Sample records for interim monthly values

  1. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  2. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Value Proposition Study: Interim Report: Phase I Scenario Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, Karen R [ORNL; Markel, Lawrence C [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Hinds, Shaun [Sentech, Inc.; DeVault, Robert C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) offer significant improvements in fuel economy, convenient low-cost recharging capabilities, potential environmental benefits, and decreased reliance on imported petroleum. However, the cost associated with new components (e.g., advanced batteries) to be introduced in these vehicles will likely result in a price premium to the consumer. This study aims to overcome this market barrier by identifying and evaluating value propositions that will increase the qualitative value and/or decrease the overall cost of ownership relative to the competing conventional vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) of 2030 During this initial phase of this study, business scenarios were developed based on economic advantages that either increase the consumer value or reduce the consumer cost of PHEVs to assure a sustainable market that can thrive without the aid of state and Federal incentives or subsidies. Once the characteristics of a thriving PHEV market have been defined for this timeframe, market introduction steps, such as supportive policies, regulations and temporary incentives, needed to reach this level of sustainability will be determined. PHEVs have gained interest over the past decade for several reasons, including their high fuel economy, convenient low-cost recharging capabilities, potential environmental benefits and reduced use of imported petroleum, potentially contributing to President Bush's goal of a 20% reduction in gasoline use in ten years, or 'Twenty in Ten'. PHEVs and energy storage from advanced batteries have also been suggested as enabling technologies to improve the reliability and efficiency of the electric power grid. However, PHEVs will likely cost significantly more to purchase than conventional or other hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), in large part because of the cost of batteries. Despite the potential long-term savings to consumers and value to stakeholders, the initial cost of PHEVs presents a major market barrier to their widespread commercialization. The purpose of this project is to identify and evaluate value-added propositions for PHEVs that will help overcome this market barrier. Candidate value propositions for the initial case study were chosen to enhance consumer acceptance of PHEVs and/or compatibility with the grid. Potential benefits of such grid-connected vehicles include the ability to supply peak load or emergency power requirements of the grid, enabling utilities to size their generation capacity and contingency resources at levels below peak. Different models for vehicle/battery ownership, leasing, financing and operation, as well as the grid, communications, and vehicle infrastructure needed to support the proposed value-added functions were explored during Phase 1. Rigorous power system, vehicle, financial and emissions modeling were utilized to help identify the most promising value propositions and market niches to focus PHEV deployment initiatives.

  3. Interim Draft for Internal NASA Use Only NASA SPACE FLIGHT PROGRAM AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    ............................................................................40 2.6 Use of Earned Value ManagementInterim Draft for Internal NASA Use Only INTERIM NASA SPACE FLIGHT PROGRAM AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT............................................................................................................................2 1.4 Overview of Management Process

  4. INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004 CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY Health and Safety POLICY 2 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ POLICY STATEMENT. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ REASON FOR POLICY

  5. Policy Statement and Interim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemami, Sheila S.

    1 Policy Statement and Interim Procedures CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY POLICY 8.3 Volume: 8 Emergency Planning POLICY STATEMENT Cornell University organizes, coordinates, and directs available of this effort is dependent on the development of periodic review of comprehensive plans. This policy includes

  6. LOUISE LENNIHAN Interim Provost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennehy, John

    is Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at the Graduate Center. In her role, she and Effectiveness, the Mina Rees Library, Student Affairs, and Research and Sponsored Programs, as well from the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, NIMH, and Fulbright

  7. Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Interim Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Press Release Aug 16, 2001 Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs...

  8. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  9. Interim Action Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1 DOEAnalysisInterim

