Sample records for intermediate femp etraining

  1. FEMP Presents Its Newest On-Demand eTraining Course on Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    On-Demand eTraining Course on Building Automation Systems FEMP Presents Its Newest On-Demand eTraining Course on Building Automation Systems November 19, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  2. Federal Energy Management Program eTraining Core Courses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video summarizes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) eTraining courses available anytime online on the Whole Building Design Guide website.

  3. FEMP News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 19, 2013 FEMP Presents Its Newest On-Demand eTraining Course on Building Automation Systems The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)...

  4. FEMP News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FEMP News FEMP News October 10, 2014 Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design...

  5. FEMP Designated Product: Lavatory Faucets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP suspended its product designation and purchasing specification for commercial faucets until further notice.

  6. FEMP Certified Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with key individuals to accomplish energy change within organizations by bringing expertise from all levels of project...

  7. FEMP program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, K.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), part of the U.S. Department of Energy, helps agencies reduce their costs, increase energy efficiency, use renewable energy, and conserve water.

  8. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Request Portal User Guide Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Request Portal User Guide...

  9. FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal economic-based decision making, determine the total cost of ownership of project alternatives, and inform decisions for energy and water efficiency investments. In...

  10. FEMP Offers New Advanced eTraining on UESCs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    can help to meet site goals for energy efficiency, water efficiency, renewable power generation, and demand reduction Follow best practices in contracting for major UESC tasks...

  11. FEMP Offers New Advanced eTraining on UESCs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: Final

  12. FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life Cycle Costing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department ofPractices |for

  13. FEMP Presents Its Newest On-Demand eTraining Course on Building Automation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department

  14. FEMP Offers New eTraining Core Course on Fundamentals of Life Cycle Costing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices | Department

  15. FEMP Presents Its Newest On-Demand eTraining Course on Building Automation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices |ofSystems |

  16. FEMP Washington Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPracticesFEMP

  17. FEMP Renewable Energy Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This four-page overview describes how Federal agencies can contact the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to obtain assistance in acquiring renewable energy systems, renewable fuels, and renewable ("green") power for use in their facilities and vehicles. Renewable resources, technologies, and fuels are described, as well as Federal goals for using clean, sustainable renewable energy; the current goal is to supply 2.5% of the Federal Government's energy with renewable sources by 2005. Also included is a description of the resources and technologies themselves and associated benefits.

  18. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence...

  19. DOE/FEMP Welcome and Announcements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: DOEFEMP Welcome and Announcements October 5, 2014 David McAndrew Utility Project Lead DOE FEMP 2 Welcome To Fall FUPWG Thank...

  20. Equality and Diversity E-training Guidance How do I access the training?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Equality and Diversity E-training Guidance How do I access the training? You are already registered as a user on the system. You can access the training and save your progress in four quick steps. 1. Firstly, access the training through the following link: https://abdn.marshallacmtraining.co.uk/courselist. 2

  1. FEMP O&M Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    O&M Program FEMP O&M Program Presentation covers the FEMP O&M Program, given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode...

  2. FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects August 21, 2013 - 12:00am...

  3. FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) Update, Spring 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FEMP Update, published quarterly by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), provides information that will assist federal managers in their energy management responsibilities. The Update is distributed primarily to federal facility and energy management personnel.

  4. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  5. 2008 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tremper, C.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the market for Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) services as it existed in FY 2008. It discusses Federal energy management goal progress in FY 2008, and examines the environment in which agencies implemented energy management projects over the last three years. The report also discusses some recent events that will increase the market for FEMP services, and outlines FEMP's major strategies to address these changes in FY 2009 and beyond.

  6. Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management FEMP (Revised Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides the primary audience of Federal facility and energy managers with an accurate understanding of the services and assistance available through FEMP.

  7. FEMP Offers Updated Training on the Guiding Principles for High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) presents an updated series of training courses focused on the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High-Performance and...

  8. FEMP Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Intiative: Resources for Outdoor...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sheet describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) solid-state lighting (SSL) initiatives that provide information and resources for the application of SSL lighting...

  9. FEMP Technical Assistance to U.S. NORTHCOM (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet overview of FEMP technical assistance services provided to the U.S. NORTHCOM as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  10. FEMP UESC Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPracticesFEMP UESC

  11. FEMP Fiscal Year 1999 ESPC Business Strategy Development Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcmordie, Katherine; Hunt, W. D.

    2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the objectives, activities, products, and recommendations of the ESPC Business Strategy Development project. The objective of this project was to assist DOE FEMP in defining the potential Federal sector market for FEMP-offered alternative financing services with a focus on Super-Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super-ESPCs).

  12. FEMP Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning toPeer Review FEMP

  13. FEMP Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department ofPracticesPanelFEMP

  14. What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. FEMP Renewable Energy Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the owner or manager of more than 500,000 facilities, the US government has a superb opportunity to reduce fuel imports and improve environmental quality by using renewable sources of energy. In many Federal applications -- such as irrigation, water heating, indoor and outdoor lighting, or communications -- commercially available renewable technologies are often the most cost-effective option for supplying the needed energy, and they are environmentally friendly. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) helps Federal agencies take advantage of the benefits offered by renewable technologies and apply the renewable provisions of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order 12902. FEMP`s Renewable Energy Program educates Federal agencies about renewable opportunities and helps agencies implement successful renewable projects. And the opportunities are abundant. In new construction projects, for example, planners can optimize facility energy performance by incorporating renewable energy and energy efficiency measures early in the design process. Renewables are cost-effective in many retrofit projects. They are the clear choice for many remote sites that utility-supplied power does not reach. Their environmental advantages include either zero or reduced air emissions compared with conventional energy sources and no risk of fuel spills.

  15. Overview of the ESCO Selection Process and FEMP ESPC Templates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Overview of the ESCO Selection Process and FEMP ESPC Templates A high-level overview of the steps towards ESCO selection is depicted in the figure below. The corresponding ESPC...

  16. FEMP Offers New Training on Photovoltaic Operations and Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The instructors for this seminar are Brad Gustafson, P.E., CEM, LEED AP, supervisor of customer services for DOE FEMP, and Andy Walker, P.E., Ph.D., principal engineer at the...

  17. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: DOE/FEMP...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 7, 2014 David McAndrew Utility Project Lead DOE FEMP 2 Welcome To Virginia Beach Thank you to Virginia Natural Gas and AGL Resources for hosting the 2014 Spring FUPWG...

  18. FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs March 26, 2015 -...

  19. An integrated teamwork approach to regional FEMP project implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jhaveri, A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the establishment of Regional Energy Action Project (REAP) teams in Seattle, Chicago, and New York earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has taken a quantum leap towards assisting Federal agencies meet the minimum 30% energy savings goal, through the year 2005 from the baseline year of 1985, per the Executive Order No. 12902. The three (3) member team, including the FEMP liaison, at these three (3) Support Offices, has significantly increased the manpower resources and expertise needed to implement FEMP projects through technical, financial, marketing, procurement, and contracting assistance in each region, thus complementing the limited resources of the participating Federal agencies. The potential and opportunities available in the four-state Region 10 (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska) for aggressively promoting FEMP projects are significant as demonstrated by some 20 completed SAVEnergy Action Plan Audits and as many as 10 energy efficiency projects with innovative financing arrangements, including but not limited to, agency appropriations, utility Demand Side Management (DSM), Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) and third party financing handled by Energy Service Companies (ESCO`s), and/or combinations of these. This presentation will highlight some of the specific FEMP projects including partnership development, negotiations, coordination, and technical support models used to assist the selected Federal agency.

  20. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  1. Training | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Brush up on power purchase agreements (PPAs) by taking FEMP's newly revised eTraining course. Read more New course introduces best practices for establishing partnerships with...

  2. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and FEMP Partner to Drive Down Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    have been executing energy savings performance contract (ESPC) and utility energy service contract (UESC) projects for several years. FEMP has had programmatic responsibility for...

  3. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 11 - October 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  4. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 4 - September 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  5. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 12 - November 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  6. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 8 - June 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    June 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  7. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 7 - May 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  8. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 4 - January 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  9. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 3 - July 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  10. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 1 - May 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  11. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 2 - November 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2009 issue of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  12. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 10 - September 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  13. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 13 - December 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to federal agencies.

  14. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 9 - July 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  15. FEMP Update: Federal Energy Management activities, July 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since early 1984, FEMP has examined a number of innovative techniques for financing energy efficiency improvements in Federal facilities. Having identified a number of legal and procurement barriers to shared savings contracting by Federal agencies, FEMP set out to identify and explore possible solutions. Currently, it has narrowed in on three specific options which represent potentially viable approaches to Federal energy financing: (1) removing regulatory and institutional barriers to energy services contracts with the private sector; (2) implementing energy services agreements at Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) facilities; and (3) establishing a government financial corporation to fund agency energy conservation investments. These possible solutions are discussed in the report. The third possibility is regarded as unlikely.

  16. FEMP Updates Product Energy-Efficiency Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPracticesFEMP UESCUpdates

  17. FEMP Launches New Training Search Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8.EnergyFEMP

  18. FEMP Offers Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements FEMP Offers Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements March 30, 2015 - 2:16pm Addthis The U.S....

  19. What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. Federal Energy Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US government has an enormous cost-saving opportunity as the largest energy user in the world. In 1994, the government spent $8 billion for its 500,000 buildings, it vehicles, and process energy. The US Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) reduces the cost of government and makes it work better through energy efficiency, use of renewable energy, and water conservation. FEMP leads Federal energy efficiency efforts and helps Federal energy managers identify and procure the best, most cost-effective energy-saving projects. It does this through proactive problem solving; an aggressive emphasis on increasing the number and quality of projects; and effective partnerships among agencies, utilities, the private sector, and states. Partnerships lead to increased motivation and education and reduced barriers to successful procurement. As the lead organization implementing legislation and Presidential direction for Federal energy efficiency, FEMP administers an interagency energy committee and task force and collaborates with the DOE national energy laboratories. FEMP works with energy service companies, energy savings product manufacturers, and utilities. This partnership will lead to a $1 billion investment by companies willing to invest in return for a share of the energy cost savings. With FEMP project financing, audits, training and technical assistance, and new technology demonstrations, agencies overcome obstacles to achieving widespread energy efficiency.

  20. FEMP Webcast: O&M Best Practices for Small-Scale PV Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), this seminar covers operations and maintenance (O&M) best practices for photovoltaic (PV) systems of 100 kilowatt or less, including planning for a PV O&M scope of work and maintenance procedures to keep the system operating at optimal capacity.

  1. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus Chiller Controls-related Energy Saving Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus Chiller Controls-related Energy Saving Opportunities in Federal.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 1 INTRODUCTION Chillers are a significant in recent years has been on optimization of set point and staging controls, improvements in chiller design

  2. FEMP fiscal year 1999 ESPC business strategy development summary report[Energy Saving Performance Contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KL McMordie-Stoughton; WDM Hunt

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to reduce the cost of Government by advancing energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable technologies. This is accomplished by creating partnerships, leveraging resources, transferring technology, and providing training and technical guidance and assistance to agencies. Each of these activities is directly related to achieving requirements set forth in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the goals that have been established in Executive Order 13123 (June 1999), but also those that are inherent in sound management of Federal financial and personnel resources. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the FEMP mission in all activity areas. This responsibility includes working with various Federal energy managers to identify, monitor, and evaluate the performance of new energy efficiency technologies suitable for installation at Federal sites. This report provides the results of a Energy Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Business Strategy Development project that PNNL conducted for FEMP. The project provides information regarding the development of Federal market scenarios for FEMP Super-ESPC delivery orders. Two market scenarios were developed. The initial scenario resulted in an estimated delivery order target that was much lower than initially estimated in the spring of 1998. The second scenario yielded a lower estimated number of delivery orders. The main difference between these two scenarios was an estimated increase in utility financed projects in the Federal sector.

  3. Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center - Faucet and Showerhead Replacement Project: Best Management Practice Case Study #7: Faucets and Showerheads, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of the Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center water efficiency program as part of FEMP's water efficiency best management practice series.

  4. Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of the U.S. Army Fort Huachuca water awareness practice as part of FEMP's water efficiency best management practice series.

  5. Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.

  6. FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department of Energy FEMP

  7. Meeting with EarthJustice Regarding FEMP Rulemakings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & GasTechnicalMeeting with EarthJustice Regarding FEMP Rulemakings

  8. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP Best

  9. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Acquisition Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP Best3.

  10. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Critical Outcomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP

  11. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: ESCO Selection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4. ESCO

  12. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Final Negotiations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4. ESCO.

  13. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: General Best Practices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4.

  14. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4..

  15. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Investment-Grade Audit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4..7.

  16. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Measurement and Verification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN CameronFEMP4..7.1.

  17. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  18. New National Conservation Training Center a model of energy-efficient design: FEMP technical assistance case study fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkison, K.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This FEMP technical assistance case study shows that energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, and aesthetics can be incorporated into the design of a Federal facility--in this case the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, WV, which encompasses many buildings with a variety of purposes.

  19. Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Program Overview (revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitchford, P.

    2001-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This four-page publication describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) streamlined energy savings performance contracting, or ''Super ESPC,'' process, which is managed by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Under a Super ESPC, a qualifying energy service company (ESCO) from the private sector pays for energy efficiency improvements or advanced renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic systems, wind turbines, or geothermal heat pumps, among others) for a facility of a government agency. The ESCO is then repaid over time from the agency's resulting energy cost savings. Delivery orders under these contracts specify the level of performance (energy savings) and the repayment schedule; the contract term can be up to 25 years, although many Super ESPCs are for about 10 years or less.

  20. What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. Federal energy saver showcases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To promote widespread Federal energy efficiency, agencies are showcasing their best energy efficiency, water conserving, and solar and other renewable energy technologies. To highlight these successful energy-efficient projects, Executive Order 12902 directs agencies to designate at least one newly constructed or existing building as a showcase facility. At existing facilities, agencies must also try to incorporate cogeneration and indoor air quality improvements. Agencies are directed to develop and implement effective plans to make these showcase projects happen. Project successes will show the strength of partnering with other agencies, energy services companies, utilities, and national laboratories, and of using the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) as a resource. The goal is Federal facilities operating at peak efficiency. A Federal Energy Saver Showcase plaque is prominently displayed at each showcase site, notifying visitors they are entering a government building that successfully conserves energy and water and saves taxpayer dollars.

  1. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance for Geothermal Resource Evaluation Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood; Joel Renner

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to report on the evaluation of geothermal resource potential on and around three different United States (U. S.) Air Force Bases (AFBs): Nellis AFB and Air Force Range (AFR) in the State of Nevada (see maps 1 and 5), Holloman AFB in the State of New Mexico (see map 2), and Mountain Home AFB in the State of Idaho (see map 3). All three sites are located in semi-arid parts of the western U. S. The U. S. Air Force, through its Air Combat Command (ACC) located at Langley AFB in the State of Virginia, asked the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) for technical assistance to conduct technical and feasibility evaluations for the potential to identify viable geothermal resources on or around three different AFBs. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is supporting FEMP in providing technical assistance to a number of different Federal Agencies. For this report, the three different AFBs are considered one project because they all deal with potential geothermal resource evaluations. The three AFBs will be evaluated primarily for their opportunity to develop a geothermal resource of high enough quality grade (i.e., temperature, productivity, depth, etc.) to consider the possibility for generation of electricity through a power plant. Secondarily, if the resource for the three AFBs is found to be not sufficient enough for electricity generation, then they will be described in enough detail to allow the base energy managers to evaluate if the resource is suitable for direct heating or cooling. Site visits and meetings by INL personnel with the staff at each AFB were held in late FY-2009 and FY-2010. This report provides a technical evaluation of the opportunities and challenges for developing geothermal resources on and around the AFBs. An extensive amount of literature and geographic information was evaluated as a part of this assessment. Resource potential maps were developed for each of the AFBs.

  2. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermott, Christa; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the use of institutional change principles and the institutional impact of award-winning projects through interviews with 22 Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (DOE FEMP) award winners. Award winners identified institutional facilitators and barriers in their projects and programs as well as factors in their implementation processes, thus providing information that can guide other efforts. We found that award winners do use strategies based on eight principles of institutional change, most frequently in terms of making changes to infrastructure, engaging leadership, and capitalizing on multiple motivations for making an energy efficiency improvement. The principles drawn on the least often were commitment and social empowerment. Award winners also faced five major types of obstacles that were institutional in nature: lack of resources, constraints of rules, psychological barriers, lack of information, and communication problems. We also used the seven categories of Energy Management Excellence (EME) as a lens to interpret the interview data and assess whether these categories relate to established institutional change principles. We found that the eight principles reflect strategies that have been found to be useful in improving energy efficiency in organizations, whereas the EME categories capture more of a blend of social contextual factors and strategies. The EME categories fill in some of the social context gaps that facilitate institutional change and energy management excellence, for example, personal persistence, a culture that supports creativity and innovation, regular engagement with tenants, contractors, and staff at all levels. Taking together the use of principles, EME criteria, and obstacles faced by interviewees, we make recommendations for how FEMP can better foster institutional change in federal agencies.

  3. Denver Federal Center Saves Energy, Forges Partnerships Through Super ESPC. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) ESPC Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Services Administration is not just replacing aging heating and cooling equipment and reducing maintenance costs at the 670-acre Denver Federal Center (DFC). The GSA is also helping the government save about $450,000 in annual energy costs, conserve nearly 11 million gallons of water per year, and reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions by 15.9 million pounds, all by making use of the Department of Energy's Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at the DFC. Under these contracts, an energy services provider pays the up-front project costs and is then repaid over the contracts term out of the resulting energy cost savings. This two-page case study, prepared by NREL for the DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), demonstrates how the GSA forged new project partnerships, improved the DFCs boiler plant, and acquired efficient new chillers, motors, controls, and lighting by placing two delivery orders for this work under FEMPs Central Region Super ESPC.

  4. HOSPITAL COVER INTERMEDIATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a lower premium. Plus, our unique Excess Bonus feature applies to Level 2. You can choose an excess option of: Level 1 No excess Level 2 $250 - plus our Excess Bonus feature applies Level 3 $500 Excess options Excess Bonus feature ­ available on Corporate Hospital Intermediate Level 2. It means you won

  5. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  6. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  7. FEMP UESC Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and automation and processes, in consultation with local utilities - Participate in demand response programs, where available 8 9 Better Buildings Challenge Following...

  8. FEMP Director's Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide -SeptemberNovemberFEMA

  9. FEMP Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department ofPracticesPanel

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: combustion intermediates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intermediates Direct Measurement of Key Molecule Will Increase Accuracy of Combustion Models On March 3, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Energy, Facilities,...

  11. Reactive intermediates in organometallic chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoutland, P.O.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, activation, and dissociation of bonds of organometallic compounds are discussed. In particular, results of thermolysis of iridium compounds and reaction intermediates are presented, as well as flash photolysis of several metal carbonyl species. 179 refs., 32 figs., 20 tabs. (CBS)

  12. FEMP O&M Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Cost information, efficiency information, and URL links updated - Additional graphics, charts, and tables added to motivate reader to create near-term action plan -...

  13. Characterization of protein folding intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, P.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded in its linear sequence of amino acids. Studies of protein folding are aimed at understanding the nature of this code which translates one-dimensional information to three-dimensions. It is now well-established that protein folding intermediates exist and can be populated significantly under some conditions. A method to characterize kinetic folding intermediates is described. The method takes advantage of the decrease in exchange rates between amide protons (i.e., peptide backbone NH) and solvent water protons, when the amide proton is involved in structure. The feasibility of using amide proton exchange to pulse-label proteins during folding has been demonstrated using (/sup 3/H)-H/sub 2/O. The results with ribonuclease A (RNase A) support a framework model for folding, in which the secondary structure of a protein is formed before tertiary structure changes are complete. Extension of these studies using NMR should permit characterization of early secondary structure folding frameworks.

  14. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  15. New Fleet eTraining Available | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum |EnergyNewEnergy Services »

  16. Curvaton field and intermediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The curvaton in an intermediate inflationary universe model is studied. This study has allowed us to find some interesting constraints on different parameters that appear in the model.

  17. Training is sponsoring Excel Intermediate & Advanced Courses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Due to a tremendous response, Training is sponsoring additional Excel Intermediate & Advanced Courses. The classes will be held on Wednesday and Thursday, May 20-21, 8 a.m.-5 p.m....

  18. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

  19. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer...

  20. A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery System A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for...

  1. Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity to reconstruct past Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) have the advantage of allowing transient

  2. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  3. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio del Campo; Ramon Herrera

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflationary universe models in the context of intermediate expansion, between power law and exponential, are studied. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. The inflaton potentials considered in this study are negative-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. The parameters of our models are constrained from the WMAP three and five year data.

  4. Intermediate Scale Accidental Axion and ALPs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex G. Dias

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the problem of constructing models containing an axion and axion-like particles, motivated by astrophysical observations, with decay constants at the intermediate scale ranging from $10^9$GeV to $10^{13}$GeV. We present examples in which the axion and axion-like particles arise accidentally as pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons of automatic global chiral symmetries, in models having exact discrete symmetries.

  5. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Intermediate Band Solar Cells W. Walukiewicz 1 , K. M.single-junction intermediate band solar cells. Figure 5:conversion efficiency for a solar cell fabricated from a Zn

  6. 2005: Table of EMICs (Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Claussen

    apparent that Earth system modelling has to rely on a hierarchy of models in which models of intermediate

  7. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

  8. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  9. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E. (Altadena, CA); Crane, Douglas Todd (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  10. Neutron scattering measurements at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Olsson; J. Blomgren; E. Ramstrom

    The study of elastic neutron scattering at intermediate energies is essential for the understanding of the isovector term in the nucleon-nucleus interaction, as well as for the development of macroscopic and microscopic optical potentials at these energies. The techniques used for neutron scattering measurements is presented in this paper, as well as the di culties encountered. The few facilities that have been used are reviewed, and a newly installed setup for such measurements in Uppsala is described. Finally, the normalization problem is speci cally addressed. 1

  11. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  12. Search Via quantum walks with intermediate measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efrain Buksman; André L. Fonseca de Oliveira; Jesús GarcÍa López de Lacalle

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A modification of the Tulsi quantum search algorithm with intermediate measurements of the control is presented. In order to analyze the effect of measurements in quantum searches, a different choice of the angular parameter is used. The study is performed for several values of time lapses between measurements, finding close relationships between probabilities and correlations (Mutual Information and Cumulative Correlation Measure). The order of this modified algorithm is estimated, showing that for some time lapses the performance is improved, and became of order $O(N)$ (classical brute force search) when the measurement is taken in every step. The results indicate a possible way to analyze improvements to other quantum algorithms using one, or more, control qubits.

  13. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  14. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  15. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  16. FEMP Website Moves Into Energy.gov

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program in January moved its Web pages into Energy.gov, the U.S. Department of Energy's website.

  17. FEMP: Super energy savings performance contracts overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program was created to provide agencies with a quick and cost-effective way to finance energy-saving technologies. Under an ESPC, energy service companies (ESCOs) assume the capital costs of installing energy and water conservation equipment and renewable energy systems.

  18. FEMP Renewable Energy Fact Sheet: Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic energy systems, which convert sunlight to electricity, can meet many different needs in Federal facilities. This fact sheet describes how photovoltaic (PV) energy systems can be used to provide electricity for lighting, communications, refrigeration, fans, signs, pumps, drilling equipment, emergency power packs, and cathodic (corrosion) protection, among others. Applications for PV power in Federal facilities include staff housing, parking areas, campgrounds, marinas, visitor centers, roadside communications equipment, ranger stations, underground pipelines, irrigation and disinfecting systems, and disaster response units. PV systems are particularly suitable and cost-effective for facilities that now use diesel power or that are in remote areas far from electric power lines.

