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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

2

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Production of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Ordinary Portland Cement(OPC) from NALCO Red Mud has been successfully developed from a raw mix containing limestone, red mud,shale and fine coal.

6

Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

Lin Feng [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Department of Civil Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: fl2040@columbia.edu; Meyer, Christian [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current research interest in multi-scale modeling of cement paste requires accurate characterization of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the material, particularly the C-S-H phase. Nanoindentation is evaluated as a tool for measuring both the instantaneous and the short-term viscoelastic properties of cement paste. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based indentation is compared to conventional nanoindentaion in measuring mechanical properties of cement pastes. Time-dependent solutions are derived to characterize creep indentation tests performed on hardened cement paste and to extract the time-dependent properties. The effect of approximating C-S-H viscoelastic properties with a time-independent Poisson's ratio is discussed, and arguments for utilizing a time-independent Poisson's ratio for short-term response are presented. In evaluating AFM as a mechanical characterization tool, various analytical and numerical modeling approaches are compared. The disparities between the numerical self-consistent approach and analytical solutions are determined and reported. The measured elastic Young's modulus values acquired by AFM indentation tests are compared to Young's modulus values from nanoindentation measurements from cement paste. These results show that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of hydrated portland cement has different properties on the nanometric scale than on the micron scale. Packing density of C-S-H particles is proposed as an explanation for the disparity in the measured results. The AFM measured uniaxial viscoelastic compliance values are compared to similar values obtained with traditional nanoindentation for the same material. The comparison of these results shows that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of portland cement has similar but distinct properties on the sub micron scale than on the micron scale. Additionally, the effect of moisture is evaluated by controlling the relative humidity (RH) of the testing environment between 40% and 100% plus, or wet. The viscoelastic compliance appears to be highest at 40% RH and the material appears to be less compliant at higher relative humidity levels. Possible mechanisms controlling the viscoelastic deformation are presented and evaluated in conjunction with the moisture related poromechanical effect.

Jones, Christopher

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... especially around the main hydration peaks. ... at the main hydration peak) seems to create a ... Oil Well Cement, Cement and Concrete Research 40 ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - California Portland...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and plant benchmarking of energy using the ENERGY STAR cement plant energy performance indicator. CPC was among the inaugural group of companies to receive the ENERGY STAR...

13

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland Cement Concrete  

SciTech Connect

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Lower air temperatures decrease demand for cooling energy and slow the formation of urban smog. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo, though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed, but stabilized within six weeks of casting.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fe(II)-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) technology is the modification of conventional solidification/stabilization (S/S). Inorganic pollutants are immobilized by Fe(II)-DS/S while organic pollutants are destroyed. Experimental studies were conducted to identify the active agents for Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) degradation as well as the conditions that enhance the formation of the active agents in the Fe(II)-DS/S system. PCE was chosen as a model chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in this study. First, the conditions that lead to maximizing production of the active agents were identified by measuring the ability of various chemical mixtures to degrade PCE. Results showed that Fe(II), Fe(III), Ca, and Cl were the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement did not form the same solids as those with cement or cement extract. Ferrous hydroxide was identified as a major solid phase formed in systems without cement. Finally, the effect of using different types of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on PCE degradation rate during Fe(II)-DS/S was examined and the solids were examined by instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM-EDS). Four different OPC (Txi, Lehigh, Quikrete, and Capitol) showed different PCE degradation behaviors. Pseudo first-order kinetics was observed for Capitol and Txi OPC and second-order kinetics was observed for Quikrete. In the case of Lehigh cement, pseudo first-order kinetics was observed in cement slurry and second-order kinetics in cement extract. Calcium aluminum hydroxide hydrates dominated solids made with Txi, Quikrete, and Lehigh cements and FriedelÂ?s salt was the major phase found in solids made with Capitol cements. Fe tended to be associated with hexagonal thin plate particles, which were supposed to be a LDH.

Ko, Sae Bom

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of composition and exposure on the solar reflectance of Portland cement concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance (albedo) of a paved surface keeps it cooler in the sun, reducing convection of heat from pavement to air and thereby decreasing the ambient air temperature. Simulations of the influence of pavement albedo on air temperature in Los Angeles predict that increasing the albedo of 1,250 km2 of pavement by 0.25 would save cooling energy worth $15M yr-1, and reduce smog-related medical and lost-work expenses by $76M yr-1. Most sidewalks and a small fraction of roads and parking areas are paved with portland cement concrete, which can be made quite reflective through suitable choice of cement and aggregate. Variations with composition and environmental exposure of the albedos of portland cement concrete pavements were investigated through laboratory fabrication and exposure of 32 mixes of concrete. Twenty-four mixes yielded substandard, ''rough'' concretes due to high, unmet aggregate water demand. The albedos of the remaining eight ''smooth'' concrete mixes ranged from 0.41 to 0.77 (mean 0.59). Simulated weathering, soiling, and abrasion each reduced average concrete albedo (mean decreases 0.06, 0.05, and 0.19, respectively), though some samples became slightly more reflective through weathering or soiling. Simulated rain (wetting) strongly depressed the albedos of concretes (mean decrease 0.23) until their surfaces were dried. Concrete albedo grew as the cement hydration reaction progressed (mean increase 0.08), but stabilized within six weeks of casting. White-cement concretes were on average significantly more reflective than gray-cement concretes. The albedo of the most-reflective white-cement concrete was 0.18 to 0.39 higher than that of the most-reflective gray-cement concrete, depending on state of exposure. Concrete albedo generally correlated with cement albedo and sand albedo, and, after abrasion, with rock albedo. Cement albedo had a disproportionately strong influence on the reflectance of concrete. Efflorescence and surface carbonation whitened some gray-cement mixes.

Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

The effect of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The influence of gyrolite additive on the hydration properties of ordinary Portland cement was examined. It was found that the additive of synthetic gyrolite accelerates the early stage of hydration of OPC. This compound binds alkaline ions and serves as a nucleation site for the formation of hydration products (stage I). Later on, the crystal lattice of gyrolite becomes unstable and turns into C-S-H, with higher basicity (C/S {approx} 0.8). This recrystallization process is associated with the consumption of energy (the heat of reaction) and with a decrease in the rate of heat evolution of the second exothermic reaction (stage II). The experimental data and theoretical hypothesis were also confirmed by thermodynamic and the apparent kinetic parameters of the reaction rate of C{sub 3}S hydration calculations. The changes occur in the early stage of hydration of OPC samples and do not have a significant effect on the properties of cement stone.

Eisinas, A., E-mail: anatolijus.eisinas@ktu.lt; Baltakys, K.; Siauciunas, R.

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study relates the assessment of durability to ''early-opening-to-traffic'' (EOT) portland cement concrete (PCC). Several factors were identified relative to the performance of EOT PCC. Each of these factors was considered in terms of freeze-thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using utility decision theory was applied in evaluating the parameters. Promising combinations of the above factors were determined based on the existing knowledge of material combinations used for EOT PCC, coupled with our understanding of the potentials of high performance concrete (HPC) for this type of application.

Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Zinc electrode with cement additive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Recycling contaminated spent blasting abrasives in Portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology. Final research report  

SciTech Connect

The use of abrasive blasting to remove lead-based paint from steel bridges produces contaminated spent blasting abrasives that may be classified as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency. If the spent abrasives leach lead, chromium, and cadmium greater than the EPA limits, the spent abrasives are classified as hazardous and must be rendered nonhazardous prior to disposal. An alternative to disposing of spent blasting abrasives is to recycle them in an environmentally sound application. This study investigates the feasibility of recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars using solidification/stabilization technology to produce a usable construction material. Field application guidelines for recycling spent blasting abrasives in portland cement mortars are established based upon the results of this study.

Salt, B.K.; Carrasquillo, R.L.; Loehr, R.C.; Fowler, D.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste-form development for conversion to portland cement at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area 55 (TA-55)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process used at TA-55 to cement transuranic (TRU) waste has experienced several problems with the gypsum-based cement currently being used. Specifically, the waste form could not reliably pass the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) prohibition for free liquid and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) standard for chromium. This report describes the project to develop a portland cement-based waste form that ensures compliance to these standards, as well as other performance standards consisting of homogeneous mixing, moderate hydration temperature, timely initial set, and structural durability. Testing was conducted using the two most common waste streams requiring cementation as of February 1994, lean residue (LR)- and oxalate filtrate (OX)-based evaporator bottoms (EV). A formulation with a pH of 10.3 to 12.1 and a minimum cement-to-liquid (C/L) ratio of 0.80 kg/l for OX-based EV and 0.94 kg/L for LR-based EV was found to pass the performance standards chosen for this project. The implementation of the portland process should result in a yearly cost savings for raw materials of approximately $27,000 over the gypsum process.

Veazey, G.W.; Schake, A.R.; Shalek, P.D.; Romero, D.A.; Smith, C.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Daniel, J. (Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A comparative study of ordinary and mineralised Portland cement clinker from two different production units Part II: Characteristics of the calcium silicates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement clinkers from two production units were investigated in order to determine the effects of mineralisation on alite and belite; Plant 1: ordinary clinker (P1) and clinker mineralised with CaF{sub 2+}CaSO{sub 4} (P1m); Plant 2: ordinary clinker (P2) and two clinkers mineralised with CaF{sub 2+}CaSO{sub 4} (P2m, P2m'). The polymorphism of alite was studied using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), wavelength 1.5227 A, and electron diffraction (ED) in a transmission electron microscope. The substitutions of minor elements in alite and belite were determined using electron microprobe analysis. Clinkers P1 and P1m both contained apparent rhombohedral alite (XRD) with an incommensurately modulated structure (ED), while clinkers P2, P2m, and P2m' all contained monoclinic alite (XRD). The addition of mineralisers in the process caused increased content of fluoride in alite and increased substitution of Si(4+) by Al(3+) and S(6+) in both calcium silicates. The latter effect was most pronounced in clinker P1m due to its high molar SO{sub 3} to alkali oxide ratio (R=2.18). The improved hydraulic activity of P1m compared to P1 was caused by substitutions rather than a change in symmetry. The decreased hydraulic activity of P2m and P2m' compared to P2 was explained by the high levels of fluorine, which had a retarding effect on the hydration.

Emanuelson, Anna; Landa-Canovas, Angel R.; Hansen, Staffan

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Portland Cement Association Since its founding in 1916, the Portland Cement Association has had the same mission: "Improve and expand the uses of portland cement and concrete." The Cement Sustainability Initiative Coordinated by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) helps the cement industry address the challenges of sustainable development. The business leaders of a group of major cement companies lead the initiative. The GHG Protocol Initiative Coordinated in 1998 by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and the World Resources Institute, the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative (GHG Protocol) develops internationally-accepted accounting and reporting standards for greenhouse gas emissions from companies

28

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PCA), 1980. “1979 Energy Report U.S. Portland CementCement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department of1994). Energy Information Admininstration, U.S. Department

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Category:Portland, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OR OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Portland, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Portland OR... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Portland ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Portland... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Portlan... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Por... 72 KB SVOutPatient Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Portland ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

31

Category:Portland, ME | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ME ME Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Portland, ME" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 58 KB SVHospital Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVHospital Portland ME... 61 KB SVLargeHotel Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Portland ... 56 KB SVLargeOffice Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Portland... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Portlan... 59 KB SVMidriseApartment Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Por... 58 KB SVOutPatient Portland ME Bangor Hydro-Electric Co.png SVOutPatient Portland ...

32

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements Portland Cement Association Logo The Portland Cement Association has committed to a 10% reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton of cementitious product produced or sold from a 1990 baseline by 2020. The industry will achieve this goal and foster further reductions by end users of their product through the implementation of a 3-part program that focuses on the production process, the product cement manufacturers produce, and application of the product. Reductions from the first two elements of this plan will contribute to achieving the 10% reduction goal. While reductions from the product application element will not count towards the goal, the CO2-reduction benefits of cement and concrete use could be even more significant than those achieved through manufacturing

33

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

SciTech Connect

A process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this paper. Inexpensive cement is needed to grout abandoned in-situ retorts of spent shale for subsidence control, mitigation of leaching, and strengthening the retorted mass in order to recover oil from adjacent pillars of raw shale. A hydraulic cement was produced by heating a 1:1 mixture of Lurgi spent shale and CaCO{sub 3} at 1000 C for one hour. This cement would be less expensive than ordinary portland cement and is expected to fulfill the above requirements.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Small Business Cyber Security Workshop for Portland, Oregon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Portland District Office Small Business Cyber Security Workshop Portland District Office 601 SW Second Ave. Suite ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transit and Non-Motorized Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . Future Data SourcesPORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL Transportation System Performance Report June, 2008 #12;2007 Portland Metropolitan Region Transportation System

Bertini, Robert L.

36

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

38

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

City of Portland - Green Building Policy and LEED Certification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings City of Portland - Green Building Policy and LEED Certification City of Portland - Green Building Policy and...

40

EA-97-C Portland General Electric | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Order authorizing Portland General Electric to export electic energy to Canada EA-97-C Portland General Electric More Documents & Publications EA-342 Royal Bank of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Portland Public School Children Move with Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cement invasion  

SciTech Connect

Damage from cement and cement filtrate has been a much discussed subject since set-through-and-perforate completions were first used. Historically, much of the discussion was similar to that for rotary drilling and drilling mud - it would be nice to prevent all damage, but in the real world, some damage must be tolerated to allow the operator to reap the benefits of cementing. The principal perceived formation damage due to cement invasion is seen by the operator as reducing production. The pure idealist requires full potential production under all alternatives, and would to complete all oil and gas wells free of any formation damage. The more practical idealist holds that damage would result in lower production with the completion method he prefers should be prevented. The pragmatic operator compares the cost of preventing damage to the cost of correcting the damage. Even an extremely high damage ratio is academic if the planned stimulation treatment eliminates the influence the cement invasion might have on production. Formations with permeability high enough to yield economical production without some sort of stimulation or cleanup treatment are unlikely to be subject to significant cement filtrate damage.

Sutton, D.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry CalPortland New Westminster C4I Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Westminster Cement Terminal CalPortland Company 20 Capilano Way New Westminster, British Columbia V3L 5H2 The CalPortland Company New Westminster Cement Terminal opened for business in 1999. The terminal is located in New Westminster, BC and serves the surrounding markets including Vancouver. The terminal consists of two 600 ton storage silos, both pneumatic and mechanical conveying, and one truck loadout scale. The facility has space for 9 railcars, 6 gravity and 3 pneumatic railcars. The standard operating procedures were reviewed and new processes were put into place to minimize run time and maximize operating efficiencies. Additionally, the railcar fleet was rearranged to include more gravity than pneumatic railcars. Through excellent energy management practices the New

44

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diversifying Weatherization Workforce Diversifying Weatherization Workforce Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce May 6, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE As Recovery Act funds started flowing towards businesses in Oregon last year, stakeholders in Portland wanted to make sure some of the money landed in the hands of women, minorities and other underrepresented groups. A diverse group in itself, the stakeholders-made up of city officials, labor unions, civil rights organizations, nonprofits, faith-based organizations and contractors-signed the agreement as the Clean Energy Works Portland program got underway. The agreement ensures that those in disadvantaged communities have access to some of the weatherization jobs stemming from the pilot phase, which has almost 500 homes receiving

46

Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Institute of Transportation Studies Portland State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Transportation Studies Portland State University November 2007 Transit's Dirty Little Director, UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies #12;Institute of Transportation Studies Transit of Transportation Studies Fewer than 40 trips per capita since 1965 Trend in Transit Ridership Per Capita 1900

Bertini, Robert L.

48

Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Design of intelligent interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ubiquitous computing is transforming interior design by allowing utilities, goods and information to be delivered where and when we need them. How will new information technologies impact the design of interior spaces? ...

Bonanni, Leonardo Amerigo, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Portland, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Portland, OR) (Redirected from Portland, OR) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5234515°, -122.6762071° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5234515,"lon":-122.6762071,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

MHK Projects/Portland | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland Portland < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-37.3063,"lon":144.755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Portland, ME) (Redirected from Portland, ME) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.661471°, -70.2553259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.661471,"lon":-70.2553259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Portland General Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland General Electric Co Portland General Electric Co Place Oregon Service Territory Oregon Website www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Landing Page www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Reference Page energy.gov/articles/green Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15248 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

55

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods 1 June 2012 Financing and Incentives Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Key...

56

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) SolarWind Permitting Standards...

57

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) This is the approved revision of...

58

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive The City of Portland's...

59

Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

neighborhoods 1 June 2012 Workforce Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Key Takeaways Solicit ongoing feedback from...

60

Optically measuring interior cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

Stone, Gary Franklin (Livermore, CA)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Optically measuring interior cavities  

SciTech Connect

A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

Stone, Gary Franklin (Livermore, CA)

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Interior Design Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Companies Historic Preservation Agencies Hospitals Interior Design Firms/Studios Hotel Chains Cost Estimator Architect Manufacturer's Representative Schools Television and Motion Picture Studios Theatres Utilities

Ronquist, Fredrik

63

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System October 3, 2011 - 4:43pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system will help Portland Community College save on its energy bills and help achieve its energy efficiency and sustainability goals. Students at the College will also learn about the fuel cell technology used in the project as part of a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum offered by the school. "The benefits of a combined heat and power fuel cell system, coupled with

65

Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program Portland General Electric - Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $200 Provider Portland General Electric Portland General Electric's (PGE) Heat Pump Rebate Program offers residential customers a $200 rebate for an energy-efficient heat pump installed to PGE's standards by a PGE-approved contractor. The rebate is also available for replacing older, inefficient heat pump units. See the program web site or contact the utility for additional information on program incentives and guidelines. Other Information Heat pumps: 7.7 HSPF and 13 SEER minimum

66

2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Portland Workshop 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop On December 13, 2011, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Portland, OR to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The workshop flyer, agenda, presentations, and full transcript are available below. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2012 Western Workshops.pdf 12-13-11 CONGESTION WORKSHOP AGENDA - PORTLAND (final).pdf Introduction by David Meyer, DOE .pdf Presentation by Steve Oxley, WY PSC.pdf Presentation by Rich Bayless, NTTG.pdf Presentation by Susan Henderson, Xcel Energy.pdf Presentation by Marv Landauer, ColumbiaGrid.pdf Presentation by Steve Metague, PGE.pdf Presentation by Bradley Nickell, WECC.pdf

67

Portland General Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from PGE) (Redirected from PGE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Portland General Electric Co Place Oregon Service Territory Oregon Website www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Landing Page www.portlandgeneral.com/d Green Button Reference Page energy.gov/articles/green Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15248 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

68

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

69

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

70

City of Portland- Green Building Policy and LEED Certification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2001, the City of Portland adopted a Green Building Policy requiring new construction and major renovations of all city facilities to meet the Certified level of LEED. This policy was amended on...