  10. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasaki, Tomonari [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Kyushu Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Araya, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  11. Interim Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Abrams; S. K. Agarwalla; A. Alekou; C. Andreopoulos; C. M. Ankenbrandt; S. Antusch; M. Apollonio; M. Aslaninejad; J. Back; P. Ballett; G. Barker; K. B. Beard; E. Benedetto; J. R. J. Bennett; J. S. Berg; S. Bhattacharya; V. Blackmore; M. Blennow; A. Blondel; A. Bogacz; M. Bonesini; C. Bontoiu; C. Booth; C. Bromberg; S. Brooks; A. Bross; O. Caretta; A. Cervera-Villanueva; S. Choubey; D. Cline; J. Cobb; P. Coloma; L. Coney; M. A. C. Cummings; T. Davenne; A. de Gouvea; C. Densham; X. Ding; A. Donini; P. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Eccleston; R. Edgecock; I. Efthymiopoulos; M. Ellis; E. Fernandez-Martinez; R. Fernow; G. Flanagan; J. C. Gallardo; R. Gandhi; R. Garoby; B. Gavela; S. Geer; S. Gilardoni; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; S. Goswami; V. B. Graves; R. Gupta; G. Hanson; P. Harrison; T. Hart; P. Hernandez; P. Huber; D. Indumathi; R. P. Johnson; C. Johnstone; Y. Karadzhov; D. Kelliher; H. Kirk; J. Kopp; Y. Kudenko; Y. Kuno; A. Kurup; P. Kyberd; A. Laing; T. Li; M. Lindner; K. Long; J. Lopez Pavon; P. Loveridge; S. Machida; D. Majumdar; M. Maltoni; J. Martin-Albo; M. Martini; R. Matev; K. T. McDonald; A. McFarland; D. Meloni; M. Mezzetto; P. Migliozzi; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; N. Mondal; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; V. Morozov; D. Neuffer; T. Ota; V. Palladino; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; J. Peltoniemi; R. Petti; T. Planche; M. Popovic; J. Pozimski; G. Prior; C. Prior; G. Rees; S. Rigolin; T. J. Roberts; Y. Roblin; C. Rogers; R. Samulyak; T. Schwetz; N. Simos; N. Sinha; G. Skoro; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; N. Souchlas; J. Strait; D. Stratakis; S. Striganov; J. Tang; J. W. G. Thomason; L. Tortora; R. Tsenov; W. Winter; H. Witte; O. Yasuda; C. Y. Yoshikawa; M. Zisman

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) was established by the community at the ninth "International Workshop on Neutrino Factories, super-beams, and beta- beams" which was held in Okayama in August 2007. The IDS-NF mandate is to deliver the Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility on the timescale of 2012/13. In addition, the mandate for the study [3] requires an Interim Design Report to be delivered midway through the project as a step on the way to the RDR. This document, the IDR, has two functions: it marks the point in the IDS-NF at which the emphasis turns to the engineering studies required to deliver the RDR and it documents baseline concepts for the accelerator complex, the neutrino detectors, and the instrumentation systems. The IDS-NF is, in essence, a site-independent study. Example sites, CERN, FNAL, and RAL, have been identified to allow site-specific issues to be addressed in the cost analysis that will be presented in the RDR. The choice of example sites should not be interpreted as implying a preferred choice of site for the facility.

  12. Stump Harvesting: Interim Guidance on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including biomass for fossil fuel substitution. Forest harvesting residues are increasingly being used to supply biomass for heat and power generation in the UK and attention is now turning to the potentialStump Harvesting: Interim Guidance on Site Selection and Good Practice Forest Research, April 2009

  13. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  14. associations interim guidelines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the MacAdam, Keith 20 RESEARCH REPORT 1405-5 INTERIM CONCLUSIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS, Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: RESEARCH REPORT 1405-5 INTERIM...

  15. Interim activities report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majzlik, E.H. Jr.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several developments have occurred since the 32nd WANTO Meeting that effect the status of the Savannah River Site. A request to restart K-Reactor was issued after nearly three years of intensive engineering analysis, procedure revisions and enhanced operator training to upgrade all aspects of reactor operation. In early December 1991, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company requested permission from DOE to start the K-Reactor. In mid-December the DOE and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board concurred with readiness to operate and a Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against a lawsuit to delay restart until a cooling tower is completed. The K-Reactor was restarted and has been in an evaluation and testing mode. Full power operation at thirty percent of maximum capacity is projected for March 1992 after which actual tritium generation will begin. Operation will continue until October when the cooling tower will be tied into the reactor cooling system. In conjunction with the restart of K-Reactor, the P-Reactor has been placed in permanent shutdown status and the L-Reactor has been placed in warm stand-by. In another reactor related situation, the DOE will delay the decision on construction of the New Production Reactor (NPR) until 1993. The choice of reactor type and location of the NPR will be integrated into the overall programmatic decision on Reconfiguration of the Weapons Complex. Finally, construction of the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) was resumed in December 1991 after several months stoppage for evaluation and revision of project funding procedures.

  16. Tritium APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Tritium APEX Interim Report November, 1999 16-1 CHAPTER 16: TRITIUM Contributors Lead Author: Dai Kai Sze #12;Tritium APEX Interim Report November, 1999 16-2 16. TRITIUM 16.1 Design constraints Tritium recovery and containment are some of the key issues associated with breeding blanket design