  19. FEMP Director's Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.

  20. FEMP Receives Internationally Recognized Training Accreditation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| DepartmentContracting

  1. DOE/FEMP Welcome and Announcements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 Final Environmental(July

  2. Intermediate Vapor Expansion Distillation and Nested Enrichment Cascade Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.

    INTERMEDIATE VAPOR EXPANSION DISTILLATION AND NESTED ENRICHMENT CASCADE DISTILLATION D.. C. Erickson Energy Concepts Company Annapolis, Maryland ABSTRACT Although it is known that incorporating an intermediate reboiler or reflux... condenser in a distillation ~olumn will improve column efficiency by 15 to 100%, there has been little use of this technique to date." Intermediate vapor compression heat pumping was recently introduced as one practical means of achieving this benefit...

  3. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediates can accelerate protein folding. Proceedings ofunifying mechanism for protein folding? [Review]. Trends incoordinate for protein folding. Journal of Chemical Physics

  4. 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics, Fall 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autor, David H.

    Presents basic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. Emphasizes applications, including the measurement of productivity, rationing, insurance markets, and ...

  5. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll Brian West Wendy Clark...

  6. abasic site intermediate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Long Wavelength Intermediate Array (LWIA): Choosing the First Four Station Sites Engineering Websites Summary: have been done on over 30 possible station sites throughout...

  7. PE06 -Beginning & Intermediate Core Training Class Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PE06 - Beginning & Intermediate Core Training Class Syllabus Instructor: Sandra Marbut Office attendance requirements as outlined on this syllabus 3. Pass midterm examination 4. Submit their final

  8. alkaline intermediate level: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intermediation. Positive scale effects may make a single monopoly intermediary optimal. Comparing can also eliminate the problems of adverse selection and inefficient...

  9. A Dianionic Phosphorane Intermediate and Transition States in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of this debate centers around the roles of the conserved residues, structures of the transition state or states, the possibility of a stable intermediate, and the charge and...

  10. Curvaton field and the intermediate inflationary universe model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The curvaton in an intermediate inflationary universe model is studied. This study has allowed us to find some interesting constraints on different parameters that appear in the model.

  11. Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures of the Ribosome in Intermediate States of Ratcheting Print Protein synthesis is conducted by the ribosome: a megadalton sized complex responsible for making proteins...

  12. Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing July 30, 2014 Bryna Berendzen Technology Manager BETO Conversion...

  13. Desiccation of unsaturated porous media: Intermediate-scale experiment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermediate-scale experiments and numerical simulation. Abstract: Soil desiccation (drying) is recognized as a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process involving water...

  14. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  15. A Review of Multidimensional, Multifluid Intermediate-scale Experiment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mapping for intermediate-scale experiments include photon-attenuation methods such as gamma and X-ray techniques, and photographic methods such as the light reflection, light...

  16. 14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autor, David

    This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, ...

  17. Structural Characterization of an Equilibrium Unfolding Intermediate in Cytochrome c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Heinrich

    form found under acidic high-salt conditions, as well as a kinetic intermediate populated at a late native and unfolded states (the so-called molten-globule state) of

  18. Intermediate connector for stacked organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Andrade, Brian

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an intermediate connector disposed between the anode and the cathode. A first organic layer including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the anode and the intermediate connector, and a second including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the intermediate connector and the cathode. The intermediate connector includes a first metal having a work function lower than 4.0 eV and a second metal having a work function lower than 5.0 eV. The work function of the first metal is at least 0.5 eV less than the work function of the second metal. The first metal is in contact with a sublayer of the second organic layer that includes a material well adapted to receive holes from a low work function metal.

  19. THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosnick, Tobin R.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTEIN FOLDING INTERMEDIATES FOR DELINEATION ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Why study protein folding .............................................................................. 3 1.2.1 How fast should a protein fold ........................................................... 3

  20. Process and Intermediate Calculations User AccessInputs Outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process and Intermediate Calculations User AccessInputs Outputs Fire Behavior & Probability STARFire System Flow Valuation Processing Temporal Schedules Smoke · Zones · Zone impact · Emissions Fire and compare Valuation (Structured Elicit Process) 1) Value Layers: · Point (housing, cultural trees, etc

  1. Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle-organolithium intermediates with lead halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jerry Neal

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACTIONS OF NITROGEN HETEROCYCLE- ORGANOLITHIUM INTERMEDIATES WITH LEAD HALIDES A Thesis by JERRY HEAL KINNEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree ot MASTER...) (Mem er) December 1970 ABSTRACT Reactions of Nitrogen Heterocycle-Organollthium intermediates With Lead Halides. (December l970) Jerry Neal Kinney, B. S. , Texas AE, M University Directed by: Dr. Choo-Seng Giam Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle...

  2. Reduction of Quantum Phase Fluctuations in Intermediate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Verma; Anirban Pathak

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we have shown that the reduction of the Carruthers-Nieto symmetric quantum phase fluctuation parameter (U) with respect to its coherent state value corresponds to an antibunched state, but the converse is not true. Consequently reduction of U is a stronger criterion of nonclassicality than the lowest order antibunching. Here we have studied the possibilities of reduction of $U$ in intermediate states by using the Barnett Pegg formalism. We have shown that the reduction of phase fluctuation parameter U can be seen in different intermediate states, such as binomial state, generalized binomial state, hypergeometric state, negative binomial state, and photon added coherent state. It is also shown that the depth of nonclassicality can be controlled by various parameters related to intermediate states. Further, we have provided specific examples of antibunched states, for which $U$ is greater than its poissonian state value.

  3. Seismic evolution of low/intermediate mass PMS stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. G. Pinheiro

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study of the evolution of the internal structure and seismic properties expected for low/intermediate mass Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) stars. Seismic and non-seismic properties of PMS stars were analysed. This was done using 0.8 to 4.4M$_\\odot$ stellar models at stages ranging from the end of the Hayashi track up to the Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS). This research concludes that, for intermediate-mass stars (M$>$1.3M$_\\odot$), diagrams comparing the effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) against the small separation can provide an alternative to Christensen-Dalsgaard (C-D) diagrams. The impact of the metal abundance of intermediate mass stars (2.5-4.4M$_\\odot$) has over their seismic properties is also evaluated.

  4. Effect of Intermediate Principal Stress on Overconsolidated Kaolin Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    Effect of Intermediate Principal Stress on Overconsolidated Kaolin Clay Amit Prashant1 and Dayakar of overconsolidated kaolin clay is investigated using three-dimensional true triaxial testing on cubical specimens specimens under stress and strain-control modes. Undrained tests on kaolin clay show that the following vary

  5. Cell Host & Microbe Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdivia, Raphael

    Cell Host & Microbe Article Actin and Intermediate Filaments Stabilize the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions within a cell leading to the highest yield of EBs (Wilson et al., 2006). The expansion of inclu- sions is likely fueled by the acquisition of membrane lipids from Golgi-derived vesicles (Carabeo et al

  6. Intermediate Band Properties of Femtosecond-Laser Hyperdoped Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    . The high concentration of dopants forms an intermediate band (IB), instead of discrete energy levels exhibits broad-band light absorption to wavelengths deep below the corresponding bandgap energy of silicon) using secondary ion mass spectrometry. By varying the pressure of SF6, we find that the surface adsorbed

  7. The metallicities of luminous, massive field galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mouhcine; S. P. Bamford; A. Aragon-Salamanca; O. Nakamura

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive oxygen abundances for a sample of 40 luminous (M_{B} = 0.45. Oxygen abundances, relative to hydrogen, of the interstellar emitting gas are estimated by means of the empirically calibrated strong emission line ratio technique. The derived (12+log(O/H)) values range from 8.4 to 9.0, with a median of 8.7. Twenty of these galaxies have securely measured rotation velocities, in the range 50--244 km/s. The measured emission line equivalent widths and diagnostic ratios for the intermediate redshift galaxies cover similar ranges to those observed across a large sample of local galaxies. The estimated oxygen abundances for our luminous star-forming intermediate redshift galaxies cover the same range as their local counterparts. However, at a given galaxy luminosity, many of our galaxies have significantly lower oxygen abundances, i.e., $(12+log(O/H))~8.6$, than local galaxies with similar luminosities. Interestingly, these luminous, massive, intermediate redshift, star-forming galaxies with low oxygen abundances exhibit physical conditions, i.e., emission line equivalent width and ionization state, very similar to those of local faint and metal-poor star-forming galaxies. The oxygen abundance of the interstellar gas does not seem to correlate with the maximum rotation velocity or the emission scale length of the parent galaxy. This suggests that there is a diversity in the intrinsic properties of the massive field galaxy population at intermediate redshifts (ABRIDGED).

  8. Amyloid -Protein Fibrillogenesis STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PROTOFIBRILLAR INTERMEDIATES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedek, George B.

    with damaged neuropil and blood vessels contain abun- dant fibrils formed by the amyloid -protein (A ). Fibrils discovered a novel intermediate in the pathway of A fibril formation, the amyloid protofibril (Walsh, D. M); 2) have a secondary structure characteristic of amyloid fibrils; 3) appear as beaded chains

  9. Intermediate Modern Physics: PH 354 (UA) Spring Semester 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camata, Renato P.

    Intermediate Modern Physics: PH 354 (UA) Spring Semester 2009 Time and location: Tuesdays, (205) 348-3799 (Other times by appointment) Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers Thornton & Rex: http://modern.physics.virginia.edu/Book/errata3.html Other Books and Resources Suggested: Quantum

  10. Exact theory of intermediate phases in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfino, Gesualdo, E-mail: delfino@sissa.it; Squarcini, Alessio, E-mail: alessio.squarcini@sissa.it

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how field theory yields the exact description of intermediate phases in the scaling limit of two-dimensional statistical systems at a first order phase transition point. The ability of a third phase to form an intermediate wetting layer or only isolated bubbles is explicitly related to the spectrum of excitations of the field theory. The order parameter profiles are determined and interface properties such as passage probabilities and internal structure are deduced from them. The theory is illustrated through the application to the q-state Potts model and the Ashkin–Teller model. The latter is shown to provide the first exact solution of a bulk wetting transition. -- Highlights: •Phase separation with appearance of a third phase is studied exactly. •Interfacial properties are derived from field theory. •Exact solution of bulk wetting transition is provided.

  11. Intermediate scalings in holographic RG flows and conductivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jyotirmoy Bhattacharya; Sera Cremonini; Blaise Goutéraux

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct numerically finite density domain-wall solutions which interpolate between two $AdS_4$ fixed points and exhibit an intermediate regime of hyperscaling violation, with or without Lifshitz scaling. Such RG flows can be realized in gravitational models containing a dilatonic scalar and a massive vector field with appropriate choices of the scalar potential and couplings. The infrared $AdS_4$ fixed point describes a new ground state for strongly coupled quantum systems realizing such scalings, thus avoiding the well-known extensive zero temperature entropy associated with $AdS_2 \\times \\mathbb{R}^2$. We also examine the zero temperature behavior of the optical conductivity in these backgrounds and identify two scaling regimes before the UV CFT scaling is reached. The scaling of the conductivity is controlled by the emergent IR conformal symmetry at very low frequencies, and by the intermediate scaling regime at higher frequencies.

  12. A Note on the Intermediate Region in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. I. Barenblatt; A. J. Chorin; V. M. Prostokishin

    2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the processing of the experimental data for the average velocity profiles obtained by J. M. \\"Osterlund (www.mesh.kth.se/$\\sim$jens/zpg/) presented in [1] was incorrect. Properly processed these data lead to the opposite conclusion: they confirm the Reynolds-number-dependent scaling law and disprove the conclusion that the flow in the intermediate (`overlap') region is Reynolds-number-independent.

  13. League City Intermediate School - A Study in Energy Efficient Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longserre, J. T.; Ahrens, L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,000 square foot League City Intermediate School. The project cost was $8,080,000, or $52.75 per square foot. Due to the architectural firm's careful planning and use of a computer analysis to evaluate potential energy usage, the budget... requirements. The heating, ventilation .. . . 3st for the project was per square foot. 3 of lighting that con- most visible. Natural practicable and is pro- s and insulated skylights. rce center. located at the , permit borrowed light to windows...

  14. Intermediate-Generalized Chaplygin Gas inflationary universe model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon; Videla, Nelson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate inflationary universe model in the context of a generalized Chaplygin gas is considered. For the matter we consider two different energy densities; a standard scalar field and a tachyon field, respectively. In general, we discuss the conditions of an inflationary epoch for these models. We also, use recent astronomical observations from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven year data for constraining the parameters appearing in our models.

  15. Isotope analysis in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCL-EX Collaboration; :; E. Geraci; U. Abbondanno; L. Bardelli; S. Barlini; M. Bini; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; G. Casini; M. Chiari; M. D'Agostino; J. DeSanctis; A. Giussani; F. Gramegna; V. L. Kravchuk; A. L. Lanchais; P. Marini; A. Moroni; A. Nannini; A. Olmi; A. Ordine; G. Pasquali; S. Piantelli; G. Poggi; G. Vannini

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetry energy is a key quantity in the study of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Heavy ion collisions at low and intermediate energies, performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, can be used to extract information on the symmetry energy coefficient Csym, which is currently poorly known but relevant both for astrophysics and for structure of exotic nuclei.

  16. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  17. The self-enrichment scenario in intermediate metallicity globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Ventura; Francesca D'Antona

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present stellar yields computed from detailed models of intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars of low metallicity. In this work, the whole main microphysics inputs have been updated, and in particular alpha-enhancement is explicitly taken into account both in the opacities and equation of state. The target of this work is to provide a basis to test the reliability of the AGB self-enrichment scenario for Globular Clusters of intermediate metallicity. These Globular Clusters exhibit well defined abundance patterns, which have often been interpreted as a consequence of the pollution of the interstellar medium by the ejecta of massive AGBs. We calculated a grid of intermediate mass models with metallicity Z=0.001; the evolutionary sequences are followed from the pre-Main sequence along the whole AGB phase. We focus our attention on those elements largely studied in the spectroscopic investigations of Globular Clusters stars, i.e. oxygen, sodium, aluminum, magnesium and fluorine.} The predictions of our models show an encouraging agreement with the demand of the self-enrichment scenario for what concerns the abundances of oxygen, aluminum, fluorine and magnesium. The question of sodium is more tricky, due to the large uncertainties of the cross-sections of the Ne-Na cycle. The present results show that only a relatively small range of initial masses (M=5,6 solar masses) can be responsible for the self enrichment.

  18. 1Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity: Closing the Gap in the Spectrum of Climate System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Claussen; Michel Crucifix; Thierry Fichefet; Andrey Ganopolski; Huges Goosse; Vladimir Petoukhov; Thomas Stocker; Peter Stone; Zhaoming Wang; Andrew Weaver; Susanne L. Weber

    system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) is discussed. It be-comes apparent that there exists a

  19. Alternatives generation and analysis for phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, M.D.

    1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides; a decision analysis summary; problem statement; constraints, requirements, and assumptions; decision criteria; intermediate waste feed staging system options and alternatives generation and screening; intermediate waste feed staging system design concepts; intermediate waste feed staging system alternative evaluation and analysis; and open issues and actions.

  20. EVALUATION OF TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS FOR INTERMEDIATE NON DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Susan; Hoggard, Gary

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) shipments of irradiated experiments from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) have historically been accomplished using the General Electric Model 2000 (GE 2000) Type B shipping container. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) concerns regarding the future availability and leasing and handling costs associated with the GE 2000 cask have warranted an evaluation of alternative shipping options. One or more of these shipping options may be utilized to perform non destructive examinations (NDE) such as neutron radiography and precision gamma scans of irradiated experiments at HFEF and then return the experiments to ATR for further irradiation, hereafter referred to as “intermediate NDE.”

  1. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Ramon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  2. Warm-Intermediate inflationary universe model in braneworld cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Eugenio San Martin

    2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm-intermediate inflationary universe models in the context of braneworld cosmologies, are studied. This study is done in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We find that, the scalar potentials and dissipation coefficients in terms of the scalar field, evolves as type-power-law and powers of logarithms, respectively. General conditions required for these models to be realizable are derived and discussed. We also study the scalar and tensor perturbations for each regime. We use recent astronomical observations to constraint the parameters appearing in the braneworld models.

  3. Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Tran, Binh-Nien (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

  4. Effective summation over intermediate states in double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, J. (Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)); Haxton, W.C. (Institute for Nuclear Theory HN-12 and Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Vogel, P. (Physics Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two separate schemes for eliminating the explicit summation over states in the intermediate nucleus in double-beta decay. The first, known as the operator expansion method, has recently been applied in several calculations; we show in a variety of simple models that the method fails and isolate its weaknesses. We then describe an efficient technique for generating Green's function matrix elements, based on the Lanczos algorithm, and apply it to a full {ital fp}-shell calculation in {sup 48}Ca. The method efficiently generates an exact (to within machine accuracy) result while the operator expansion method is again inaccurate.

  5. File:Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdf JumpIntermediate wind

  6. The 1994 intermediate reline of H-3 furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J.D.; Nanavati, K.S.; Spirko, E.J.; Wakelin, D.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LTV Steel`s Indiana Harbor Works H-3 Blast Furnace was rebuilt in 1988 to provide reliable operations at high production rates without damage to the shell for an overall campaign. This Rebuild included: (1) complete bosh and partial stack shell replacement; (2) a spray cooled carbon bosh; (3) a row of staves at the mantle and six rows of stack staves, all stack staves had noses (ledges at the top of the stave) with the exception of row 5; (4) silicon carbide filled semi graphite brick for the bosh, silicon carbide brick from the mantle area and to the top of stave row No. 1, super duty brick in front of the remaining staves and phosphate bonded high alumina brick in the upper stack; (5) movable throat armor; (6) upgraded instrumentation to follow furnace operation and lining wear occurring in the furnace. No work was done to the hearth walls and bottom, since these had been replaced in 1982 with a first generation graphite cooled design and has experienced 7.7 million NTHM. The furnace was blown in November 18, 1988 and operated through September 3, 1994, at which time it was blown down for its first intermediate repair after 7.85 million NTHM. This paper summarizes the operation of the furnace and then discusses the major aspects of the 1994 intermediate repair.

  7. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  8. MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

  9. On the Blue Loops of Intermediate-Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walmswell, J J; Eldridge, J J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the blue loops in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that occur when intermediate-mass stars begin core helium burning. It has long been known that the excess of helium above the burning shell, the result of the contraction of the convective core during core hydrogen burning, has the effect of making such stars redder and larger than they would be otherwise. The outward motion of the burning shell in mass removes this excess and triggers the loop. Hitherto nobody has attempted to demonstrate why the excess helium has this effect. We consider the effect of the local opacity, which is reduced by excess helium, the shell fuel supply, which is also reduced, and the local mean molecular weight, which is increased. We demonstrate that the mean molecular weight is the decisive reddening factor. The opacity has a much smaller effect and a reduced fuel supply actually favours blueward motion.

  10. CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L. (Paris Observatoire, Meudon (France) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA) Maryland Univ., College Park (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs.

  11. Elastic Hadron Scattering on Li Isotopes at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Kazakh State University, ul. Timiryazeva 46, Almaty, 480121 (Kazakhstan); Ibraeva, E.T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty, 480082 (Kazakhstan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic scattering of hadrons (protons, charged pions, and positively charged kaons) on {sup 6,7,8}Li nuclei is analyzed on the basis of Glauber-Sitenko diffraction theory. A few nuclear-wave-function versions found within two- and three-particle potential cluster models are used in the calculations. It is shown that the application of these wave functions in diffraction theory makes it possible to describe adequately the experimental differential cross sections and analyzing powers in hadron scattering at intermediate energies. In this study, particular attention is given to a comparison of the scattering of different particles on the same target nucleus, as well as to a comparison of scattering of particles of the same sort on different target nuclei.

  12. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  13. Kaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article reviews the physics related to kaon and antikaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. Chiral dynamics predicts substantial modifications of the kaon properties in a dense nuclear environment. The status of the theoretical predictions as well as experimental evidences for medium effects such as repulsive/attractive mass shifts for $K^+/K^-$ are reviewed. In the vicinity of the thresholds, and even more pronounced below threshold, the production of strangeness is a highly collective process. Starting from elementary reaction channels the phenomenology of $K^+$ and $K^-$ production, i.e. freeze-out densities, time scales etc. as derived from experiment and theoretical transport calculations is presented. Below threshold kaon production shows a high sensitivity on the nuclear compression reached in heavy ion reactions. This allows to put constraints on the nuclear equation-of-state which are finally discussed.

  14. Can quark effects be observed in intermediate heavy ion collisions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. da Silva; D. Hadjimichef

    2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years a tentative description of the short-range part of hadron interactions with constituent quark interchange has been developed providing an alternative approach to meson physics. Quark interchange plays a role, for example, in the nucleon-nucleon ($NN$) phase-shifts and cross-section. In heavy ion collision simulations at intermediate energies one of the main features is the $NN$ cross-section in the collisional term, where in most cases it is an input adjusted to the free space value. In this paper we introduce the quark degrees of freedom to the $NN$ cross-section in the Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) model and explore the possibility that these effects appear in the observables at lower energies.

  15. Intermediate hearth repair technique at Thyssen Stahl AG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, W.; Bachhofen, H.J.; Ruether, P.; Ballewski, T. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays various techniques for the fastest possible intermediate repair and/or emplacement of refractory materials above the tuyere level allow a significant extension of furnace campaign life. The latter are hence now exclusively determined by the service life of the hearth. The improvement of hearth monitoring and the estimation of residual brick strength of the refractory lining on the basis of temperature measurements in the hearth enable the location of individual zones of premature wear. These measurement methods, which were developed by Thyssen Stahl AG, aid the decision to undertake selective repair of the hearth. Three areas of repair are differentiated: taphole zone; hearth wall, localized; and hearth wall, extensive. This hearth repair method is described in this report using the example of hearth refurbishing blast furnace 8, Hamborn.

  16. Phase slips and dissipation of Alfvenic intermediate shocks and solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laveder, D.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time evolution of a rotational discontinuity, characterized by a change of the magnetic-field direction by an angle {Delta}{theta} such that {pi}<|{Delta}{theta}|<2{pi} and no amplitude variation, is considered in the framework of asymptotic models that, through reductive perturbative expansions, isolate the dynamics of parallel or quasi-parallel Alfven waves. In the presence of viscous and Ohmic dissipation, and for a zero or sufficiently weak dispersion (originating from the Hall effect), an intermediate shock rapidly forms, steepens and undergoes reconnection through a quasi gradient collapse, leading to a reduction of |{Delta}{theta}| by an amount of 2{pi}, which can be viewed as the breaking of a topological constraint. Afterwards, as |{Delta}{theta}|<{pi}, the intermediate shock broadens and slowly dissipates. In the case of a phase jump |{Delta}{theta}|>3{pi}, which corresponds to a wave train limited on both sides by uniform fields, a sequence of such reconnection processes takes place. Differently, in the presence of a strong enough dispersion, the rotational discontinuity evolves, depending on the sign of {Delta}{theta}, to a dark or bright soliton displaying a 2{pi} phase variation. The latter is then eliminated, directly by reconnection in the case of a dark soliton, or through a more complex process involving a quasi amplitude collapse in that of a bright soliton. Afterwards, the resulting structure is progressively damped. For a prescribed initial rotational discontinuity, both quasi gradient and amplitude collapses lead to a sizeable energy decay that in the collisional regime is independent of the diffusion coefficient {eta} but requires a time scaling like 1/{eta}. In the non-collisional regime where dissipation originates from Landau resonance, the amount of dissipated energy during the event is independent of the plasma {beta}, but the process becomes slower for smaller {beta}.

  17. Challenges in the Selective Transformation of Biomass to Useful Chemical Intermediates and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    highly hydroxylated biomass feedstocks into new chemical intermediates and thermoplastics. New scientific. We have developed new catalytic methods for transforming biomass feedstocks into new monomers

  18. Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on shell and straight tube and printed circuit heat exchangers.