71

2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/13/2013 1 © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand Response their usage. Demand Response ­ PGE Current Status 10 Automated Demand R

72

FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Portland, Oregon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland, Oregon Portland, Oregon FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Portland, Oregon October 7, 2013 - 2:46pm Addthis Image of the FUPWG logo which displays an illustration of Mount Hood. The logo reads On the Trail to Peak Energy Efficiency; FUPWG April 20-21, 2010; Portland, Oregon. April 19-21, 2011 Hosted by Bonneville Power Administration Tuesday, April 19, 2011 (Pre-Meeting) 8:30 am Welcome and Overview Curt Nichols, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) 9:00 am FEMP Introduction David McAndrew, Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) 9:00 am Overview of Available BPA Services Your Steps to Energy Savings Partners and Resources Curt Nichols, BPA 10:15 am Break 10:30 am General Services Administration (GSA) Assisted Acquisition Services Bob Campbell, GSA 11:00 am

73

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs February 22, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Laura Smoyer checks the net-metering device in her home, which now uses the sun for about 38 percent of its total energy use. | Department of Energy Photo | Joshua DeLung A quick Web search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become

74

The Visible Cement Dataset Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. The Visible Cement Dataset is a collection of three-dimensional data sets of hydrating cement, Plaster of Paris, and ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

A study of immobilization of four heavy metals by solidification/stabilization with portland cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two sites were established in Harris County, Texas, to relate seasonal saturation to soil morphology, micromorphology, soil reduction potential (Eh), and iron phases; and to test a,a'-dipyridyl dye for field identification of iron-reduction. The Wockley soil is a Plinthic Paleudalf and the Katy soil is an Aquic Paleudalf. Both soils have shallow fine sandy loam surface soils, and clay loam subsoils, overlying buried clayey soils. Field evidence of saturation consisted of low-chroma soil colors, mottling, and iron and manganese segregations. Ironstone nodules are plentiful in upper Bt horizons of the Wockley soil, and plinthite occurs. The Katy soil has distinct sand-silt coats on ped faces of Btg horizons. Micromorphology shows iron being actively reduced in the upper profiles of both soils, through destruction of nodules, the presence of cuffent pore and void linings; and some fine soft agglomerations in the Katy soil. Some iron nodules are not being reduced, having sharp boundaries to the matrix, or clay coatings or plugs covering the nodules. Active and inactive features can occur in the same horizons. Pore and void linings were the most indicative field characteristics of saturation in the Wockley soil, while the sand-silt coats on ped faces were convincing evidence of saturation and reduction in the Katy soil. Micromorphology showed that field evidence in these soils must be interpreted cautiously. The incidence of high rainfalls over the study period exceeded the expected probabilities, implying that rare high rainfall events or sequences of events promote saturation and reduction, but continuing high rainfalls suggest that climatic probabilities need to be more thoroughly documented. Manganese was reduced when soils were at or above field capacity. Iron reduction could not be checked when the Wockley soil was saturated. The E horizon of the Katy soil seems prone to reduction of iron when water tables are present. Poorly crystalline free iron was very low in both soils. Highly crystalline free iron was more prevalent in high-chroma segments of the soils. The cl,a'-dipyridyl dye could not be fully tested; however it did not give false positive readings.

Trussell, Susan A

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies September 15, 2009 -...

77

Portland Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home Portland Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home June 9, 2010 - 2:07pm Addthis Insulation is blown into the home of Roy and Kim Fox in Portland, Ore. EcoTech modified its equipment to avoid damaging the home, which was built in 1884. | Photo courtesy of Roy Fox | Insulation is blown into the home of Roy and Kim Fox in Portland, Ore. EcoTech modified its equipment to avoid damaging the home, which was built in 1884. | Photo courtesy of Roy Fox | Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy "Lots of people come to see our house but these people were here to see weatherization." Roy Fox, historic homeowner On most days, visitors traipsing up the doorsteps of Roy and Kim Fox's

78

City of Portland, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland Portland Place Michigan Utility Id 15246 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial Large General Service "LGS" Industrial Residential Service Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh Industrial: $0.0853/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Portland,_Michigan_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410130"

79

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

80

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. , "Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oilCO, April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROMUniversity of California. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas useTable 2. Cement Industry Electricity and Natural GasFigure 2. Cement Industry End Use Electricity Consumption

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydraulic behavior of calcium sulfoaluminate-based cements derived from industrial process wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of cements based on calcium sulfoaluminate (C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]) [In this paper, the notation adopted in cement chemistry, vis. C=CO, A=Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], [bar S]=SO[sub 3], S=SiO[sub 2], and H=H[sub 2]O, has been used.] requires lower firing temperatures and lower grinding energy, as compared to ordinary Portland cements (OPC). Some of these low-energy cements can be formulated in order to develop high early strength and other performances similar to OPC. Further interest towards these types of cements relies on the possibility of using industrial process wastes as raw materials for their manufacture. It has been found that a number of industrial wastes and by-products such as phosphogypsum, bauxite fines, fly ash and blast furnace slag, can be employed without negatively affecting the hydraulic behavior of cements of planned C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]:[beta]-C[sub 2]S:C[bar S] weight ratio 1.5:1:1. Blast furnace slag and fly ash can also be advantageously used as blending components of the fired products.

Beretka, J.; Sherman, N. (CSIRO, Highett, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Building); Vito, B. de (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Santoro, L. (Univ. degli Studi di Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica); Valenti, G.L. (Univ. degli Studi della Basillicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING SUMMER 2011 CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING SUMMER 2011 CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS PAGE 1 OF 5 University TERMS & CONDITIONS 1) Term of Contract: This Contract is binding upon signature. Failure to officially Session 2: July 16 ­ August 12, 2011 2) Definitions: For purposes of this Contract, the terms below have

Bertini, Robert L.

84

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING 2010-2011 CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING 2010-2011 CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS PAGE 1 OF 5 University TERMS & CONDITIONS 1) Term of Contract: This Contract is binding upon signature. All academic year not release Resident from the financial obligations of this Contract. ii) See Summer Contract for Summer term

Bertini, Robert L.

85

The influence of phosphorous pentoxide on the phase composition and formation of Portland clinker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of phosphorous pentoxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) on the phase composition and formation of Portland clinker was studied in laboratory conditions. Phosphorous pentoxide in the form of calcium phosphate was added to common cement-making raw meal in graded quantities up to 5 wt.%. The raw meal properties were studied by thermal analysis. The development of clinker formation by burning for periods ranging from 20 s to 30 min in a special semi-automatic oven with a manipulator was followed using light optical microscopy. The phase composition of clinkers burnt to equilibrium was quantified by the optical point counting method. The entry of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} into clinker minerals was determined by electron microprobe analyses. The laboratory tests show that at 0.7 wt.% of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the clinker the alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) content decreases and belite (Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) content increases. At a P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content of 4.5 wt.% alite formation was totally blocked and the resulting clinker contained free lime in equilibrium with belite.

Stanek, T., E-mail: stanek@vustah.cz [Research Institute of Building Materials, Hnevkovskeho 65, 617 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Sulovsky, P., E-mail: sulovsky@sci.muni.cz [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects June 4, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in the Portland area by this fall. A program developed by the city of Portland, Ore., is proving to be a model of public and private collaboration for large-scale home retrofit projects throughout the country. Clean Energy Works Portland (CEWP) seeks to cut energy costs for residents, create green jobs and slash greenhouse gases by retrofitting 500 homes in

87

BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

89

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work aims at recycling of the solid wastes of clay brick industry (WCB) in the manufacture of blended cement. The various characteristics of collected samples of the waste were determined. WCB was ground to different surface areas. Different mixes were designed from the WCB and ordinary Portland cement (OPC). After adding the required amount of water for each mix, the pastes were moulded in 5x5x5cm3 mould. The initial and final setting time were measured. The moulded specimens were cured at room temperature for 24hr, then demoulded and cured at water for the required testing time. The compressive strength for the hardened specimens was measured. The kinetic of the reaction was followed by determining free lime and chemically combined water contents. The obtained results were compared with OPC and different types of blended cement already existing in the market. The results clearly illustrate the suitability of WCB for the production of series of different types of blended cement (green products) having great impact on the energy saving moreover decreasing carbon dioxide content released during cement industry .

Amin, A. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for geothermal well completions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials formed by acid-base reactions between calcium aluminate compounds and phosphate-containing solutions yield high strength, low permeability and CO{sub 2}-resistant cements when cured in hydrothermal environments. The cementing formulations are pumpable at temperatures up to 150{degrees}C. thereby making their use for well completions technically feasible. When this cementing matrix was exposed in an autoclave containing Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3},-saturated brine for 120 days. <0.4 wt% CaCO{sub 3} was produced. A conventional portland cement-based well completion material will form {approximately}10 wt% CACO, after only 7 days exposure. The addition of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres to the uncured matrix constituents yields slurries with densities as low as {approximately} 1.2 g/cc which cure to produce materials with properties meeting die criteria for well cementing. These formulations also exhibit low rates of carbonation. Laboratory characterization is nearing completion. engineering scale-up is underway, and plans for field testing in a variety of geothermal fluids are being made.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyConcepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energyor Photo: Waste heat recovery at cement plant, image taken

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Cementing horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of horizontal drilling, most completions have been open hole. Open-hole or slotted-liner completions may be satisfactory in straight, thick formations, if stimulation is not required. But if the wellbore wanders out of the reservoir, whether due to loss of directional control or spotty knowledge of formation dimensions, casing becomes a necessity. In addition, a wellbore that stays in the formation but comes uncomfortably close to the water-oil contact or gas cap requires casing to prevent coning. Further, if stimulation is anticipated, or may become a necessity, it is essential that the hole be cased and cemented. Otherwise, there is no control of the stimulation treatment. Even if the horizontal wellbore itself does not require casing, intermediate casing in the high-angle hole is needed. This is especially critical in open-hole completions below a gas cap, for example. The keys to effective horizontal cementing are fundamentally the same as for cementing vertical wells: proper centralization of casing in the bore-hole to ensure efficient mud removal and well-designed cement slurries.

Baret, F.; Griffin, T.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Welcome to Portland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Welcome to Portland Mike Weedall Vice President for Energy Efficiency Bonneville Power Administration FUPWG Spring Meeting Portland, Oregon April 20-21, 2011 Slide 2 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Bonneville Power Slide 3 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BPA's Service Area Slide 4 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Energy Efficiency Pays * BPA helps our customers encourage energy

95

Cementation and solidification of miscellaneous mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site produces a variety of wastes which are amenable to micro-encapsulation in cement Portland cement is an inexpensive and readily available material for this application. The Waste Projects (WP) group at Rocky Flats evaluated cementation to determine its effectiveness in encapsulating several wastes. These included waste analytical laboratory solutions, incinerator ash, hydroxide precipitation sludge, and an acidic solution from the Delphi process (a chemical oxidation technology being evaluated as an alternative to incineration). WP prepared surrogate wastes and conducted designed experiments to optimize the cement formulation for the waste streams. These experiments used a Taguchi or factorial experimental design, interactions between the variables were also considered in the testing. Surrogate waste samples were spiked with various levels of each of six Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed metals (Cd, Cr, Ba, Pb, Ni, and Ag), cemented using the optimized formulation, and analyzed for leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The metal spike levels chosen were based on characterization data, and also based on an estimate of the highest levels of contaminants suspected in the waste. This paper includes laboratory test results for each waste studied. These include qualitative observations as well as quantitative data from TCLP analyses and environmental cycling studies. The results from these experiments show that cement stabilization of the different wastes can produce final waste forms which meet the current RCRA Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements. Formulations that resulted in LDR compliant waste forms are provided. The volume increases associated with cementation are also lower than anticipated. Future work will include verification studies with actual mixed radioactive waste as well as additional formulation development studies on other waste streams.

Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Climate VISION: News and Events - Cement - First Cement Plants...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

in the top 25 percent nationally using EPA's ENERGY STAR Cement Plant Energy Performance Indicator (EPI). EPA's national energy performance rating system, developed in...

99

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry CalPortland...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with energy efficiency in mind by installing mechanical conveying systems instead of high energy intensity pneumatic systems. During times of economic slowdown, CalPortland's...

100

Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

> Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs LShapton's picture Submitted by LShapton(9) Member 28 August, 2013 - 16:09 Portland General Electric has issued an RFP for marketing and supply...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Interior design for passive solar homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

Breen, J. C.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis Software. Description/Summary: ... Type of software: Analysis Software of Water-to-Cement Distance Analysis. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

Odell, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Oregon www the benefits of the System- Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM) system implemented in the Portland Metropolitan northbound I-5 or northbound OR-217. Archival data does not include vehicle inflows to the ramp or metering

Bertini, Robert L.

108

China's Cement Production:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of CO Estimation of CO 2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties Jing Ke, Michael McNeil, Lynn Price, Nina Zheng Khanna, Nan Zhou Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 57, Pages 172-181, June 2013 January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6329E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

109

INTERIOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l and d i l a t a t i o n a l f i r s t m o t i o n s were r e c o r d e d f o r t h e 1 6 a f t e r s h o c k s i n d i c a t e s t h a t a s i m p l e , volume change d i d n o t...

110

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energywaste heat recovery for electricity production in cement plants

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Generalized fuzzy interior ideals in semigroups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the idea of quasi-coincidence of a fuzzy point with a fuzzy set, the concept of an (@a,@b)-fuzzy interior ideal, which is a generalization of a fuzzy interior ideal, in a semigroup is introduced, and related properties are investigated. Keywords: (?,?)-Fuzzy interior ideal, Belong to, Fuzzy algebra, Quasi-coincident with

Young Bae Jun; Seok Zun Song

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

High resolution non-contact interior profilometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for inspecting the interior surfaces of devices such as vessels having a single entry port. Laser energy is launched into the vessel, and the light reflected from the interior surfaces is interfered with reference laser energy to produce an interference pattern. This interference pattern is analyzed to reveal information about the condition of the interior surfaces of the device inspected.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Patterson, R. Alan (Los Alamos, NM); Leeches, Gerald W. (Los Alamos, NM); Nierop, John Van (Largo, FL); Teti, John J. (Tampa, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambuja Cements Limited Ambuja Cements Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited Place Mumbai, India Zip 400 021 Sector Biomass Product Indian cement company. the company installed a 24MW biomass based captive electric generating stations that will provide electricity to Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limitedâ€(tm)s (“GACL”) facility in Ropar, Punjab. References Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited is a company located in Mumbai, India . References ↑ "Gujarat Ambuja Cements Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gujarat_Ambuja_Cements_Limited&oldid=346290

114

Extraction of hydrogenous material from cemented wasteforms by supercritical fluid carbonation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous and/or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice at LANL for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with portland cement, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wasteforms do not qualify for transportation or underground disposition, however, because they do not meet Department of Energy regulations for free liquids, decay heat, and/or head-space gases. The present treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented wasteform by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced levels of free liquids and organic compounds, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories.

Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.W.; Taylor, C.M.V.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interior Construction Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Construction Renovations Interior Construction Renovations Interior Construction Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Interior Construction Renovations Daylighting Passive Solar Heating Solar Water Heating (SWH) Solar Ventilation Air Preheating When a renovation realigns the interior space in a Federal building, proper design of the new space can take advantage of a number of energy technologies. Primarily, the new interior construction should be developed in conjunction with daylighting design to maximize the use of natural light in the space and minimize glare or other lighting issues that affect performance. Passive solar heating, solar water heating (SWH), solar ventilation air preheating, and energy efficiency technologies can also be considered for interior construction renovations.

116

Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013 Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013 at 5:00 PM PDT Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs LShapton's picture Submitted by LShapton(9) Member 28 August, 2013 - 15:09 Portland General Electric has issued an RFP for marketing and supply for its voluntary renewable energy program. Bidders may bid on the marketing or supply portions of the RFP or both. Intent to bid is due September 3, 2013. Date: Wednesday, 28 August, 2013 - 00:00 - Tuesday, 3 September, 2013 - 17:00 Groups: Renewable Energy RFPs Login to post comments Latest event comments No comments have been made yet Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Past group events Aug 27 2013 Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September 3, 2013

117

Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies September 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu today awarded more than $1.3 million to Ocean Renewable Power Company in Portland, Maine to improve the efficiency, flexibility, and environmental performance of hydroelectric energy. The investment will further the nation's supply of domestic clean hydroelectricity through technological innovation and will advance research to maximize the nation's largest renewable energy source. "Hydropower is our largest source of renewable energy and it can play an even bigger role in the further. These investments will create jobs, cut

118

The Determination of Appropriate Phosphogypsum: Class C Fly Ash: Portland Type II Cement Compositions for Use in Marine Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Phosphogypsum (PG, CaSO4·2H2O) is a waste by-product produced during the wet manufacturing phosphoric acid process. Phosphoric acid is manufactured by processing phosphate rock that contains… (more)

Deshpande, Pradyot Sudhakar

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tomography of the Solar Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar oscillations consist of a rich spectrum of internal acoustic waves and surface gravity waves, stochastically excited by turbulent convection. They have been monitored almost continuously over the last ten years with high-precision Doppler images of the solar surface. The purpose of helioseismology is to retrieve information about the structure and the dynamics of the solar interior from the frequencies, phases, and amplitudes of solar waves. Methods of analysis are being developed to make three-dimensional images of subsurface motions and temperature inhomogeneities in order to study convective structures and regions of magnetic activity, like sunspots.

Gizon, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tomography of the Solar Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar oscillations consist of a rich spectrum of internal acoustic waves and surface gravity waves, stochastically excited by turbulent convection. They have been monitored almost continuously over the last ten years with high-precision Doppler images of the solar surface. The purpose of helioseismology is to retrieve information about the structure and the dynamics of the solar interior from the frequencies, phases, and amplitudes of solar waves. Methods of analysis are being developed to make three-dimensional images of subsurface motions and temperature inhomogeneities in order to study convective structures and regions of magnetic activity, like sunspots.

L. Gizon

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry CalPortland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 th 1999 with three small silos and enough track to hold thirty-two 100 ton cement rail cars. The terminal now has 5 silos and 2 sets of loop track to hold 9600 tons of cement...

124

Special Session on Internal Dose at HPS Meeting in Portland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2006, the most recent of the usually quadrennial European internal dosimetry meetings was held in Montpellier, France. Based on questions and discussions at that meeting, Health Physics Society (HPS) Past President Ray Guilmette of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) organized and cochaired with Keith Eckerman a special session onCurrent Topics in Internal Dose Assessment.” For a session scheduled on the last day of the Annual HPS Meeting in Portland, Oregon, one might not expect a huge turnout. However, the session was intense and riveting, with well over 100 people at the beginning, and perhaps 60 holding on until well after noon, after the official ending of the meeting. First, Guilmette invited six of our best and brightest in the internal dosimetry and dose reconstruction community. Then he challenged each to answer five questions on assessment or reconstruction of doses due to intakes of radionuclides: Who is the customer (for the dose assessment)? What are the rules and constraints for the dose assessment? What are the appropriate methods, models, and calculation techniques? What are the dose endpoints? How are uncertainties handled?

Strom, Daniel J.

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

125

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Interior Lighting Good Design...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Regulations Resource Center AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Interior Lighting Good Design Practice The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office...

126

Sensory study in restaurant interior design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to five senses, sight, smell, taste, hearing, and haptic, sight receives the most attention in restaurant interior design; however, the other senses are significant… (more)

Yu, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mapping the Interior of Nanocrystals in Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Nanocrystals in Depth Complex, three-dimensional images of the interior of a nanocrystal have, for the first time, been obtained by researchers employing a new technique:...

128

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production of a Portland Cement substitute, and (2) utilization of CO 2 in carbonation chemistry as a binding phase - Traditional Portland Cement production: - Solidia Cement...

130

Lloyd Crossing Sustainable Urban Design Plan and Catalyst Project - Portland, Oregon [2005 EDRA/Places Award -- Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban Design Plan and Catalyst Project—Portland, Oregonsensitivity. The associated Catalyst Project attempts toUrban Design Plan and Catalyst Project—Jury Comments Brager:

Hayter, Jason Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications in the Cement Industry. ” Mineral Engineering Cement  Production,” Cement Industry Technical Conference, gearless mill drive,” Cement Industry Technical Conference, 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cementing temperatures for deep-well production liners  

SciTech Connect

Temperature of cement is an important factor in properly cementing deep well production liners, yet current methods of determining cement temperatures do not account for all variables. In this paper a computer model predicts temperatures of cement while pumping and while waiting on cement, compares computed and measured temperatures, defines the importance of certain cementing variables on temperatures, and provides an explanation of difficulties encountered while cementing liner tops.

Wooley, G.R.; Galate, J.W.; Giussani, A.P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Sun's Interior Metallicity Constrained by Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observed solar neutrino fluxes are employed to constrain the interior composition of the Sun. Including the effects of neutrino flavor mixing, the results from Homestake, Sudbury, and Gallium experiments constrain the Mg, Si, and Fe abundances in the solar interior to be within a factor 0.89 to 1.34 of the surface values with 68% confidence. If the O and/or Ne abundances are increased in the interior to resolve helioseismic discrepancies with recent standard solar models, then the nominal interior Mg, Si, and Fe abundances are constrained to a range of 0.83 to 1.24 relative to the surface. Additional research is needed to determine whether the Sun's interior is metal poor relative to its surface.

