and methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Wai, Chien M.; Fisher, Darrell R.

    2000-01-01

    The invention pertains to compounds for binding lanthanide ions and actinide ions. The invention further pertains to compounds for binding radionuclides, and to methods of making radionuclide complexes. Also, the invention pertains to methods of extracting radionuclides. Additionally, the invention pertains to methods of delivering radionuclides to target locations. In one aspect, the invention includes a compound comprising: a) a calix[n]arene group, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene group comprising an upper rim and a lower rim; b) at least one ionizable group attached to the lower rim; and c) an ion selected from the group consisting of lanthanide and actinide elements bound to the ionizable group. In another aspect, the invention includes a method of extracting a radionuclide, comprising: a) providing a sample comprising a radionuclide; b) providing a calix[n]arene compound in contact with the sample, wherein n is an integer greater than 3; and c) extracting radionuclide from the sample into the calix[n]arene compound. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a method of delivering a radionuclide to a target location, comprising: a) providing a calix[n]arene compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene compound comprising at least one ionizable group; b) providing a radionuclide bound to the calix[n]arene compound; and c) providing an antibody attached to the calix[n]arene compound, the antibody being specific for a material found at the target location.

  14. Photometric investigation of the totally eclipsing contact binary V12 in the intermediate-age open cluster NGC 7789

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, S.-B.; Wang, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhou, X.; Essam, A.; Ali, G. B.; Haroon, A.-A.

    2015-02-01

    NGC 7789 is an intermediate-age open cluster with an age similar to the mean age of contact binary stars. V12 is a bright W UMa-type binary star with an orbital period of 0.3917 days. The first complete light curves of V12 in the V, R, and I bands are presented and analyzed with the WilsonDevinney (W-D) method. The results show that V12 is an intermediate-contact binary (f=43.0(2.2)%) with a mass ratio of 3.848, and it is a W-type contact binary where the less massive component is slightly hotter than the more massive one. The asymmetry of the light curves is explained by the presence of a dark spot on the more massive component. The derived orbital inclination (i=83{sub .}{sup ?}6) indicates that it is a totally eclipsing binary, which suggests that the determined parameters are reliable. The orbital period may show a long-term increase at a rate of P-dot =+2.48(0.17)10{sup ?6} days yr{sup ?1} that reveals a rapid mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. However, more observations are needed to confirm this conclusion. The presence of an intermediate-contact binary in an intermediate-age open cluster may suggest that some contact binaries have a very short pre-contact timescale. The presence of a third body and/or stellar collision may help to shorten the pre-contact evolution.

  15. Magneto thermal conductivity of superconducting Nb with intermediate level of impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.S. Sharath Chandra, M.K. Chattopadhyay, S.B. Roy, V.C. Sahni, G.R. Myneni

    2012-03-01

    Niobium materials with intermediate purity level are used for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities (SCRF), and thermal conductivity is an important parameter influencing the performance of such SCRF cavities. We report here the temperature and magnetic field dependence of thermal conductivity {kappa} for superconducting niobium (Nb) samples, for which the electron mean free path I{sub e}, the phonon mean free path I{sub g}, and the vortex core diameter 2r{sub C} are of the same order of magnitude. The measured thermal conductivity is analyzed using the effective gap model (developed for I{sub e} >> 2r{sub C} (Dubeck et al 1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 98)) and the normal core model (developed for I{sub e} << 2r{sub C} (Ward and Dew-Hughes 1970 J. Phys. C: Solid St. Phys. 3 2245)). However, it is found that the effective gap model is not suitable for low temperatures when I{sub e} {approx} 2r{sub C}. The normal core model, on the other hand, is able to describe {kappa}(T,H) over the entire temperature range except in the field regime between H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} i.e. in the mixed state. It is shown that to understand the complete behavior of {kappa} in the mixed state, the scattering of quasi-particles from the vortex cores and the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling are to be invoked. The quasi-particle scattering from vortices for the present system is understood in terms of the framework of Sergeenkov and Ausloos (1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 3614) extending their approach to the case of Nb. The intervortex tunneling is understood within the framework of Schmidbauer et al (1970 Z. Phys. 240 30). Analysis of the field dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering from vortices dominates in the low fields, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling dominates in high fields. Analysis of the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering is dominant at low temperatures, the

  16. Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bechtold; Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; Szybist, James P; West, Brian H; Theiss, Timothy J; Timbario, Tom; Goodman, Marc

    2007-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

  17. Use of Multiple Reheat Helium Brayton Cycles to Eliminate the Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop for Advanced Loop Type SFRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Samuel E. Bays

    2009-05-01

    The sodium intermediate heat transfer loop is used in existing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) plant design as a necessary safety measure to separate the radioactive primary loop sodium from the water of the steam Rankine power cycle. However, the intermediate heat transfer loop significantly increases the SFR plant cost and decreases the plant reliability due to the relatively high possibility of sodium leakage. A previous study shows that helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling for SFRs with reactor outlet temperature in the range of 510°C to 650°C can achieve thermal efficiencies comparable to or higher than steam cycles or recently proposed supercritical CO2 cycles. Use of inert helium as the power conversion working fluid provides major advantages over steam or CO2 by removing the requirement for safety systems to prevent and mitigate the sodium-water or sodium-CO2 reactions. A helium Brayton cycle power conversion system therefore makes the elimination of the intermediate heat transfer loop possible. This paper presents a pre-conceptual design of multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle for an advanced loop type SFR. This design widely refers the new horizontal shaft distributed PBMR helium power conversion design features. For a loop type SFR with reactor outlet temperature 550°C, the design achieves 42.4% thermal efficiency with favorable power density comparing with high temperature gas cooled reactors.

  18. Thioozonide decomposition: sulfur and oxygen atom transfer. Evidence for the formation of a carbonyl O-sulfide intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matturro, M.G.; Reynolds, R.P.; Kastrup, R.V.; Pictroski, C.F.

    1986-05-14

    The chemistry of ozonides is of considerable interest from a practical and theoretical viewpoint. Thioozonide 1, formally the monosulfur-substituted ozonide of dimethylcyclobutadiene, has been proposed as an intermediate in the room temperature photooxidation of 2,5-dimethylthiophene. Subsequent low-temperature studies confirmed this structural assignment. When 1 is allowed to warm to room temperature, it rearranges to a mixture of sulfine 2 and cis- and trans-3-hexene-2,5-diones (3c and 3t). Recent examination of the thermal decomposition of 1 has led to a proposed mechanism involving a carbonyl sulfide 4 as an intermediate along the sulfur expulsion pathway to 3c; however, no experimental support for this hypothesis was given. Carbonyl O-sulfides have also been implicated as intermediates from the photolysis of oxathiiranes. The authors report evidence for the formation of 4 during the decomposition of 1 and that elemental sulfur (S/sub 8/) is formed during the reaction by concatenation of sulfur atoms or fragments (S/sub 2/, S/sub 3/, etc.).

  19. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez, Nria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernndez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, scar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P<.01). Late skin toxicity was no worse than grade 2 in either group, without significant differences between the 2 groups. In the ipsilateral breast, the areas that received the highest doses (ie, the boost or quadrant) showed the greatest loss of elasticity. WBI resulted in a greater loss of elasticity in the high-dose area compared with APBI (P<.05). Physician assessment showed that >75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for