  19. Microsoft Word - FEMP Industry Days FAQ.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE like our company's small business contracting managers to attend, and should our ESCO consider giving a presentation or providing small business exhibits to engage small...

  20. FEMP Offers Training on Distributed-Scale Renewable Energy Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    be able to: Plan facility renewable energy projects using available screening tools for renewable energy resources, savings to investment ratio analysis, and feasibility studies...

  1. Ocean Energy Technology Overview: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  2. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new energy conservation measures (ECMs): solar photovoltaic (PV) and simple one-for-one heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system replacement (small building...

  3. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.

  4. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

  5. Overview of the ESCO Selection Process and FEMP ESPC Templates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides a flowchart showing the steps for selecting an energy services company (ESCO) for a Federal project and energy savings performance contract (ESPC) templates to assist with the process.

  6. FEMP Presents Latest Training Course on Advanced Energy Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and performance matrix in summarizing and assigning risks or responsibilities to the energy service company (ESCO), agency, or both The importance of measurements and...

  7. "FEMP Support Through Initial Proposal Review for Contractor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agency ESPC Delivery Order. ","Workshop Materials and electronic copies of contracts, DO RFP formats and other guidelines","Agency will identify acquisition team members who should...

  8. Green Roofs: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholz-Barth, K.; Tanner, S.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a ''green roof,'' a layer of vegetation (e.g., a roof garden) covers the surface of a roof to provide shade, cooler indoor and outdoor temperatures, and effective storm-water management to reduce runoff. The main components are waterproofing, soil, and plants. There are two basic kinds: intensive and extensive. An intensive green roof often features large shrubs and trees, and it can be expensive to install and maintain. An extensive green roof features shallow soil and low-growing, horizontally spreading plants that can thrive in the alpine conditions of many rooftops. These plants do not require a lot of water or soil, and they can tolerate a significant amount of exposure to the sun and wind. This Federal Technology Alert focuses on the benefits, design, and implementation of extensive green roofs and includes criteria for their use on federal facilities.

  9. FEMP and Department of Transportation Partnership Wins GreenGov...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technologies and techniques to assist the Department in designing one of the first energy- and water-efficient airport control towers that meet the high-performance...

  10. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the opportunity for Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD or the Depot) to utilize biogenic methane, which may be available in shale formations under the Depot, to provide a supplemental source of natural gas that could allow the Depot to increase energy independence. Both the Director and Deputy of Public Works at the Depot are supportive in general of a methane production project, but wanted to better understand the challenges prior to embarking on such a project. This report will cover many of these issues. A similar project has been successfully developed by the U. S. Army at Ft. Knox, KY, which will be explained and referred to throughout this report as a backdrop to discussing the challenges and opportunities at LEAD, because the geologic formations and possibilities at both sites are similar. Prior to discussing the opportunity at LEAD, it is important to briefly discuss the successful methane recovery operation at Ft. Knox, because it is applicable to the projected approach for the LEAD methane system. The Ft. Knox project is an excellent example of how the U. S. Army can use an onsite renewable resource to provide a secure energy source that is not dependent on regional energy networks and foreign oil. At Ft. Knox, the U. S. Army contracted (through a utility co-op) with an energy production company to drill wells, establish a distribution infrastructure, and provide the equipment needed to prepare and compress the produced methane gas for use by base operations. The energy production company agreed to conduct the exploratory investigation at Ft. Knox with no cost to the government, as long as they could be granted a long-term contract if a reliable energy resource was established. The Depot is located, in part, over an Ordovician Age shale formation that may have the potential for producing biogenic methane, similar to the Devonian Age shale found beneath Ft. Knox. However, the Ordovician Age Shale beneath the Letterkenny Depot is not known to have any currently producing gas wells.

  11. arra femp technical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is published Erdem, Erkut 29 Technical Brief CiteSeer Summary: ii iiiFOREWARD The Depleted Uranium Technical Brief is designed to convey available information and knowledge about...

  12. FEMP ESPC Best Practices: Agency Plan and Variances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document serves as a checklist for tracking agency use of Federal Energy Management Program energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) best practices.

  13. FEMP/NTDP Technology Installation Review New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the ventilation pathways among and over office partitions. Compounding this problem, there has been a growing and ventilation environment. Since its original introduction in West Germany during the 1950s, the open plan

  14. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance and heat pump water heaters are not covered.other than commercial heat pump water heaters). 10CFR431.110

  15. FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) presents alternative financing guidance memoranda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility financing of energy efficient measures becomes easier to accomplish with the two new alternative financing guidance memoranda, released April 17, 1998, that address the use of utility incentives for Federal facilities. The memoranda have been approved by the Alternative Financing Guidance Committee on the Interagency Energy Management Task Force. The memoranda include: (1) Policy Statement No. 001: Authority to Sole Source Utility Service Contracts as Referenced in Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992; and (2) Policy Statement No. 002: Congressional Notification for Utility Projects Under the Authority of Section 152 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 1992. The purpose for developing the financing memoranda was to address specific issues within current Federal procurement regulations that require clarification or guidance. This new guidance will allow for increased use of utility incentives as a means of financing energy efficient and life cycle cost-effective projects in Federal facilities.

  16. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rating of at least 4000 Btu per hour per gallon of storedpackaged boiler that has an input rating from 300,000 Btu/hrto 12,500,000 Btu/hr (and at least 4,000 Btu/hr per gallon

  17. FEMP 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO. 11-59-LNGCustomer2015

  18. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERAL ENERGY

  19. FEMP Launches New Training Search Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERAL

  20. FEMP Offers New Training Series on Renewable Energy Technologies |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERALDepartment of

  1. FEMP Offers New Training on Photovoltaic Operations and Maintenance Best

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET

  2. FEMP Presents Latest Training Course on Advanced Energy Savings Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning toPeer Review

  3. FEMP Publishes Aspinall Courthouse Case Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning toPeer

  4. FEMP Releases 10 Updated Covered Product Categories | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning toPeerReleases 10

  5. Energy Savings Performance Contracts: FEMP Assistance | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic Law of the 109thEnergy SaverENERGY

  6. FEMP Completes 2000th Renewable Energy Optimization Screening | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:EnergyFAR27.pdfFE DOCKETFEDERALFEMAof

  7. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Request

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy ManagementAugustin2012)4 News5Management CasePortal

  8. FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman Aerospace CenterEverlightOpenEyeforenergyFEM

  9. FEMP Solar Hot Water Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman Aerospace CenterEverlightOpenEyeforenergyFEMSolar Hot

  10. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Training Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman AerospaceEfficiency

  11. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001 PowerofUse ofManagement Excellence |

  12. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Request

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergy

  13. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide

  14. FEMP SUGGESTED ESPC MILESTONE PLAN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| DepartmentContractingReleases

  15. FEMP Services Interagency Agreement for DOE ESPC Support | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732 DOEDepartment of EnergyEricDocuments andofPressEnergy

  16. Microsoft Word - FEMP-State MOU pdf version.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENTtheStatusUNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE U.S.

  17. US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDB Schema Documentation?

  18. FEMP Announces New Utilities Offering UESCs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN Cameron

  19. FEMP Expands ESPC ENABLE Program to Include More Energy Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8. REVIEW OF

  20. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8.

  1. FEMP Launches New Technical Assistance Request Portal | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8.Energy

  2. FEMP Offers New Training Series on Renewable Energy Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC

  3. FEMP Offers New Training on Photovoltaic Operations and Maintenance Best

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices | Department of

  4. FEMP Offers Training on Energy Efficiency Expert Evaluations | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices |of Energy

  5. FEMP Releases AFFECT Funding Opportunity Announcement | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices |ofSystems

  6. FEMP Releases ESPC Request for Information Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices |ofSystemsESPC

  7. FEMP SUGGESTED ESPC MILESTONE PLAN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices

  8. Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Lot Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 March 2013 WHAT: The last7 Guide9TABLE

  9. Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Structure Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 March 2013 WHAT: The last7

  10. US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin HydropowerTrinityTurnbullGlobal Map-Annex 1 JumpICSViewDOE 20%

  11. US DOE Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin HydropowerTrinityTurnbullGlobal Map-Annex 1 JumpICSViewDOE

  12. The changing accretion states of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staude; A. D. Schwope; R. Schwarz; J. Vogel; M. Krumpe; A. Nebot Gomez-Moran

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis (1RXS J062518.2+733433) to determine the accretion modes and the accretion geometry from multi-wavelength, multi-epoch observational data. Light curves in different observed energy ranges (optical, UV, X-ray) are extracted. The timescales of variability in these light curves are determined using Analysis of Variance. Phase-resolved X-ray spectra are created with respect to the most prominent detected periodicities and each fitted with an identical model, to quantify the differences in the fitted components. The published tentative value for the spin period is unambiguously identified with the rotation period of the white dwarf. We detect a distinct soft X-ray component that can be reproduced well by a black body. The analysis of data obtained at different epochs demonstrates that the system is changing its accretion geometry from disk-dominated to a combination of disk- plus stream-dominated, accompanied with a significant change in brightness at optical wavelengths.

  13. The changing accretion states of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staude, A; Schwarz, R; Vogel, J; Krumpe, M; Gomez-Moran, A Nebot

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis (1RXS J062518.2+733433) to determine the accretion modes and the accretion geometry from multi-wavelength, multi-epoch observational data. Light curves in different observed energy ranges (optical, UV, X-ray) are extracted. The timescales of variability in these light curves are determined using Analysis of Variance. Phase-resolved X-ray spectra are created with respect to the most prominent detected periodicities and each fitted with an identical model, to quantify the differences in the fitted components. The published tentative value for the spin period is unambiguously identified with the rotation period of the white dwarf. We detect a distinct soft X-ray component that can be reproduced well by a black body. The analysis of data obtained at different epochs demonstrates that the system is changing its accretion geometry from disk-dominated to a combination of disk- plus stream-dominated, accompanied with a significant...

  14. Simulating the growth of Intermediate Mass Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacucci, Fabio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical models predict that a population of Intermediate Mass Black Holes (IMBHs) of mass $M_\\bullet \\approx 10^{4-5} \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ might form at high ($z > 10$) redshift by different processes. Such objects would represent the seeds out of which $z > 6$ Super-Massive Black Holes (SMBHs) grow. We numerically investigate the radiation-hydrodynamic evolution governing the growth of such seeds via accretion of primordial gas within their parent dark matter halo of virial temperature $T_{vir} \\sim 10^4 \\, \\mathrm{K}$. We find that the accretion onto a Direct Collapse Black Hole (DCBH) of initial mass $M_0=10^5 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ occurs at an average rate $\\dot{M}_{\\bullet} \\simeq 1.35 \\, \\dot{M}_{Edd} \\simeq 0.1 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot} \\, yr^{-1}}$, is intermittent (duty-cycle $ emits on average at super-Eddington luminosities, progressively becoming more luminous as the density of the inner mass shells, directly feeding the central obj...

  15. Dynamics of the Core Tryptophan during the Formation of a Productive Molten Globule Intermediate of Barstar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    in the intermediates that are populated during the salt-induced transition of the D form to the molten globule B formDynamics of the Core Tryptophan during the Formation of a Productive Molten Globule Intermediate formation in the denatured D form at pH 12, by addition of increasing concentrations of the stabilizing salt

  16. A Cost-Effective Strategy for Intermediate Data Storage in Scientific Cloud Workflow Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    1 A Cost-Effective Strategy for Intermediate Data Storage in Scientific Cloud Workflow Systems Dong the overall cost of scientific cloud workflow execution significantly. Keywords - data storage; cost be reused. Storing valuable intermediate data can save their regeneration cost when they are reused

  17. Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancho, Javier

    Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate MarõÂa P. IruÂn1 in surface- exposed hydrogen bonds connecting secondary-structure elements in the native protein. All hydrogen bonds analysed are formed in the molten globule intermediate, either with native strength

  18. Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK Abstract-Intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) have the thermodynamic efficiency limits of solar energy conversion. While tandem solar cells can the- oretically exceedNUSOD 2007 Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells S

  19. Intermediate Mirrors to Reach Theoretical Efficiency Limits of Multi-Bandgap Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapati, Vidya; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating a single bandgap solar cell that approaches the Shockley-Queisser limit requires a highly reflective rear mirror. This mirror enhances the voltage of the solar cell by providing photons with multiple opportunities for escaping out the front surface. Efficient external luminescence is a pre-requisite for high voltage. Intermediate mirrors in a multijunction solar cell can enhance the voltage for each cell in the stack. These intermediate mirrors need to have the added function of transmitting the below bandgap photons to the next cell in the stack. In this work, we quantitatively establish the efficiency increase possible with the use of intermediate selective reflectors between cells in a tandem stack. The absolute efficiency increase can be up to ~6% in dual bandgap cells with optimal intermediate and rear mirrors. A practical implementation of an intermediate selective mirror is an air gap sandwiched by antireflection coatings. The air gap provides perfect reflection for angles outside the escape c...

  20. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

  1. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  2. CONSTRAINING INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A., E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu, E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decades after the first predictions of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in globular clusters (GCs) there is still no unambiguous observational evidence for their existence. The most promising signatures for IMBHs are found in the cores of GCs, where the evidence now comes from the stellar velocity distribution, the surface density profile, and, for very deep observations, the mass-segregation profile near the cluster center. However, interpretation of the data, and, in particular, constraints on central IMBH masses, require the use of detailed cluster dynamical models. Here we present results from Monte Carlo cluster simulations of GCs that harbor IMBHs. As an example of application, we compare velocity dispersion, surface brightness and mass-segregation profiles with observations of the GC M10, and constrain the mass of a possible central IMBH in this cluster. We find that, although M10 does not seem to possess a cuspy surface density profile, the presence of an IMBH with a mass up to 0.75% of the total cluster mass, corresponding to about 600 M{sub Sun }, cannot be excluded. This is also in agreement with the surface brightness profile, although we find it to be less constraining, as it is dominated by the light of giants, causing it to fluctuate significantly. We also find that the mass-segregation profile cannot be used to discriminate between models with and without IMBH. The reason is that M10 is not yet dynamically evolved enough for the quenching of mass segregation to take effect. Finally, detecting a velocity dispersion cusp in clusters with central densities as low as in M10 is extremely challenging, and has to rely on only 20-40 bright stars. It is only when stars with masses down to 0.3 M{sub Sun} are included that the velocity cusp is sampled close enough to the IMBH for a significant increase above the core velocity dispersion to become detectable.

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  4. Distances and Metallicities of High- and Intermediate-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A table is presented that summarizes published absorption line measurements for the high- and intermediate velocity clouds (HVCs and IVCs). New values are derived for N(HI) in the direction of observed probes, in order to arrive at reliable abundances and abundance limits (the HI data are described in Paper II). Distances to stellar probes are revisited and calculated consistently, in order to derive distance brackets or limits for many of the clouds, taking care to properly interpret non-detections. The main conclusions are the following. 1) Absolute abundances have been measured using lines of SII, NI and OI, with the following resulting values: ~0.1 solar for one HVC (complex C), ~0.3 solar for the Magellanic Stream, ~0.5 solar for a southern IVC, and ~ solar for two northern IVCs (the IV Arch and LLIV Arch). Finally, approximate values in the range 0.5-2 solar are found for three more IVCs. 2) Depletion patterns in IVCs are like those in warm disk or halo gas. 3) Most distance limits are based on strong UV lines of CII, SiII and MgII, a few on CaII. Distance limits for major HVCs are >5 kpc, while distance brackets for several IVCs are in the range 0.5-2 kpc. 4) Mass limits for major IVCs are 0.5-8x10^5 M_sun, but for major HVCs they are >10^6 M_sun. 5) The CaII/HI ratio varies by up to a factor 2-5 within a single cloud, somewhat more between clouds. 6) The NaIHI ratio varies by a factor >10 within a cloud, and even more between clouds. Thus, CaII can be useful for determining both lower and upper distance limits, but NaI only yields upper limits.

  5. Design of compact intermediate heat exchangers for gas cooled fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gezelius, Knut, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two aspects of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for GFR service have been investigated: (1) the intrinsic characteristics of the proposed compact printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE); and (2) a specific design optimizing ...

  6. Feasibility of the use of capillary electrophoresis for the study of vldl assembly intermediates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Elizabeth Anne

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The chicken has long been a model used for the study of plasma lipoproteins due to the ability to increase VLDL production by administration of estrogen. In this study we were able to demonstrate successful isolation of VLDL assembly intermediates...

  7. Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goosse, H.

    The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and ...

  8. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  9. Feasibility of the use of capillary electrophoresis for the study of vldl assembly intermediates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Elizabeth Anne

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    estrogen treatment. Effects of estrogen waned after 24 hours and particle diameter of first step particles increased to an average of 23.9 nm. These assembly intermediates, as well as plasma VLDL and VLDLy, were successfully studied using capillary...

  10. Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    LETTERS Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities * Positive relationships between species diversity and productivity have been reported for a number of understanding how diversity and productivity are linked over evolutionary timescales. Here, we investigate

  11. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunets, Vas. P., E-mail: vkunets@uark.edu; Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Mortazavi, M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71601 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  12. On Inquiry: Human Concept Formation and Construction of Meaning through Library and Information Science Intermediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konrad, Allan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science Intermediation By Allan Mark Konrad B.A. (UniversityCopyright © 2007 by Allan Mark Konrad All rights reservedProQuest/UMI. The author, Allan M Konrad, does not indemnify

  13. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

  14. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  15. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerata, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  16. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  17. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  18. Optimum fertilization rate for intermediate leaf cucumber grown for once-over mechanical harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konderla, Timothy Michael

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPTIMUM FERTILIZATION RATE FOR INTERMEDIATE LEAF CUCUMBER GROWN FOR ONCE-OVER MECHANICAL HARVEST A Thesis by TIMOTHY MICHAEL KONDERLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A& M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture OPTIMUM FERTILIZATION RATE FOR INTERMEDIATE LEAF CUCUMBER GROWN FOR ONCE-OVER MECHANICAL HARVEST A Thesis by TIMOTHY MICHAEL KONDERLA Approved as to style...

  19. High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

  20. The periods of the intermediate polar RX J0153.3+7446

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Norton; J. D. Tanner

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first optical photometry of the counterpart to the candidate intermediate polar RX J0153.3+7446. This reveals an optical pulse period of 2333s +/- 5s. Reanalysis of the previously published ROSAT X-ray data reveals that the true X-ray pulse period is probably 1974s +/- 30s, rather than the 1414 s previously reported. Given that the previously noted orbital period of the system is 3.94 h, we are able to identify the X-ray pulse period with the white dwarf spin period and the optical pulse period with the rotation period of the white dwarf in the binary reference frame, as commonly seen in other intermediate polars. We thus confirm that RX J0153.3+7446 is indeed a typical intermediate polar.

  1. Nucleon scattering from very light nuclei: Intermediate energy expansions for transition potentials and breakup processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elster, C. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)] [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Gloeckle, W. [Institute for Theoretical Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition potentials for elastic p-d scattering and the coupled processes p+{sup 3}He {r_arrow} p+{sup 3}He and n+{sup 3}He {r_arrow} d+d are derived in the Faddeev-Yakubovsky framework with special emphasis on leading order terms, which are expected to be valid at intermediate energies. In addition, equations for the fragmentations {sup 3}He(p,ppp)n and {sup 3}He(p,pp)d are derived within the same framework. Again leading order terms for intermediate energies are considered. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, I; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Balazs, L G; Veres, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important task of the Gamma-Ray Burst field is the classification of the bursts. Many researches have proven the existence of the third kind (intermediate duration) of GRBs in the BATSE data. Recent works have analyzed BeppoSax and Swift observations and can also identify three types of GRBs in the data sets. However, the class memberships are probabilistic we have enough observed redshifts to calculate the redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate GRBs. They are significantly farther than the short bursts and seems to be closer than the long ones.

  3. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  4. The Role of Phase Space in Complex Fragment Emission from Low to Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. G. Moretto; R. Ghetti; K. X. Jing; L. Phair; K. Tso; G. J. Wozniak

    1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental emission probabilities of complex fragments by low energy compound nuclei and their dependence upon energy and atomic number are compared to the transition state rates. Intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for a variety of reactions at intermediate energies are shown to be binomial and thus reducible at all measured transverse energies. From these distributions a single binary event probability can be extracted which has a thermal dependence. A strong thermal signature is also found in the charge distributions. The n-fold charge distributions are reducible to the 1-fold charge distributions through a simple scaling dictated by fold number and charge conservation.

  5. Stellar and Intermediate-Mass Black Holes in the Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, Jimmy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States)

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of high resolution X-ray telescopes, the ability to identify extragalactic black holes has greatly enhanced our understanding of massive compact objects, as we are no longer limited to the rather meager Milky Way black hole population. The greatly increased numbers have opened up opportunities to find new modes of compact object accretion and potentially long-sought evidence for intermediate-mass black holes. In this lecture series, the current state of knowledge of stellar- and intermediate-mass black holes is reviewed, particularly in regards to black hole populations in external galaxies.

  6. Intermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parameter in the photovoltaic PV solar cell technology. It is defined as = FFVocJsc Pin , 1 where FFIntermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina Nano to implement the intermediate-band solar cell with the efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit

  7. Ecient Statistical Modeling for the Compression of Tree Structured Intermediate Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Priti

    . Compressors that work on compiler intermediate representations or virtual machine code are a partial solution to the problem of reducing transmission time. The idea of using syntactic information source models for source used to specify trees. When universal data compressors are applied to the compression of such data

  8. COMPASS: an instrument for measuring the polarization of the CMB on intermediate angular scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    COMPASS: an instrument for measuring the polarization of the CMB on intermediate angular scales 44106, USA Abstract COMPASS is an on-axis 2.6-m telescope coupled to a correlation polarimeter 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Instrument design COMPASS was designed to measure the po

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of proteins in cages: influence of confinement on the stability of intermediate states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Ojeda; Aurora Londono; Nan-Yow Chen; Martin Garcia

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of the folding of small proteins inside confining potentials. Proteins are described in the framework of an effective potential model which contains the Ramachandran angles as degrees of freedom and does not need any {\\it a priori} information about the native state. Hydrogen bonds, dipole-dipole- and hydrophobic interactions are taken explicitly into account. An interesting feature displayed by this potential is the presence of some intermediates between the unfolded and native states. We consider different types of confining potentials in order to study the structural properties of proteins folding inside cages with repulsive or attractive walls. Using the Wang-Landau algorithm we determine the density of states (DOS) and analyze in detail the thermodynamical properties of the confined proteins for different sizes of the cages. We show that confinement dramatically reduces the phase space available to the protein and that the presence of intermediate states can be controlled by varying the properties of the confining potential. Cages with strongly attractive walls lead to the disappearance of the intermediate states and to a two-state folding into a less stable configuration. However, cages with slightly attractive walls make the native structure more stable than in the case of pure repulsive potentials, and the folding process occurs through intermediate configurations. In order to test the metastable states we analyze the free energy landscapes as a function of the configurational energy and of the end-to-end distance as an order parameter.