Guillermo Gonzalez

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Portland General Electric Company Renewable Energy RFP , Deadline Sept 28, 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portland General Electric Company Portland General Electric Company REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Issued: August 22, 2001 INTRODUCTION Portland General Electric Company (PGE) is requesting bid proposals for retail marketing services and renewable power or tradable renewable credits (TRCs) sufficient to meet the needs of PGE customer enrollments for the period from March 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003. Proposals are due by 5:00 p.m. on September 28, 2001. Pursuant to the Oregon Public Utility Commission (OPUC) adoption of Portfolio Options contained in ORS 757.603(2), OAR 860-038-0220 (refer to OPUC Order 01-337 at http://www.puc.state.or.us/orders/2001ords/01-337.pdf.) PGE is seeking to purchase Marketing Services and Renewable Energy or TRCs in support of the Company's portfolio option offers of

136

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Soyoung Ahn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating the Benefits of a System-Wide Adaptive Ramp-Metering Strategy in Portland, Oregon-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM) system is being implemented in the Portland metropolitan area, replacing the previous pre-timed ramp-metering system. SWARM has been deployed on six major corridors and operates during

Bertini, Robert L.

137

Interior Communication from the Subtropical to the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The communication from the subtropical gyre interior to the Tropics is examined using wind stress datasets and results from an ocean data assimilation system. It is shown that the interior communication can be clarified by a simple interior mass ...

Rui Xin Huang; Qi Wang

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Sun's meridional circulation and interior magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a magnetic ?eld in the sun’s radiative interior,” Nature,The sun’s meridional circulation and interior magnetic ?eldthe radiative interior of the sun under- goes nearly uniform

McCaslin, Jeremy; Garaud, Pascale; Wood, Toby

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Interior Space Conditioning . . . . . . . . . .HumanControl in Interior Space Conditioning Problem DescriptionMechanism of Interior Space Conditioning System . . . . . .

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pack Cementation Aluminizing of Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Partial list of commercial applications of pack cementation aluminizing...Carbon and stainless steels Steam power and cogeneration Waterwall tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Fluidized bed combustor tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Waste heat boiler tubes Carbon steel Economizer and air preheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Superheater tubes 2 % Cr-1% Mo steel Aerospace (a) Turbine blades...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Definition: Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cement Bond Log A representation of the integrity of the cement job, especially whether the cement is adhering solidly to the outside of the casing. The log is typically obtained from one of a variety of sonic-type tools. The newer versions, called cement evaluation logs, along with their processing software, can give detailed, 360-degree representations of the integrity of the cement job, whereas older versions may display a single line representing the integrated integrity around the casing.[1] Related Terms Acoustic Logs References ↑ Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

142

Departments of Energy and Interior Award Nearly $17 Million for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Energy and Interior Award Nearly 17 Million for Advanced Hydropower Technologies Departments of Energy and Interior Award Nearly 17 Million for Advanced Hydropower...

143

Some Interior Observations of Southeastern Montana Hailstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates some of the characteristics or the interior regions of several hailstorms penetrated by the armored T-28 aircraft during the 1981 CCOPE field project. The vertical wind data were analyzed to identify updraft and downdraft ...

Dennis J. Musil; Sundar A. Christopher; Regina A. Deola; Paul L. Smith

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

U.S. Department of Interior Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Interior Overview Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Mary Heying Department of the Interior Office of Acquisition and Property Management April 2008 2 DOI Mission DOI's mission is to: Protect and provide access to our Nation's natural and cultural heritage and honor our trust responsibilities to Indian Tribes and our commitments to island communities. DOI Bureaus Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation Minerals Management Service National Park Service Office of Surface Mining U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service U.S. Geological Survey 3 DOI Bureaus 4 5 DOI Owned Assets * Interior's Owned Assets - 48,000 Buildings * Office Buildings * Visitor Centers * Schools * Dormitories * Laboratories * Detention Centers * Historical Buildings &

145

INTERIOR-POINT METHODS FOR NONCONVEX NONLINEAR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 4, 2005 ... problem is not convex, the algorithm will be searching for a local optimum. ..... the terms in the barrier objective of our infeasible interior-point method. ..... In order to enter dual feasibility restoration mode, we monitored the ...

146

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Results Technology Pathways Cement - Results No measured results exist...

148

Scanning electron microscopy imaging of hydraulic cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement clinker is manufactured from a finely-ground, homogenized blend of limestone, shale and iron ore sintered in a rotary kiln to temperatures ...

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the availability of energy audits. Barriers to Energywith an energy manager program, these audits could helpenergy-efficiency projects particular to the cement industry, audits

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portland State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portland State University Oct 14, 2009 #12;Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money James Whiteneck #12;Intelligent Transportation Systems: Saving Lives, Time and Money Portal archives a large amount of data Over

Bertini, Robert L.

153

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING 2013-2014 PROPOSED CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING 2013-2014 PROPOSED CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS PAGE 1 OF 6 HOUSING CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS 1) Term of Contract: This Contract is binding upon signature (for not release Resident from the financial obligations of this Contract. ii. See Summer Contract for Summer term

Bertini, Robert L.

154

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China Title Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in...

155

FLSmidth Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. and Titan Florida Cement Teaming Profile cover page of document FLSmidth reduces energy at processing facilities saving Titan Florida Cement 55,000 annually. FLSmidth...

156

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodolog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the need to understand the uncertainty of current estimates of cement emissions in China. This paper compares several methodologies for calculating CO2 emissions from cement...

157

Winds at an Interior Alaska Summit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One purpose of this study was to compare anemometer-based average wind speeds at a well-exposed interior Alaskan summit with those deduced from local rawinsonde data at the same summit altitude. The second purpose was to evaluate the wind power ...

Tunis Wentink Jr.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

Sugama, T.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

160

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialNo. 16000393, September 9. Energy Technology Support Unit (of China (ITIBMIC). Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalJ. B. , "Simulated effects of oil-shale development on the

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Proper centralizers can improve horizontal well cementing  

SciTech Connect

The selection and spacing of appropriate centralizers can improve the cementation of high-angle and horizontal wells. Mud removal is one of the most important factors in obtaining a good cement job. Effective centralization assists in mud removal and helps ensure an even cement coat around the casing. Centralizers for horizontal wells have to fulfill two requirements: They should have a high restoring capability and a low moving force, and they should allow pipe rotation and reciprocation. Conventional bow-type centralizers have been used successfully in some horizontal wells. But as the horizontal section length increases, special centralizers, such as low-moving-force, bow-type centralizers and rigid centralizers, may be necessary. The paper describes the following: cementing liners, centralization, torque and drag, centralizer placement, the bow-type centralizer, the rigid centralizer, and the downhole activated centralizer.

Kinzel, H. (Weatherford Oil Tool, Langenhagen (Germany))

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A nanochemomechanical investigation of carbonated cement paste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete, and in particular its principal component, cement paste, has an interesting relation with carbon dioxide. Concrete is a carbon dioxide generator-- it is estimated that 5-10% of atmospheric CO? comes from this ...

Vanzo, James (James F.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. ; and ( 3) an Energy Guide (prepared by LBNL),for Cement Making: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantenergy-efficiency measures in the Focus industry. The Guide

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p. 54S,Colorado's primary oil shale resource for vertical modifiedSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

Mehta, P.K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Recent Advances in Modeling Stellar Interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: 1) updates to input physics of stellar models; 2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; 3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid gamma Dor/delta Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as eta Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

Guzik, Joyce Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fire Tests of Amtrak Passenger Rail Vehicle Interiors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Fire Tests of Amtrak Passenger Rail Vehicle Interiors R. D. Peacock E. Braun Center for Fire Research National ...

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG  

SciTech Connect

The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microsoft Word - DOE Congestion Workshop Portland 12-13-11 Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 4 5 6 NATIONAL ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION STUDY 7 WORKSHOP 8 9 10 Portland, Oregon 11 Tuesday, December 13, 2011 12 13 14 2 PARTICIPANTS: 1 Welcome and Presentation: 2 DAVID MEYER 3 U.S. Department of Energy 4 5 Panel 1 Regulators: 6 7 PHILIP B. JONES 8 Washington Utilities & Transportation 9 Commission 10 11 STEVE OXLEY 12 Wyoming Public Service Commission 13 14 JOHN SAVAGE 15 Oregon Public Utilities Commission 16 17 MARSHA SMITH 18 Idaho Public Utilities Commission 19 20 Panel 2 Industry: 21 22 RICH BAYLESS 23 TEPPC Representative, Pacificorp/Northern 24

175

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P.Cement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,203 (1974), E. D. York, Amoco Oil Co. , letter to J, P. Fox,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 to 40% of the oil shale, and explosively rubblizing andCEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,

Mehta, P.K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater sandstones: North Sea. This study attempts to make a large-scale regional examination of the distribution of carbonate cements

Haszeldine, Stuart

178

Portland State University Standard Terms and Conditions for the Purchase of Goods and Services, Effective July 1, 2004 Ts & Cs Goods and Services-1.DOC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland State University Standard Terms and Conditions for the Purchase of Goods and Services, Effective July 1, 2004 Ts & Cs Goods and Services-1.DOC PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY STANDARD TERMS, including but not limited to the Invitation to Bid or Request for Proposal and its specifications, terms

Lafferriere, Gerardo

179

Portland General Electric Company Second Revision of Sheet No. 7-1 P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Canceling First Sheet No. 7-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland General Electric Company Second Revision of Sheet No. 7-1 P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Canceling on and after January 1, 2003 #12;Portland General Electric Company First Revision of Sheet No. 7-2 PWh in addition to Energy Charge Renewable Usage 0.800¢ per kWh in addition to Energy Charge Fixed Renewable $3

180

Lithium, Potassium, and Sodium Additions to Cement Pastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cement and Concrete Research 2004, 34, 2045-2056. 16. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. CRC Press, 1987. 17. ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Temperature Cements High Temperature Cements Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High Temperature Cements Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

182

New and Underutilized Technology: Interior LED/Solid State Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior LED/Solid State Lighting Interior LED/Solid State Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Interior LED/Solid State Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for interior LED/solid state lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Interior LED retrofits are currently viable for down lights, track lighting, sconces, and both line and low voltage task lighting. Replacements for incandescent A-lamps have also been improving rapidly. Replacements for fluorescent tube lighting may be viable for high-cost maintenance areas. Application Interior LED/solid state lighting is a rapidly improving technology currently most applicable for down lights, track lights, task lighting, accenting, high ceiling, and high cost maintenance areas.

183

Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association, Canadian Pulp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Industrial Consumption of Energy, and the Quarterly Report of Energy Supply and Demand 3. Annual Canada (NRCan): 1. Annual Survey of Manufacturers (ASM, from STC) 2. Industrial Consumption of Energy consistent source of historical data related to energy consumption in all Canadian industry by region

184

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Natural Gas Consumption Energy Use Type GWh per year, electricity MW, electricity Million therms per year, natural gas California U.S.gas consumption. Table 2 compares cement industry electricity and natural gas use for California and the U.S.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Matrix-free Interior Point Method for Compressed Sensing Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 27, 2012 ... Matrix-free Interior Point Method for Compressed Sensing Problems. Kimon Fountoulakis (K.Fountoulakis ***at*** sms.ed.ac.uk) Jacek Gondzio ...

186

Information Geometry and Primal-Dual Interior-point Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 14, 2010 ... Abstract: In this paper, we study polynomial-time interior-point algorithms in view of information geometry. We introduce an information ...

187

Alaska Region Offshore GIS Data The US Department of Interior...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Offshore GIS Data The US Department of Interior's (DOI) Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) published GIS data of offshore information for...

188

FULL NESTEROV-TODD STEP INTERIOR-POINT METHODS FOR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the unified study of IPMs (Interior-Point Methods) for symmetric cones [4]. ...... the (mutually orthogonal with respect to the trace inner product) components of the.

189

Institute of Computer Science Primal interior point method for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Primal interior point method for minimization of generalized minimax functions.

190

Chapter 26: Earth's Interior Did you read chapter 26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between science and "not science" How do we know anything about the Earth's Interior? Direct · Resulting shadow zone is bowl-

Hart, Gus

191

Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How to Cite. Tshudy, J. A. (1995), Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior products. J Vinyl Addit Technol, 1: 155–158. doi: ...

192

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such...

193

1 ISFNT-10, Portland, OR, September 12-16, 2011 Overview of the Design and R&D of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of first wall components. - Full replacement of FW at least once over ITER lifetime - Remote Handling Class required for leak localization (2 valves per circuit). #12;Blanket Remote Handling ISFNT-10, Portland lifetime (designed for 15,000 cycles). - Both are designed for remote handling replacement (FW: RH Class 1

Raffray, A. René

194

Portland General Electric Company P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Original Sheet No. 86-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service that allows participating Consumers an opportunity to voluntarily reduce their Electricity usagePortland General Electric Company P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Original Sheet No. 86-1 Advice No. 00-14A participating Consumers of the opportunity to reduce Energy usage. AVAILABLE In all territory served

195

Portland General Electric Company P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Original Sheet No. 88-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

participating Consumers an opportunity to voluntarily reduce Electricity usage to a Company-determined levelPortland General Electric Company P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Original Sheet No. 88-1 SCHEDULE 88 LOAD Nonresidential Consumers receiving Electricity Service under Schedules 83 and/or 583 from one or more Point

196

Goal 4 Long Life Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies-Rigid: Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexural Fatigue Life of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Beamsperformance of Fast-Setting Hydraulic Cement Concrete (and Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete Mixes”,

Kohler, Erwin R.; Ali, Abdikarim; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the cement industryprice of electricity paid by the cement industry in 2009 isElectricity Conservation Supply Curve for the Cement Industry .

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Indian Country Energy & Infrastructure Working Group, Sept. 10-11, 2013, Portland, Maine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 10-11, 2013 September 10-11, 2013 DOUBLETREE HOTEL 363 Maine Mall Road Portland, Maine 207-775 6161 AGENDA TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013 CONFERENCE ROOM: WHALEBACK 9:00 - 9:30 a.m. REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST (Hot breakfast will be provided onsite.) 9:30 - 10:00 a.m. WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS Opening Prayer by ICEIWG Tribal Leader Pilar Thomas, Acting Director, U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy (IE) & DOE ICEIWG co-chair Chief Joseph Socobasin, Passamaquoddy Tribe at Indian Township, ICEIWG member and meeting co-host  Attendee Introductions  Overview of Agenda and Meeting Goals  Review of Past Meeting Summary and ICEIWG Accomplishments to Date 10:00 - 10:30 a.m. ICEIWG UPDATES AND GENERAL DISCUSSION  Individual ICEIWG Member Updates and Report-Out

199

Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels  

SciTech Connect

The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CS’s corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PROJECT: LOM 437 Interior Build Out  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT: PROJECT: LOM 437 Interior Build Out - LOCATION: 9700 South Cass Avenue Lemont, IL 60439 M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Trinidad Litgen West Elsdon Trinidad Hill/Ahern x x x x x x McCauley x x x x x McCauley x x x x x McCauley x x x x x x x x x x x x x x West Elsdon x x x x x x x x Trinidad x x Trinidad D&M x x McCauley x x x x x x x McCauley x x x x x x x West Elsdon x x x x x x x Trinidad x x x x x D&M x x Trinidad x x x x x West Elsdon x x x x West Elsdon x x x x Trinidad x x x Frame hallway walls in pentagons A, B, D & E Install duct work in pentagons D & E Install piping in pentagons D & E Rough in electrical for floor boxes Complete Install insulation in Pentagons D&E Complete Complete Commets SUBCONTRACTOR Relocated sprinkler line for mechanical rough in Pentagons A & B DESCRIPTION OF WORK Above ceiling electrical in Pentagons D & E

202

Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project  

SciTech Connect

The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Bond Log Cement Bond Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cement Bond Log Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Acoustic Logs Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 0.8585 centUSD 8.5e-4 kUSD 8.5e-7 MUSD 8.5e-10 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 1.25125 centUSD 0.00125 kUSD 1.25e-6 MUSD 1.25e-9 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 3.00300 centUSD 0.003 kUSD 3.0e-6 MUSD 3.0e-9 TUSD / foot Time Required Low-End Estimate: 0.35 days9.582478e-4 years 8.4 hours 0.05 weeks 0.0115 months / job

204

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends October 29, 2013 - 1:15pm Addthis Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends Learn more To learn more about this research, read the full report, An Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells. Full report on NETL's website. As we meander down the sidewalk, how many of us give more than a passing thought to the cement underfoot? For the most part, it's just another flat surface, a means to an end, whether it leads us to a coffee shop, book store, or parking lot. But when it's puckered, chipped, or crumbling, we certainly think about its need for repair.

205

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, September 1999 (PDF 330 KB) Download Acrobat Reader Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost-Saving Opportunities for Cement Making, an ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, January 2004 (PDF 471 KB). Download Acrobat Reader This report presents information on the opportunities for energy and cost savings in a cement plant and assists energy and plant managers to strategically manage energy. Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities for the Cement Industry, BCS,

206

Chloride Ion Diffusion in Cement-Based Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... into Hardened Cement Paste , Fly Ash, Silica Fume ... Diffusion Cell: Effects of Material and Test ... LJ, and Yu, SW, Diffusion in Cementitious Materials: II ...

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

208

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Work Plans  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

NewsEvents Contact Us CEMENT Letters of IntentAgreements Work Plans GHG Information Energy Footprints Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical...

209

Estimation of the degree of hydration of blended cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The minimum particle size measured was 1 JUn. Air dispersion and laser scattering techniques were used. cement atw/c=0.4. ...

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The use of gasification ash in cement and concrete.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cement is an essential material in todays society because, as a major constituent of concrete, it forms a fundamental element of any housing or… (more)

Du Plessis, Hanli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Secondary menu...

213

Background on the 2011 Cement EPI Update | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through informed and realistic goal setting. Download the Measuring Improvment in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry report here. Energy Efficient Products...

214

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 e. Ningguo Cement Plant 9100KW Waste Heat Recovery andof the surveyed cement plants have waste heat recovery powerWaste Heat Recovery, and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) for Large Motors/Fans in 35 Cement Plants

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Birch, E. 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,”11 C. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-26 B. Benchmarking and Energy-Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement industry using energy conservation supply curves (energy conservation supply curve for Shandong’s cement industry,Energy Conservation Supply Curve This part of the analysis of Shandong’s cement industry

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyM. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” Energy

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andin clinker production. If oil shale is burned separately,in cement production. Assuming that oil shale replaces 8

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,eworrellt@lbl.gov. End Notes Energy Efficiency Improvementthe Cement Industry: An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Energy and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Departments of Energy and Interior Announce $26.6 Million in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Announce 26.6 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced Hydropower Technologies Departments of Energy and Interior Announce 26.6 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced...

225

U.S. Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Interior Announce Site for Solar Energy Demonstration Projects in the Nevada Desert U.S. Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar Energy Demonstration...

226

United States Department of Interior | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interior Interior Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Department of Interior Name United States Department of Interior Address 1849 C Street NW Place Washington, District of Columbia Year founded 1849 Website http://www.doi.gov/index.cfm Coordinates 38.8936749°, -77.0425236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8936749,"lon":-77.0425236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes Interior Department Solicits Grant Proposals from Tribes January 9, 2014 - 11:11am Addthis On December 23, Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Kevin K. Washburn announced that the U.S. Department of the Interior's (DOI's) Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is soliciting grant proposals from Indian Tribes and Alaska Native regional and village corporations for projects to 1) build tribal capacity for energy resource development and 2) promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Tribal Energy Development Capacity-Building Grant Proposals Applications Due: February 18, 2014 Eligible Entities: Federally recognized Tribes, including Alaska Native

228

Property:Building/InteriorHeight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building/InteriorHeight Building/InteriorHeight Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Interior height, m Pages using the property "Building/InteriorHeight" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.8 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.2 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 3 +

229

Estimates of Power Consumed by Mixing in the Ocean Interior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much attention has focused on the power required for driving mixing processes in the ocean interior, the thermohaline circulation, and the related meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Recent estimates range from roughly 0.5 to 2 TW (1 TW = 1 ...

Louis St. Laurent; Harper Simmons

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

LBNL-4417E Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-4417E Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images K. Konis, E.S. Lee, R.D....

231

Edens islands rooms : the project of the urban interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The privately owned public interior, defined here as an enclosed urban space owned by a private entity, has been a recurrent character of many 20th century liberal cities. It has today found an epitome in the mega-structural ...

Mahindroo, Amrita

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 February 23, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -- The Department of Energy and the Department of the Interior today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 will be held at the National Mall's West Potomac Park, on the banks of the Potomac River along the path between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials. Specifically, the event will be held on the peninsula just south of the new Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial - scheduled to open in August of this year - between the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Potomac River. The Decathlon will begin in late September as originally

233

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Sulfate Resistance of Flyash Blended Cement Concrete Materials Barzin Mobasher1 or water with high SO3 content. External sulfate 2007 World of Coal Ash (WOCA), May 7-10, 2007, Covington, the effect of curing (especially in the case of blended cements) and the effect of the pH change during

Mobasher, Barzin

235

Algorithms for raw material dosage control for cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw material used for producing cement is obtained using several components which we must dosages so that the mixture should have a uniform chemical composition. This paper work proposes fuzzy algorithms for performing this process. Using them turns ... Keywords: algorithm, cement, control, dosage, fuzzy, raw material

Stela Rusu-Anghel; Ovidiu Tirian; Osaci Mihaela; Dinis Corina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PultrusionPultrusion of Fabric Reinforced Highof Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement CompositesFlyash Blended Cement Composites Barzin Mobasher1, Alva Peled 2, Jitendra Pahalijani1 1 Department Engineering Ben-Gurion University, Israel The World of Coal Ash 2005 International Ash Utilization Symposium

Mobasher, Barzin

237

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Interior Board of Land Appeals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interior Board of Land Appeals Interior Board of Land Appeals Jump to: navigation, search Name Interior Board of Land Appeals Address 801 N. Quincy Street, Suite 300 Place Arlington, Virginia Zip 22203 Phone number 703-235-9902 Website http://www.oha.doi.gov/about_i Coordinates 38.880369°, -77.107316° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.880369,"lon":-77.107316,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Time Evolution of Entanglement Entropy from Black Hole Interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

Thomas Hartman; Juan Maldacena

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Time Evolution of Entanglement Entropy from Black Hole Interiors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

Hartman, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information This section provides various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million metric tons of carbon equivalents (MMTCE) based upon the Annual Energy Outlook 2003. According to EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2003" data, energy-related CO2 emissions for the cement industry were 8.3 MMTCE in 2002, and process-related CO2 emissions were approximately 11.4 MMTCE for a total of 19.7 MMTCE. (The AEO Supplementary tables were generated for the reference case of the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 using the National Energy Modeling System, a computer-based model which produces annual projections of energy markets for 2000-2025. The AEO2003 reflects data and information available as of

242

Weyl type bound on positive Interior Transmission Eigenvalues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains a lower bound of the Weyl type on the counting function of the positive eigenvalues of the interior transmission eigenvalue problem which justifies the existence of an infinite set of positive interior transmission eigenvalues. We consider the classical transmission problem as well as the case where the inhomogeneous medium contains an obstacle. One of the essential components of the proof is an estimate for the D-t-N operator for the Helmholtz equation for positive $\\lambda$ that replaces the standard parameter-elliptic estimate valid outside of the positive semi-axis.

Evgeny Lakshtanov; Boris Vainberg

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Portland General Electric Company Fourth Revision of Sheet No. 32-1 P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17 Canceling Third Revision of Sheet No. 32-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland General Electric Company Fourth Revision of Sheet No. 32-1 P.U.C. Oregon No. E-17, Vice President on and after January 1, 2004 #12;Portland General Electric Company Fifth Revision) Renewable Usage 0.800¢ per kWh in addition to Energy Charge Fixed Renewable $3.50 per month per block

244

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

245

Nanostructure and Nanomechanics of Cement: Polydisperse Colloidal Packing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement setting and cohesion are governed by the precipitation and growth of calcium-silicate-hydrate, through a complex evolution of microstructure. A colloidal model to describe nucleation, packing, and rigidity of ...

Masoero, Enrico

246

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

247

Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Cement Dissolution and Delamination of Hyper-Eutectoid Pearlitic Steel Filaments for Tire Cords by Y. S. Yang, S. Y. Park, J. G. Bae, M. C. Kim, ...

248

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementing Energy Efficiency Policy for the Cement Industry in India: The PAT Mechanism of the NMEEE Speaker(s): S. S. Krishnan Date: April 13, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133...

249

Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

251

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images Title Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-4417E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Konis, Kyle, Eleanor S. Lee, and Robert D. Clear Call Number LBNL-4417E Abstract The objective of this study was to explore how calibrated high dynamic range (HDR) images (luminance maps) acquired in real world daylit environments can be used to characterize, evaluate, and compare visual comfort conditions of innovative facade shading and light-redirecting systems. Detailed (1536 x 1536 pixel) luminance maps were time-lapse acquired from two view positions in an unoccupied full scale testbed facility. These maps were analyzed using existing visual comfort metrics to quantify how innovative interior and exterior shading systems compare to conventional systems under real sun and sky conditions over a solstice-to-solstice test interval. The results provide a case study in the challenges and potential of methods of visualizing, evaluating and summarizing daily and seasonal variation of visual comfort conditions computed from large sets of image data.

252

The interior transmission problem and bounds on transmission eigenvalues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the interior transmission eigenvalue problem for sign-definite multiplicative perturbations of the Laplacian in a bounded domain. We show that all but finitely many complex transmission eigenvalues are confined to a parabolic neighborhood of the positive real axis.

Michael Hitrik; Katsiaryna Krupchyk; Petri Ola; Lassi Päivärinta

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

The interior transmission problem and bounds on transmission eigenvalues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the interior transmission eigenvalue problem for sign-definite multiplicative perturbations of the Laplacian in a bounded domain. We show that all but finitely many complex transmission eigenvalues are confined to a parabolic neighborhood of the positive real axis.

Hitrik, Michael; Ola, Petri; Päivärinta, Lassi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BEST-Cement for China BEST-Cement for China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BEST-Cement Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Partner: Energy Research Institute, China Cement Association, China Building Materials Academy, Shandong University, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Foundation, Dow Chemical Company Sector: Energy Focus Area: Industry Topics: Pathways analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: china.lbl.gov/research/industry/benchmarking/best-cement/best-cement-c Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

How to avoid casing collapse during inner string cementing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that in the Mobile Bay area offshore Alabama, inflatable surface packoffs are being used to seal the top of the 20-in. conductor casing-to-drill pipe annulus. With the seal in place, annular pressure is maintained during inner string cementing jobs to counter forces that tend to shorten the drill pipe inner string. Inside pressure also helps protect the casing from collapse due to the hydrostatic pressure of a long column of cement. Casing is less resistant than the bottom of the hole and the wellbore, (unless a weak formation breaks down) and can crush under the hydrostatic weight when fluid inside does not offer enough offsetting support. Casing collapse can cause cement to leak into the casing-to-drill pipe annulus, thereby cementing the drill string in the well or otherwise ruining the cement job. In a situation where casing does not have sufficient collapse resistance to withstand hydrostatic pressure loading, a surface packoff can be used to maintain pressure inside the casing throughout the cementing job.

Lubitz, R.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the global cement industry’, Ann. Rev. Energy Environ.were estimated. Cement industry BERs ranged from 205 kgCO 2carbon intensity, cement industry, Central America, electric

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Treated ceramic microsphere-cement lightweight composites for geothermal cementing systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compressive strength and water permeability of high-temperature light-weight cementing materials containing sillimanite-based hollow microspheres as a filler can be improved by treating the surfaces of the microspheres with a Ca(OH)/sub 2/-saturated solution at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C. The precipitation of an epitaxial layer formed by an interaction between a hot calcium hydroxide solution and the surface of the sphere plays an essential role in developing favorable bonding characteristics at the interfaces and in promoting the hydration of the cement matrix. The properties of the composites include a slurry density of <1.2 g/cc at 25/sup 0/C, a 300/sup 0/C-24 hour compressive strength of >1015 psi (7.0 MPa), a water permeability of <10/sup -4/ Darcy, and a bulk density of <1.0 g/cc. It was observed that tobermorite-truscottite transformation and anorthite formation during autoclave exposure for 180 days in brine at 300/sup 0/C results in slight strength reductions and increased water permeability.

Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

house and its HVAC systems, tested the optimization controlOptimization Control in Interior Space Conditioning Problem Description Interior space conditioning is a type of temperature regulation by HVAC

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analytical Method of Torque Calculation for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method for performing the output torque calculations of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor circuit, inductance, permanent magnet machine, synchronous motors, torque. I. NOMENCLATURE BFE brushless field excitation IPMSM interior permanent magnet synchronous motor FEA finite element analysis mmf

Tolbert, Leon M.

262

Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 Federal Register 58 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 209 / Friday, October 28, 2011 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [LLWO300000.L14300000] Notice of Availability of the Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States and Notice of Public Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Department of Energy (DOE) (the Agencies) as joint lead agencies announce the availability of the Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (Supplement) (BLM/DES 11-49,

263

New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Model of New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes New Model of Earth's Interior Reveals Clues to Hotspot Volcanoes October 29, 2013 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Geosciences, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov volcanic-hotspots1.jpg This 3D view of the top 1,000 kilometers of Earth's mantle beneath the central Pacific shows the relationship between seismically-slow "plumes" and channels imaged in the UC Berkeley study. Green cones on the ocean floor mark islands associated with "hotspot" volcanoes, such as Hawaii and Tahiti. (Image courtesy of Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, UC Berkeley) Using supercomputers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), scientists have detected

264

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the mixed processes of heat transfer for the interior air ofby a series of heat transfer processes. The thermal dynamics

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Direct Torque Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors with Respect to Optimal Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Torque Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors with Respect to Optimal@lea.upb.de, boecker@lea.upb.de URL: http://wwwlea.upb.de Keywords «Interior permanent magnet synchronous motor to their high torque and power per volume ratio, interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM

Noé, Reinhold

266

A Precise Open-Loop Torque Control for an Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Precise Open-Loop Torque Control for an Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (IPMSM@lea.upb.de Abstract-Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) are preferentially chosen as traction drives. INTRODUCTION Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM) provide high power and torque densities

Noé, Reinhold

267

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1240 Legacy Mercury--Data Collection at Alviso Slough. Photo by M. Marvin-DiPasquale. Bottom Left--Aerial Photo with Alviso Slough of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;iii U.S. Department of the Interior DIRK KEMPTHORNE, Secretary U

268

The CO2 Abatement Cost Curve for the Thailand's Cement Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract The cement industry is one of the largest carbon dioxide (CO2) emitters in the Thai industry. The cement sector accounted for about 20633 kilotonnes (ktonnes) CO2...

269

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cement plants electricity tariffs have been  structured is scheduled around an electricity tariff that incorporates electricity pricing prepared for the state of California analyzed  the response of foreign cement plants to multi? period tariffs.  

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Three cement output projections are developed based onthese three production projections, energy savings and CO2have been a number of projections of China’s future cement

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

one-and-a-half-story, two-bedroom home with a half-basement one-and-a-half-story, two-bedroom home with a half-basement is typical of 100-year-old homes in Portland, Oregon. The home had no insulation, an unfinished basement, old appliances and air leaks everywhere when purchased by its current owner in 2010. The owners performed a full deep energy retrofit, including air sealing and insulating exterior walls and attic and installing new, efficient appliances. Building America researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory audited the home after the retrofits had occurred and used Energy Gauge USA simulation software to predict energy savings. They also partnered with local home performance contractor Imagine Energy to meter the circuit-level electricity use and the natural gas use of the tankless hot water heater and 95% condensing gas furnace. Based on

273

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods 1 June 2012 Financing and Incentives Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Key Takeaways ■■ Use performance-based incentives to nudge customers toward greater energy savings ■■ Promote recurring, limited- time bonus rebates to grab customers' attention, even when reducing incentive levels ■■ Approve financing early and make it an integral part of the program to reduce barriers to customer participation C i i r p l e m B t o i t f m c The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is a U.S. Energy Department program that is improving lives and communities across the country through energy efficiency. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood

274

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

Miller, Naomi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessment of non-destructive testing of well casing,, cement and cement bond in high temperature wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the difficulty in bringing geothermal well blowouts under control, any indication of a casing/cement problem should be expeditiously evaluated and solved. There are currently no high temperature cement bond and casing integrity logging systems for geothermal wells with maximum temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/F. The market is currently insufficient to warrannt the private investment necessary to develop tools and cables capable of withstanding high temperatures. It is concluded that a DOE-funded development program is required to assure that diagnostic tools are available in the interim until geothermal resource development activities are of sufficient magnitude to support developmental work on high temperature casing/cement logging capabilities by industry. This program should be similar to and complement the current DOE program for development of reservoir evaluation logging capabilities for hot wells. The appendices contain annotated bibliographies on the following: high temperature logging in general, cement integrity testing, cosing integrity testing, casing and cement failures, and special and protective treatment techniques. Also included are composite listing of references in alphabetical order by senior author.

Knutson,, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

276

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is coal-fired power generation. power generation. China Cement (10), 18-heat recovery (WHR) power generation technologies have been

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste heat recovery from exhaust gases may be used to economically cogenerate electricity at  some cement plants (

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Downhole cement test in a very hot hole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of the commercial-sized Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project requires that hydraulic fractures be created between two inclined wellbores at a depth of about 4 km (15,000 ft). Isolation of a section of the open wellbore is necessary for pressurization to achieve the fracture connections. A cemented-in liner/PBR assembly is one of the methods used for zone isolation near the botton of the injection well. A downhole, pumped cement test was first conducted at a wellbore temperature of 275/sup 0/C (525/sup 0/F) to determine if a suitable slurry could be designed, pumped, and later recovered to assure the success of the cemented-in liner operation.

Pettitt, R.A.; Cocks, G.G.; Dreesen, D.N.; Sims, J.R.; Nicholson, R.W.; Boevers, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not too many years ago energy costs and efficiencies were virtually ignored by corporate decision makers. The prevailing attitude was 'my business is manufacturing and my capital is best spent improving and expanding my manufacturing capacity.' With energy now contributing a significant fraction of the overall product cost in many industries, there is general recognition that control of fuel and electric costs is just as important to remaining competitive as is improving manufacturing methods. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners, the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants.

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Internal cathodic protection of cement-lined steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

Internally coated, cement-lined, carbon steel pipes have been used extensively for ballast- and service-water systems offshore. Mechanical cracking of the lining, undercutting, and erosion have resulted in corrosion and system leaks. Cathodic protection is one alternative that has been evaluated as a solution. Cathodic protection normally gives limited protection when applied internally to a pipeline system. Tests have been performed to evaluate this hypothesis and the possibility of improved current distribution due to the cement lining. This paper presents the test results as well as a solution to the problem. Internally coated, cement-lined steel pipes are used for ballast-water, service-water, and fire-water systems in the offshore oil and gas production industry.

Jensen, F.O. (Sharpnord Corrosion, P.O. Box 46, 3971 Langesund (NO)); Tems, R.D. (Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., P.O. Box 510, 4001 Stavanger (NO))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixtures sometimes leads to unpredictable concrete performance in the field which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste rheology measurements instead of traditional workability tests (i.e., slump cone test) can have great potential in detecting those incompatibilities in concrete before the concrete is placed, which can, in turn, avoid related workability problems and setting time as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities, based on the determined rheological parameters. The DSR was modified and optimized for cement paste rheology measurements. Two different modes of operations (i.e., static and dynamic methods) with the modified DSR were investigated to measure representative rheological parameters as well as to identify cement and chemical/mineral admixture incompatibility. The conventional plastic viscosity and yield stress are measured in static mode and storage modulus curve, as a function of time, is measured in dynamic mode. The rate of change of plastic viscosity (RPV) as another static rheological parameter and the modeled magnitude parameter ?, from the dynamic rheological method, showed great potentialities as acceptance criteria to identify incompatible mixtures. The heat of hydration data from isothermal conduction calorimeter tests and setting time results for the studied mixtures have strongly supported the rheology based observations as supporting tools. Based on the main tests results, the acceptance criteria were set up using the rheological parameters in accordance with heat of hydration data. This will ultimately help material suppliers, concrete producers, and other users to detect problematic combinations of concrete ingredients before a given concrete mixture is placed.

Jang, Se Hoon

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy saving opportunities through heat recovery from cement processing kilns: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a system for the utilization of dissipated heat from the surfaces of cement processing kilns at the Jordan Cement Factories in heating heavy fuel oil used in the burning process of these kilns. It is proposed that this can be achieved ... Keywords: Jordan, cement, energy efficiency, heat recovery, kilns

I. Al-Hinti; A. Al-Ghandoor; A. Al-Naji; M. Abu-Khashabeh; M. Joudeh; M. Al-Hattab

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

SPE 142421 PP Cementing at High Pressure Zones in KSA Discovering Mystery behind Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at an over-pressurized zone, the formation might be underbalanced before cement becomes strong in the sense for the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A before it was able to develop static gel strength in the hydrostatic pressure had likely caused the cement column to be underbalanced against Formation-A. Figure#1

Hossain, M. Enamul

285

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

286

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEDs LEDs for Interior Office Applications to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: LEDs for Interior Office Applications on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

288

More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature. Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount

289

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

290

Certification of SRM 114q: Part II (Particle size distribution)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LA: Ronald J. Rajki California Portland Cement ... Mitsubishi Cement Corp., Lucerne Valley, CA: Tom ... of diffracted light around the central beam can ...

2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Permeability predictions for sand- clogged Portland cement pervious concrete pavement systems,” Journal of Environmental Management 81, 42 ...

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method for fabricating prescribed flaws in the interior of metals  

SciTech Connect

The method for fabricating a metal body having a flaw of predetermined size and shape located therein comprises placing half of the metal powder required to make the metal body in the die of a press and pressing it to create a flat upper surface thereon. A piece of copper foil is cut to the size and shape of the desired interior crack and placed on the upper surface of the powder and centered in position. The remaining powder is then placed in the die to cover the copper foil. The powder is first cold pressed and removed from the press. The powder metal piece is then sintered in a furnace at a temperature above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal. It is then removed from the furnace, cooled to room temperature, and placed back in the die and pressed further. This procedure results in an interior flaw or crack. Modified forms of the method involve using a press-sinter-press-sinter cycle with the first sinter being below the melting point of the copper and the second sinter being above the melting point of the copper and below the melting point of the metal.

Hsu, David K. (Ames, IA); Thompson, Donald O. (Ames, IA)

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE SECOND PRODUCTION-TEST FLARING, PROJECT RULISON ( R u l i s o n - 1 0 ) a 1 9 7 1 P r e p a r e d U n d e r A g r e e m e n t No. A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) -474 '. f o r the N e v a d a Operations Office . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . USGS -474 - 1 2 2 R u l i sdn- 10 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 8 0 2 2 5 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE S EC OND PRODUCTION- TES T FLARING,

294

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Initial rotor position estimation for low saliency interior permanent-magnet synchronous motor drives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents an initial rotor position estimation method for low saliency interior permanent-magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives. The method injects signals into the stationary… (more)

Yang, Yan.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

MULTIPLE CHISEL STRUCTURE FOR DISINTEGRATING AND REMOVING INCRUSTATIONS FROM INTERIOR WALLS OF RECEPTACLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This device is designed to remove sublimate or incrustations from the interior of a vessel, being operable from the outside through appropriate seals.

Prescott, C.H.

1951-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Local Analysis of the Feasible Primal-Dual Interior-Point Method R ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Silva ?. J. Soares †. L. N. Vicente ‡. Abstract. In this paper we analyze the rate of local convergence of the Newton primal-dual interior- point method when ...