  10. Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H. [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, C. X. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

  11. Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Instruments and Methods Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1002, U.S.A. ABSTRACT. A lightweight, portable drilling system for coring up to 500 m depths has been developed and field-tested. The drilling system includes four major components

  12. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

  13. Simulation of glacial Cycles with an Earth System Model of intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    Statistical-Dynamical Atmosphere Model (POTSDAM) Surface Energy and Mass balance Interface (SEMI) annual mass circulation ·Conclusions and outlook #12;·Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 Petoukhov et of THC are important to fully complete the glacial terminations. #12;Outlook ·Close the carbon cycle

  14. Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

    1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

  15. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by Fe.1063/1.1448489 I. INTRODUCTION The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transport- able liquid such as methanol process and as the simplest model for alkane oxidation.1,2 Although no direct, efficient methane­methanol

  16. Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India Brazil-China-India Workshop on Energy Efficiency Financing Cross country exchange, outreach and dissemination Juan Zak URC Brazil, May 2004 #12;2 What is URC ? · URC is the UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy

  17. Interhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the prescribed tropical heating in both intensity and geographical extent and by inducing remote precipitation anomalies by interaction with the basic state. 1. Introduction Tropical heat sources can remotely influenceInterhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models XUAN

  18. Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

  19. Discovery of Eight Recycled Pulsars - The Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. T. Edwards

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a pulsar survey of intermediate Galactic latitudes (15deg 0.57 Mo and > 1.2 Mo), while anotherhas a low mass (~0.2 Mo) companion in a 23.3-d orbit, residing the well-known orbital period ``gap''.

  20. Soumis J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Soumis à J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test using Nd1.95NiO4 Abstract This work deals with SOFC single cell tests using neodymium nickelate Nd1.95NiO4+ as cathode electrochemical activity with respect to classical materials. The SOFC cells were fabricated from an anode

  1. Differential Salt-induced Stabilization of Structure in the Initial Folding Intermediate Ensemble of Barstar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Differential Salt-induced Stabilization of Structure in the Initial Folding Intermediate Ensemble of Fundamental Research, GKVK Campus, Bangalore 560 065 India The effects of two salts, KCl and MgCl2 mol21 in the absence of salt to a value of 6.9 kcal mol21 in the presence of 1 M KCl or 1 M MgCl2

  2. Protein Unfolding, and the "Tuning In" of Reversible Intermediate States, in Protic Ionic Liquid Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    's heat capacity as it undergoes the unfolding process. This yields a spe- cific enthalpy change, which partial heat capacities, we will simply report the total system heat capacity and attribute the partProtein Unfolding, and the "Tuning In" of Reversible Intermediate States, in Protic Ionic Liquid

  3. On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water Zouhair Lachkar Mesoscale eddies CFC-11 Ventilation Southern Ocean a b s t r a c t The spatial distribution of Antarctic and ventilation are substantially affected by mesoscale eddies. To diagnose the role of eddies, we made global CFC

  4. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system and atmosphere radiation balance in a developing EMIC project named GENIE (Grid Enabled Integrated Earth system

  5. Intermediate magnetite formation during dehydration of O zden O zdemir *, David J. Dunlop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, David J.

    Intermediate magnetite formation during dehydration of goethite Oë zden Oë zdemir *, David J The dehydration of goethite has been studied by low-temperature induced magnetization (LTIM) and X-ray diffraction and 610³C. Goethite and hematite were the magnetically dominant phases after all runs except 500³C and 610

  6. Plasticity of intermediate mechanics students' coordinate system choice Eleanor C. Sayre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Plasticity of intermediate mechanics students' coordinate system choice Eleanor C. Sayre Department from solid. To describe our work more precisely, we define a scale of plasticity and several heuristics for defining resources and their plasticity. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.4.020105 PACS number s : 01.30.lb, 01

  7. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was built in 1983. It was recently expanded in 1994 and renamed the Willow Branch Intermediate School. It now has a total floor area of 88,617 square feet. The system under investigation is a water-loop heat pump system which provides the HVAC needs...

  8. EDUCATOR'S GUIDE The large format film Hurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    EDUCATOR'S GUIDE #12;The large format film Hurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou is appropriate for all intermediate gradesHurricane on the Bayou (4 for young children. Hurricane on the Bayou Produced and distributed by MacGillivray Freeman Films Executive

  9. Structure and Electronic Configurations of the Intermediates of Water Oxidation in Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Zakharova, Taisiya; Alperovich, Igor; Meyer, Thomas J.; Pushkar, Yulia (Purdue); (UNC)

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic O{sub 2} evolution with cis,cis-[(bpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)Ru{sup III}ORu{sup III}(OH{sub 2})(bpy){sub 2}]{sup 4+} (bpy is 2,2-bipyridine), the so-called blue dimer, the first designed water oxidation catalyst, was monitored by UV-vis, EPR, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with ms time resolution. Two processes were identified, one of which occurs on a time scale of 100 ms to a few seconds and results in oxidation of the catalyst with the formation of an intermediate, here termed [3,4]'. A slower process occurring on the time scale of minutes results in the decay of this intermediate and O{sub 2} evolution. Spectroscopic data suggest that within the fast process there is a short-lived transient intermediate, which is a precursor of [3,4]'. When excess oxidant was used, a highly oxidized form of the blue dimer [4,5] was spectroscopically resolved within the time frame of the fast process. Its structure and electronic state were confirmed by EPR and XAS. As reported earlier, the [3,4]' intermediate likely results from reaction of [4,5] with water. While it is generated under strongly oxidizing conditions, it does not display oxidation of the Ru centers past [3,4] according to EPR and XAS. EXAFS analysis demonstrates a considerably modified ligand environment in [3,4]'. Raman measurements confirmed the presence of the O-O fragment by detecting a new vibration band in [3,4]' that undergoes a 46 cm{sup -1} shift to lower energy upon {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O exchange. Under the conditions of the experiment at pH 1, the [3,4]' intermediate is the catalytic steady state form of the blue dimer catalyst, suggesting that its oxidation is the rate-limiting step.

  10. Macroscopic/microscopic simulation of nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. Denis Lacroix, Aymeric Van Lauwe and Dominique Durand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Macroscopic/microscopic simulation of nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. Denis Lacroix- tion of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. The model simulates events for reactions close to the fusion barrier (5-10 MeV/A) up to higher energy (100 MeV/A) and it gives access

  11. Novel Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Vincent Wu, University of California, Berkeley, 2011 SURF Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Introduction The need to develop new cathode materials for intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCsNovel Materials for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Vincent Wu, University) is driven by the temperature conditions required for IT-SOFC operation. Designing SOFCs to operate at lower

  12. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  13. QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAO,LL; SNYDER,PB; LEONARD,AW; OIKAWA,T; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; FERRON,JR; GROEBNER,RJ; HORTON,LD; KAMADA,Y; MURAKAMI,M; SAARELMA,S; STJOHN,HE; TURNBULL,AD; WILSON,HR

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES. Several testable features of the working model of edge localized modes (ELMs) as intermediate toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes are evaluated quantitatively using DIII-D and JT-60U experimental data and the ELITE MHD stability code. These include the hypothesis that ELM sizes are related to the radial widths of the unstable MHD modes, the unstable modes have a strong ballooning character localized in the outboard bad curvature region, and ELM size generally becomes smaller at high edge collisionality. ELMs are triggered when the growth rates of the unstable MHD modes become significantly large. These testable features are consistent with many ELM observations in DIII-D and JT-60U discharges.

  14. GHIGLS: HI mapping at intermediate Galactic latitude using the Green Bank Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, P G; Goncalves, D Pinheiro; Lockman, Felix J; Boothroyd, A I; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Joncas, G; Stephan, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the data cubes from GHIGLS, our deep Green Bank Telescope surveys of the 21-cm line emission of HI in targeted fields at intermediate Galactic latitude. The GHIGLS fields together cover over 800 square degrees at 9.55' spatial resolution. The HI spectra have an effective velocity resolution about 1.0 km/s and cover at least -450 power spectra of maps of the column density, NHI. For our featured representative field, centered on the North Ecliptic Pole, the scaling exponents in power-law representations of the power spectra of NHI maps for low, intermediate, and high velocity gas components (LVC, IVC, and HVC) are -2.90 +/- 0.03, -2.55 +/- 0.04, and -2.66 +/- 0.06, respectively. After Gaussian decomposition of the line profiles, NHI maps were also made corresponding to the broad and narrow line components in the LVC...

  15. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  16. A study of nuclear stopping in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Escano-Rodriguez; D. Durand; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; the INDRA Collaboration

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear stopping has been investigated in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Firstly, it is found that the isotropy ratio, Riso, reaches a minimum near the Fermi energy and saturates or slowly increases depending on the mass of the system as the beam energy increases. An approximate scaling based on the size of the system is found above the Fermi energy suggesting the increasing role of in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions. Secondly, the charge density distributions in velocity space, dZ/dvk and dZ/dv?, reveal a strong memory of the entrance channel and, as such, a sizeable nuclear transparency in the intermediate energy range. Lastly, it is shown that the width of the transverse velocity distribution is proportional to the beam velocity.

  17. Elliptic flow and system size dependence of transition energies at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yingxun Zhang; Zhuxia Li

    2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The elliptic flow for $Z\\le2$ particles in heavy ion collisions at energies from several tens to several hundreds MeV per nucleon is investigated by means of transport model,i.e. a new version of the Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (ImQMD05). In this model, a complete Skyrme potential energy density functional is employed. The influence of different effective interactions and medium corrections of nucleon-nucleon cross sections on the elliptic flow are studied. Our results show that a soft nuclear equation of state and incident energy dependent in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections are required for describing the excitation function of the elliptic flow at intermediate energies. The size dependence of transition energies for the elliptic flow at intermediate energies is also studied. The system size dependence of transition energies fits a power of system size with a exponent of 0.223.

  18. Criteria for releases and disposal of low level and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindbom, G. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Waste Management and Environmental Protection

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In Sweden there exists a complete system for management, including final disposal, of all radioactive wastes which are not classified as long-lived or high-level waste. This paper will present the disposal options and the requirements set on the waste categories as well as Sweden`s four different engineered shallow land disposals. The advantages of having a shallow land disposal together with exemption of waste and a final storage facility for low-level and intermediate-level waste are discussed. Finally, the paper will give a summary of why Sweden has succeeded in establishing a full system for low-level and intermediate-level waste. The discussion is from regulatory point of view.

  19. Condensation of an ideal gas with intermediate statistics on the horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somayeh Zare; Zahra Raissi; Hosein Mohammadzadeh; Behrouz Mirza

    2012-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a boson gas on the stretched horizon of the Schwartzschild and Kerr black holes. It is shown that the gas is in a Bose-Einstein condensed state with the Hawking temperature $T_c=T_H$ if the particle number of the system be equal to the number of quantum bits of space-time $ N \\simeq {A}/{{\\l_{p}}^{2}}$. Entropy of the gas is proportional to the area of the horizon $(A)$ by construction. For a more realistic model of quantum degrees of freedom on the horizon, we should presumably consider interacting bosons (gravitons). An ideal gas with intermediate statistics could be considered as an effective theory for interacting bosons. This analysis shows that we may obtain a correct entropy just by a suitable choice of parameter in the intermediate statistics.

  20. Intermediate- to Deep-Water Circulation Changes on Short and Long Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Daniel Patrick

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ). In the subtropical eastern North Pacific, interstadials are characterized by increases in sea surface temperature (Kennett and Venz, 1995; Hendy and Kennett, 1999) and primary productivity (Ortiz et al., 2004; Pospelova et al., 2006) as well as diminished... levels at the seafloor via oxidation of organic matter during interstadials (e.g. Ortiz et al., 2004). The second hypothesis calls for a change in intermediate water circulation, in which a younger, relatively oxygen-rich stadial water mass...

  1. IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3: A DEEPLY ECLIPSING INTERMEDIATE POLAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aungwerojwit, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Gaensicke, B. T.; Wheatley, P. J.; Pyrzas, S. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Staels, B. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Krajci, T. [CBA Flanders, Alan Guth Observatory, Koningshofbaan 51, B-9308 Hofstade, Aalst (Belgium); Rodriguez-Gil, P. [Astrokolkhoz Observatory, PO Box 1351 Cloudcroft, NM 88317 (United States)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present time-resolved photometry of a cataclysmic variable discovered in the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric H{alpha} Survey of the northern galactic plane, IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3, and classify the system as the fourth deeply eclipsing intermediate polar known with an orbital period of P {sub orb} = 8.16 hr and a spin period of P {sub spin} = 2210 s. The system shows mild variations of its brightness that appear to be accompanied by a change in the amplitude of the spin modulation at optical wavelengths and a change in the morphology of the eclipse profile. The inferred magnetic moment of the white dwarf is {mu}{sub wd} {approx} (6-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} G cm{sup 3}, and in this case IPHAS J062746.41+014811.3 will evolve either into a short-period EX Hya-like intermediate polar with a large P {sub spin}/P{sub orb} ratio or, perhaps more likely, into a synchronized polar. Swift observations show that the system is an ultraviolet and X-ray source, with a hard X-ray spectrum that is consistent with those seen in other intermediate polars. The ultraviolet light curve shows orbital modulation and an eclipse, while the low signal-to-noise ratio X-ray light curve does not show a significant modulation on the spin period. The measured X-ray flux is about an order of magnitude lower than would be expected from scaling by the optical fluxes of well-known X-ray-selected intermediate polars.

  2. Design techniques for high intermediate frequency bandpass (sigma/delta) modulator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kode, Praveena

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are to support multiple standards on a single chip to support spec- trum management when used in communication systems. It has been proven that CT bandpass ?? modulators is the best choice for high frequency Analog–to–Digital conversion [3...DESIGN TECHNIQUES FOR HIGH INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY BANDPASS ?? MODULATOR AThesis by PRAVEENA KODE Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

  3. Intermediate DNA at low added salt: DNA bubbles slow the diffusion of short DNA fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Vuletic; Sanja Dolanski Babic; Ticijana Ban; Joachim Raedler; Francoise Livolant; Silvia Tomic

    2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a study of DNA (150 bp fragments) conformations in very low added salt $DNA concentration range $0.0015\\leq c \\leq 8$~mM (bp). We found an intermediate DNA conformation in the region $0.05 DNA has the diffusion coefficient, $D_p$ reduced below the values for both ssDNA coils and native dsDNA helices of similar polymerization degree $N$. Thus, this DNA population can not be a simple mix of dsDNA and of ssDNA which results from DNA melting. Here, melting occurs due to a reduction in screening concomitant with DNA concentration being reduced, in already very low salt conditions. The intermediate DNA is rationalized through the well known concept of fluctuational openings (DNA bubbles) which we postulate to form in AT-rich portions of the sequence, without the strands coming apart. Within the bubbles, DNA is locally stretched, while the whole molecule remains rod-like due to very low salt environment. Therefore, such intermediate DNA is elongated, in comparison to dsDNA, which accounts for its reduced $D_p$.

  4. Characteristics and sources of intermediate size particles in recovery boilers : final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Larry L. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Shaddix, Christopher R.; Verrill, Christopher L. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA); Wessel, Richard A. (Babcock & Wilcox Company, Barberton, OH)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) Forest Products research program, a collaborative investigation was conducted on the sources, characteristics, and deposition of particles intermediate in size between submicron fume and carryover in recovery boilers. Laboratory experiments on suspended-drop combustion of black liquor and on black liquor char bed combustion demonstrated that both processes generate intermediate size particles (ISP), amounting to 0.5-2% of the black liquor dry solids mass (BLS). Measurements in two U.S. recovery boilers show variable loadings of ISP in the upper furnace, typically between 0.6-3 g/Nm{sup 3}, or 0.3-1.5% of BLS. The measurements show that the ISP mass size distribution increases with size from 5-100 {micro}m, implying that a substantial amount of ISP inertially deposits on steam tubes. ISP particles are depleted in potassium, chlorine, and sulfur relative to the fuel composition. Comprehensive boiler modeling demonstrates that ISP concentrations are substantially overpredicted when using a previously developed algorithm for ISP generation. Equilibrium calculations suggest that alkali carbonate decomposition occurs at intermediate heights in the furnace and may lead to partial destruction of ISP particles formed lower in the furnace. ISP deposition is predicted to occur in the superheater sections, at temperatures greater than 750 C, when the particles are at least partially molten.

  5. Higher Order Squeezing and Higher Order Subpoissonian Photon Statistics in Intermediate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Verma; Anirban Pathak

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently simpler criteria for the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing (HOS) and higher order subpossonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are provided by us [Phys. Lett. A 374 (2010) 1009]. Here we have used these simplified criteria to study the possibilities of observing HOSPS and HOS in different intermediate states, such as generalized binomial state, hypergeometric state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. It is shown that these states may satisfy the condition of HOS and HOSPS. It is also shown that the depth and region of nonclassicality can be controlled by controlling various parameters related to intermediate states. Further, we have analyzed the mutual relationship between different signatures of higher order nonclassicality with reference to these intermediate states. We have observed that the generalized binomial state may show signature of HOSPS in absence of HOS. Earlier we have shown that NLVSS shows HOS in absence of HOSPS. Consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS of same order are independent phenomenon.

  6. Arylpalladium Phosphonate Complexes as Reactive Intermediates in Phosphorus-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Mark C. [Bucknell University; Grimes, Thomas V. [University of North Texas; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Cundari, Thomas R. [University of North Texas; Stockland, Robert A. Jr. [Bucknell University

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphorus-carbon bond formation from discrete transition metal complexes have been investigated through a combination of synthetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational methods. Reactive intermediates of the type (diphosphine)Pd(aryl)(P(O)(OEt)(2)) have been prepared, characterized, and studied as possible intermediates in metal-mediated coupling reactions. Several of the reactive intermediates were characterized crystallographicaliy, and a discussion of the solid state structures is presented. In contrast to other carbon-heteroelement bond forming reactions, palladium complexes containing electron-donating substituents on the aromatic fragment exhibited faster rates of reductive elimination. Large bite angle diphosphine ligands induced rapid rates of elimination, while bipyridine and small bite angle diphosphine ligands resulted in much slower rates of elimination. An investigation of the effect of typical impurities on the elimination reaction was carried out. While excess diphosphine, pyridine, and acetonitrile had little effect on the observed rate, the addition of water slowed the phosphorus-carbon bond forming reaction. Coordination of water to the complex was observed spectroscopically and crystallographically. Computational studies were utilized to probe the reaction pathways for P-C bond formation via Pd catalysis.

  7. Simulation of MLI concerning the influence of an additional heat load on intermediate layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funke, Thomas; Golle, Steffen; Haberstroh, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Bitzer-Stiftungsprofessur fuer Kaelte-, Kryo- und Kompressorentechnik, Dresden, 01062 (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is commonly used in most cryogenic devices such as LHe cryostats or storage vessels. Numerical and experimental studies of such insulation systems are known from literature. The temperature distribution of intermediate layers has been investigated as well. Experiments using temperature sensors, for example thermocouples, to determine the temperature of intermediate layers had been described. Naturally such wiring causes additional heat load on the respective layer and influences the equilibrium temperature. A mathematical model of heat transfer through MLI has been developed to investigate the temperature distribution across the MLI layers. The model comprises a combination of radiation, residual gas conduction and conductive heat flux. An analysis for variable cold and warm boundary temperatures and various residual gases and pressures is carried out. In addition to the model an experimental test rig will be built for the verification of the model. The paper presents the influence of an additional heat load on an intermediate layer on the temperature distribution and on the overall thermal performance of MLI.

  8. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  9. Accuracy of B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) transition rates from intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Cook; T. Glasmacher; A. Gade

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation has been widely used to determine absolute B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) quadrupole excitation strengths in exotic nuclei with even numbers of protons and neutrons. Transition rates measured with intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation are compared to their respective adopted values and for the example of 26Mg to the B(E2; 0+ -> 2+) values obtained with a variety of standard methods. Intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation is found to have an accuracy comparable to those of long-established experimental techniques.

  10. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2009 Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of sound, cost-effective energy management & investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security & environmental stewardship 5 FEMP: Mission FEMP'S Program Services FEMP:...

  11. Management of intermediated channels for high technology firms : achieving success in a dynamic and rapidly changing marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorsky, John Paul

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging problems for high technology firms in an increasingly global marketplace is the effective utilization of intermediated sales channels. As product development cycles shorten, there can be a ...

  12. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Sc???Ce????Zr????O? ELECTROLYTE MATERIAL FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendy

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Scandia doped zirconia has been considered a candidate for electrolyte material in intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) due to its high ionic conductivity, chemical stability and good electrochemical ...

  13. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005–2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Nancy

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources ...

  14. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Sc???Ce????Zr????O? ELECTROLYTE MATERIAL FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendy

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Scandia doped zirconia has been considered a candidate for electrolyte material in intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) due to its high ionic conductivity, chemical stability and good electrochemical performance. The aim...

  15. Deglacial Neodymium Isotopic Ratios in the Florida Straits and the Response of Intermediate Waters to Reduced Meridional Overturning Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Alyssa L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between intermediate watermass response to Atlantic Meridonial Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during two abrupt cooling events of the last deglacial, the Younger Dryas (YD) and Heinrich Event 1 (H1) is controversial and has been...

  16. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

  17. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  18. Energy barriers, cooperativity, and hidden intermediates in the folding of small proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 37, Room 6114E, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)]. E-mail: yawen@helix.nih.gov

    2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Current theoretical views of the folding process of small proteins (<{approx}100 amino acids) postulate that the landscape of potential mean force (PMF) for the formation of the native state has a funnel shape and that the free energy barrier to folding arises from the chain configurational entropy only. However, recent theoretical studies on the formation of hydrophobic clusters with explicit water suggest that a barrier should exist on the PMF of folding, consistent with the fact that protein folding generally involves a large positive activation enthalpy at room temperature. In addition, high-resolution structural studies of the hidden partially unfolded intermediates have revealed the existence of non-native interactions, suggesting that the correction of the non-native interactions during folding should also lead to barriers on PMF. To explore the effect of a PMF barrier on the folding behavior of proteins, we modified Zwanzig's model for protein folding with an uphill landscape of PMF for the formation of transition states. We found that the modified model for short peptide segments can satisfy the thermodynamic and kinetic criteria for an apparently two-state folding. Since the Levinthal paradox can be solved by a stepwise folding of short peptide segments, a landscape of PMF with a locally uphill search for the transition state and cooperative stabilization of folding intermediates/native state is able to explain the available experimental results for small proteins. We speculate that the existence of cooperative hidden folding intermediates in small proteins could be the consequence of the highly specific structures of the native state, which are selected by evolution to perform specific functions and fold in a biologically meaningful time scale.

  19. Age determination of 15 old to intermediate-age small Magellanic cloud star clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Piatti, A. E. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Leiton, R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Carraro, G. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Costa, E. [Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Grocholski, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Sarajedini, A., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: andres@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: roger.leiton@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org, E-mail: costa@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present color-magnitude diagrams in the V and I bands for 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on data taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT, Chile). We selected these clusters from our previous work, wherein we derived cluster radial velocities and metallicities from calcium II infrared triplet (CaT) spectra also taken with the VLT. We discovered that the ages of six of our clusters have been appreciably underestimated by previous studies, which used comparatively small telescopes, graphically illustrating the need for large apertures to obtain reliable ages of old and intermediate-age SMC star clusters. In particular, three of these clusters, L4, L6, and L110, turn out to be among the oldest SMC clusters known, with ages of 7.9 ± 1.1, 8.7 ± 1.2, and 7.6 ± 1.0 Gyr, respectively, helping to fill a possible 'SMC cluster age gap'. Using the current ages and metallicities from Parisi et al., we analyze the age distribution, age gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of a sample of SMC clusters measured homogeneously. There is a suggestion of bimodality in the age distribution but it does not show a constant slope for the first 4 Gyr, and we find no evidence for an age gradient. Due to the improved ages of our cluster sample, we find that our AMR is now better represented in the intermediate/old period than we had derived in Parisi et al., where we simply took ages available in the literature. Additionally, clusters younger than ?4 Gyr now show better agreement with the bursting model of Pagel and Tautvaišien?, but we confirm that this model is not a good representation of the AMR during the intermediate/old period. A more complicated model is needed to explain the SMC chemical evolution in that period.

  20. Mixing Envelope D Sludge with LAW Intermediate Products with and without Glass Formers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.K.