299

Institute of Computer Science Trust-region interior-point method for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Trust -region interior-point method for. large sparse l1 optimization. L.Lukšan, C.

300

Institute of Computer Science Primal interior-point method for large ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Primal interior-point method for large sparse minimax optimization. L.Lukšan, C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hygro-Thermal Performance of Imperfectly Protected Below-Grade Walls with Interior Insulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the performance of three different types of insulation installed in the interior of a basement wall system in a below-grade wall system.… (more)

Wolfgang, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Interior Bureau of Land Management Battle Mountain District Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Battle Mountain District Office Battle Mountain Nevada November 19, 2010 Tonopah Field Office Tonopah, Nevada FES-10-57 N-86292 DOI-BLM-NVB020-2009-0104-EIS Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project: Final EIS| ii BLM Mission Statement It is the mission of the Bureau of Land Management to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. BLM/NV/BM/EIS/10/30+1793 DOI No. FES 10-57 http://www.blm.gov/nv/stlenlfo/battle_mountain_field.html In Reply Refer To: N-86292 DOI-BLM-NVBO2O-2009-0 1 04-EIS 2800 (NVB0200) Dear

303

I~ Central Nevada-40 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i I~ Central Nevada-40 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225 USGS-474-90 SUMMARY OF HYDRAULIC TESTING IN AND CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER SAMPLES FROM DEEP EXPLORATORY HOLES IN LITTLE FISH LAKE, MONITOR, HOT CREEK, AND LITTLE SMOKY VALLEYS, NEVADA By George A. Dinwiddie and leRoy J. Schroder ,.....---'-------.,... NOT ICE - - - - - - - - - - , .This report was prepared as an account of work . sponsored by. the. United States Government. Neither the United States nor the ·United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accurac y, com- pleteness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its

304

System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to provide an assessment of the cost structure for an interior permanent magnet ('IPM') motor which is designed to meet the 2010 FreedomCAR specification. The program is to evaluate the range of viable permanent magnet materials for an IPM motor, including sintered and bonded grades of rare earth magnets. The study considers the benefits of key processing steps, alternative magnet shapes and their assembly methods into the rotor (including magnetization), and any mechanical stress or temperature limits. The motor's costs are estimated for an annual production quantity of 200,000 units, and are broken out into such major components as magnetic raw materials, processing and manufacturing. But this is essentially a feasibility study of the motor's electromagnetic design, and is not intended to include mechanical or thermal studies as would be done to work up a selected design for production.

Peter Campbell

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The quest for solar gravity modes: probing the solar interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar gravity modes are the best probes to improve our knowledge on the solar interior, as they spend most of their time in the radiative zone, which represents 98% of the solar mass. Many attempts have been led to observe them using different techniques: either individually, then adding some statistical approach or more recently, globally leading to the detection of the signature of asymptotical properties of these modes. Then, several theoretical works have been done to quantify the effect of detecting g-mode on solar modeling and on the rotation profile. We will give here an update on the g-mode detection. Then, we will study an example of a theoretical work showing how their detection would improve our knowledge on the dynamics of the solar core as well as an application on the detection of the global properties to infer some physical inputs in solar models.

Mathur, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources and Links -  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The mission of IMF is to lead a national effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials, for the Industries of the Future. ENERGY STAR Focus for Cement Manufacturing The U.S. cement manufacturers and EPA work together in an ENERGY STAR Focus on energy efficiency within the industry. Participating companies work with EPA to institute or improve their corporate energy management programs and the energy performance of their operations. Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools to gauge plant and program energy performance, a forum for elevating energy management in the industry, and recognition for superior

307

Carbon emissions reductions for a specific new cement plant:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5346 5346 Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 July 2000 This work was supported by the Climate Policies and Program Division, Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 ii iii Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Michael Ruth, Ernst Worrell, and Lynn Price Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division

308

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China's cement industry, which produced 1,388 million metric tons (Mt) of cement in 2008, accounts for almost half of the world's total cement production. Nearly 40% of China's cement production is from relatively obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the remainder from more modern rotary kiln cement plants, including plants equipped with new suspension pre-heater and pre-calciner (NSP) kilns. Shandong Province is the largest cement-producing Province in China, producing 10% of China's total cement output in 2008. This report documents an analysis of the potential to improve the energy efficiency of NSP kiln cement plants in Shandong Province. Sixteen NSP kiln cement plants were surveyed regarding their cement production, energy consumption, and current adoption of 34 energy-efficient technologies and measures. Plant energy use was compared to both domestic (Chinese) and international best practice using the Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for Cement (BEST-Cement). This benchmarking exercise indicated an average technical potential primary energy savings of 12% would be possible if the surveyed plants operated at domestic best practice levels in terms of energy use per ton of cement produced. Average technical potential primary energy savings of 23% would be realized if the plants operated at international best practice levels. Energy conservation supply curves for both fuel and electricity savings were then constructed for the 16 surveyed plants. Using the bottom-up electricity conservation supply curve model, the cost-effective electricity efficiency potential for the studied cement plants in 2008 is estimated to be 373 gigawatt hours (GWh), which accounts for 16% of total electricity use in the 16 surveyed cement plants in 2008. Total technical electricity-saving potential is 915 GWh, which accounts for 40% of total electricity use in the studied plants in 2008. The fuel conservation supply curve model shows the total technical fuel efficiency potential equal to 7,949 terajoules (TJ), accounting for 8% of total fuel used in the studied cement plants in 2008. All the fuel efficiency potential is shown to be cost effective. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emission reduction potential associated with cost-effective electricity saving is 383 kiloton (kt) CO{sub 2}, while total technical potential for CO{sub 2} emission reduction from electricity-saving is 940 ktCO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials associated with fuel-saving potentials is 950 ktCO{sub 2}.

Price, Lynn; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Wang, Lan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Heat or cold storage composition containing a hydrated hydraulic cement  

SciTech Connect

A polyphase composition for the storage of heat or cold is disclosed that utlizes the latent heat of fusion of a salt hydrate continuous phase intimately intermixed with a hydrated hydraulic cement continuous phase and wherein said continuous phases are optionally in contact with a discontinuous crystalline phase comprising a nucleating component and wherein the composition is enveloped, contained, or packaged within a vapor impermeable material.

Boardman, B.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Immobilization of heavy metals by calcium sulfoaluminate cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two types of calcium sulfoaluminate cement containing 20% and 30% phosphogypsum, respectively, were investigated for their ability in hazardous waste stabilization. Fourteen series of pastes were prepared, each containing the following soluble salt: Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O; Na{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}.2H{sub 2}O; CrCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O; Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}; Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O; ZnSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O; and CdCl{sub 2}.5H2O. The level of pollution was 0.069 mol of heavy metal per Kg of cement. The study has been carried out by means of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, electrical conductivity, and leaching tests. Very good retention of lead, cadmium, zinc and trivalent chromium is observed. The retention of hexavalent chromium depends upon the nature of the binder: the cement containing 20% gypsum develops the best behaviour. This is explained by the microstructure of the hydrated paste: in the paste containing 30% gypsum, delayed ettringite precipitates and damages the hardened paste.

Peysson, S. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pera, J. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: Jean.Pera@insa-lyon.fr; Chabannet, M. [Unite de Recherche en Genie Civil-MATERIAUX, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrothermal cements for use in the completion of geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program to develop an improved cement for use in high-temperature geothermal wells was carried out. The work involved in the selection and evaluation of an aluminum hydroxide-cured cement from the SwRI family of hydrothermal cements for this use are described. The physical testing program is described; the topics discussed include placement ability, compressive and bond strengths, permeability to water, compatibility to drilling muds, corrosion properties, and thermal properties.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate  

SciTech Connect

A method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate, particularly cooling passages of nozzles or buckets of a gas turbine, involves the hot isostatic pressing of a leachable passage insert whose surface carries the female image of the desired interior surface configuration inside the substrate followed by leaching of the insert from the substrate.

Dembowski, Peter V. (Richmond Heights, OH); Schilke, Peter W. (Scotia, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Current Controller with Defined Dynamic Behavior for an Interior Permanent Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current Controller with Defined Dynamic Behavior for an Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor saturation and changing motor parameters. In this paper a current control scheme is presented that ensures combustion vehicles already provide. Today's modern HEV and EV mostly include interior permanent magnet

Noé, Reinhold

316

Optimum Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors (IPMSM) in Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors (IPMSM) in Constant Torque and Electrical Drives, Paderborn, Germany Abstract--Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors (IPMSM) gain weakening range. Operation during flux weakening, however, causes stress to the magnets of the motor

Noé, Reinhold

317

Linear Instability with Ekman and Interior Friction. Part I: Quasigeostrophic Eigenanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eigenvalue problems for the original Eady model and a modified Eady model (the G model) are examined with no friction, Ekman friction only, and both Ekman and interior friction. When both Ekman and interior friction are included in the models,...

Richard Grotjahn; Min Chen; Joseph Tribbia

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Polynomiality of an inexact infeasible interior point algorithm for semidefinite programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a primal-dual inexact infeasible interior-point algorithm for semidefinite programming problems (SDP). This algorithm allows the use of search directions that are calculated from the defining linear system with only moderate ... Keywords: inexact search direction, infeasible interior point method, polynomial complexity, primal-dual

Guanglu Zhou; Kim-Chuan Toh

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A New Decomposition Technique in Solving Multistage Stochastic Linear Programs by Infeasible Interior Point Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multistage stochastic linear programming (MSLP) is a powerful tool for making decisions under uncertainty. A deterministic equivalent problem of MSLP is a large-scale linear program with nonanticipativity constraints. Recently developed infeasible interior ... Keywords: Decomposition, Infeasible primal-dual interior point method, Scenario analysis, Stochastic linear programs

Xinwei Liu; Jie Sun

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Scenario Formulation of Stochastic Linear Programs and the Homogeneous Self-Dual Interior-Point Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a homogeneous self-dual interior-point algorithm for solving multistage stochastic linear programs. The algorithm is particularly suitable for the so-called “scenario formulation” of the problem, whose constraint system consists ... Keywords: decomposition, interior-point methods, multistage stochastic linear programs

Jie Sun; Xinwei Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. This report outlines the extensive information that was presented on assessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks.

Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Investigation of Interior Airflow Visualization of U-type Fin-and-Tube Heat Exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interior airflow visualization of a U-type fin-and-tube heat exchanger was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical results presented detail information of whole airflow field. Smoke test using dry ice showed visualization of airflow, ... Keywords: Fin-and-tube heat exchanger, interior airflow, CFD, visualization, smoke test

Shihua Lu; Weihua Liu; Hu Huang; Qihe Li

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used as the electricity price in electricity conservationof energy. Since average electricity prices and average fuelECSC) with average electricity price for studied cement

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), Internationaland MAIN. 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement IndustrialAugust 19, 2009. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU).

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A case study of ultralightweight cementing practices in the Northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

Wells in the northeastern United States are generally drilled to a depth of from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. They are usually air drilled through several incompetent formations among which are the Marcellus and Coffee shales. Completions in this area are hampered by very low fracture gradients of 0.4 to 0.6 psi/ft, with most of the formations containing a large number of natural fractures. During cementing, pressures in excess of 1,100-psi hydrostatic can result in breakdown of the formation leading to incomplete fillup on the cement job. This paper will discuss the existing completion practices in this area, which include the use of multistage cementing, and the incorporation of cementing baskets and other downhole tools. The current cement systems in use and the problems encountered in using them will also be discussed. Several case histories of new cementing techniques, using ultralightweight foam-cementing systems, will be presented along with the job design used on these wells. Bond logging of the foam-cemented wells creates an array of special problems for the logging companies, due to the ultra-low densities and the high porosities of these special cementing systems. Newly developed techniques for logging these wells will be discussed, along with the bond logs from the case histories.

Edmondson, T.D.; Benge, O.G.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry This paper from Duke University focuses primarily on the development of an updated ENERGY STAR industrial...

327

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gomes, A. S. 1990. “Energy Saving and Environmental ImpactEnergy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential,” ProceedingsBirch, E. 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln Systems,”

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. For information Energy Guide for Cement Making,Bureau, and (2) the Energy Guide, which discusses a wideair system efficiency. The Energy Guides are researched and

Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 2010. Statistics on Energy Consumption Per Unit of GDP.8 S HANDONG CEMENT SECTOR ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND CARBON11 Shandong energy consumption and

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

U.S. Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar Energy Demonstration Projects in the Nevada Desert U.S. Departments of Energy and Interior Announce Site for Solar Energy Demonstration Projects in the Nevada Desert July 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada announced today the site of the new Solar Demonstration Zone to demonstrate cutting-edge solar energy technologies. The Solar Demonstration Zone will be located in the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site, a former nuclear site, on lands owned by the Department of Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and administered by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration. Secretaries Chu and Salazar

333

U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study, May 15, 2007 U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study, May 15, 2007 The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Departments) today delivered to Congress and sent to the Federal Register the Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study required by Section 1813 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). The study provides analyses and recommendations on energy rights-of-way (ROWs) negotiations on tribal lands. U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study, May 15, 2007 More Documents & Publications Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Draft Report to Congress: Federal

334

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

UNITED STATES UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR i ..- - - - . WA-5 PROJECT REPORT West A f r i c a n S t a t e s (ECOWAS) Region I n v e s t i g a t i o n (1R)WA-5 USGS-OFR--82-714 DE84 900493 ASSESSMENT OF THE PETROLEUM, COAL,, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES OF THE ECONOMIC COMMUNITY OF WEST AFRICAN STATES (ECOWAS) REGION Compiled by Robert E. M a t t i c k U.S. G e o l o g i c a l Survey Open-File Report 92 - 7/4! DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

335

UNITED STATES D E P - OF TEE INTERIOR C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TEI -764 TEI -764 Nuclear $xplosions --Peaceful Applications 316858 UNITED STATES D E P - OF TEE INTERIOR C z E O L o G I C A L SURVEY S U P P ~ A R Y RFFORT ON G E O L O G I C INVESTIGATIONS I N S U P P O R T O F PHASE 11, PROJECT C E W i R I C C IN THE VICINITY O F CAPE THCIMPSOIV, NOR!FE~~ESTERN ALASKA* Eeuben Kachadwrian, A. H1 Zachenbmch, G. W. Moo~e, and R. M. lhller This report is preliminary an8 has not been edited for conformity with Geological Survey format and nomenclature, b Whis report concerns work done on behalf of San Francisco Operations Office, U . S . Atomic Energy Ccmnnission. June 1 g 0 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. rJIJh?l%D STATE33 D E P A R M OF THE ImERIOR G E O L O

336

Interior Permanent Magnet Reluctance Machine with Brushless Field Excitation  

SciTech Connect

In a conventional permanent magnet (PM) machine, the air-gap flux produced by the PM is fixed. It is difficult to enhance the air-gap flux density due to limitations of the PM in a series-magnetic circuit. However, the air-gap flux density can be weakened by using power electronic field weakening to the limit of demagnetization of the PMs. This paper presents the test results of controlling the PM air-gap flux density through the use of a stationary brushless excitation coil in a reluctance interior permanent magnet with brushless field excitation (RIPM-BFE) motor. Through the use of this technology the air-gap flux density can be either enhanced or weakened. There is no concern with demagnetizing the PMs during field weakening. The leakage flux of the excitation coil through the PMs is blocked. The prototype motor built on this principle confirms the concept of flux enhancement and weakening through the use of excitation coils.

Wiles, R.H.

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Control system for an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high performance, fully operational, four-quadrant control scheme is used in an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine. The machine operates smoothly with full performance in the constant-torque region as well as in the flux-weakening, constant-power region in both directions of motion. The transition between the constant-torque and constant-power regions is very smooth under all conditions of operation. Control in the constant-torque region is based on a vector or field-oriented technique, with the direct-axis aligned with the total stator flux, whereas constant-power region control is accomplished by orientation of the torque angle of the impressed square-wave voltage through the feedforward vector rotator. In a preferred embodiment, the control system employs a digital distributed microcomputer controller arrangement which relies upon various precisely estimated feedback signals, such as torque, flux, etc. The control scheme includes an outer torque control loop primarily for traction type applications, but also contemplates speed and position control loops for various industrial drives. A 70 hp drive system using a Neodymium-Iron-Boron permanent magnet machine and transistor pulse width modulating inverter has been designed and successfully tested. This control scheme also has application in controlling surface permanent magnet machines. 16 figs.

Bose, B.K.

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optimization of a solar cooling system with interior energy storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the optimization of the performance of a solar absorption cooling system composed by four units with interior energy storage. A full dynamic simulation model that includes the solar collector field, the absorption heat pump system and the building load calculation has been developed. It has been applied to optimize the coupling of a system based on this new technology of solar powered absorption heat pump, to a bioclimatic building recently constructed in the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. The absorption heat pump system considered is composed by four heat pumps that store energy in the form of crystallized salts so that no external storage capacity is required. Each heat pump is composed of two separate barrels that can charge (store energy from the solar field) and discharge (deliver heat or cold to the building) independently. Different configurations of the four units have been analysed taking into account the storage possibilities of the system and its capacity to respond to the building loads. It has been shown how strong the influence of the control strategies in the overall performance is, and the importance of using hourly simulations models when looking for highly efficient buildings. (author)

Sanjuan, C.; Soutullo, S.; Heras, M.R. [Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency in Buildings Unit, CIEMAT, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proton Range Uncertainty Due to Bone Cement Injected Into the Vertebra in Radiation Therapy Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We wanted to evaluate the influence of bone cement on the proton range and to derive a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting distorted computed tomography (CT) data as a reference to determine whether the correction is needed. Two CT datasets were obtained with and without a bone cement disk placed in a water phantom. Treatment planning was performed on a set of uncorrected CT images with the bone cement disk, and the verification plan was applied to the same set of CT images with an effective CT number for the bone cement disk. The effective CT number was determined by measuring the actual proton range with the bone cement disk. The effects of CT number, thicknesses, and position of bone cement on the proton range were evaluated in the treatment planning system (TPS) to draw a conversion factor predicting the range shift by correcting the CT number of bone cement. The effective CT number of bone cement was 260 Hounsfield units (HU). The calculated proton range for native CT data was significantly shorter than the measured proton range. However, the calculated range for the corrected CT data with the effective CT number coincided exactly with the measured range. The conversion factor was 209.6 [HU . cm/mm] for bone cement and predicted the range shift by approximately correcting the CT number. We found that the heterogeneity of bone cement could cause incorrect proton ranges in treatment plans using CT images. With an effective CT number of bone cement derived from the proton range and relative stopping power, a more actual proton range could be calculated in the TPS. The conversion factor could predict the necessity for CT data correction with sufficient accuracy.

Lim, Young Kyung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ui-Jung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongho, E-mail: dongho@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Doo Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Lee, Sang-Yeob [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Comparison of proton field-cycling relaxometry and molecular dynamics simulations for protonwater surface dynamics in cement-based materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. / Cement and Concrete Research 37 (2007) 348­350 #12;Acknowledgements JPK and PJM thank the NANOCEM

Kalinichev, Andrey G.

343

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to stress within cement matrix and possibly leading to cracks. #12;The aims of this research coloured corrosion products were observed visually on the aluminium encapsulated in OPC. Cracking was alsoCorrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation

Sheffield, University of

345

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 10, July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Experimental work has been completed at the Colorado School of Mines. Samples of ..beta..-dicalcium silicate-silica cement developed in this program have been submitted for additional evaluation. The initial screening portion of this work has identified several promising systems that will undergo more rigorous testing. Dynamic brine exposure testing of several systems has been initiated at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Facility. Testing at the Niland test site is scheduled to start soon. Property verification tests on cements produced in the materials development phase of the program were initiated at the Bureau of Standards. Preliminary data are available for five cements exposed for 176 h to water at a temperature of 195/sup 0/C. Three of the cements exhibited strength losses during the test. An aluminum hydroxide cement and a polymer cement showed slight increases in strength after the exposure. These and longer-term data will be utilized in the selection of a material for use in the remedial cementing of a hot dry rock well at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Study of Various Slanted Air-gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Various Slanted Air-gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor of the slanted air-gap structure of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor with brushless field magnet machine, synchronous motors, torque. I. NOMENCLATURE BFE brushless field excitation IPMSM interior

Tolbert, Leon M.

347

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

348

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry, - Industrial Processes Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.ccap.org/docs/resou Program Start 2011 Program End 2011 Country Mexico UN Region Central America References CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector[1] CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector Screenshot "This interim report presents the preliminary results of the first phase of the study - an evaluation of sectoral approach issues and opportunities

349

Phosphate-bonded glass cements for geothermal wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calcium aluminosilicate glasses were found to react with phosphoric acid in three ways depending upon silica content. Above 55% SiO/sub 2/ they are insoluble while below 50% they dissolve readily. The transition compositions release calcium and aluminum ions and a silica gel phase replaces the glass. Activation energies in the order of 10 kcal/mole are associated with the dissolution. Equilibrium studies in the systems CaO-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O, and CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-H/sub 2/O were made to determine the phases which are stable at 200/sup 0/C in excess water. The CaO system shows hydroxylapatite, monetite and monocalcium orthophosphate are the stable phases. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system contains augelite, berlinite, and a high phosphate aluminum hydrate. The quaternary system shows the above phase plus a lime alumina hydrogarnet and crandallite. Cement made from a glass frit of the composition 45% SiO/sub 2/: 24% CaO: 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has a compressive strength of 500 psi after several days in steam at 200/sup 0/C and 800 psi after months in steam. Bonding of cements to mild steel are discussed.

Rockett, T.J.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mattus, C.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study May 15, 2007 - 12:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Departments) today delivered to Congress and sent to the Federal Register the Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study required by Section 1813 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). The study provides analyses and recommendations on energy rights-of-way (ROWs) negotiations on tribal lands. The study recommended that grants, expansions, or renewals of energy ROWs on tribal lands should continue to be based on terms negotiated between the two parties. In the event that negotiations are not successful,

352

U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study U.S. Departments of Interior and Energy Release Report on Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study May 15, 2007 - 11:02am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Departments) today delivered to Congress and sent to the Federal Register the Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study required by Section 1813 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). The study provides analyses and recommendations on energy rights-of-way (ROWs) negotiations on tribal lands. The study recommended that grants, expansions, or renewals of energy ROWs on tribal lands should continue to be based on terms negotiated between the two parties. In the event that negotiations are not successful,

353

Departments of Energy and Interior Award Nearly $17 Million for Advanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Award Nearly $17 Million for Interior Award Nearly $17 Million for Advanced Hydropower Technologies Departments of Energy and Interior Award Nearly $17 Million for Advanced Hydropower Technologies September 6, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis U.S. Department Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar today announced nearly $17 million in funding over the next three years for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology. Sixteen projects in 11 states were selected through a competitive grant process for their ability to contribute to the development of innovative technologies that produce hydropower more efficiently, reduce costs and increase sustainable hydropower generation. The funding will help advance the Obama Administration's goal of meeting

354

Large-Scale Climate Controls of Interior Alaska River Ice Breakup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frozen rivers in the Arctic serve as critical highways because of the lack of roads; therefore, it is important to understand the key mechanisms that control the timing of river ice breakup. The relationships between springtime Interior Alaska ...

Peter A. Bieniek; Uma S. Bhatt; Larry A. Rundquist; Scott D. Lindsey; Xiangdong Zhang; Richard L. Thoman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Scale-dependent dispersion within the stratified interior on the shelf of northern Monterey Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous underwater vehicle measurements are used to quantify lateral dispersion of a continuously released Rhodamine WT dye plume within the stratified interior of shelf waters in northern Monterey Bay, CA. The along-shelf evolution of the ...

Ryan J. Moniz; Derek A. Fong; C. Brock Woodson; Susan K. Willis; Mark T. Stacey; Stephen G. Monismith

356

Postulated Feedbacks of Deciduous Forest Phenology on Seasonal Climate Patterns in the Western Canadian Interior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large portion of the western Canadian interior exhibits a distinctive seasonal pattern in long-term mean surface temperatures characterized by anomalously warmer conditions in spring and autumn than would be expected from a sinusoidal model. ...

E. H. Hogg; D. T. Price; T. A. Black

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A New Full-Newton step O (n) Infeasible Interior-Point Algorithm for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

++ denote the set of vectors with n components, the set of nonnegative vector and ... respectively. ri(C) denotes the relative interior of a convex set C. I denotes n ...

358

Dry Surface Frontogenesis Arising from Interior Potential Vorticity Perturbations in a Semigeostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the role of interior potential vorticity perturbations in surface frontogenesis using the two-dimensional semigeostrophic Eady model. Fronts form rapidly for properly configured small disturbances even at zonal wavenumbers for which no ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Composite View of Surface Signatures and Interior Properties of Nonlinear Internal Waves: Observations and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface signatures and interior properties of large-amplitude nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) in the South China Sea (SCS) were measured during a period of weak northeast wind (2 m s?1) using shipboard marine radar, an acoustic Doppler current ...

Ming-Huei Chang; Ren-Chieh Lien; Yiing Jang Yang; Tswen Yung Tang; Joe Wang

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Layered Structure of the Winter Atmospheric Boundary Layer in the Interior of Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-latitude winter atmospheric boundary layer of interior Alaska continually exhibits a complex layered structure as a result of extreme meteorological conditions. In this paper the occurrence of elevated inversions (EI), surface-based ...

John A. Mayfield; Gilberto J. Fochesatto

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Departments of Energy and Interior Announce $26.6 Million in Funding to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Announce $26.6 Million in Interior Announce $26.6 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced Hydropower Technologies Departments of Energy and Interior Announce $26.6 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced Hydropower Technologies April 5, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar today announced $26.6 million in funding for research and development projects to advance hydropower technology, including pumped storage hydropower. This funding is focused on development of innovative technologies that can produce power more efficiently, reduce costs and increase sustainable hydropower generation at sites not previously considered practical. "By improving hydropower technology, we can maximize America's biggest

362

SODIUM POLYPHOSPHATE-MODIFIED CLASS C/CLASS F FLY ASH BLEND CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors investigated the usefulness of the coal combustion by-products, Class C fly ash (C) and Class F fly ash (F), in developing cost-effective acid-resistant phosphate-based cements for geothermal wells. In the temperature range of 20-100 C, sodium polyphosphate (NaP) as the acidic cement-forming solution preferentially reacted with calcium sulfate and lime in the C as the base solid reactant through the exothermic acid-base reaction route, rather than with the tricalcium aluminate in C. This reaction led to the formation of hydroxyapatite (HOAp). In contrast, there was no acid-base reaction between the F as the acidic solid reactant and NaP. After autoclaving the cements at 250 C, a well-crystallized HOAp phase was formed in the NaP-modified C cement that was responsible for densifying the cement's structure, thereby conferring low water permeability and good compressive strength on the cement. however, the HOAp was susceptible to hot CO{sub 2}-laden H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution (pH 1.1), allowing some acid erosion of the cement. On the other hand, the mullite in F hydrothermally reacted with the Na from NaP to form the analcime phase. Although this phase played a pivotal role in abating acid erosion, its generation created an undesirable porous structure in the cement. They demonstrated that blending fly ash with a C/F ratio of 70/30 resulted in the most suitable properties for acid-resistant phosphate-based cement systems.

SUGAMA, T.; BROTHERS, L.E.; KASPEREIT, D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

364

Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

Blount, Gerald C. (North Augusta, SC); Falta, Ronald W. (Seneca, SC); Siddall, Alvin A. (Aiken, SC)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology Pathways  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technology Pathways Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To achieve that vision, industry leaders jointly define detailed R&D agendas known as roadmaps. ITP relies on roadmap-defined priorities to target cost-shared solicitations and guide development of a balanced R&D portfolio that yields useful results in the near, mid, and long term. Industry Vision & Roadmaps Two documents address the cement industry's challenges and priorities: Vision 2030, which outlines broad goals for the future, and Roadmap 2030, which established the industry's R&D priorities. ITP and the Strategic Development Council, a council of the American Concrete Institute's

368

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

A POSSIBLE CARBON-RICH INTERIOR IN SUPER-EARTH 55 Cancri e  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial planets in the solar system, such as the Earth, are oxygen-rich, with silicates and iron being the most common minerals in their interiors. However, the true chemical diversity of rocky planets orbiting other stars is yet unknown. Mass and radius measurements are used to constrain the interior compositions of super-Earths (exoplanets with masses of 1-10 M{sub Circled-Plus }), and are typically interpreted with planetary interior models that assume Earth-centric oxygen-rich compositions. Using such models, the super-Earth 55 Cancri e (mass 8 M{sub Circled-Plus }, radius 2 R{sub Circled-Plus }) has been suggested to bear an interior composition consisting of Fe, silicates, and an envelope ({approx}> 10% by mass) of supercritical water. We report that the mass and radius of 55 Cancri e can also be explained by a carbon-rich solid interior made of Fe, C, SiC, and/or silicates and without a volatile envelope. While the data allow Fe mass fractions of up to 40%, a wide range of C, SiC, and/or silicate mass fractions are possible. A carbon-rich 55 Cancri e is also plausible if its protoplanetary disk bore the same composition as its host star, which has been reported to be carbon-rich. However, more precise estimates of the stellar elemental abundances and observations of the planetary atmosphere are required to further constrain its interior composition. The possibility of a C-rich interior in 55 Cancri e opens a new regime of geochemistry and geophysics in extraterrestrial rocky planets, compared to terrestrial planets in the solar system.

Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Lee, Kanani K. M. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Mousis, Olivier, E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers THETA, CP 1615, F-25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

372

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 9, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Work on polymer cements containing mixtures of organosiloxanes and styrene is continuing to show the potential of the system as a high temperature cementing material. Samples exposed for 360 hr to brine at 250/sup 0/C have not shown evidence of hydrolysis and have maintained high strength. At 350/sup 0/C, the compressive strength is > 5000 psi. Preliminary tests to determine the pumpability of the system are in progress. Work on the development of inorganic cementing materials is continuing at six laboratories. Several promising materials have been identified. Tests to measure compressive strengths, bond strengths, permeability, and compatibility with drilling muds are in progress. Consistometer tests have been performed on some materials.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore Wells 7 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-3-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

374

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Energy and Oil Shale Minerals within the Production ofproduction – use of carbide slag Cement with low lime saturation factor Calcareous oil shaleoil shale can be used as an alternative feedstock and partial fuel substitute in clinker production.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andOther Hydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in China’s cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hilger, J. 2003. Combined Utilization of Oil Shale Energyand Oil Shale Minerals within the Production of Cement andHydraulic Minerals. Oil Shale, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 347-355.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Grinding of cement clinkers : linking multi-scale fracture properties to system chemistry, mineralogy and microstructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing environmental concerns encourage the cement industry to improve its environmental performance, which in turn renews the interest in clinker grinding efficiency. Current knowledge on clinker grinding was built over ...

Wilson, William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy-saving cements obtained from chemical gypsum and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

The main sources, properties and uses of chemical gypsum are reviewed and the possibility of its utilization for the manufacturing process of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is explored. In this process other industrial wastes, as sources of reactive silica and alumina, can be employed. Phosphogypsum, blast-furnace slag and fly ash were the main by-products investigated. The principal properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cements, such as synthesis, hydration and strength, were discussed. Some durability problems and suggested solutions were particularly emphasized.

Beretka, J. [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia)] [CSIRO Div. of Building, Construction and Engineering, Highett, Victoria (Australia); Cioffi, R. [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione] [Univ. Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione; Marroccoli, M.; Valenti, G.L. [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente] [Univ. della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell`Ambiente

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optimizing the physical and technological properties of cement additives in concrete mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the physical and technological properties of phosphogypsum, borogypsum, sludges and reactor residue recovered from boric acid factor, lignite ashes, and steel making slags samples were investigated. Physical test results obtained from these cement additives were studied with comparison to the control mix. The optimal values of cementitious additives are replacement of cement and/or of replacement of natural aggregates were conducted.

Demirbas, A. [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty] [Technical Univ. of Black Sea, Akcaabat-Trabzon (Turkey). Educational Faculty

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

New high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells: stability and properties. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential high-temperature cements have been formulated and evaluated in terms of their properties for geothermal well cementing. Phase formation and compatibility in two major compositional regions were investigated in the temperature region between 200 and 400/sup 0/C and pressures up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi). These were followed by an evaluation of properties of the cements formed. One area in the system Ca0-Mg0-Si0/sub 2/-H/sub 2/0 centered around the xonotlite-chrysotile join while the other area of interest centered around the anorthite composition in the system Ca0-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O. After numerous exploratory studies, the magnesia-containing mixtures were prepared by mixing a Class J cement with various sources of magnesia such as calcined chrysotile, or magnesium oxide. Calcium oxide and silica fine quartz powder were also added to adjust the compositions. The aluminous system cements were formulated from high-alumina cements which were mixed with various silica sources.

Roy, D.M.; White, E.L.; Langton, C.A.; Grutzeck, M.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Literature survey on cements for remediation of deformed casing in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells have been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal`s portion of The Geysers geothermal field. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields.

Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

The hydration of reactive cement-in-polymer dispersions studied by nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behaviour of two novel cement-in-polymer (c/p) dispersions, namely cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) and cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol) upon exposure to water at room temperature was investigated by a combination of various NMR methods. The swelling, cracking, and the water ingress were monitored non-destructively using {sup 1}H single point imaging. The hydration of the cement matrix was investigated using {sup 29}Si NMR whilst {sup 13}C CPMAS NMR spectra allowed the quantification of the kinetics of the hydrolysis reaction of poly(vinyl acetate) into poly(vinyl alcohol). The polymer controls the rate of water ingress and swelling which in turn determines the behaviour of the c/p dispersions upon exposure to water. For the cement-in-poly(vinyl alcohol), the rates of water ingress and swelling are much faster than the hydration of the clinker whilst for the cement-in-poly(vinyl acetate) the slow rates of the two processes allow the formation of a cementious matrix which assures the stability of the sample.

Olaru, A.M. [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Weichold, O. [DWI an der RWTH Aachen, e. V., Pauwelsstrasse 8, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Adams, A., E-mail: aadams@mc.rwth-aachen.de [Institut fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Energy, Interior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Energy, Interior Departments Announce New Location for Solar Decathlon 2011 Wednesday, February 23, 2011 WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy and the Department of the Interior today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 will be held at the National Mall's West Potomac Park, on the banks of the Potomac River along the path between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials. Specifically, the event will be held on the peninsula just south of the new Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial - scheduled to open in August of this year - between the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Potomac River. The Decathlon will begin in late September as originally scheduled. The event is being moved from its previous location on the Mall between the

389

Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL); Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Seismology of the Sun : Inference of Thermal, Dynamic and Magnetic Field Structures of the Interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent overwhelming evidences show that the sun strongly influences the Earth's climate and environment. Moreover existence of life on this Earth mainly depends upon the sun's energy. Hence, understanding of physics of the sun, especially the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of its interior, is very important. Recently, from the ground and space based observations, it is discovered that sun oscillates near 5 min periodicity in millions of modes. This discovery heralded a new era in solar physics and a separate branch called helioseismology or seismology of the sun has started. Before the advent of helioseismology, sun's thermal structure of the interior was understood from the evolutionary solution of stellar structure equations that mimicked the present age, mass and radius of the sun. Whereas solution of MHD equations yielded internal dynamics and magnetic field structure of the sun's interior. In this presentation, I review the thermal, dynamic and magnetic field structures of the sun's inter...

Hiremath, K M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm  

SciTech Connect

Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

Moore, Karen A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zatorski, Raymond A. (East Hampton, CT)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

392

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

St. Louis, Missouri. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU),de Beer, 1997. "Energy Efficient Technologies in Industry -and MAIN, 1993. “Energy Technology in the Cement Industrial

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sulfur polymer cement stabilization of elemental mercury mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, is a problem throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report describes the development and testing of a process to immobilize elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, in a form that is non-dispersible, will meet EPA leaching criteria, and has low mercury vapor pressure. In this stabilization and solidification process (patent pending) elemental mercury is mixed with an excess of powdered sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and additives in a vessel and heated to {approximately}35 C, for several hours, until all of the mercury is converted into mercuric sulfide (HgS). Additional SPC is then added and the mixture raised to 135 C, resulting in a homogeneous molten liquid which is poured into a suitable mold where is cools and solidifies. The final stabilized and solidified waste forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, as well as tested for leaching behavior and mercury vapor pressure. During this study the authors have processed the entire inventory of mixed mercury waste stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

Melamed, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Patel, B.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation. The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) under ambient temperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO{sub 2} with Ca(OH){sub 2}, and CaCO{sub 3} was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Deborah N. Huntzinger; John S. Gierke; S. Komar Kawatra; Timothy C. Eisele; Lawrence L. Sutter [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 12, January-March, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is continuing. Results from initial tests in the Dynamic Brine Exposure Testing Apparatus (D-BETA) are available. Based upon initial data, the rate at which cement coupons undergo change in the D-BETA is between that of the static tests and the dynamic exposures at East Mesa. Several cementing compositions have been formulated with chemical, physical and mechanical properties to withstand the existing geothermal conditions. The pumpability of three formulations has been demonstrated and the materials have been submitted to NBS for additional evaluation. The effect of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ on different binders were studied at Colorado School of Mines. The results were found to range from deleterious to beneficial. Phosphate-bonded cements have been produced at the University of Rhode Island from a glass containing 7% Na/sub 2/O, 24% CaO, 24% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 45% SiO/sub 2/. Preliminary tests indicate that the material sets in several hours and appears to have some high temperature stability. Tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate six formulations that are pumpable as long as three hours at 316/sup 0/C. Two formulations, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and ZrO/sub 2/, have been chosen for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C. Polymer concentrates containing cement fillers have been found to be hydrothermally stable in 300/sup 0/C brine. Recommended standards for evaluating geothermal well cements have been developed by NBS. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An Interior Point Constraint Generation Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Optimization with Health-Care Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an interior point constraint generation (IPCG) algorithm for semi-infinite linear optimization (SILO) and prove that the algorithm converges to an ?-solution of SILO after a finite number of constraints is generated. We derive a complexity ... Keywords: second-order cone optimization, sector duration optimization, semi-infinite linear optimization

Mohammad R. Oskoorouchi; Hamid R. Ghaffari; Tamás Terlaky; Dionne M. Aleman

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2010­1229 Unintended rates of nitrogen increase the nitrogen exported from the Yazoo River Basin to the Mississippi River by Michael A. Manning, U.S. Geological Survey. Why has the Production of Biofuels Become Important? Biofuels

398

Linear Instability with Ekman and Interior Friction. Part II: Initial Value Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normal-mode and nonmodal growth are investigated using initial value models. The initial value problems for the Eady and a generalized Eady model (the G model) are solved with no friction and with both Ekman and interior friction. The nonmodel ...

Richard Grotjahn; Roderick Pedersen; Joseph Tribbia

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Measure Guideline: Installing Rigid Foam Insulation on the Interior of Existing Brick Walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This measure guideline provides information on an effective method to insulate the interior of existing brick masonry walls with extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation board. The guide outlines step-by-step design and installation procedures while explaining the benefits and tradeoffs where applicable. The authors intend that this document be useful to a varied audience that includes builders, remodelers, contractors and homeowners.