    2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection is in the process of designing a waste treatment system to process the Hanford Reservation High Level Waste (HLW). Envelope D sludge slurries will be blended with the concentrated Cs/Ts eluates, and the Sr/TRU intermediates separated from Envelope A, B, and C feeds. This study produced two washed simulated sludges (representing tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 sludge), a Sr/TRU washed precipitate produced from tank 241-AN-107 simulant, and a concentrated blended eluate simulant based upon eluates from processing 241-AZ-102 supernate.

  1. INTERMEDIATE-AGE CLUSTERS IN A FIELD CONTAINING M31 AND M32 STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Pavlo; Worthey, Guy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 (United States); Mateo, Mario [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)], E-mail: rudenko@wsu.edu, E-mail: gworthey@wsu.edu, E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys fields toward M31 and M32 were examined for the presence of possible star clusters. On the basis of stellar photometry, two intermediate-age clusters were found in the field that contains both M31 and M32 stars. One is approximately 200 Myr of age with a mass {approx}400 M {sub sun}, and the other is 1 Gyr old with mass {approx}8 x 10{sup 4} M {sub sun}. Several other cluster candidates are identified, but their stellar populations are more similar to the field: old and slightly metal-poor.

  2. Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model with Viscous Pressure in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation model with bulk viscous pressure in the context of "intermediate inflation" where the cosmological scale factor expands as $a(t)=a_0\\exp(At^f)$, is studied. The characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and in high dissipative regime are presented in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous coefficient $\\zeta$ as a function of energy density $\\rho$. 2- $\\Gamma$ and $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. Scalar, tensor perturbations and spectral indices for this scenario are obtained. The cosmological parameters appearing in the present model are constrained by recent observational data (WMAP7).

  3. Tachyon Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; V. Kamali

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider tachyonic warm-inflationary models in the context of intermediate inflation. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$. We also describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario. The parameters appearing in our model are constrained by recent observational data. We find that the level of non-Gaussianity for this model is comparable with non-tachyonic model.

  4. Tachyon Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider tachyonic warm-inflationary models in the context of intermediate inflation. We derive the characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and develop our model in two cases, 1- For a constant dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$. 2- $\\Gamma$ as a function of tachyon field $\\phi$. We also describe scalar and tensor perturbations for this scenario. The parameters appearing in our model are constrained by recent observational data. We find that the level of non-Gaussianity for this model is comparable with non-tachyonic model.

  5. Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model with Viscous Pressure in High Dissipative Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setare, M R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm inflation model with bulk viscous pressure in the context of "intermediate inflation" where the cosmological scale factor expands as $a(t)=a_0\\exp(At^f)$, is studied. The characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and in high dissipative regime are presented in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous coefficient $\\zeta$ as a function of energy density $\\rho$. 2- $\\Gamma$ and $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. Scalar, tensor perturbations and spectral indices for this scenario are obtained. The cosmological parameters appearing in the present model are constrained by recent observational data (WMAP7).

  6. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of sodium melt on ?”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  7. Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonoda, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

  8. An intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with electrospun nanofiber cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Lee, Shiwoo; Miller, Nicholas; Menzler, Norbert H.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) nanofibers have been fabricated by the electrospinning method and used as the cathode of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte. The three-dimensional nanofiber network cathode has several advantages: (i) high porosity; (ii) high percolation; (iii) continuous pathway for charge transport; (iv) good thermal stability at the operating temperature; and (v) excellent scaffold for infiltration. The fuel cell with the monolithic LSCF nanofiber cathode exhibits a power density of 0.90 W cm{sup ?2} at 1.9 A cm{sup ?2} at 750 °C. The electrochemical performance of the fuel cell has been further improved by infiltration of 20 wt% of gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) into the LSCF nanofiber cathode. The fuel cell with the LSCF–20% GDC composite cathode shows a power density of 1.07 W cm{sup ?2} at 1.9 A cm{sup ?2} at 750 °C. The results obtained show that one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanofibers hold great promise as electrode materials for intermediate-temperature SOFCs.

  9. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

  10. Progress in Low and Intermediate Level Operational Waste Characterization and Preparation for Disposal at Ignalina NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskas, P.; Adomaitis, J. E.; Ragaisis, V.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In Lithuania about 70-80% of all electricity is generated at a single power station, Ignalina NPP, which has two RBMK-1500 type reactors. Units 1 and 2 will be closed by 2005 and 2010, respectively, taking into account the conditions of the long-term substantial financial assistance rendered by the European Union, G-7 countries and other states as well as international institutions. The Government approved the Strategy on Radioactive Waste Management. Objectives of this strategy are to develop the radioactive waste management infrastructure based on modern technologies and provide for the set of practical actions that shall bring management of radioactive waste in Lithuania in compliance with radioactive waste management principles of IAEA and with good practices in force in European Union Member States. SKB-SWECO International-Westinghouse Atom Joint Venture with participation of Lithuanian Energy Institute has prepared a reference design of a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate level waste. This reference design is applicable to the needs in Lithuania, considering its hydro-geological, climatic and other environmental conditions and is able to cover the expected needs in Lithuania for at least thirty years ahead. Development of waste acceptance criteria is in practice an iterative process concerning characterization of existing waste, repository development, safety and environmental impact assessment etc. This paper describes the position in Lithuania with regard to the long-term management of low and intermediate level waste in the absence of finalized waste acceptance criteria and a near surface repository.

  11. Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There will be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service, can economically remove most of the variation from electric-power demands. Therefore, the analysis assesses the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. Section 2 provides a condensed description of the models used in the analysis. (Details and data sets are contained in the appendixes.) Results of sensitivities on growth rates, model parameters, and appliance saturations are discussed in Section 3, which also contains the analysis of the potential impacts of customer energy storage, appliance control, and time-of-use pricing. The future need for intermediate and peaking technologies is analyzed in Section 4.

  12. Q-dependence of the spin fluctuations in the intermediate valence compound CePd3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanelli, V. R.; Lawrence, J. M.; Goremychkin, E. A.; Osborn, R.; Bauer, E. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Thompson, J. D.; Booth, C. H.; Christianson, A. D.; Riseborough, P. S.

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal of the intermediate valence compound CePd3. At 300 K the magnetic scattering is quasielastic, with half-width G = 23 meV, and is independent of momentum transfer Q. At low temperature, the Q-averaged magnetic spectrum is inelastic, exhibiting a broad peak centered near E-max = 55 meV. These results, together with the temperature dependence of the susceptibility, 4f occupation number, and specific heat, can be fit by the Kondo/Anderson impurity model. The low temperature scattering near Emax, however, shows significant variations with Q, reflecting the coherence of the 4f lattice. The intensity is maximal at (1/2, 1/2, 0), intermediate at (1/2, 0, 0) and (0, 0, 0), and weak at (1/2, 1/2, 1/2). We discuss this Q-dependence in terms of current ideas about coherence in heavy fermion systems.

  13. IRAS 22198+6336: DISCOVERY OF AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Palau, Aina [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Kurtz, Stan [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Zhang Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James [Conseil national de recherches Canada, Institut Herzberg d'astrophysique, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shepherd, Debra, E-mail: asanchez@am.ub.e [NRAO, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new Submillimeter Array and Plateau de Bure Interferometer observations of the intermediate-mass object IRAS 22198+6336 in the millimeter continuum and in several molecular line transitions. The millimeter continuum emission reveals a strong and compact source with a mass of {approx}5 M {sub sun} and with properties of Class 0 objects. CO emission shows an outflow with a quadrupolar morphology centered on the position of the dust condensation. The CO outflow emission seems to come from two distinct outflows, one of them associated with SiO outflow emission. A large set of molecular lines has been detected toward a compact dense core clearly coincident with the compact millimeter source, and showing a velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow traced by CO and SiO. The chemically rich spectrum and the rotational temperatures derived from CH{sub 3}CN and CH{sub 3}OH (100-150 K) indicate that IRAS 22198+6336 is harboring one of the few intermediate-mass hot cores known at present.

  14. NSIDC Data Center: Energy Reduction Strategies (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)NSIDC Data Center: Energy Reduction Strategies (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,Energy NREL Job TaskWelcomeHeatHeat Recovery

  15. Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. 1. Intermediates and mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photochemistry of aqueous 9,10-anthraquinone-s-sulfonate (AQS) was investigated by using four different approaches: (1) laser photolysis of AQS in water as a function of concentration and pH; (2) laser photolysis of AQS in CH/sub 3/CN and CH/sub 3/CN/H/sub 2/O mixtures, combined with emission spectroscopy; (3) steady-state photolytic study of the effect of AQS concentration and pH on the yield of photohydroxylation in water; (4) quenching of intermediates and inhibition of photohydroxylation by inorganic anions. The authors results lead to identification of triplet AQS (tau approx. 100 ns in water) and two other intermediates (B and C) which are formed by two parallel reactions of triplet AQS with H/sub 2/O. The nature of these intermediates is still uncertain, but evidence is presented to rule out H abstraction or net electron transfer (even in the case of OH/sup -/) leading to formation of free OH radicals. The possibility that B and C are two different water adducts is discussed. The role of preferential solvation of AQS in CH/sub 3/CN/H/sub 2/O mixtures in determining its photochemistry is also examined. Species C(lambda/sub max/ approx. 600 nm) is the only transient observed which appears to react with ground-state AQS, and this reaction is considered to be responsible for photohydroxylation. Our results provide direct evidence for the validity of the /sup 3/AQS/H/sub 2/O mechanism proposed by Clark and Stonehill (CS), in which the primary step is reaction of /sup 3/AQS with water (and not with ground-state AQS) to produce the hydroxylating agent. However, this mechanism is modified for pH greater than or equal to 11 by proposing another hydroxylating agent which may be AQS-OH exciplex (or radical pair) produced by charge-transfer (CT) quenching of /sup 3/AQS by OH/sup -/. Evidence is presented to establish the charge-transfer nature of quenching of triplet AQS by various anions including OH/sup -/.

  16. Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. 1. Intermediates and mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeff, I. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem, Israel); Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

    1983-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The photochemistry of aqueous 9,10-anthranquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) was investigated by using four different approaches: (1) laser photolysis of AWS in water as a function of concentration and pH; (2) laser photolysis of AQS in CH/sub 3/CN and CH/sub 3/CN/H/sub 2/O mixtures, combined with emission spectroscopy; (3) steady-state photolytic study of the effect of AQS concentration and pH on the yield of photohydroxylation in water; (4) quenching of intermediates in inhibition of photohydroxylation by inorganic anions. Our results lead to identification of triplet AQS (tau approx. 100 ns in water) and two other intermediates (B and C) which are formed by two parallel reactions of triplet AQS with H/sub 2/O. The nature of these intermediates is still uncertain, but evidence is presented to rule out H abstraction or net electron transfer (even in the case of OH/sup -/) leading to formation of free OH radicals. The possibility that B and C are two different water adducts is discussed. The role of referential solvation of AQS in CH/sub 3/CH/H/sub 2/O mixures in determining its photochemistry is also examined. Species C (lambda/sub max/ approx. 600 nm) is the only transient observed which appears to react with ground-state AQS, and this reaction is considered to be responsible for photohydroxylation. Our results provide direct evidence for the validity of the ''/sup 3/AQS/H/sub 2/O'' mechanism proposed by Clark and Stonehill (CS), in which the primary step is reaction of /sup 3/AQS with water (and not with ground-state AQS) to produce the hydoxylation agent. However, this mechanism is modified for pHgreater than or equal to11 by proposing another hydroxylating agent which may be AQS/sup -/.OH exciplex (or radical pair) produced by charge-transfer (CT) quenching of /sup 3/AQS by OH/sup -/. Evidence is presented to establish the charge-transfer nature of quenching of triplet AQS by various anions including OH/sup -/.

  17. Collective and fractal properties of pion jets in the four-velocity space at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Okorokov; A. K. Ponosov; F. M. Sergeev

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are presented for study of collective and fractal properties of soft pion jets in the space of relative four-dimensional velocities. Significant decreasing is obtained for mean square of second particle distances from jet axis for pion-proton interactions at initial energies $\\sim 3$ GeV in comparison with hadron-nuclear collisions at close energies. The decreasing results in power dependence of distance variable on collision energy for range $\\sim 2 - 4$ GeV. The observation allows us to estimate the low boundary of manifestation of color degree of freedom in pion jet production. Cluster dimension values were deduced for pion jets in various reactions. Fractional values of this dimension indicate on the manifestation of fractal-like properties by pion jets. Changing of mean kinetic energy of jet particles and fractal dimension with initial energy increasing is consistent with suggestion for presence of color degrees of freedom in pion jet production at intermediate energies.

  18. Interface oxidation and stress-rupture of Nicalon{trademark}/SiC CFCCs at intermediate temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Curzio, E.; Ferber, M.K.; Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of oxidation of the carbonaceous fiber coating on the intermediate temperature stress-rupture behavior of a Nicalon{trademark}/C/SiC continuous fiber composite was modeled. The model, that was reduced to the analysis of a general ideal bundle composed of classical fibers subjected to constant loading, predicts that the oxidation of the fiber coating triggers a sequence of processes that can lead, under certain conditions, to composite failure. These processes involve loss of stress transfer between the fiber and the matrix, fiber overloading, and fiber failure. The implications of the model predictions are discussed in relation to experimental measurements at 425 C in air that show that Nicalon{trademark}/C/SiC exhibits time-dependent loss of strength.

  19. Geo-polymers as Candidates for the Immobilisation of Low- and Intermediate-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Dan; Vance, Eric; Kiyama, Satoshi; Aly, Zaynab; Yee, Patrick [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geo-polymers should be serious waste form candidates for intermediate level waste (ILW), insofar as they are more durable than Portland cement and can pass the PCT-B test for high-level waste. Thus an alkaline ILW could be considered to be satisfactorily immobilised in a geo-polymer formulation. However a simulated Hanford tank waste was found to fail the PCT-B criterion even for a waste loading as low as 5 wt%, very probably due to the formation of a soluble sodium phosphate compound(s). This suggests that it could be worth developing a 'mixed' GP waste form in which the amorphous material can immobilize cations and a zeolitic component to immobilize anions. The PCT-B test is demonstrably subject to significant saturation effects, especially for relatively soluble waste forms. (authors)

  20. The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

  1. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  2. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wei, Guodan (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  3. 1RXSJ062518.2+733433: A bright, soft intermediate polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staude; A. D. Schwope; M. Krumpe; V. Hambaryan; R. Schwarz

    2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 50 hours time-resolved R-band photometry of the ROSAT all-sky survey source 1RXSJ062518.2+733433. The source was identified by Wei et al. (1999) as a cataclysmic variable. Our photometry, performed in 10 nights between February 11, 2003, and March 21, 2003, reveals two stable periodicities at 19.7874 and 283.118 min, which are identified as probable spin and orbital periods of the binary. We therefore classify 1RXSJ062518.2+733433 as an intermediate polar. Analysis of the RASS X-ray observations reveal a variability of 100% in the X-ray flux and a likely soft X-ray excess. The new IP thus joins the rare group of soft IPs with only four members so far.

  4. 1RXSJ062518.2+733433: A bright, soft intermediate polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staude, A; Krumpe, M; Hambaryan, V; Schwarz, R

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 50 hours time-resolved R-band photometry of the ROSAT all-sky survey source 1RXSJ062518.2+733433. The source was identified by Wei et al. (1999) as a cataclysmic variable. Our photometry, performed in 10 nights between February 11, 2003, and March 21, 2003, reveals two stable periodicities at 19.7874 and 283.118 min, which are identified as probable spin and orbital periods of the binary. We therefore classify 1RXSJ062518.2+733433 as an intermediate polar. Analysis of the RASS X-ray observations reveal a variability of 100% in the X-ray flux and a likely soft X-ray excess. The new IP thus joins the rare group of soft IPs with only four members so far.

  5. Cross sections for electron scattering by propane in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, G. L. C. de; Lee, M.-T.; Sanches, I. P.; Rawat, P.; Iga, I.; Santos, A. S. dos; Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Brescansin, L. M.; Homem, M. G. P.; Lucchese, R. R. [Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, UFSCar, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, UFSC, 88010-970 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 7784-3255 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron scattering by propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer as well as total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 2 to 500 eV. Also, experimental absolute elastic cross sections are reported in the 40- to 500-eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Pade approximant is used to solve the scattering equations. The experimental angular distributions of the scattered electrons are converted to absolute cross sections using the relative flow technique. The comparison of our calculated with our measured results, as well as with other experimental and theoretical data available in the literature, is encouraging.

  6. Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ashley Brinson

    2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1994 to 2001, Dow Corning studied a waste recycling process to recover direct process residues (DPR) resulting from the production of silicone precursors. Over the course of eight years, Dow Corning constructed and operated a pilot plant, a small scale commercial plant, and a full scale plant. The process reacts DPR with hydrogen and chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and high pressure. The process converted 85% of the DPR to valuable chlorosilane monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. When feeding methyltrichlorosilane, the process converted 30% of the MeSiCl3 to other monomers. Alternate co-feed monomers were tested. By converting waste DPR to valuable intermediates, the technology significantly reduces waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.

  7. Scaling of Anisotropic Flows in Intermediate Energy and Ultra-relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic flows ($v_2$ and $v_4$) of hadrons and light nuclear clusters are studied by a partonic transport model and nucleonic transport model, respectively, in ultra-relativistic and intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. Both number-of-constituent-quark scaling of hadrons, especially for $\\phi$ meson which is composed of strange quarks, and number-of-nucleon scaling of light nuclear clusters are discussed and explored for the elliptic flow ($v_2$). The ratios of $v_4/v_2^2$ of hadrons and nuclear clusters are, respectively, calculated and they show different constant values which are independent of transverse momentum. The above phenomena can be understood, respectively, by the coalescence mechanism in quark-level or nucleon-level.

  8. Alternatives generation and analysis for the Phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claghorn, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) addresses the question: What is the design basis for the facilities required to stage low-level waste (LLW) feed to the Phase I private contractors? Alternative designs for the intermediate waste feed staging system were developed, analyzed, and compared. Based on these analyses, this document recommends installing mixer pumps in the central pump pit of double-shell tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Also recommended is installing decant/transfer pumps at these tanks. These recommendations have clear advantages in that they provide a low shedule impact/risk and the highest operability of all the alternatives investigated. This revision incorporates comments from the decision board.

  9. A DOUBLE PLANETARY SYSTEM AROUND THE EVOLVED INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR HD 4732

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Makiko; Ida, Shigeru [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Wittenmyer, Robert A. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of NSW 2052 (Australia)] [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of NSW 2052 (Australia); Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Kamogata, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)] [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Kamogata, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Takeda, Yoichi; Kokubo, Eiichiro [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)] [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)] [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Itoh, Yoichi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2, Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan)] [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2, Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Ando, Hiroyasu, E-mail: satobn@geo.titech.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of a double planetary system orbiting around the evolved intermediate-mass star HD 4732 from precise Doppler measurements at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory and Australian Astronomical Observatory. The star is a K0 subgiant with a mass of 1.7 M {sub Sun} and solar metallicity. The planetary system is composed of two giant planets with minimum mass of msin i = 2.4 M {sub J}, orbital period of 360.2 days and 2732 days, and eccentricity of 0.13 and 0.23, respectively. Based on dynamical stability analysis for the system, we set the upper limit on the mass of the planets to be about 28 M {sub J} (i > 5 Degree-Sign ) in the case of coplanar prograde configuration.

  10. Transient model of an intermediate surge system for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, B.; Blankenship, J.G.; McGrady, P.W.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering design work (Reference 1) is underway for intermediate surge systems to be added to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) cascade as part of the Process Inventory Control System (PICS) project. These systems would be located between 000 buildings and lower half 00 buildings and would remove or add inventory during cascade transients in order to protect cascade compressors from overload and surge. Similar systems were operated in the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant cascade and are operated in the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant cascade. A steady state flow analysis of the system to be installed at the PGDP has been made. The flow analysis did not address response of the surge system to the cascade transients, nor did it address automatic control of the system. The need to address these issues prompted development of the transient model described in this report. 2 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertone, Gianfranco

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

  12. Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Bertone

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

  13. Phase-dependent propagation in a two-level system with intermediate states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharypov, A. V.; Eilam, A.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Friedmann, H. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan IL-52900 (Israel)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase-dependent propagation of a strong, resonant pump and two weak symmetrically detuned fields in a two-level system with population decay through a cascade of intermediate levels. As this system forms a closed loop, the propagation is phase-dependent. For an initial total phase PHI=0, there is constructive interference between the two weak fields, leading to parametric amplification on propagation. When PHI=pi, destructive interference occurs, leading to absorption of the weak fields on propagation. When the weak fields are initially equal in intensity, and PHI=0,pi, PHI remains constant on propagation. For other initial phases, PHI changes on propagation. Dramatic phase changes from pi to 0 can occur when the weak fields are initially unequal in intensity and PHI=pi.

  14. The Intermediate Polar EI UMa: A Pre-Polar Cataclysmic Variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamara W. Reimer; William F. Welsh; Koji Mukai; F. A. Ringwald

    2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present optical and X-ray time-series photometry of EI UMa that reveal modulation at 746 and 770 s, which we interpret as the white dwarf spin and spin-orbit sidebands. These detections, combined with previous X-ray studies, establish EI UMa as an intermediate polar. We estimate the mass accretion rate to be ~ 3.6 x 10^{17} g s^{-1}, which is close to, and likely greater than, the critical rate above which dwarf nova instabilities are suppressed. We also estimate the white dwarf to have a large magnetic moment mu > (3.4 +/- 0.2) x 10^{33} G cm^3. The high mass accretion rate and magnetic moment imply the existence of an accretion ring rather than a disk, and along with the relatively long orbital period, these suggest that EI UMa is a rare example of a pre-polar cataclysmic variable.

  15. 19-electron intermediates in the Ligand Substitution of CpW(CO)3with a Lewis Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahoon, James F.; Kling, Matthias F.; Sawyer, Karma R.; Frei,Heinz; Harris, Charles B.

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Odd electron species are important intermediates in organometallic chemistry, participating in a variety of catalytic and electron-transfer reactions which produce stable even-electron products. While electron deficient 17-electron (17e) radicals have been well characterized, the possible existence of short-lived 19-electron (19e) radicals has been a subject of continuing investigation. 19e radicals have been postulated as intermediates in the photochemical ligand substitution and disproportionation reactions of organometallic dimers containing a single metal-metal bond, yet the reactions of these intermediates on diffusion-limited time scales (ns-{micro}s) have never been directly observed. This study resolves the 19e dynamics in the ligand substitution of 17e radicals CpW(CO){sub 3}{sup {sm_bullet}} (Cp = C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) with the Lewis base P(OMe){sub 3}, providing the first complete description 19e reactivity.

  16. Recurrence Patterns and Survival for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Grade Myxofibrosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haglund, Karl E. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Raut, Chandrajit P. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Nascimento, Alessandra F. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Qian [Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); George, Suzanne [Department of Medical Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@LROC.Harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Myxofibrosarcoma (MFS) is a rare sarcoma with a predilection for multiple local recurrences (LR), for which optimal treatment has not been defined. We reviewed our experience to determine the impact of surgery and radiation therapy (RT) on pattern of recurrence, limb salvage, and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2005, 36 patients with localized intermediate- or high-grade MFS were treated at our institution. Data on clinicopathologic features, treatments, and patient outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Median age was 72.5 years (range, 42-96 years). Median tumor size was 7.5 cm, and 34 tumors (94%) were high grade. All patients underwent surgery at our institution, including re-resections in 20 patients (56%) after initial surgery elsewhere. Margins were microscopically positive in 9 patients (25%). RT was given to 28 patients (78%) pre - and/or postoperatively. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years (range, 0.4-12.4 years), 11 patients (31%) developed LR. There were no significant predictors for LR on univariate analysis, including margin status or use of RT. Limb salvage was ultimately achieved in only 5 of 11 LRs (45%) because of multiple subsequent LRs. Distant recurrence (DR) occurred in 6 patients (17%). Median and 4-year OS were 96 months and 65%, respectively. Seven patients (19%) died of tumor-related causes, 6 of whom had DRs. On univariate analysis, tumor size was associated with OS. Conclusions: Despite aggressive surgery and RT, intermediate- and high-grade MFS are associated with a high rate of LR that adversely affects limb preservation. More aggressive local treatment strategies are necessary.