Natarajan, H.; Klocke, S.; Puttagunta, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Object Library of Algorithms for Dynamic Optimization Problems: Benchmarking SQP and Nonlinear Interior Point Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to describe the design, implementation and possibilities of our object-oriented library of algorithms for dynamic optimization problems. We briefly present library classes for the formulation and manipulation of dynamic ... Keywords: Automatic Differentiation, Dynamic Optimization, Large-Scale Optimization, Nonlinear Interior-Point Methods, Object-Oriented Numerical Computations, Performance Data Analysis, Sequential Quadratic Programming

Jacek B?Aszczyk; Andrzej Karbowski; Krzysztof Malinowski

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but not limited to, taxiway, obstruction, runway edge, threshold, or approach lighting systems

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 124 (2001) 95103 Chandler wobble and geomagnetic jerks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 124 (2001) 95­103 Chandler wobble and geomagnetic and noticing their correlation with geomagnetic jerks [J. Geophys. Res. 103 (B11) (1998) 27069­27089], we signature of this instability is comparable with the typical evolution of the geomagnetic field during

403

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2008 in Hydraulic Conductivity to Represent Bedrock Structure #12;Cover. Photograph showing aerial view looking by David L. Nelms, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Ground-Water Resources Program National Cooperative Geologic

404

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Synoptic surveys of roosting cranes were conducted at night by using an aerial thermal infrared videoU.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2005-3029 April 2005 Assessing, 2001 and 2002 infrared surveys were 552,000, 488,000, and 486,000 birds, respectively. The highest

405

Kuhn-Tucker conditions for a convex programming problem in Banach spaces partially ordered by cone with empty interior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuhn-Tucker conditions for mathematical programming problems in Banach spaces partially ordered by cone with empty interior are obtained under strong simultaneity condition. If partial ordered cone has interior point, it is proved that Slater and strong simultaneity conditions are equivalent.

Ahmetoglu, Feyzullah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Numerical treatment for nonlinear MHD Jeffery-Hamel problem using neural networks optimized with interior point algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper new computational intelligence techniques have been developed for the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Jeffery-Hamel flow problem using three different feed-forward artificial neural networks trained with an interior point method. The ... Keywords: Boundary value problems, Interior point method, Jeffery-Hamel Problem, Neural networks, Nonlinear ODEs, Radial basis function

Muhammad Asif Zahoor Raja, Raza Samar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced high-temperature lightweight foamed cements for geothermal well completions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Foamed cement slurries that were prepared by mixing a cementitious material having a Class H cement-to-silica flour ratio of 1.0 in conjunction with a alpha-olefin sulfate foam surfactant and a coconut diethanolamide foam stabilizer were exposed in an autoclave at a temperature of 300/sup 0/C and a hydrostatic pressure of 2000 psi (13.79 MPa). One lightweight slurry having a density of 9.61 lb/gal (1.15 g/cc) yielded a cellular cement having a compressive strength at 24 hr of >1000 psi (6.9 MPa) and a water permeability of approx.10/sup -3/ darcys. The factors responsible for the attainment of these mechanical and physical properties were identified to be well-crystallized truscottite phases and a uniform distribution of discrete fine bubbles. The addition of graphite fiber reinforcement for the cement matrix significantly suppressed any segregation of foam caused by thermal expansion of the air bubbles and further improved the mechanical characteristics of the cured cements.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Galen, B.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal well cements: current status of R and D and downhole testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status as of October 1981 of the program to develop and test geothermal well cementing materials. The program represents the most comprehensive and thorough examination of the geothermal cementing problem undertaken thus far. To date, 27 cements identified in an R and D phase of the program or supplied by industry have been evaluated in laboratory tests. Sixteen of these materials were selected for downhole investigations currently in progress in Mexico at Cerro Prieto. Data for 3 months exposures to flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C are available. Most of the cements continue to meet the strength and permeability acceptance criteria. These results should be reassuring to operators who are using such slurries. Further evaluations are planned after 6 and 12 months exposures. Contingent upon these results, tests will be initiated at 350{sup 0}C. Since many of the cements were formulated specifically for use at temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, it is expected that significant property improvements may be observed as the downhole temperature is increased.

Kukacka, L.E.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 11, October-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a one month shake-down test at East Mesa, 32 cement formulations were exposed to flowing brine at 150/sup 0/C and 95 psig. Based upon the results from this test, 15 formulations were selected for evaluation in a 2 year test. Experimental work indicates that none of the cements under consideration cause severe corrosion to steel casing. Compared with the possible corrosive attack on the steel casing by the geothermal environment, the corrosive effects of the cement are minimal. A promising cementing composition has been sent to the National Bureau of Standards for additional tests, and at least one more composition will be submitted. Pumpability tests performed on hydrothermal cements indicate several formulations that are pumpable for at least 2 hr at 316/sup 0/C. Polymer concrete samples containing 50 wt% styrene - 35 wt% acrylonitrile - 5 wt% acrylamide - 10 wt% divinyl benzene have not shown any reduction in strength after exposure to 25% brine at 240/sup 0/C for 8 months. This is the highest strength formulation to date and is the first formulation that has not exhibited any strength reduction after brine exposure. Strengths of 204 MPa and 162 MPa were measured at 20/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C, respectively, after 8 months in brine.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current anthropogenic CO 2 emissions worldwide. Given increasing cement demand and production, the industry’s absolute energy

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

New microtextural criterion for differentiation of compaction and early cementation in fine-grained limestones  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of porosity reduction in fine-grained limestones (micrites), the most abundant type of limestone, have been difficult to evaluate because of the fine crystal sizes. Scanning electron microscopy reveals common minute voids termed microfenestrae ({approximately} 1.5-40{mu}m diameter) in Holocene lime muds from all marine carbonate environments studied. Experimental compaction of lime muds greatly reduces abundance of microfenestrae at pressures less than 10 bar. Thus, the abundance of cement-filled microfenestrae in micrites appears to be a widely applicable criterion for recognition of the extent of cementation prior to significant compaction in any given micrite. Microfenestrae in most Phanerozoic micrites studied are about as common as in Holocene lime muds, suggesting that early cementation is a more important mechanism in micrite porosity reduction than recent views have suggested.

Lasemi, Z.; Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford OH (USA)); Sandberg, P.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Prediction of early heat of hydration of plain and blended cements using neuro-fuzzy modelling techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a new approach based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was presented for the prediction of early heat of hydration of plain and blended cements. Two different type of model is trained and tested using these data. The ... Keywords: ANFIS, Cement, Fuzzy logic, Hydration heat, Neural networks

Abdulhamit Subasi; Ahmet Serdar Yilmaz; Hanifi Binici

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The investigation of bioactivity and mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements prepared from Al2O3-SiO2 glass and poly(?-glutamic acid)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theglass ionomer cement as one of the dental cements has been subjected to be widespread application in restoring tooth structure. Most of glass ionomer cements employ the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as the liquid phase, but the presence of PAA inhibits ...

Jinkun Liu, Yoshimitsu Kuwahara, Yuki Shirosaki, Toshiki Miyazaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This paper is an initial effort to compile the available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO2 emissions. This paper consolidates available information on eighteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE  

SciTech Connect

This report is an initial report on the laboratory effort executed under RPP-PLAN-33338, Test Plan for the Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This report delineates preliminary data obtained under subcontract 21065, release 30, from the RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences. The report is predicated on CLS RPT-816, Draft Report: Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This document will be revised on receipt of the final RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences report, which will contain data subjected to quality control and quality assurance criteria.

COOKE GA; DUNCAN JB; LOCKREM LL

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Insulation Retrofit Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies K. Ueno and R. Van Straaten Building Science Corporation (BSC) February 2012 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

417

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

A convergent algorithm for the hybrid problem of reconstructing conductivity from minimal interior data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the hybrid problem of reconstructing the isotropic electric conductivity of a body $\\Omega$ from interior Current Density Imaging data obtainable using MRI measurements. We only require knowledge of the magnitude $|J|$ of one current generated by a given voltage $f$ on the boundary $\\partial\\Omega$. As previously shown, the corresponding voltage potential u in $\\Omega$ is a minimizer of the weighted least gradient problem \\[u=\\hbox{argmin} \\{\\int_{\\Omega}a(x)|\

Moradifam, Amir; Timonov, Alexandre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A design for improved performance of interior permanent magnet synchronous motor for hybrid electric vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the layout of a magnet shape on the performance of an interior permanent magnet (IPM) synchronous motor. The motor is used in a hybrid electric vehicle. The IPM motor is a pancake shaped motor that has permanent magnets inside the rotor. The motor acts as a rotational electrodynamic machine between the engine and transmission. The main purpose of redesigning the shape of the magnet is to improve the motor performance

Seong Yeop Lim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The biological control of brown soft scale Coccus hesperidum L. (Homoptera: Coccidae) in interior plantscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interior plantscape pests consist predominantly of a wide variety of species of Homoptera. Soft scale insects appear to account for one quarter to one third of all significant pest problems associated with interior plantscape environments. Brown soft scale, Coccus hesperidum L., is arguably the most common soft scale pest in these locations. The objective of this research project was to assess the potential for reducing C. hesperidum to non-pest status in interior plantscapes using the techniques of classical biological control. Improved methods for rearing C. hesperidum in the laboratory were developed using All Season" squash and Basalla alba, the Malabar spinach. More than a dozen species of encyrfid and aphelinid parasite species were reared from samples taken from naturally occurring California and Texas populations of C. hesperidum. Emerging parasites were screened for successful reproduction on Texas populations of C. hesperidum, and cultures of the most promising species were initiated. Metaphycus alberti (Howard) was chosen for further experimentation because it was found in low density populations in California, its eggs were not encapsulated by the Texas populations of C. hesperidum, it developed reliably, it was gregarious, it had a simple lifecycle, it had a short developmental time, and it was not present in Texas. Controlled comparison field trials using closed, open, and no sleeve treatments were conducted to measure the effect of release of M. alberti on the population dynamics of C.

Stauffer, Robert Stevens

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Illumination of interior spaces by bended hollow light guides: Application of the theoretical light propagation method  

SciTech Connect

To ensure comfort and healthy conditions in interior spaces the thermal, acoustics and daylight factors of the environment have to be considered in the building design. Due to effective energy performance in buildings the new technology and applications also in daylight engineering are sought such as tubular light guides. These allow the transport of natural light into the building core reducing energy consumption. A lot of installations with various geometrical and optical properties can be applied in real buildings. The simplest set of tubular light guide consists of a transparent cupola, direct tube with high reflected inner surface and a ceiling cover or diffuser redistributing light into the interior. Such vertical tubular guide is often used on flat roofs. When the roof construction is inclined a bend in the light guide system has to be installed. In this case the cupola is set on the sloped roof which collects sunlight and skylight from the seen part of the sky hemisphere as well as that reflected from the ground and opposite facades. In comparison with the vertical tube some additional light losses and distortions of the propagated light have to be expected in bended tubular light guides. Recently the theoretical model of light propagation was already published and its applications are presented in this study solving illuminance distributions on the ceiling cover interface and further illuminance distribution on the working plane in the interior. (author)

Darula, Stanislav; Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kittler, Richard [ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kundracik, Frantisek [Department of Experimental Physics, FMPI, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 19, 2009 ... ash (FA) - geothermal waste (GW) and Portland cement (PC) were investigated. The replacement materials were activated with 1, 4 and 7% of ...

424

EL Highlights July 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Green Concrete; concrete that has up to 50 % of the portland cement replaced with industrial by-product (IBP) materials, such as, fly ash, slag, and ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurements, Standards, and Reference Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the following SRMs have been developed or renewed in collaboration with industry: Completed new and renewal SRMs for steel, Portland cement ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. This report outlines the extensive information that was presented on ass

427

CSER 96-027: storage of cemented plutonium residue containers in 55 gallon drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed for the storage of residual plutonium cementation containers, produced at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, in 55 gallon drums. This CSER increases the limit of total plutonium stored in each 55 gallon drum from 100 to 200 grams.

Watson, W.T.

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Recovery Act Production of Algal BioCrude Oil from Cement Plant Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consortium, led by Sunrise Ridge Algae Inc, completed financial, legal, siting, engineering and environmental permitting preparations for a proposed demonstration project that would capture stack gas from an operating cement plant and convert the carbon dioxide to beneficial use as a liquid crude petroleum substitute and a coal substitute, using algae grown in a closed system, then harvested and converted using catalyzed pyrolysis.

Robert Weber; Norman Whitton

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Recent advances in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the properties of the cured material, the practical use of advanced cementitious materials for geothermal well completions depends primarily upon the ability to predictably extend the thickening times for the precursor slurries at elevated temperatures to times sufficient to permit conventional placement. Ongoing work at Brookhaven National Laboratory being conducted with assistance from the geothermal industry, indicates that lightweight calcium phosphate cement slurries being developed as CO{sub 2{minus}} resistant well completion materials, can be conventional pumped at temperatures > 100{degrees}C without the addition of retarding admixtures. These slurries consist of mullite-shelled hollow microspheres, calcium aluminate cements and polybasic sodium phosphate. When cured in hydrothermal environments, the slurries yield high strength, low permeability cements which bond well to steel casing. Two compositional factors that affect the thickening times were identified. One is the calcium aluminate cement species that serve as the base reagent in the slurry formulation, and the other is the rate of hydrothermal reaction between the microspheres and the polybasic sodium phosphate solution.

Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Modeling of the Aging Viscoelastic Properties of Cement Paste Using Computational Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of the time-dependent behavior of cement paste has always been a difficulty. In the past, viscoelastic behavior of cementitious materials has been primarily attributed to the viscoelastic properties of C-S-H components. Recent experimental results show that C-S-H may not exhibit as much creep and relaxation as previously thought. This requires new consideration of different mechanisms leading to the viscoelastic behavior of cement paste. Thus the objective of this thesis is to build a computational model using finite element method to predict the viscoelastic behavior of cement paste, and using this model, virtual tests can be carried out to improve understanding of the mechanisms of viscoelastic behavior. The primary finding from this thesis is that the apparent viscoelastic behavior due to dissolution of load bearing phases is substantial. The dissolution process occurring during the hydration reaction can change the stress distribution inside cementitious materials, resulting in an apparent viscoelastic behavior of the whole cementitious materials. This finding requires new consideration of mechanisms of time-dependent behavior of cementitious materials regarding the dissolution process of cement paste.

Li, Xiaodan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Effects of oil charge on illite dates and stopping quartz cement: calibration of basin Oil can fill pores in reservoir sandstones at any burial depth by long or short distance migration. There has been a debate since 1920 concerning the effect of oil charge. We have made detailed local

Haszeldine, Stuart

433

Capillary porosity depercolation in cement-based materials: Measurement techniques and factors which influence their interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the service-life of civil engineering infrastructure has led in many cases to the increased use of low w of cracking at early-ages [1,2]. To minimize the risk of early-age cracking several approaches have been­10] and (4) the utilization of expansive cements or additives that can generate an expansion to mitigate

Bentz, Dale P.

434

Cementing of geothermal wells. Progress report No. 7, October--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in work to implement the program plan for the development of improved high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells is reported. Work on the first element of the program management plan (problem definition) was completed and a report issued. The materials development and property verification phases of the plan are in progress. Plans for the down-hole testing phase of the program are being formulated. The most promising high temperature polymer cement (PC) system identified to date consists of a cross-linked mixture of styrene, acrylonitrile, and acrylamide in conjunction with a sand-cement filler. A study is in progress to optimize the concentrations of the mix components with respect to properties. Work to determine the pumpability of the system is in progress. Samples of PC have been removed after exposure at The Geysers to dry steam at 460/sup 0/F (238/sup 0/C) for 2 yrs. Visual inspection of the specimens indicated little apparent deterioration. The appendix includes five reports from contributing researchers on the development of high temperature cementing materials for geothermal wells.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Suitability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to Predict the June 2005 Fire Weather for Interior Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard indices used in the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) and Fosberg fire-weather indices are calculated from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations and observations in interior Alaska for June 2005. Evaluation ...

Nicole Mölders

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Ornament after the orders : Percier, Fontaine and the rise of the architectural interior in post-revolutionary France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the collaborative work in interior decoration undertaken by the French architects Charles Percier (1764-1838) and Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine (1762- 1853), in order to argue that their shared ...

Moon, Iris (Iris Jee)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

On the Role of Interior Mixing and Air-Sea Fluxes in Determining the Stratification and Circulation of the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining the (eastern boundary) basic stratification and the buoyancy-driven circulation of the oceans is addressed. A global integral constraint relating the interior stratification and the air-sea heat fluxes is derived, based ...

Eli Tziperman

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Examining Interior Grid Nudging Techniques Using Two-Way Nesting in the WRF Model for Regional Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates interior nudging techniques using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for regional climate modeling over the conterminous United States (CONUS) using a two-way nested configuration. NCEP–Department of Energy ...

Jared H. Bowden; Tanya L. Otte; Christopher G. Nolte; Martin J. Otte

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electronic detection of molecules on the exterior and molecular transport through the interior of single walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are unique materials with high surface to volume ratio and all atoms residing on the surface. Due to their tubular shape both exterior and interior of the SWNT are available for ...

Lee, Chang Young

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

LITERATURE SURVEY ON CEMENTS FOR REMEDIATION OF DEFORMED CASING IN GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells has been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal's portion of The Geysers geothermal field. Reduced internal diameter and casing doglegs result in lost production and the possible need for abandonment. The cause of the deformations is believed to be formation movement along fault planes and/or along weaker layers or interfaces between high impedance contrast media. Apparently, it is unclear whether shear or axial compression is the dominant failure mechanism. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields. The literature survey focused on published properties for cements used in geothermal and oil well applications and the experiences of well casing deformation occurring in oil and gas fields. Dr. Mike Bruno of Terralog Technologies kindly supplied a reference list from the DEA (Drilling Engineering Association) 99 Project on Analysis of Well Casing Damage Induced by Reservoir Compaction and Overburden Shear.

ALLAN,M.L.; PHILIPPACOPOULOS,A.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Procedure for calculating interior daylight illumination with a programmable hand calculator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A procedure is described for calculating interior daylight illumination using an inexpensive programmable hand calculator. The proposed procedure calculates illumination at any point within a room utilizing sky luminance distribution functions that are consistent with the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) Overcast and Clear Sky functions. This procedure separates the light reaching the point being considered into three components, these being (a) light directly from the sky, (b) light after being reflected from external, and (c) internal surfaces. Finally, two examples are presented in order to demonstrate the proposed procedure and indicate the speed with which the calculations may be performed.

Bryan, H.J.; Clear, R.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effect of Side Permanent Magnets for Reluctance Interior Permanent Magnet Reluctance Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A traditional electric machine uses two dimensional magnetic flux paths in its rotor. This paper presents the development work on the utilization of the third dimension of a rotor. As an example, the air gap flux of a radial gap interior permanent magnet motor can be significantly enhanced by additional permanent magnets (PM) mounted at the sides of the rotor. A prototype motor built with this concept provided higher efficiency and required a shorter stator core length for the same power output as the Toyota/Prius traction drive motor.

Hsu, John S [ORNL; Lee, Seong T [ORNL; Wiles, Randy H [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL; Lowe, Kirk T [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Superionic to superionic phase change in water: consequences for the interiors of Uranus and Neptune  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using density functional molecular dynamics free energy calculations, we show that the body-centered-cubic phase of superionic ice previously believed to be the only phase is in fact thermodynamically unstable compared to a novel phase with oxygen positions in fcc lattice sites. The novel phase has a lower proton mobility than the bc phase and may exhibit a higher melting temperature. We predict a transition between the two phases at a pressure of 1 +/- 0.5 Mbar, with potential consequences for the interiors of ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune.

Wilson, Hugh F; Militzer, Burkhard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Surface Evidence of an Iron-Rich Solar Interior and a Neutron-Rich Solar Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative data on the solar wind, solar magnetic fields, solar eruptions, solar neutrinos, and on the planetary material orbiting the Sun all indicate the presence of an iron-rich solar interior and a neutron star at the core of the Sun. Solar magnetic fields are deep-seated remnants from the core and/or Bose-Einstein condensation of Fe-rich material into a rotating superconductor. Neutron emission from the core triggers a series of reactions that produce solar luminosity, the H carrier gas that maintains mass separation in the Sun, and an outpouring of 3 E43 H+ ions per year in the solar wind.