  17. Improved evidence for the existence of an intermediate phase during hydration of tricalcium silicate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellmann, Frank, E-mail: frank.bellmann@uni-weimar.d [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Damidot, Denis [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, BP 10838, 59508 Doua cedexi (France); Moeser, Bernd [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Skibsted, Jorgen [Instrument Center for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tricalcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) with a very small particle size of approximately 50 nm has been prepared and hydrated for a very short time (5 min) by two different modes in a paste experiment, using a water/solid-ratio of 1.20, and by hydration as a suspension employing a water/solid-ratio of 4000. A phase containing uncondensed silicate monomers close to hydrogen atoms (either hydroxyl groups or water molecules) was formed in both experiments. This phase is distinct from anhydrous tricalcium silicate and from the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, commonly identified as the hydration product of tricalcium silicate. In the paste experiment, approximately 79% of silicon atoms were present in the hydrated phase containing silicate monomers as determined from {sup 29}Sileft brace{sup 1}Hright brace CP/MAS NMR. This result is used to show that the hydrated silicate monomers are part of a separate phase and that they cannot be attributed to a hydroxylated surface of tricalcium silicate after contact with water. The phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is metastable with respect to the C-S-H phase since it transforms into the latter in a half saturated calcium hydroxide solution. These data is used to emphasize that the hydration of tricalcium silicate proceeds in two consecutive steps. In the first reaction, an intermediate phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is formed which is subsequently transformed into C-S-H as the final hydration product in the second step. The introduction of an intermediate phase in calculations of the early hydration of tricalcium silicate can explain the presence of the induction period. It is shown that heterogeneous nucleation on appropriate crystal surfaces is able to reduce the length of the induction period and thus to accelerate the reaction of tricalcium silicate with water.

  18. The ecology of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes in the Galactic bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Portegies Zwart; Holger Baumgardt; Stephen L. W. McMillan; Junichiro Makino; Piet Hut; Toshi Ebisuzaki

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate the inner 100pc of the Milky-Way Galaxy to study the formation and evolution of the population of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes. For this study we perform extensive direct N-body simulations of the star clusters which reside in the bulge, and of the inner few tenth of parsecs of the super massive black hole in the Galactic center. In our N-body simulations the dynamical friction of the star cluster in the tidal field of the bulge are taken into account via (semi)analytic soluations. The N-body calculations are used to calibrate a (semi)analytic model of the formation and evolution of the bulge. We find that about 10% of the clusters born within 100pc of the Galactic center undergo core collapse during their inward migration and form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) via runaway stellar merging. After the clusters dissolve, these IMBHs continue their inward drift, carrying a few of the most massive stars with them. We predict that region within about 10 parsec of the SMBH is populated by about 50IMBHs of some 1000Msun. Several of these are expected to be accompanied still by some of the most massive stars from the star cluster. We also find that within a few milliparsec of the SMBH there is a steady population of several IMBHs. This population drives the merger rate between IMBHs and the SMBH at a rate of about one per 10Myr, sufficient to build the accumulate majority of mass of the SMBH. Mergers of IMBHs with SMBHs throughout the universe are detectable by LISA, at a rate of about two per week.

  19. Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

  20. Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

  1. RESULTS FOR THE INTERMEDIATE-SPECTRUM ZEUS BENCHMARK OBTAINED WITH NEW 63,65Cu CROSS-SECTION EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobes, Vladimir [ORNL] [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The four HEU, intermediate-spectrum, copper-reflected Zeus experiments have shown discrepant results between measurement and calculation for the last several major releases of the ENDF library. The four benchmarks show a trend in reported C/E values with increasing energy of average lethargy causing fission. Recently, ORNL has made improvements to the evaluations of three key isotopes involved in the benchmark cases in question. Namely, an updated evaluation for 235U and evaluations of 63,65Cu. This paper presents the benchmarking results of the four intermediate-spectrum Zeus cases using the three updated evaluations.

  2. Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L.G. Thompson and E. Mosley-Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Portable system for intermediate-depth ice-core drilling V. Zagorodnov, L.G. Thompson and E. Mosley-Thompson

  3. Does the world need yet another solar inverter concept? Intermediate size inverters have grown; now there is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Roger

    the continuum of solar inverters available in the market place today. The bookends are a panel level. Basically, every solar panel must be connected to this inverter box, via a network of DC runs, combiners, DCABSTRACT Does the world need yet another solar inverter concept? Intermediate size inverters have

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (comps.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

  5. A candidate LiBH4 for hydrogen storage: Crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of intermediate phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    combustion engine for transporta- tion. A hydrogen fuel cell car needs to store at least 4 kg hydrogenA candidate LiBH4 for hydrogen storage: Crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of intermediate phases Jeung Ku Kanga and Se Yun Kim Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305

  6. Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty, 480082 (Kazakhstan); Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow oblast, 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

  7. Altered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance in Quercus stands on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Justin

    . Logistic regression revealed an increasing probability of mortality during wind disturbance with increasingAltered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance Structure Succession Wind a b s t r a c t Natural disturbances play important roles in shaping the structure

  8. Key experimental information on intermediate-range atomic structures in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .1063/1.3657139 Nature of phase transitions in crystalline and amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials J. Chem. Phys on intermediate-range atomic structures in amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material Shinya Hosokawa,1,2,a) Wolf change material Shinya Hosokawa, Wolf-Christian Pilgrim, Astrid Höhle, Daniel Szubrin, Nathalie Boudet

  9. THE MAGELLANIC INTER-CLOUD PROJECT (MAGIC). I. EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noeel, N. E. D.; Read, J. I. [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Conn, B. C.; Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Carrera, R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dolphin, A., E-mail: noelia@phys.ethz.ch [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734-1337 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the gas in between the Magellanic Clouds (MCs)-known as the ''Magellanic Bridge'' (MB)-is puzzling. Numerical simulations suggest that the MB formed from tidally stripped gas and stars in a recent interaction between the MCs. However, the apparent lack of stripped intermediate- or old-age stars associated with the MB is at odds with this picture. In this paper, we present the first results from the MAGellanic Inter-Cloud program (MAGIC) aimed at probing the stellar populations in the inter-Cloud region. We present observations of the stellar populations in two large fields located in between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), secured using the WFI camera on the 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. Using a synthetic color-magnitude diagram technique, we present the first quantitative evidence for the presence of intermediate-age and old stars in the inter-Cloud region. The intermediate-age stars-which make up {approx}28% of all stars in the region-are not present in fields at a similar distance from the SMC in a direction pointing away from the LMC. This provides potential evidence that these intermediate-age stars could have been tidally stripped from the SMC. However, spectroscopic studies will be needed to confirm or rule out the tidal origin for the inter-Cloud gas and stars.

  10. “Click” Synthesis of Heteroleptic Tris-cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes: Cu(I) Triazolide Intermediates as Transmetalating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    Efficient synthesis of heteroleptic tris-cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes mer-Ir(C/\\N)[subscript 2](trpy) (trpy = 2-(1H-[1,2,3]triazol-4-yl)pyridine) is achieved by using the Cu(I)-triazolide intermediates formed in “click” ...

  11. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon GEANT4 GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo Code GWD Giga-Watt Days HDP Hematite Decommissioning Project HEU Highly Enriched Uranium IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency ILW Intermediate Level Waste ISOCs In-Situ Object... Field Measured LaBr Overlay on MCNP Spectra for HEU ................................. 44 3 Code System and Software Summary .................................................................. 52 4 Dimensions of the Canberra Industries Model IPROL-1...

  12. Supernova rates from the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Botticella; M. Riello; E. Cappellaro; S. Benetti; G. Altavilla; A. Pastorello; M. Turatto; L. Greggio; F. Patat; S. Valenti; L. Zampieri; A. Harutyunyan; G. Pignata; S. Taubenberger

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To measure the supernova (SN) rates at intermediate redshift we performed the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS). Unlike most of the current high redshift SN searches, this survey was specifically designed to estimate the rate for both type Ia and core collapse (CC) SNe. We counted the SNe discovered in a selected galaxy sample measuring SN rate per unit blue band luminosity. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~43000 galaxies and on 25 spectroscopically confirmed SNe plus 64 selected SN candidates. Our approach is aimed at obtaining a direct comparison of the high redshift and local rates and at investigating the dependence of the rates on specific galaxy properties, most notably their colour. The type Ia SN rate, at mean redshift z=0.3, amounts to 0.22^{+0.10+0.16}_{-0.08 -0.14} h_{70}^2 SNu, while the CC SN rate, at z=0.21, is 0.82^{+0.31 +0.30}_{-0.24 -0.26} h_{70}^2 SNu. The quoted errors are the statistical and systematic uncertainties. With respect to local value, the CC SN rate at z=0.2 is higher by a factor of ~2 already at redshift, whereas the type Ia SN rate remains almost constant. This implies that a significant fraction of SN Ia progenitors has a lifetime longer than 2-3 Gyr. We also measured the SN rates in the red and blue galaxies and found that the SN Ia rate seems to be constant in galaxies of different colour, whereas the CC SN rate seems to peak in blue galaxies, as in the local Universe. SN rates per unit volume were found to be consistent with other measurements showing a steeper evolution with redshift for CC SNe with respect to SNe Ia. Finally we have exploited the link between star formation (SF) and SN rates to predict the evolutionary behaviour of the SN rates and compare it with the path indicated by observations.

  13. A TCP model for external beam treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Sean [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, Connacht (Ireland); Putten, Wil van der [Department of Medical Physics and Bio-Engineering, Galway University Hospitals, Connacht, Ireland and School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway, Connacht (Ireland)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Biological models offer the ability to predict clinical outcomes. The authors describe a model to predict the clinical response of intermediate-risk prostate cancer to external beam radiotherapy for a variety of fractionation regimes. Methods: A fully heterogeneous population averaged tumor control probability model was fit to clinical outcome data for hyper, standard, and hypofractionated treatments. The tumor control probability model was then employed to predict the clinical outcome of extreme hypofractionation regimes, as utilized in stereotactic body radiotherapy. Results: The tumor control probability model achieves an excellent level of fit, R{sup 2} value of 0.93 and a root mean squared error of 1.31%, to the clinical outcome data for hyper, standard, and hypofractionated treatments using realistic values for biological input parameters. Residuals Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 1.0% are produced by the tumor control probability model when compared to clinical outcome data for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Conclusions: The authors conclude that this tumor control probability model, used with the optimized radiosensitivity values obtained from the fit, is an appropriate mechanistic model for the analysis and evaluation of external beam RT plans with regard to tumor control for these clinical conditions.

  14. Blind Spots for neutralino Dark Matter in the MSSM with an intermediate m_A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peisi Huang; Carlos E. M. Wagner

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spin-independent neutralino Dark Matter scattering off heavy nuclei in the MSSM. We identify analytically the blind spots in direct detection for intermediate values of $m_A$. In the region where $\\mu$ and $M_{1,2}$ have opposite signs, there is not only a reduction of the lightest CP-even Higgs coupling to neutralinos, but also a destructive interference between the neutralino scattering through the exchange of the lightest CP-even Higgs and that through the exchange of the heaviest CP-even Higgs. At critical values of $m_A$, the tree-level contribution from the light Higgs exchange cancels the contribution from the heavy Higgs, so the scattering cross section vanishes. We denote these configurations as blind spots, since they provide a generalization of the ones previously discussed in the literature, which occur at very large values of $m_A$. We show that the generalized blind spots may occur in regions of parameter space that are consistent with the obtention of the proper neutralino relic density, and can be tested by non-standard Higgs boson searches and EWino searches at the LHC and future linear colliders.

  15. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Physics Department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Backer, D. C., E-mail: robert.ferdman@obs-nancay.f [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  16. TITUS: An Intermediate Distance Detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasorak, Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokai Intermediate Tank with Unoscillated Spectrum (TITUS) detector is a proposed addition to the Hyper-Kamiokande (HK) experiment located approximately 2 km from the J-PARC neutrino beam. The design consists of a 2 kton Gadolinium (Gd) doped water Cherenkov detector, surrounded by a magnetized iron detector designed to range-out muons. The target material and location are chosen so that the neutrino interactions and beam spectrum at TITUS will match those of HK. Including a 0.1% Gd concentration allows for neutrino/antineutrino discrimination via neutron tagging. The primary goal of TITUS is to directly measure the neutrino flux and make cross-section measurements that reduce the systematic uncertainty of the long-baseline oscillation physics program at HK and enhance its sensitivity to CP violation. TITUS can also be used for physics unrelated to the J-PARC beam, functioning as an independent detector for supernova neutrino bursts and measuring the neutron rate to improve HK proton decay searches.

  17. Dwarf Nova-like Outburst of Short Period Intermediate Polar HT Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryoko Ishioka; Taichi Kato; Makoto Uemura; Gary W. Billings; Koichi Morikawa; Ken'ichi Torii; Kenji Tanabe; Arto Oksanen; Harri Hyvonen; Hitoshi Itoh

    2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first time-series observations of the short outburst of the proposed intermediate polar HT Cam (=RX J0757.0+6306). On 2001 December 29, we detected the object was undergoing a bright outburst at the magnitude of $m_{vis}=12.2$. Following this detection, we started international joint observations through VSNET. The light curve showed a gradual decline for the first 0.5 d. Following this short plateau phase, the rate of decline dramatically increased to more than 4 mag d$^{-1}$. Within 1.5 d from the outburst detection, the object almost declined to the quiescent level. During the rapidly declining phase, long-term modulations with a period of 86 min and strong pulses with a period of 8.6 min were observed. We concluded that 86 min and 8.6 min are the orbital period and the spin period of HT Cam, respectively. By the detection of the spin period, we confirmed the IP classification of HT Cam. However, its outburst behavior rather resembles that of dwarf novae. The discrepancy between the declining rates of the total flux and the pulse flux strongly suggests that the disk instabilities were taking place during the outburst.

  18. Warm Gas in the Inner Disks around Young Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Brittain; Theodore Simon; Joan Najita; Terrence Rettig

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of gas in the inner disks around young stars is of particular interest because of its connection to planet formation. In order to study the gas in inner disks, we have obtained high-resolution K-band and M-band spectroscopy of 14 intermediate mass young stars. In sources that have optically thick inner disks, i.e. E(K-L)>1, our detection rate of the ro-vibrational CO transitions is 100% and the gas is thermally excited. Of the five sources that do not have optically thick inner disks, we only detect the ro-vibrational CO transitions from HD 141569. In this case, we show that the gas is excited by UV fluorescence and that the inner disk is devoid of gas and dust. We discuss the plausibility of the various scenarios for forming this inner hole. Our modeling of the UV fluoresced gas suggests an additional method by which to search for and/or place stringent limits on gas in dust depleted regions in disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  19. Direct Gravitational Imaging of Intermediate Mass Black Holes in Extragalactic Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiki Taro Inoue; Valery Rashkov; Joseph Silk; Piero Madau

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A galaxy halo may contain a large number of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses in the range of 10^{2-6} solar mass. We propose to directly detect these IMBHs by observing multiply imaged QSO-galaxy or galaxy-galaxy strong lens systems in the submillimeter bands with high angular resolution. The silhouette of an IMBH in the lensing galaxy halo would appear as either a monopole-like or a dipole-like variation at the scale of the Einstein radius against the Einstein ring of the dust-emitting region surrounding the QSO. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo with black holes, and show that the surface mass density and number density of IMBHs have power-law dependences on the distance from the center of the host halo if smoothed on a scale of ~ 1 kpc. Most of the black holes orbiting close to the center are freely roaming as they have lost their dark matter hosts during infall due to tidal stripping. Next generation submillimeter telescopes with high angular resolution (solar mass in a lensing galaxy that harbours a O(10^9) solar mass supermassive black hole in its nucleus.

  20. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  1. Total Reaction Cross Sections in CEM and MCNP6 at Intermediate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie M. Kerby; Stepan G. Mashnik

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region ($\\sim$50 MeV to $\\sim$5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky {\\it et al.} model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  2. EVN+MERLIN Observations of Radio-Intermediate Quasars: Evidence for Boosted Radio-Weak Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Alok Patnaik; William Sherwood

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLBI (EVN+MERLIN) observations of a sample of three low-redshift radio-intermediate PG quasars (RIQ) with flat and variable radio spectrum (III Zw 2, PG 1309+355, PG 2209+184). Their radio-to-optical flux ratio (R) is slightly lower than the average R for steep-spectrum quasars, but their radio spectral properties are those of core-dominated quasars. It was proposed previously that these sources might be relativistically boosted jets in radio-weak quasars. Our VLBI observations now indeed confirm the presence of a high brightness temperature core in all three of these objects --- two of them have lower limits on T_B well in excess of 10^10 Kelvin. Moreover, we find no ``missing-flux'' which means that basically all the flux of these quasars is concentrated in the compact radio core. As the total radio flux is already at the low end for radio-loud quasars, we can place a strong limit on the presence of any extended emission. This limit is consistent with the extended emission in radio-weak quasars, but excludes that the flat-spectrum RIQ reside in typical radio-loud quasars. The observations therefore strongly support the idea that relativistic jets are present in radio-weak quasars and hence that radio-loud and radio-weak quasars have very similar central engines.

  3. Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There would be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service can economically remove most of the variation from electric power demands. The objective of this analysis is to assess the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. The analysis is exploratory in nature and broad in scope. It does not attempt to predict the future or to model precisely the technical characteristics or economic desirability of load management. Rather, its purpose is to provide research and development planners with some basic insights into the order of magnitude of possible hourly demand shifts on a regional basis and to determine the impact of load management on daily and seasonal variations in electricity demand.

  4. Analyzing power measurements in pion-deuteron breakup at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeomans, D.M.; Mathie, E.L.; Huber, G.M.; Lolos, G.J.; Naqvi, S.I.H.; Pafilis, V. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Jones, G.; Sevior, M.; Trelle, R.P.; Weber, P. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Tacik, R.; Healey, D.; Ottewell, D.F.; Smith, G.R.; Wait, G. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Garcilazo, H. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politechnico Nacional, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)] [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politechnico Nacional, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Humphrey, D.L. [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an experimental study of the {pi}{ital NN} system, the pion-deuteron breakup reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital {rvec d}}{r_arrow}{ital pn}{pi}{sup +} was investigated at intermediate energies. Distributions of the vector analyzing power {ital iT}{sub 11} versus outgoing proton momentum {ital P}{sub {ital p}} are presented for 36 {pi}{ital p} angle pairs in the range of scattering angles 20{degree}{le}{theta}{sub {ital p}}{le}51{degree}, 62{degree}{le}{theta}{sub {pi}}{le}124{degree} at 228 and 134 MeV. These include 7 previously unmeasured angle pairs at 228 MeV and 20 new pairs at 134 MeV. In all regions of overlap with previous measurements, there is excellent agreement. There is generally excellent agreement with relativistic Faddeev predictions, except in the {ital np} final-state interaction region at 228 MeV. This is in contrast to the cross-section measurements, which are not well described by the theory.

  5. Conditioning of Boron-Containing Low and Intermediate Level Liquid Radioactive Waste - 12041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbunova, Olga A. [SUE SIA 'Radon', Moscow (Russian Federation); Kamaeva, Tatiana S. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cementation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW) aided by vortex electromagnetic treatment as well as silica addition was investigated. Positive effects including accelerated curing of boron-containing cement waste forms, improve end product quality, decreased product volume and reduced secondary LRW volume from equipment decontamination were established. These results established the possibility of boron-containing LRW cementation without the use of neutralizing alkaline additives that greatly increase the volume of the final product intended for long-term storage (burial). Physical (electromagnetic) treatment in a vortex mixer can change the state of LRW versus chemical treatment. By treating the liquid phase of cement solution only, instead of the whole solution, and using fine powder and nano-particles of ferric oxides instead of separable ferromagnetic cores for the activating agents the positive effect are obtained. VET for 1 to 3 minutes yields boron-containing LRW cemented products of satisfactory quality. Silica addition at 10 % by weight will accelerate curing and solidification and to decrease radionuclide leaching rates from boron-containing cement products. (authors)

  6. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  7. Detection of Intermediates And Kinetic Control During Assembly of Bacteriophage P22 Procapsid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuma, R.; Tsuruta, H.; French, K.H.; Prevelige, P.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteriophage P22 serves as a model for the assembly and maturation of other icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses. P22 coat and scaffolding proteins assemble in vitro into an icosahedral procapsid, which then expands during DNA packaging (maturation). Efficient in vitro assembly makes this system suitable for design and production of monodisperse spherical nanoparticles (diameter {approx} 50 nm). In this work, we explore the possibility of controlling the outcome of assembly by scaffolding protein engineering. The scaffolding protein exists in monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium. We address the role of monomers and dimers in assembly by using three different scaffolding proteins with altered monomer-dimer equilibrium (weak dimer, covalent dimer, monomer). The progress and outcome of assembly was monitored by time-resolved X-ray scattering, which allowed us to distinguish between closed shells and incomplete assembly intermediates. Binding of scaffolding monomer activates the coat protein for assembly. Excess dimeric scaffolding protein resulted in rapid nucleation and kinetic trapping yielding incomplete shells. Addition of monomeric wild-type scaffold with excess coat protein completed these metastable shells. Thus, the monomeric scaffolding protein plays an essential role in the elongation phase by activating the coat and effectively lowering its critical concentration for assembly.

  8. Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers Ian K. Bartol, Paul S. Krueger, William J. Stewart and Joseph T. Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynes, Wayne L.

    Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers Ian K. Bartol, Paul S of various appendages, squid paralarvae (hatchlings) employ a pulsed jet for locomotion at intermediate Re different propulsive mechanism, i.e. jetting, involves (1) radial expansion of the mantle, resulting

  9. Tidal Effects on Intermediate Waters: A Case Study in the East/Japan Sea HO JIN LEE,* JAE-HUN PARK, AND MARK WIMBUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    transports fresh waters with density conducive to the ventilation of intermediate waters in the EJS. 1 ventilation of the North Pacific Ocean intermediate layer (Nakamura et al. 2006). Indeed, internal tides model to resolve internal tides is, however, a chal- lenging problem because of its heavy computational

  10. A CLOSE-PAIR ANALYSIS OF DAMP MERGERS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Richard C. Y.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bridge, Carrie R., E-mail: chou@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: bridge@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the kinematics of {approx}2800 candidate close-pair galaxies at 0.1 < z < 1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5 m Magellan and 5 m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the 'hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al., we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red, and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al.. Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as 'damp', rather than 'dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z {approx} 0.5. Our data support models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behavior, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.

  11. Mechanism of N[superscript 10]-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase derived from complexes with intermediates and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, Lesa R.; Chai, Geqing; Bielak, Magdalena; Minor, Wladek; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Lebioda, Lukasz (SC); (UV)

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    N{sup 10}-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) is a folate enzyme that catalyzes the formylation of tetrahydrofolate (THF) in an ATP dependent manner. Structures of FTHFS from the thermophilic homoacetogen, Moorella thermoacetica, complexed with (1) a catalytic intermediate-formylphosphate (XPO) and product-ADP; (2) with an inhibitory substrate analog-folate; (3) with XPO and an inhibitory THF analog, ZD9331, were used to analyze the enzyme mechanism. Nucleophilic attack of the formate ion on the gamma phosphate of ATP leads to the formation of XPO and the first product ADP. A channel that leads to the putative formate binding pocket allows for the binding of ATP and formate in random order. Formate binding is due to interactions with the gamma-phosphate moiety of ATP and additionally to two hydrogen bonds from the backbone nitrogen of Ala276 and the side chain of Arg97. Upon ADP dissociation, XPO reorients and moves to the position previously occupied by the beta-phosphate of ATP. Conformational changes that occur due to the XPO presence apparently allow for the recruitment of the third substrate, THF, with its pterin moiety positioned between Phe384 and Trp412. This position overlaps with that of the bound nucleoside, which is consistent with a catalytic mechanism hypothesis that FTHFS works via a sequential ping-pong mechanism. More specifically, a random bi uni uni bi ping-pong ter ter mechanism is proposed. Additionally, the native structure originally reported at a 2.5 {angstrom} resolution was redetermined at a 2.2 {angstrom} resolution.