O. Manuel; Y. Singh

2004-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry such as portland cement, ASTM Class C fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), blends of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

447

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand Opportunities through 2030. Washington, DC: CCAP. Wang,cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofCost of Conserved Final Energy (US$/GJ) Final CCE includingwithout including non-energy benefits, U.S. steel industry (

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Teaming Up to Save Energy guide (U.S. EPA 2006), which isis used throughout this Energy Guide for consistency. For afor Cement Making An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used throughout this Energy Guide for consistency. systemsfor Cement Making, An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantGuide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems. Hydraulic Institute/Europump/ United States Department of Energy.

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry.American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy,Park, NC. Birch, E. , 1990. “Energy Savings in Cement Kiln

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

Han, Jiabin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

UNITED STATES DEPAR~FIENT OF THE INTERIOR GE O U X I CAL S URVEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEPAR~FIENT OF THE INTERIOR DEPAR~FIENT OF THE INTERIOR GE O U X I CAL S URVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 CHEMICAL AllD RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM STREAMS, RESERVOIRS, WELLS, AND SPRINGS I N THE R U L I S O N PROJECT AREA, GARFIELD AND MESA COUNTIES, COLORADO P r e p a r e d under C o n t r a c t A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) - 4 7 4 for the N e v a d a O p e r a t i o n s O f f i c e U . S . A t o m i c E n e r g y C o m m i s s i o n DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Methods of study and d a t a . 3 3 Samples of s u r f a c e w a t e r s . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . . . . . . Samples of w e l l s , s p r i n g s and c i s t e r n s . S e l e c t e d r e f e r e n c e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

454

Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) Database: A Data Synthesis Resource (NDP-92, ORNL/CDIAC-159)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) was an international collaborative project for synthesis of data on ocean interior carbon and its related parameters in the Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES), Section on Carbon and Climate (S-CC) supported the project. Hydrographic/hydrochemical datasets have been merged from a total of 272 cruises, including those from cruises conducted between the late 1980s and 2000 but not included in GLODAP, as well as CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography datasets from the 2000s. Adjustments were calculated to account for analytical offsets in dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients (nitrate and nitrite, phosphate, and silicic acid) for each cruise as a result of the secondary quality control procedure, based on crossover analysis using data from deep layers (Tanhua et al., 2010). A total of 59 adjusted datasets from Line P off the west coast of Canada were also merged. Finally, the authors have produced the adjusted PACIFICA database that consists of datasets from a total of 306 cruises that also includes 34 datasets from WOCE Hydrographic Program cruises in the Pacific Ocean conducted in the 1990s. The PACIFICA database is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP-92) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the primary PACIFICA data site at pacifica.pices.jp. The NDP consists of the original cruise data files, adjusted data product, and the documentation.

Suzuki, T.; Ishii, M.; Aoyama, M. R; Christian, J. R.; Enyo, K.; Kawano, T.; Key, R. M.; Kosugi, N.; Kozyr, A.; Miller, L. A.; Murata, A.; Nakano, T.; Ono, T.; Saino, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sasano, D; Takatani, Y.; Wakita, M.; Sabine, C.

456

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. It supersedes ETL 10-18 of the same title, dated 13 December 2010. It updates guidance in ETL 10-18 regarding: (1) required calculations for LED investment decisions; (2) retrofit design requirements; (3) applicable prohibitions; and (4) environmental considerations. Requirements in this ETL are mandatory. Deviations require approval from the Air Force Electrical SME, HQ AFCESA/CEOA. Requests for deviations must be coordinated through the MAJCOM before submitting to HQ AFCESA/CEOA. Note: LED applications not specifically addressed in this ETL or Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 3-530-01, Interior and Exterior Lighting and Controls, require HQ AFCESA/CEOA approval. Note: Use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this ETL does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. Summary of Revisions: Corrected references to applicable ETLs. 2. Application. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. It supersedes ETL 12-4 of the same title, dated 17 February 2012. Requirements in this ETL are mandatory. Deviations require approval from the Air Force Electrical SME, AFCEC/COS. Requests for deviations must be coordinated through the MAJCOM before submitting to AFCEC/CO. Note: LED applications not specifically addressed in this ETL or Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 3-530-01, Interior and Exterior Lighting and Controls, require AFCESA/CEOA approval. Note: Use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this ETL does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. 2. Summary of Revisions: Updates reference (paragraph 4.3). 3. Application. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but not limited to, taxiway, obstruction, runway edge, threshold, or approach lighting

Tyndall Air; Force Base Florida

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Cavitation erosion of cobalt based STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface treated low alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

Results are given for erosion-resistance tests involving several STELLITE alloys, cemented carbides and surface-treated alloy steels. It is shown that the cobalt-rich, solid-solution phase of the STELLITE alloys is the basis of their erosion resistance, while the erosion of cemented carbides is predominantly controlled by the binder phase. It is also found that nickel-based tungsten carbides are more erosion-resistant than those based on cobalt. It is demonstrated for the case of the low-alloy steels that surface treatment can improve their erosion rates, and that application of a proprietary nitrocarburizing method to the same steels results in a similar performance improvement only after the initial loss of the compound layer.

Heathcock, C.J. (Cape Town, Univ., Rondebosch, Republic of South Africa); Ball, A.

1981-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.

Miller, L.G.; Kunze, J.F.; Sanders, R.D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use, significant NOx reduction, lower emissions, lessof cement produced NOx Reduction in all pollutants relatedNOx control, specifically Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce the primary (fossil) fuel consumption. ” Inresults with traditional fossil fuels. As cement is blendedof these elements in fossil fuels. The subsections below

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Convergence analysis of a balalncing domain decomposition method for solving interior Helmholtz equations  

SciTech Connect

A variant of balancing domain decomposition method by constraints (BDDC) is proposed for solving a class of indefinite system of linear equations, which arises from the finite element discretization of the Helmholtz equation of time-harmonic wave propagation in a bounded interior domain. The proposed BDDC algorithm is closely related to the dual-primal finite element tearing and interconnecting algorithm for solving Helmholtz equations (FETI-DPH). Under the condition that the diameters of the subdomains are small enough, the rate of convergence is established which depends polylogarithmically on the dimension of the individual subdomain problems and which improves with the decrease of the subdomain diameters. These results are supported by numerical experiments of solving a Helmholtz equation on a two-dimensional square domain.

Li,Jing; Tu, Xuemin

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

Applications of elliptic operator theory to the isotropic interior transmission eigenvalue problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper concerns the isotropic interior transmission eigenvalue (ITE) problem. This problem is not elliptic, but we show that, using the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map, it can be reduced to an elliptic one. This leads to the discreteness of the spectrum as well as to certain results on possible location of the transmission eigenvalues. If the index of refraction $\\sqrt{n(x)}$ is real, we get a result on the existence of infinitely many positive ITEs and the Weyl type lower bound on its counting function. All the results are obtained under the assumption that $n(x)-1$ does not vanish at the boundary of the obstacle or it vanishes identically, but its normal derivative does not vanish at the boundary. We consider the classical transmission problem as well as the case when the inhomogeneous medium contains an obstacle. Some results on the discreteness and localization of the spectrum are obtained for complex valued $n(x)$.

Evgeny Lakshtanov; Boris Vainberg

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

467

Analysis of Slanted Air-gap Structure of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Slanted Air-gap Structure of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. This unique slanted permanent magnet synchronous motor FEA finite element analysis PM permanent magnet II. INTRODUCTION

Tolbert, Leon M.

468

Power-Factor and Torque Calculation with Consideration of Cross Saturation of the Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation Seong Taek Lee1,2 , Timothy A. Burress1 permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM). The conventional two-axis IPMSM model is modified to include motor of a hybrid electric vehicle. I. INTRODUCTION The interior permanent magnet synchronous motor

Tolbert, Leon M.

469

A Primal-Dual Decomposition-Based Interior Point Approach to Two-Stage Stochastic Linear Programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision making under uncertainty is a challenge faced by many decision makers. Stochastic programming is a major tool developed to deal with optimization with uncertainties which has found applications in, e.g., finance, such as asset--liability and ... Keywords: Programming, stochastic: decomposition and interior point methods

Arjan Berkelaar; Cees Dert; Bart Oldenkamp; Shuzhong Zhang

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and Bone Cement Leakage: Clinical Experience with a New High-Viscosity Bone Cement and Delivery System for Vertebral Augmentation in Benign and Malignant Compression Fractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of and venous leakage reduction in percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) using a new high-viscosity bone cement (PMMA). PV has been used effectively for pain relief in osteoporotic and malignant vertebral fractures. Cement extrusion is a common problem and can lead to complications. Sixty patients (52 female; mean age, 72.2 {+-} 7.2) suffering from osteoporosis (46), malignancy (12), and angiomas (2), divided into two groups (A and B), underwent PV on 190 vertebrae (86 dorsal, 104 lumbar). In Group A, PV with high-viscosity PMMA (Confidence, Disc-O-Tech, Israel) was used. This PMMA was injected by a proprietary delivery system, a hydraulic saline-filled screw injector. In Group B, a standard low-viscosity PMMA was used. Postprocedural CT was carried out to detect PMMA leakages and complications. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank test were used to assess significant differences (p PV was feasible, achieving good clinical outcome (p < 0.0001) without major complications. In Group A, postprocedural CT showed an asymptomatic leak in the venous structures of 8 of 98 (8.2%) treated vertebrae; a discoidal leak occurred in 6 of 98 (6.1%). In Group B, a venous leak was seen in 38 of 92 (41.3%) and a discoidal leak in 12 of 92 (13.0%). Reduction of venous leak obtained by high-viscosity PMMA was highly significant (p < 0.0001), whereas this result was not significant (p = 0.14) related to the disc. The high-viscosity PMMA system is safe and effective for clinical use, allowing a significant reduction of extravasation rate and, thus, leakage-related complications.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.i [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Zoarski, Gregg [University of Maryland, Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Masala, Salvatore [University 'Tor Vergata', Radiology Unit and Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effect of MgO Additive on Volumetric Expansion of Self-Degradable Cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We identified hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) as a suitable expansive additive for improving the plugging performance of self-degradable, temporary sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) blend cement sealers into rock fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGSs). MgO extended the volumetric expansion of sealers during their exposure to a hydrothermal environment at 200 C under pressures, ranging from 300 to 1500 psi. A great expansion ratc of 19.3% was observed by adding 3.0 wt% MgO under 300 psi pressure, thus promising to plug thoroughly inner fracture. When the pressure was increased from 300 psi to 1500 psi, the expansion rate of cement markedly reduced, corresponding to the formaLion of crack-free specimens and the improvement of compressive strength. However, with 3.0 wt% MgO, the specimens still engendered the generation of numerous visual cracks, although they were prepared under a high pressure of 1500 psi. The effective content of MgO in minimizing and eliminating the generation of cracks was 2.0 wt%, which provided a moderate expansion of {ge} 0.5%. The compressive strength of 2.0 wt% MgO specimens made under a pressure of 300 psi rose {approx} 1.7-fold to 4816 psi with an increasing pressure to 1500 psi. The in-situ growth of brucite crystal formed by the hydrothermal hydration of MgO was responsive for such an expansion of the SSASC cement; meanwhile. two crystalline hydrothermal reaction products, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrated, contributed to the development of the sealer's compressive strength. Thus, the increasing pressure seems to suppress and control a growth rate of brucite crystal in response to a lower extension of expansion. Furthermore, all MgO-conlaining SSASC sealers possessed the water-catalyzed self-degradable properties.

Sugama T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Techno-economic study of CO{sub 2} capture from an existing cement plant using MEA scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Man-made CO{sub 2} emissions contribute approximately 63% of greenhouse gases and the cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of CO{sub 2} emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO{sub 2} per 1000 kg of cement. CO{sub 2} from a cement plant was captured and purified to 98% using the monoethanolamine (MEA) based absorption process. The capture cost was $51 per tonne of CO{sub 2} captured, representing approximately 90% of total cost. Steam was the main operating cost representing 39% of the total capture cost. Switching from coal to natural gas reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by about 18%. At normal load, about 36 MW of waste heat is available for recovery to satisfy the parasitic heat requirements of MEA process; however, it is very difficult to recover.

Hassan, S.M.N.; Douglas, P.L.; Croiset, E. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Techno-economic study of CO{sub 2} capture from an existing cement plant using MEA scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Man-made CO{sub 2} emissions contribute approximately 63% of greenhouse gases and the cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of CO{sub 2} emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO{sub 2} per 1000 kg of cement. CO{sub 2} from a cement plant was captured and purified to 98% using the monoethanolamine (MEA) based absorption process. The capture cost was $51 per tonne of CO{sub 2} captured, representing approximately 90% of total cost. Steam was the main operating cost representing 39% of the total capture cost. Switching from coal to natural gas reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by about 18%. At normal load, about 36 MW of waste heat is available for recovery to satisfy the parasitic heat requirements of MEA process; however, it is very difficult to recover. 18 refs.

S.M. Nazmul Hassan; Peter L. Douglas; Eric Croiset [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

476

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Assessment of radioactivity and the associated hazards in local and imported cement types used in Sudan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activity concentration of sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra and sup 4 sup 0 K in local (Atbra and Rabak) and imported cement types (Jordanian, Indonesian and seabulk) has been measured using a high resolution gamma spectrometry. The average values obtained for sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th, sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra and sup 4 sup 0 K activity concentrations in different cements are lower than the corresponding global values reported in UNSCEAR publications. The radium equivalent (Ra sub e sub q) of the samples was calculated and compared with similar data reported in the literature. The comparison has revealed that Ra sub e sub q values obtained fall far below the criterion limit specified for building materials. The potential radiological hazard of the different samples was estimated using different approaches: representative level index, committed effective dose equivalent via inhalation and annual dose limit. The estimated representative level index for all the samples is less than unity (the upper limit) confi...

Ahmed, N A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE I REPORT AUGUST 1997 - JULY 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In exploring methods to recycle boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS), by-products generated from Keyspan's power plants, into commercially viable materials, we synthesized chemically bonded cements (CBC) offering the following three specific characteristics; (1) immobilization of hazardous heavy metals, such as Pb, Ni, and V, (2) rapid hardening and setting properties, and (3) development of high mechanical strength. The CBCs were prepared through an acid-base reaction between these by-products acting as the solid base reactants and the sodium polyphosphate solution as the cement-forming acid reactant, followed by a hydrating reaction. Furthermore, two additives, the calcium aluminate cements (CAC) and the calcium silicate cements (CSC) were incorporated into the CBC systems to improve their properties. Using a CBC formulation consisting of 53.8 wt% WWTS, 23.1 wt% CSC, and 23.1 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}]{sub 2} the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) tests showed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, and V metals leached out from the specimens were minimal. This formulation originally contained {approx} 28800 mg/kg of Pb, {approx} 6300 mg/kg of Ni, and {approx} 11130 mg/kg of V; the amounts leaching into the acid extraction fluid were only 0.15 mg/L of Pb, 0.15 mg/L of Ni, and 4.63 mgiL of V. On the other hand, CBC specimens derived from a formulation consisting of 42 wt% BA, 18 wt% CAC and 40 wt% [40 wt% -(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}] displayed an excellent compressive strength of 10.8 MPa at an early curing age of 2 hours after mixing at room temperature. The reason for its rapid hardening was due to a high exothermic energy evolved by the acid-base reaction. Furthermore, when these specimens were immersed for 28 days in water at 25 C, and exposed for 20 hours to steam at 80 C, a very high compressive strength of 3.32 MPa developed. Two physico-chemical factors played an important role in improving the mechanical strength of the specimens: One was the formation of two well-crystallized phases, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH)] and sodium vanadium sulfate hydrate [Na{sub 2}V(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},4H{sub 2}O], as the reaction products in the cement bodies; the other factor reflected the dense microstructure developed by the growth of these crystalline reaction products. Accordingly, the CBCs derived from these by-products have a high potential for use as remediating material for hazardous heavy metal-contaminated soils, as rapid-setting repair patching and filling materials for damaged roadways and bridge decks, and also as binders in precast concrete products, such as blocks, slabs, and pipes.

SUGAMA,T.; YAGER,K.A.

2002-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

A visual inspection system for evaluating the interior surface of valve stems on material storage container tops  

SciTech Connect

A nondestructive inspection for evaluating the interior surface of the small diameter valve stems on material storage container tops was mandated. The specifications required that the interior surface of the valve stem have a surface finish of {number sign}16 or better. Conventional methods which utilizes mechanical stylus-type''surface analyzing equipment could not extend into the narrow 0.312 inch diameter by 1.5 inch deep hole (of the valve stem). A visual inspection system which exploits the capabilities of a high resolution fiberoptic borescope was designed and assembled to resolve this requirement. This paper discusses the design and inspection features of the aforementioned system and includes several illustrations of inspection results. 6 figs.

Pickett, C.A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interior portland cement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A Look at the Interior of Mars A. Khan(1), K. Mosegaard(2), Philippe Lognonn(1) and M. Wieczorek(1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Look at the Interior of Mars A. Khan(1), K. Mosegaard(2), Philippe Lognonné(1) and M. Wieczorek(1) Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark khan@ipgp.jussieu.fr Introduction The existence factor (Q). Their values are, in this order, 0.3636±0.0017, 3933±0.4 kg/m3, 0.145±0.017, 92

Benzerara, Karim

482

Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 6, 0.06 Interior construction  

SciTech Connect

General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for conventional and specialty partitions, toilet partitions & accessories, interior doors, paint finishes/coatings/ wall covering systems; floor finishing systems; and ceiling systems.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. PART I. ANELASTIC APPROXIMATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here, we study the properties of gravity waves in stably stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve energy in stably stratified atmospheres, instead conserving pseudo-energies that depend on the stratification, and we demonstrate this numerically. One anelastic equation set does conserve energy in all atmospheres and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number anelastic codes to this set of equations.

Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Vasil, Geoffrey M., E-mail: bpbrown@astro.wisc.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

Not Available

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Cementing plug  

SciTech Connect

A plug for use in wellbore operations is described comprising: shaft means having a first end and a second end, first hollow cup-shaped conical wiper means mounted on the shaft means with its apex pointed in the direction of the first end of the shaft means; second hollow cup-shaped conical wiper means disposed on the shaft means, the second conical wiper means inverted with respect to the first conical wiper means and the second hollow conical wiper means with its apex pointed away from the apex of the first hollow conical wiper means, and the outer edges of the first and second conical wiper means are in contact.

Schneider, D.E.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

Cementing plug  

SciTech Connect

A wellbore plug is described for use in a cased wellbore wherein breakaway plugs protrude into the casing, the wellbore plug comprising: shaft means, first flexible wiper means mounted on the shaft means, breaking means for breaking the breakaway plugs, the breaking means mounted on the shaft means and spaced apart from the first flexible wiper means, the breaking means having insert means for providing rigidity to enhance the breaking means ability to break the breakaway plugs, second flexible wiper means mounted on the shaft means and spaced apart from the breaking means, the breaking means mounted at an intermediate position between the first flexible wiper means and the second flexible wiper means, the first flexible wiper means flexible enough to bypass one or more of the breakaway plugs without breaking them, and the breaking means rigid enough for breaking one or more of the breakaway plugs bypassed by the first flexible wiper means.

Schneider, D.E.

1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

487

Occurrence of Sustained Droughts in the Interior Pacific Northwest (A.D. 1733–1980) Inferred from Tree-Ring Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of moderate and severe sustained droughts in the interior Pacific Northwest (PNW) from 1733 to 1980 was mapped using 18 western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. occidentalis Hook.) tree-ring chronologies. The frequency and ...

Paul A. Knapp; Peter T. Soulé; Henri D. Grissino-Mayer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

67006 67006 INFORMAL REPORT PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT- BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS FINAL REPORT FY 1999 M.L. Allan and A.J. Philippacopoulos November 1999 Prepared for: Office of Geothermal Technologies United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Materials and Chemical Sciences Division DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agenc:y of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makers any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility of the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

489

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-003-2012_Cementing Research Needs_20121207.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Research Needs Assessment of Research Needs Related to Improving Primary Cement Isolation of Formations in Deep Offshore We