  12. Measurements of the UV Upturn in Local and Intermediate-Redshift Ellipticals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The rest-frame UV contains the most sensitive indicators of age for elliptical galaxies. While the near-UV flux from young ellipticals isolates the main sequence turnoff, the far-UV flux in old ellipticals is dominated by hot horizontal branch (HB) stars. This evolved population was first revealed by early UV observations showing a sharp flux increase shortward of rest-frame 2500 A, subsequently dubbed the "UV upturn." The phenomenon has since been characterized in many local ellipticals, and measurements at intermediate redshifts are now underway. Once ellipticals reach ages of 5-10 Gyr, stellar and galactic evolution theories predict that the UV-to-optical flux ratio can increase by orders of magnitude over timescales of a few Gyr, making the UV upturn the most rapidly evolving feature of these galaxies. It is thus expected to fade dramatically with increasing redshift. I review the imaging and spectroscopic evidence for the nature of the UV upturn in nearby ellipticals, and then present observations that measure the UV upturn at an epoch significantly earlier than our own. Far-UV data from the HUT demonstrate that the spectra of nearby ellipticals are dominated by hot HB stars. FOC UV imaging of M32 and the M31 bulge detected the UV-bright phases of post-HB stars, but did not reach the HB itself. Recent STIS observations were the first to image the hot HB and post-HB stars in the center of the nearest elliptical galaxy, M32; these observations also show a striking lack of UV-bright post-AGB stars. FOC observations of Abell 370, a rich galaxy cluster at z=0.375, show that giant ellipticals at a lookback time of 4 Gyr can exhibit strong UV luminosity, with no evidence of evolution in the UV upturn between this epoch and our own, thus implying a high redshift of formation (z_f > 4).

  13. Parsec-Scale Herbig-Haro Outflows from Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiona McGroarty; Tom Ray; John Bally

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    While there are many parsec-scale Herbig-Haro (HH) outflows known to be driven by low-mass young stars, few are associated with their intermediate mass counterparts. Here we present the discovery of five such bipolar outflows. Of these, LkHalpha 198, 1548C27 IRS1, LkHalpha 233 and LkHalpha 234 were previously known to possess small-scale HH flows, while no such activity was observed before near IRAS 19395+2313. The largest of the newly discovered outflows are seen in the vicinity of LkHalpha 234 and 1548C27 IRS1, and stretch (in projection) 8pc and 7.5pc respectively. LkHalpha 233 which was previously known to power a spectroscopically detected small-scale (< 10'') jet is now seen to drive a 3pc outflow and LkHalpha 198 is shown here to power a 2pc outflow. Two HH objects in the vicinity of IRAS 19395+2313 lead us to suggest that it may also be responsible for a 5pc outflow. In total, 27 new HH objects/complexes were discovered. Examination of these parsec-scale outflows show that they have similar lengths, morphologies, and dynamical timescales as those from low-mass sources. Many appear to have blown out of the parent cloud, suggesting that their total lengths are much greater than optically observed. The degree of collimation of these outflows is similar to those from low-mass sources suggesting that the transition to more poorly-collimated outflows must occur at higher masses than the sources observed here.

  14. Pore-Water Extraction from Unsaturated Porous Media: Intermediate-Scale Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As a remedial approach, vacuum-induced pore-water extraction offers the possibility of contaminant and water removal from the vadose zone, which may be beneficial in reducing the flux of vadose zone contaminants to groundwater. Vadose zone water extraction is being considered at the Hanford Site in Washington State as a means to remove technetium-99 contamination from low permeability sediments with relatively high water contents. A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted to improve the fundamental understanding and limitations of the technique. Column experiments were designed to investigate the relations between imposed suctions, water saturations, and water production. Flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of high-permeability layers and near-well compaction on pore-water extraction efficiency. Results show that water extraction from unsaturated systems can be achieved in low permeability sediments, provided that the initial water saturations are relatively high. The presence of a high-permeability layer decreased the yield, and compaction near the well screen had a limited effect on overall performance. In all experiments, large pressure gradients were observed near the extraction screen. Minimum requirements for water extraction include an imposed vacuum-induced suction larger than the initial sediment capillary pressure, in combination with a fully saturated seepage-face boundary. A numerical multiphase simulator with a coupled seepage-face boundary conditions was used to simulate the experiments. Reasonable matches were obtained between measured and simulated results for both water extraction and capillary pressures, suggesting that numerical simulations may be used as a design tool for field-scale applications of pore-water extraction.

  15. Federal Energy Management Program Training Offers IACET Continuing Education Units

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video explains how the Federal Energy Management Program offers International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) continuing education units for eTraining core courses.

  16. The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santilli, R M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadron...

  17. A Dark Energy Model with Generalized Uncertainty Principle in the Emergent, Intermediate and Logamediate Scenarios of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Ghosh; Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is motivated by the work of Kim et al (2008), which considered the equation of state parameter for the new agegraphic dark energy based on generalized uncertainty principle coexisting with dark matter without interaction. In this work, we have considered the same dark energy inter- acting with dark matter in emergent, intermediate and logamediate scenarios of the universe. Also, we have investigated the statefinder, kerk and lerk parameters in all three scenarios under this inter- action. The energy density and pressure for the new agegraphic dark energy based on generalized uncertainty principle have been calculated and their behaviors have been investigated. The evolu- tion of the equation of state parameter has been analyzed in the interacting and non-interacting situations in all the three scenarios. The graphical analysis shows that the dark energy behaves like quintessence era for logamediate expansion and phantom era for emergent and intermediate expansions of the universe.

  18. Complete and incomplete fusion competition in 11B-induced fission reaction on medium mass targets at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demekhina, N A; Balabekyan, A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the binary fission of 197Au, 181Ta and 209Bi targets induced by 11B ions were measured at intermediate energies. The fission products cross sections were studied by means of activation analysis in off-line regime observed gamma-ray spectra. The fission cross section is reconstructed on the basis of charge and mass distribution of the fission products.

  19. Complete and incomplete fusion competition in 11B-induced fission reaction on medium mass targets at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Demekhina; G. S. Karapetyan; A. R. Balabekyan

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the binary fission of 197Au, 181Ta and 209Bi targets induced by 11B ions were measured at intermediate energies. The fission products cross sections were studied by means of activation analysis in off-line regime observed gamma-ray spectra. The fission cross section is reconstructed on the basis of charge and mass distribution of the fission products.

  20. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taira, Al V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  1. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Offers Training on New FederalEnergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to understand new, more-stringent, energy-efficiency mandates scheduled to go into effect in July 2014. Upon completion of this course, participants will: Understand the...

  2. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document highlights energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) current best practices that agencies may want to consider in their contracting process. Agencies can use this document to help them award high-quality and high-value ESPC task orders.

  3. FEMP case study: Regional super ESPC saves energy and dollars at NASA Johnson Space Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitchford, P.; Dominick, J.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study describes the new energy-efficient equipment being installed at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, to save nearly $2 million per year in energy and utility costs. The work is being done under a delivery order by Honeywell, Inc., as part of a US Department of Energy ``super'' regional energy savings performance contract, or Super ESPC. These are streamlined contracts that allow Federal agencies to contract with competitively selected energy service companies in their region for a variety of energy- and water-efficient products and services. The service companies pay up-front capital costs and are reimbursed with part of the agency's utility cost savings. In this work, NASA Johnson Space Center will get new energy-efficient lighting and compressed-air systems, water-conserving fixtures, and improved controls.

  4. Practical Guide to Savings and Payments in FEMP ESPC Task Orders

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procedures or equipment. Using the least expensive (but less effective) air filters for a ventilation system, for example, might be necessary to keep expenses within budget. A...

  5. Interagency Sustainability Working Group: Update Report; December 2009, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2009 update report offered by the Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG). This report is updated bi-annually.

  6. Domestic Water Conservation Technologies: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Federal Technology Alert (Booklet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Order 13123 calls for the Federal government to conserve water as well as energy in its 500,000 facilities. To help set priorities among water-saving measures, the Federal Energy Management Program conducted a study of Federal water use in 1997. The study indicated that the government consumes more than 50% of its water in just three types of Federal facilities: housing, hospitals, and office buildings. These facilities have enough kitchens, rest rooms, and laundry areas to provide facility managers with many opportunities to begin reducing their water use (and utility costs) with appropriate water-saving fixtures and products. Therefore, this Federal Technology Alert focuses on domestic technologies, products, and appliances such as water-efficient faucets, showerheads, toilets, urinals, washing machines, and dishwashers. Conserving water also saves the energy needed to treat, pump, and heat that water in homes, businesses, and other buildings.

  7. FEMP Assists White House in Setting GHG Reduction Target for Federal

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|July 14,DepartmentDepartment of1. Q:Government |

  8. FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|July 14,DepartmentDepartment of1. Q:Government

  9. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERAL ENERGYFEMP

  10. FEMP Helps Federal Facilities Develop Large-Scale Renewable Energy Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERAL ENERGYFEMP|

  11. FEMP Offers New Training on Energy Management Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKET NO.FEDERALDepartment

  12. FEMP Offers Training on Distributed-Scale Renewable Energy Projects: From

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning to Project

  13. FEMP Offers Training on Federal On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning to Project|

  14. FEMP Offers Training on the Five Phases to Success for ESPCs | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning to Project|of

  15. FEMP Offers Updated Training on the Guiding Principles for High-Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning to Project|ofand

  16. FEMP Outdoor Solid-State Lighting Intiative: Resources for Outdoor SSL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning to

  17. FEMP and Department of Transportation Partnership Wins GreenGov Award |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010SaltInstrumentation andFE DOCKETPlanning toPeerReleases

  18. FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:EnergyFAR27.pdfFE

  19. FEMP Seeking Public Comment on Draft M&V Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:EnergyFAR27.pdfFEFEMP Seeking Public

  20. Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Lot Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment ofofthe PublicDocument provides acquisition

  1. Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Structure Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment ofofthe PublicDocument provides

  2. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Request Portal User Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartmentEnergyEnergy Management Program Technical

  3. FEMP Offers Training on the Five Phases to Success for ESPCs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide| Department ofPractices |for|of

  4. DOE FEMP Procedure for Notifying Congress Prior to Award of ESPCs |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|Statement |3250.1 DOE5700.2 DOE FForm

  5. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and FEMP Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecemberInjury atArbitraryCosts |

  6. Practical Guide to Savings and Payments in FEMP ESPC Task Orders |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrativeof Excellence BuildingDepartment of Energy

  7. Sell Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of Energy Advisory10 March 2010Self-powered Hydrogen +By

  8. Buy Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartment ofBUILDING-TO-GRIDLight WaPROJECTS FUNDED BY

  9. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |in STEMEnergyI.ofTrack(CHP)SavingFDA

  10. Microsoft Word - FEMP-State MOU pdf version.doc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to EnergyDepartmentOfficeNOTICE:InspectionsMicrosoft Word -MicrosoftMicrosoft

  11. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Preliminary Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN

  12. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8. REVIEW OF THE

  13. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Task Order Request for Proposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8. REVIEW OF THE.

  14. FEMP ESPC Success Story - Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Camp Pendleton, California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8. REVIEW OF THE.a m

  15. FEMP ESPC Success Story - U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFIC PLAN8. REVIEW OF THE.a

  16. FEMP Outdoor Solid State Lighting Intiative: Resources for Outdoor SSL Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPractices |of

  17. FEMP: Labs, Data Centers, and High Tech Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic MediaTreatmentPROJECT-SPECIFICPracticesFEMPFEMP: Labs,

  18. Air Force Achieves Fuel Efficiency through Industry Best Practices (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NM - Building Americaof42.2 (April 2012)the

  19. The FEMP Awards Program: Fostering Institutional Change and Energy Management Excellence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartmentTheEnergy The

  20. Quick Guide: Power Purchase Agreements (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified EnergyDepartment ofOrderDepartment ofbelow arePPA

  1. Structural Studies of E. coli Topoisomerase III-DNA Complexes Reveal a Novel Type IA Topoisomerase-DNA Conformational Intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changela, Anita; DiGate, Russell J.; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (Phil. Col. Pharmacy)

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase III belongs to the type IA family of DNA topoisomerases, which transiently cleave single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) via a 5{prime} phosphotyrosine intermediate. We have solved crystal structures of wild-type E. coli topoisomerase III bound to an eight-base ssDNA molecule in three different pH environments. The structures reveal the enzyme in three distinct conformational states while bound to DNA. One conformation resembles the one observed previously with a DNA-bound, catalytically inactive mutant of topoisomerase III where DNA binding realigns catalytic residues to form a functional active site. Another conformation represents a novel intermediate in which DNA is bound along the ssDNA-binding groove but does not enter the active site, which remains in a catalytically inactive, closed state. A third conformation shows an intermediate state where the enzyme is still in a closed state, but the ssDNA is starting to invade the active site. For the first time, the active site region in the presence of both the catalytic tyrosine and ssDNA substrate is revealed for a type IA DNA topoisomerase, although there is no evidence of ssDNA cleavage. Comparative analysis of the various conformational states suggests a sequence of domain movements undertaken by the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  2. Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, Bechtold [Alliance Technical Services; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Timbario, Tom [Alliance Technical Services; Goodman, Marc [Alliance Technical Services

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

  3. Capillary electrophoretic study of dibasic acids of different structures: Relation to separation of oxidative intermediates in remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Z.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dicarboxylic acids are important in environmental chemistry because they are intermediates in oxidative processes involved in natural remediation and waste management processes such as oxidative detoxification and advanced oxidation. Capillary electrophoresis (CE), a promising technique for separating and analyzing these intermediates, has been used to examine a series of dibasic acids of different structures and conformations. This series includes malonic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, maleic acid, fumaric acid, phthalic acid, and trans, trans-muconic acid. The CE parameters as well as structural variations (molecular structure and molecular isomers, buffer composition, pH, applied voltage, injection mode, current, temperature, and detection wavelength) that affect the separations and analytical results have been examined in this study. Those factors that affect the separation have been delineated. Among these parameters, the pH has been found to be the most important, which affects the double-layer of the capillary wall, the electro-osmotic flow and analyte mobility. The optimum pH for separating these dibasic acids, as well as the other parameters are discussed in detail and related to the development of methods for analyzing oxidation intermediates in oxidative waste management procedures.

  4. The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggero Maria Santilli

    2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadronic reactor} (patented and international patents pending), consisting of actual equipment specifically intended for the possible industrial production of the clean energy released by representative cases of controlled intermediate fusions for independent scrutiny by interested colleagues.

  5. Equivalent Circuit Description of Non-compensated n-p Codoped TiO2 as Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian-Li Feng; Guang-Wei Deng; Yi Xia; Feng-Cheng Wu; Ping Cui; Hai-Ping Lan; Zhen-Yu Zhang

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel concept of non-compensated n-p codoping has made it possible to create tunable intermediate bands in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, making the codoped TiO2 a promising material for developing intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). Here we investigate the quantum efficiency of such IBSCs within two scenarios - with and without current extracted from the extended intermediate band. Using the ideal equivalent circuit model, we find that the maximum efficiency of 57% in the first scenario and 53% in the second are both much higher than the Shockley-Queisser limit from single gap solar cells. We also obtain various key quantities of the circuits, a useful step in realistic development of TiO2 based solar cells invoking device integration. These equivalent circuit results are also compared with the efficiencies obtained directly from consideration of electron transition between the energy bands, and both approaches reveal the intriguing existence of double peaks in the maximum quantum efficiency as a function of the relative location of IBs.

  6. Equivalent Circuit Description of Non-compensated n-p Codoped TiO2 as Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Tian-Li; Xia, Yi; Wu, Feng-Cheng; Cui, Ping; Lan, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel concept of non-compensated n-p codoping has made it possible to create tunable intermediate bands in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, making the codoped TiO2 a promising material for developing intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). Here we investigate the quantum efficiency of such IBSCs within two scenarios - with and without current extracted from the extended intermediate band. Using the ideal equivalent circuit model, we find that the maximum efficiency of 57% in the first scenario and 53% in the second are both much higher than the Shockley-Queisser limit from single gap solar cells. We also obtain various key quantities of the circuits, a useful step in realistic development of TiO2 based solar cells invoking device integration. These equivalent circuit results are also compared with the efficiencies obtained directly from consideration of electron transition between the energy bands, and both approaches reveal the intriguing existence of double peaks in the maximum quantum efficiency as a fun...

  7. Magneto thermal conductivity of superconducting Nb with intermediate level of impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.S. Sharath Chandra, M.K. Chattopadhyay, S.B. Roy, V.C. Sahni, G.R. Myneni

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niobium materials with intermediate purity level are used for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities (SCRF), and thermal conductivity is an important parameter influencing the performance of such SCRF cavities. We report here the temperature and magnetic field dependence of thermal conductivity {kappa} for superconducting niobium (Nb) samples, for which the electron mean free path I{sub e}, the phonon mean free path I{sub g}, and the vortex core diameter 2r{sub C} are of the same order of magnitude. The measured thermal conductivity is analyzed using the effective gap model (developed for I{sub e} >> 2r{sub C} (Dubeck et al 1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 98)) and the normal core model (developed for I{sub e} << 2r{sub C} (Ward and Dew-Hughes 1970 J. Phys. C: Solid St. Phys. 3 2245)). However, it is found that the effective gap model is not suitable for low temperatures when I{sub e} {approx} 2r{sub C}. The normal core model, on the other hand, is able to describe {kappa}(T,H) over the entire temperature range except in the field regime between H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} i.e. in the mixed state. It is shown that to understand the complete behavior of {kappa} in the mixed state, the scattering of quasi-particles from the vortex cores and the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling are to be invoked. The quasi-particle scattering from vortices for the present system is understood in terms of the framework of Sergeenkov and Ausloos (1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 3614) extending their approach to the case of Nb. The intervortex tunneling is understood within the framework of Schmidbauer et al (1970 Z. Phys. 240 30). Analysis of the field dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering from vortices dominates in the low fields, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling dominates in high fields. Analysis of the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering is dominant at low temperatures, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling is dominant at high temperatures.

  8. Current-driven transformations of the intermediate-state patterns in type-I superconductors Jacob R. Hoberg and Ruslan Prozorov*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current-driven transformations of the intermediate-state patterns in type-I superconductors Jacob R-II superconductors each bearing a single flux quanta, tubes in type-I superconductors may contain up to approxi

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

  11. Bridging the gap between the Jaynes-Cummings and Rabi models using an intermediate rotating wave approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yimin Wang; Jing Yan Haw

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel approach called the intermediate rotating wave approximation (IRWA), which employs a time-averaging method to encapsulate the dynamics of light-matter interaction from strong to ultrastrong coupling regime. In contrast to the ordinary rotating wave approximation, this method addresses the co-rotating and counter-rotating terms separately to trace their physical consequences individually, and thus establishes the continuity between the Jaynes-Cummings model and the quantum Rabi model. We investigate IRWA in near resonance and large detuning cases. Our IRWA not only agrees well with both models in their respective coupling strengths, but also offers a good explanation for their differences.

  12. The Nature of Radio-Intermediate Quasars: What is Radio-Loud and what is Radio-Quiet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; William Sherwood; Alok Patnaik

    1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed quasi-simultaneous radio flux density measurements at 2.7 and 10 GHz for all PG quasars with radio flux densities between 4-200 mJy. We find that a large fraction of these sources are variable, flat-spectrum quasars. This brings the total fraction of flat-spectrum quasars with a ratio between radio and optical flux of R>10 - a value previously used to define a radio-loud quasar - to 40% in the PG quasar sample. We also find that the median R-parameter of these flat-spectrum quasars is lower than those of steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars. This contradicts the predictions of the unified scheme and the idea that all flat-spectrum, core-dominated quasars are relativistically boosted lobe-dominated quasars. We show that this discrepancy is due to a population of flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars with 25intermediate quasars is relativistic boosting in radio-weak quasars. If the flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars are considered the boosted counterparts to usual radio-weak quasars, their fraction among radio-weak quasars is roughly 10%, similar to the fraction of boosted radio-loud quasars. This would point towards average Lorentz factors of gamma_jet=2-4 for radio-loud and radio-weak quasars. The presence of the flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars changes the definition of 'radio-loud' and can bias some conclusions drawn from optically selected quasar samples, where R ~ 1-10 is used as the dividing line for both, flat- and steep-spectrum quasars. Instead one should use separate R-parameters for the dividing line in steep- (R~25) and flat-spectrum (R~250) quasars.

  13. Warped DGP model in warm intermediate inflation with a general dissipative coefficient in light of BICEP2 and Planck results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramon Herrera; Nelson Videla; Marco Olivares

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe scenario on a warped Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane during intermediate inflation is studied. We consider a general form for the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma(T,\\phi)\\propto T^{m}/\\phi^{m-1}$, and also study this model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We analyze the evolution of the universe in the slow-roll approximation, and find the exact solutions to the equations of motion. In both regimes, we utilize recent data from the BICEP2 experiment and also from the Planck satellite to constrain the parameters in our model in accordance with the theory of cosmological perturbations.

  14. Two-step Doppler cooling of a three-level ladder system with an intermediate metastable level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Champenois; Gaetan Hagel; Martina Knoop; Marie Houssin; Cedric Zumsteg; Fernande Vedel; Michael Drewsen

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler laser cooling of a three-level ladder system using two near-resonant laser fields is analyzed in the case of the intermediate level being metastable while the upper level is short-lived. Analytical as well as numerical results for e.g. obtainable scattering rates and achievable temperatures are presented. When appropriate, comparisons with two-level single photon Doppler laser cooling is made. These results are relevant to recent experimental Doppler laser cooling investigations addressing intercombination lines in alkali-earth metal atoms and quadrupole transitions in alkali-earth metal ions.

  15. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?? Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered c0 precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  16. Low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol and ethanol-PRF blends: An experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Francis M.; Chaos, Marcos; Dryer, Frederick L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this brief communication, we present new experimental species profile measurements for the low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol under knock-prone conditions. These experiments show that ethanol exhibits no global low temperature reactivity at these conditions, although we note the heterogeneous decomposition of ethanol to ethylene and water. Similar behavior is reported for an E85 blend in n-heptane. Kinetic modeling results are presented to complement these experiments and elucidate the interaction of ethanol and primary reference fuels undergoing cooxidation. (author)

  17. Abundances in intermediate-mass AGB stars undergoing third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. McSaveney; P. R. Wood; M. Scholz; J. C. Lattanzio; K. H. Hinkle

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High dispersion near-infrared spectra have been taken of seven highly-evolved, variable, intermediate-mass (4-6 Msun) AGB stars in the LMC and SMC in order to look for C, N and O variations that are expected to arise from third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning. The pulsation of the objects has been modelled, yielding stellar masses, and spectral synthesis calculations have been performed in order to derive abundances from the observed spectra. For two stars, abundances of C, N, O, Na, Al, Ti, Sc and Fe were derived and compared with the abundances predicted by detailed AGB models. Both stars show very large N enhancements and C deficiencies. These results provide the first observational confirmation of the long-predicted production of primary nitrogen by the combination of third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning in intermediate-mass AGB stars. It was not possible to derive abundances for the remaining five stars: three were too cool to model, while another two had strong shocks in their atmospheres which caused strong emission to fill the line cores and made abundance determination impossible. The latter occurrence allows us to predict the pulsation phase interval during which observations should be made if successful abundance analysis is to be possible.

  18. Monte Carlo testing of new cross section data sets for thermal and intermediate highly enriched uranium critical assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinman, J.P. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the eigenvalue sensitivity to new {sup 235}U, hydrogen, and oxygen cross section data sets by comparing RACER Monte Carlo calculations for several thermal and intermediate spectrum critical experiments. The new {sup 235}U library (Version 107) was derived by L. Leal and H. Derrien by fitting differential experimental data for {sup 235}U while constraining the fit to match experimental capture and fission resonance integrals and Maxwellian averaged thermal K1 (v fission minus absorption). The new hydrogen library (Version 45) consists of the ENDF/B-VI release 3 data with a 332.0 mb 2,200 m/s cross section which replaces the value of 332.6 mb in the current library. The new oxygen library (Version 39) is based on a recent evaluation of {sup 16}O by E. Caro. Nineteen Oak Ridge and Rocky Flats thermal solution benchmark critical assemblies that span a range of hydrogen-to-{sup 235}U (H/U) concentrations (2,052 to 27.1) and above-thermal neutron leakage fractions (0.555 to 0.011) were analyzed. In addition, three intermediate spectrum critical assemblies (UH3-UR, UH3-NI, and HISS-HUG) were studied.

  19. Communication: Spectroscopic characterization of an alkyl substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO through pure rotational transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki, E-mail: endo@bunshi.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)] [Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO was detected in the gas phase through Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. Observed pure rotational transitions show a small splitting corresponding to the A/E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation. The rotational constants and the barrier height of the hindered methyl rotation were determined to be A = 17?586.5295(15) MHz, B = 7133.4799(41) MHz, C = 5229.1704(40) MHz, and V{sub 3} = 837.1(17) cm{sup ?1}. High-level ab initio calculations which reproduce the experimentally determined values well indicate that the in-plane C–H bond in the methyl moiety is trans to the C–O bond, and other two protons are directed to the terminal oxygen atom for the most stable structure of syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO. The torsional barrier of the methyl top is fairly large in syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO, implying a significant interaction between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the methyl moiety, which may be responsible for the high production yields of the OH radical from energized alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates.

  20. Intermediate Energy Infobook and Intermediate Infobook Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    activities are: Forms Of Energy fill in the blanks Biomass worksheet Coal worksheet Geothermal worksheet Hydropower worksheet Natural Gas worksheet Petroleum worksheet Propane...

  1. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non?Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); West, Brian H [ORNL; Clark, Wendy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Graves, Ronald L [ORNL; Orban, John [Battelle, Columbus; Przesmitzki, Steve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In summer 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program is to assess the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals in the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20--gasoline blended with 15 and 20% ethanol--on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This first report provides the results available to date from the first stages of a much larger overall test program. Results from additional projects that are currently underway or in the planning stages are not included in this first report. The purpose of this initial study was to quickly investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the following: (1) Regulated tailpipe emissions for 13 popular late model vehicles on a drive cycle similar to real-world driving and 28 small non-road engines (SNREs) under certification or typical in use procedures. (2) Exhaust and catalyst temperatures of the same vehicles under more severe conditions. (3) Temperature of key engine components of the same SNREs under certification or typical in-use conditions. (4) Observable operational issues with either the vehicles or SNREs during the course of testing. As discussed in the concluding section of this report, a wide range of additional studies are underway or planned to consider the effects of intermediate ethanol blends on materials, emissions, durability, and driveability of vehicles, as well as impacts on a wider range of nonautomotive engines, including marine applications, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Section 1 (Introduction) gives background on the test program and describes collaborations with industry and agencies to date. Section 2 (Experimental Setup) provides details concerning test fuels, vehicle and SNRE selection, and test methods used to conduct the studies presented in this report. Section 3 (Results and Discussion) summarizes the vehicle and SNRE studies and presents data from testing completed to date. Section 4 (Next Steps) describes planned future activities. The appendixes provide test procedure details, vehicle and SNRE emissions standards, analysis details, and additional data and tables from vehicle and SNRE tests.

  2. The CH3CHOO `Criegee Intermediate' and its anion: Isomers, Infrared spectra, and W3-F12 energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettner, Marcus; McKinley, Allan; Wild, Duncan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the CH3CHOO Criegee intermediates (ethanal-oxide) and analogous anions, we obtain heats of formations and electron affinities at CCSDT(Q)/CBS level of theory by means of the high-level W3-F12 thermochemical protocol. The electron affinities amount to 0.20 eV and 0.35 eV for the cis and trans isomer, respectively. Neutral cis and trans isomers are separated by 14.1 kJ/mol, the anions are almost isoenergetic (0.4 kJ/mol separation). Harmonic vibrational frequencies are presented at CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pVTZ level of theory. Since the synthesis of these species in gas-phase experiments might be possible in the near future, we include a predicted photoelectron spectrum.

  3. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The rangemore »of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  4. Testing erosion-resistant chromium carbide plasma coatings on the TVA Paradise Unit-2 intermediate pressure turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karr, O.F.; Frank, R.L.; Gaston, D.E. Jr.; Bradford, T.L.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid particle erosion (SPE) is caused by oxide particles in steam. Hard oxide particles exfoliate from the inside surfaces of boiler tubes and steam lines and are carried by the steam to the turbine where they impact and erode stationary and moving turbine parts (nozzles, moving blades, stationary blades, seal strips, and shrouds around the blades). The first stages of the high pressure (HP) and intermediate pressure (IP) turbines experience the greatest amount of SPE. Though many owners experience erosion in the first stages of both HP (main steam) and IP (reheat steam) turbines, TVA's principal erosion experience is in the IP or reheat steam turbines. This report is limited to the first few stages of IP turbines, referred to as ''first reheat stages.'' Hard chromium carbide plasma coatings have been developed. The coating was installed in Paradise Unit-2 IP turbine, 9th and 10th stages. Pretest inspection report is given.

  5. Holographic reconstruction of $f(G)$ Gravity for scale factors pertaining to Emergent, Logamediate and Intermediate scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdul Jawad; Antonio Pasqua; Surajit Chattopadhyay

    2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we reconstruct the holographic dark energy in the framework of $f(G)$ modified theory of gravity, where $G$ is Gauss-Bonnet invariant. In this context, we choose the infrared cut-off as Granda-Oliveros cut-off which is proportional to the Hubble parameter $H$ and its first derivative with respect to the cosmic time $t$. We reconstruct $f(G)$ model with the inclusion of HDE and three well-known forms of the scale factor $a(t)$, i.e. the emergent, the logamediate and the intermediate scale factors. The reconstructed model as well as equation of state parameter are discussed numerically with the help of graphical representation to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. Moreover, the stability of the models incorporating all the scale factors is checked through squared speed of sound $v_s^2$.

  6. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the sameway for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  7. NiTi shape-memory transformations: minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically-limited intermediate states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarkevich, N A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated structures and transitions, including their barriers. Using a generalized solid-state nudge elastic band (GSSNEB) method implemented via density-functional theory, we detail the structural transformations in NiTi relevant to shape memory: those between body-centered orthorhombic (BCO) groundstate and a newly identified stable austenite ("glassy" B2-like) structure, including energy barriers (hysteresis) and intermediate structures (observed as a kinetically limited R-phase), and between martensite variants (BCO orientations). All results are in good agreement with available experiment. We contrast the austenite results to those from the often-assumed, but unstable B2. These high- and low-temperature structures and structural transformations provide much needed atomic-scale detail for transitions responsible for NiTi shape-memory effects.

  8. A Study on Optimized Management Options for the Wolsong Low- and Intermediate - Level Waste Disposal Center in Korea - 13479

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, JooWan; Kim, DongSun; Choi, DongEun [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Korea 89, Bukseongno, Gyeongju, 780-050 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Korea 89, Bukseongno, Gyeongju, 780-050 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe and effective management of radioactive waste is a national task required for sustainable generation of nuclear power and for energy self-reliance in Korea. Currently, for permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW), the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center (WLDC) is under construction. It will accommodate a total of 800,000 drums at the final stage after stepwise expansion. As an implementing strategy for cost-effective development of the WLDC, various disposal options suitable for waste classification schemes would be considered. It is also needed an optimized management of the WLDC by taking a countermeasure of volume reduction treatment. In this study, various management options to be applied to each waste class are analyzed in terms of its inventory and disposal cost. For the volume reduction and stabilization of waste, the vitrification and plasma melting methods are considered for combustible and incombustible waste, respectively. (authors)

  9. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore »combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  10. Multiplicity correlations of intermediate-mass fragments with pions and fast protons in $^{12}C + ^{197}Au$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turzó, K; Begemann-Blaich, M L; Bellaize, N; Bittiger, R; Bocage, F; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Bouriquet, B; Charvet, J L; Chbihi, A; Dayras, R; Durand, D; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Gourio, D; Guinet, D; Hudan, S; Imme, G; Lautesse, P; Lavaud, F; Lefèvre, A; Legrain, R; López, O; Lukasik, J; Lynen, U; Müller, W F J; Nalpas, L; Orth, H; Plagnol, E; Raciti, G; Rosato, E; Saija, A; Schwarz, C; Seidel, W; Sfienti, C; Tamain, B; Trautmann, W; Trzcinski, A; Vient, E; Vigilante, M; Volant, C; Zwieglinski, B; Botvina, A S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy pi+ (E 150 MeV) with intermediate-mass fragments were determined from the measured coincidence data. The deduced correlation functions 1 + R \\approx 1.3 for inclusive event samples reflect the strong correlations evident from the common impact-parameter dependence of the considered multiplicities. For narrow impact-parameter bins (based on charged-particle multiplicity), the correlation functions are close to unity and do not indicate strong additional correlations. Only for pions at high particle multiplicities (central collisions) a weak anticorrelation is observed, probably due to a limited competition between these emissions. Overall, the results are consistent with the equilibrium assumption made in statistical multifragmentation scenarios. Predictions obtained with intranuclear cascade models coupled to the Statistical Multifragmentation Model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

  12. Radioactive fallout projections and arms control agreements: INF (Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces) and START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, C.S.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projections of levels of radioactive fallout from a nuclear war are sensitive to assumptions about the structure of the nuclear stockpiles as well as the assumed scenarios for a nuclear war. Recent arms control proposals would change these parameters. This paper examines the implications of the proposed (Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces) INF treaty and (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) START on fallout projections from a major nuclear war. We conclude that the INF reductions are likely to have negligible effects on estimates of global and local fallout, whereas the START reductions could result in reductions in estimates of local fallout that range from significant to dramatic, depending upon the nature of the reduced strategic forces. Should a major war occur, projections of total fatalities from direct effects of blast, thermal radiation, a nd fallout, and the phenomenon known as nuclear winter, would not be significantly affected by INF and START initiatives as now drafted. 14 refs.

  13. Why do some intermediate polars show soft X-ray emission? A survey of XMM-Newton spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Evans; Coel Hellier

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a systematic analysis of the XMM-Newton X-ray spectra of intermediate polars (IPs) and find that, contrary to the traditional picture, most show a soft blackbody component. We compare the results with those from AM Her stars and deduce that the blackbody emission arises from reprocessing of hard X-rays, rather than from the blobby accretion sometimes seen in AM Hers. Whether an IP shows a blackbody component appears to depend primarily on geometric factors: a blackbody is not seen in those that have accretion footprints that are always obscured by accretion curtains or are only visible when foreshortened on the white-dwarf limb. Thus we argue against previous suggestions that the blackbody emission characterises a separate sub-group of IPs which are more akin to AM Hers, and develop a unified picture of the blackbody emission in these stars.

  14. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  15. WASTE CONTAINER AND WASTE PACKAGE PERFORMANCE MODELING TO SUPPORT SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF LOW AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to subsurface burial of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, a demonstration that disposal of the wastes can be accomplished while protecting the health and safety of the general population is required. The long-time frames over which public safety must be insured necessitates that this demonstration relies, in part, on computer simulations of events and processes that will occur in the future. This demonstration, known as a Safety Assessment, requires understanding the performance of the disposal facility, waste containers, waste forms, and contaminant transport to locations accessible to humans. The objective of the coordinated research program is to examine the state-of-the-art in testing and evaluation short-lived low- and intermediate-level waste packages (container and waste form) in near surface repository conditions. The link between data collection and long-term predictions is modeling. The objective of this study is to review state-of-the-art modeling approaches for waste package performance. This is accomplished by reviewing the fundamental concepts behind safety assessment and demonstrating how waste package models can be used to support safety assessment. Safety assessment for low- and intermediate-level wastes is a complicated process involving assumptions about the appropriate conceptual model to use and the data required to support these models. Typically due to the lack of long-term data and the uncertainties from lack of understanding and natural variability, the models used in safety assessment are simplistic. However, even though the models are simplistic, waste container and waste form performance are often central to the case for making a safety assessment. An overview of waste container and waste form performance and typical models used in a safety assessment is supplied. As illustrative examples of the role of waste container and waste package performance, three sample test cases are provided. An example of the impacts of distributed container failure times on cumulative release and peak concentration is provided to illustrate some of the complexities in safety assessment and how modeling can be used to support the conceptual approach in safety assessment and define data requirements. Two examples of the role of the waste form in controlling release are presented to illustrate the importance of waste form performance to safety assessment. These examples highlight the difficulties in changing the conceptual model from something that is conservative and defensible (such as instant release of all the activity) to more representative conceptual models that account for known physical and chemical processes (such as diffusion), The second waste form example accounts for the experimental observation that often a thin film with low diffusion properties forms on the waste form surface. The implications of formation of such a layer on release are investigated and the implications of attempting to account for this phenomena in a safety assessment are addressed.

  16. Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

  17. Four-State Folding of a SH3 Domain: Salt-Induced Modulation of the Stabilities of the Intermediates and Native State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the late intermediate M that forms after the rate-limiting transition of folding. Protein folding reactions. This simplistic picture of protein folding is supported by and in turn reinforces simplified computer simulations structure gradually over many small distributed barriers.29,30 This complexity of protein folding reactions

  18. Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for intermediate and large wind farms Ole Rathmann1, 3 , Sten Frandsen1 , and Rebecca Barthelmie2, 1 1 Wind Energy.rathmann@risoe.dk Summary Modern, very large wind farms require large-scale effects to be taken into account when evaluating academic models for infinitely large wind farms and present-day engineering models, which take into account

  19. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 104, NO. C9, PAGES 21,063-21,082, SEPTEMBER 15, 1999 Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intermediate water in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone: A Lagrangian view Olaf Boebel,· Claudia Schmid,2 subtropicalregionsaroundthe Brazil-Malvinas(Falkland)ConfluenceZone is studied,usingdailyhydrographicand kinematicdata from-frontalprocesseswere observedcloseto meander crests.The limited numberof floatsof this studyand the complexstructureof the Brazil

  20. Characterization of a Peroxodiiron(III) Intermediate in the T201S Variant of Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase Hydroxylase from Pseudomonas sp. OX1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Woon Ju

    We report the observation of a novel intermediate in the reaction of a reduced toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH[subscript red]) T201S variant, in the presence of a regulatory protein (ToMOD), with dioxygen. ...

  1. Energy Exchange Nov 2001 The NEED Project PO Box 10101 Manassas, VA 20108 1-800-875-5029 INTERMEDIATE ACTIVITY: Solar Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    Ã?8h INTERMEDIATE ACTIVITY: Solar Cooking GOAL: To build a solar hot dog cooker and test its ability 2. 6. Place the Solar Hot Dog Cooker into direct sunlight, positioning the flaps so of reflection. 7. Time how long it takes for your hot dog to cook. If it is a very cold day, consider how you

  2. A populous intermediate-age open cluster and evidence of an embedded cluster among the FSR globular cluster candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bica, Eduardo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nature of the globular cluster (GC) candidates FSR 1603 and FSR 1755 selected from the catalogue of \\citet{FSRcat}. Their properties are investigated with 2MASS field-star decontaminated photometry, which is used to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). FSR 1603 has the open cluster (OC) Ruprecht 101 as optical counterpart, and we show it to be a massive intermediate age cluster (IAC). Relevant parameters of FSR 1603 are the age $\\approx1$ Gyr, distance from the Sun $\\ds\\approx2.7$ kpc, Galactocentric distance $\\dgc\\approx6.4$ kpc, core radius $\\rc\\approx1.1$ pc, mass function slope $\\chi\\approx1.8$, observed stellar mass (for stars with mass in the range $\\rm 1.27 \\ms\\leq m\\leq2.03 \\ms$) $\\mObs\\approx500 \\ms$, and a total (extrapolated to $\\rm m=0.08 \\ms$) stellar mass $\\mTot\\approx2300 \\ms$. FSR 1755, on the other hand, is not a populous cluster. It may be a sparse young cluster embedded in the H II region Sh2-3, subject to an absorption $\\aV\\approx...

  3. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  4. The powerful jet of an off-nuclear intermediate-mass black hole in the spiral galaxy NGC 2276

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mezcua, M; Lobanov, A P; Sutton, A D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet ejection by accreting black holes is a mass invariant mechanism unifying stellar and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that should also apply for intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), which are thought to be the seeds from which SMBHs form. We present the detection of an off-nuclear IMBH of $\\sim$5 $\\times$ 10$^{4}$ M$_\\odot$ located in an unusual spiral arm of the galaxy NGC 2276 based on quasi-simultaneous \\textit{Chandra} X-ray observations and European VLBI Network (EVN) radio observations. The IMBH, NGC2276-3c, possesses a 1.8 pc radio jet that is oriented in the same direction as large-scale ($\\sim$650 pc) radio lobes and whose emission is consistent with flat to optically thin synchrotron emission between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. Its jet kinetic power ($4 \\times 10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is comparable to its radiative output and its jet efficiency ($\\geq$ 46\\%) is as large as that of SMBHs. A region of $\\sim$300 pc along the jet devoid of young stars could provide observational evidence of jet feedback from...

  5. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M . G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; V. Dolique; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; K. Haris; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, $\\ell=m=2$, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  6. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER EVOLUTION. VI. THE INFLUENCE OF AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Fregeau, John M. [Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Chatterjee, Sourav, E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a series of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations investigating the imprint of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) on the structure of a globular cluster. We investigate the three-dimensional and projected density profiles, and stellar disruption rates for idealized as well as realistic cluster models, taking into account a stellar mass spectrum and stellar evolution, and allowing for a larger, more realistic number of stars than was previously possible with direct N-body methods. We compare our results to other N-body and Fokker-Planck simulations published previously. We find, in general, very good agreement for the overall cluster structure and dynamical evolution between direct N-body simulations and our MC simulations. Significant differences exist in the number of stars that are tidally disrupted by the IMBH, and this is most likely caused by the wandering motion of the IMBH, not included in the MC scheme. These differences, however, are negligible for the final IMBH masses in realistic cluster models, as the disruption rates are generally much lower than for single-mass clusters. As a direct comparison to observations we construct a detailed model for the cluster NGC 5694, which is known to possess a central surface brightness cusp consistent with the presence of an IMBH. We find that not only the inner slope but also the outer part of the surface brightness profile agree well with observations. However, there is only a slight preference for models harboring an IMBH compared to models without.

  7. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in pre-filled and photo-filled intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Reenaas, Turid Worren, E-mail: turid.reenaas@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study how Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination via energy levels in the bandgap, caused by defects or impurities, affects the performance of both photo-filled and pre-filled intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). For a pre-filled cell, the IB is half-filled in equilibrium, while it is empty for the photo-filled cell in equilibrium. The energy level, density, and capture cross-sections of the defects/impurities are varied systematically. We find that the photo-filled cells are, in general, less efficient than pre-filled cells, except when the defect level is between the conduction band and the IB. In that case, for a range of light intensities, the photo-filled cell performs better than the pre-filled. When the defect level is at the same energy as the IB, the efficiency is above 82% of the defect-free case, when less than 50% of the states at the IB lead to SRH recombination. This shows that even if SRH recombination via the IB takes place, high efficiencies can be achieved. We also show that band gap optimization can be used to reduce the SRH recombination.

  8. EVIDENCE FOR A STELLAR DISRUPTION BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE IN AN EXTRAGALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, Jimmy A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Brink, Thomas G.; Bregman, Joel N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Roberts, Timothy P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jairwin@ua.edu

    2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report [O III] {lambda}5007 and [N II] {lambda}6583 emission from a globular cluster harboring the ultraluminous X-ray source CXOJ033831.8 - 352604 in the Fornax elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. No accompanying Balmer emission lines are present in the spectrum. One possibility is that the forbidden lines emanate from X-ray-illuminated debris of a star that has been tidally disrupted by an intermediate-mass black hole, with this debris also feeding the black hole leading to the observed X-ray emission. The line strengths indicate that the minimum size of the emitting region is {approx}10{sup 15} cm, and if the 70 km s{sup -1} half-widths of the emission lines represent rotation around the black hole, a minimum black hole mass of 1000 M {sub sun} is implied. The non-detection of H{alpha} and H{beta} emission lines suggests a white dwarf star was disrupted, although the presence of strong nitrogen emission is somewhat of a mystery.

  9. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Goggin, L M; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs,...

  10. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentral Facility SGPIntermediate

  11. Medicine Lodge Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneoTechnologyCHPRCMedical5 National

  12. Meeker Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a NewCuneoTechnologyCHPRCMedical5 NationalMedicine

  13. Guideline for Water and Energy Considerations During Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building Case Study High Performance Computing Data Center Metering Protocol FEMP Home About FEMP Program Areas Laws &...

  14. Outreach | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Award competition. Energy Action Month: Find materials that encourage Federal agencies to lead by example each October. FEMP Home About FEMP Program Areas Laws & Requirements...

  15. Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eworktechdeploy2007overview.pdf More Documents & Publications FEMP Peer Review Energy Savings Performance Contracts: FEMP Assistance EERE PowerPoint 2007 Template: Blue Version...

  16. A NEW CLASS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM STELLAR DISRUPTIONS BY INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, H.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, S. N. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been argued that the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) of GRB 060614 without an associated supernova (SN) has challenged the current classification and fuel model for long GRBs, and thus a tidal disruption model has been proposed to account for such an event. Since it is difficult to detect SNe for long GRBs at high redshift, the absence of an SN association cannot be regarded as the solid criterion for a new classification of long GRBs similar to GRB 060614, called GRB 060614-type bursts. Fortunately, we now know that there is an obvious periodic substructure observed in the prompt light curve of GRB 060614. We thus use such periodic substructure as a potential criterion to categorize some long GRBs into a new class of bursts, which might have been fueled by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) gulping a star, rather than a massive star collapsing to form a black hole. Therefore, the second criterion to recognize for this new class of bursts is whether they fit the tidal disruption model. From a total of 328 Swift GRBs with accurately measured durations and without SN association, we find 25 GRBs satisfying the criteria for GRB 060614-type bursts: seven of them are with known redshifts and 18 with unknown redshifts. These new bursts are {approx}6% of the total Swift GRBs, which are clustered into two subclasses: Type I and Type II with considerably different viscous parameters of accretion disks formed by tidally disrupting their different progenitor stars. We suggest that the two different kinds of progenitors are solar-type stars and white dwarfs: the progenitors for four Type I bursts with viscous parameter of around 0.1 are solar-type stars, and the progenitors for 21 Type II bursts with viscous parameter of around 0.3 are white dwarfs. The potential applications of this new class of GRBs as cosmic standard candles are discussed briefly.

  17. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  18. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Thoen, D. J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Nuij, P. J. W. M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kantor, M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich GMBH, Institute of Energy and Climate research, Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint-Petersburg, 195256 (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

  19. GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

  20. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.