  17. Monthly Teleconferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee the Foundry's fullMonthly NUG

  18. Usefulness of Interim FDG-PET After Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Sequential Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Cho, Yoojin [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Roh, Jong-Lyel [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Bae, E-mail: sbkim3@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) has been used to select patients for organ preservation and determine subsequent treatments in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN). Still, the clinical outcomes of LASCCHN patients who showed response to ICT are heterogeneous. We evaluated the efficacy of interim 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after ICT in this specific subgroup of LASCCHN patients who achieved partial response (PR) after ICT to predict clinical outcomes after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with LASCCHN who showed PR to ICT by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors before definitive CCRT were chosen in this retrospective analysis. FDG-PET was performed before and 2-4 weeks after ICT to assess the extent of disease at baseline and the metabolic response to ICT, respectively. We examined the correlation of the metabolic response by the percentage decrease of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on the primary tumor or lymph node after ICT or a specific threshold of SUVmax on interim FDG-PET with clinical outcomes including complete response (CR) rate to CCRT, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: A SUVmax of 4.8 on interim FDG-PET could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 20%, p = 0.001), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.5 mo, p < 0.001), and OS (median, not reached vs. 12.0 months, p = 0.001) with a median follow-up of 20.3 months in surviving patients. A 65% decrease in SUVmax after ICT from baseline also could predict clinical CR after CCRT (100% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), PFS (median, not reached vs. 8.9 months, p < 0.001) and OS (median, not reached vs. 24.4 months, p = 0.001) of the patients. Conclusion: These data suggest that interim FDG-PET after ICT might be a useful determinant to predict clinical outcomes in patients with LASCCHN receiving sequential ICT followed by CCRT.

  19. 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas...

  20. Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and 2020 Cost Targets Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and...

  1. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, P.L.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location.

  2. NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  3. CSUF A.S. Bylaws Interim UPS 100.001 Interim UPS 100.001 Cover Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    CSUF A.S. Bylaws ­ Interim UPS 100.001 Interim UPS 100.001 Cover Page Effective Date: 1-2-13 UPS 100.001 ACADEMIC SENATE BYLAWS Interim UPS 100.001 includes sections moved from UPS 100 faculty in a special election held spring 2011 (ASD 11-64). UPS 100.001 (BYLAWS) to be edited

  4. Interim Process Agreement Proposal June 3, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interim Process Agreement Proposal June 3, 2003 Overview For the near term, the Columbia Basin Fish) return to the planning and budget management process patterned after the 1996-2001 Bonneville Power implementation of the Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) through a quarterly review process, 3) establishing

  5. 222-S Laboratory interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEAVER, L.L.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to establish the Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for the 222-S Laboratory. An ISB is a documented safety basis that provides the justification for the continued operation of the facility until an upgraded documented safety analysis (DSA) is prepared in compliance with 10CFR 830, Subpart B. The 222-S Laboratory ISB is based on revised facility and process descriptions and revised accident analyses that reflect current conditions.

  6. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford nuclear reservation. Workers had to pass through metal detectors when they arrived at the plant and materials leaving the plant had to be scanned for security reasons. Whereas other high-security nuclear materials were shipped from the PFP to Savannah River, S.C. as part ofa Department of Energy (DOE) program to consolidate weapons-grade plutonium, it was determined that the SIF should remain onsite pending disposition to a national repository. Nevertheless, the SIF still requires a high level of security that the PFP complex has always provided. With the 60-year PFP mission of producing and storing plutonium concluded, the environmental cleanup plans for Hanford call for the demolition of the 63-building PFP complex. Consequently, if the SIF remained at PFP it not only would have interfered with the environmental cleanup plans, but would have required $100 million in facility upgrades to meet increased national security requirements imposed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. A new smaller and more cost-effective area was needed to store this material, which led to the SIF Project. Once the SIF project was successfully completed and the SIF was safely removed from PFP, the existing Protected Area at PFP could be removed, and demolition could proceed more quickly without being encumbered by restrictive security requirements that an active Protected Area requires. The lightened PFP security level brought by safely removing and storing the SIF would also yield lowered costs for deactivation and demolition, as well as reduce overall life-cycle costs.

  7. Interim Vice President/CFO Administration and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Interim Vice President/CFO Administration and Finance Stephen G. Garcia Associate Vice President Project Management Tinnah Medina Director Facilities Operations Willem van der Pol Manager Finance & Admin

  8. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NRDC's comments on Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential...

  9. ORSSAB Monthly Board Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Monthly Board meeting is open to the public. This month, participants will be briefed on the East Tennessee Technology Park Zone 1 Soils Proposed Plan.

  10. ORSSAB monthly board meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB monthly board meeting is open to the public. This month, participants will receive an update on the U-233 Project.

  11. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  12. INTERIM VALIDATION REPORT MIDDLE DISTILLATE PRICE MONITORING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopelain, D.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in FEA's "Monthly Energy Review," "Monthly PetroleumEIA 0031). Monthly Energy Review. (EIA 0035) MonthlyEIA-0031) e Monthly Energy Review (EIA 0035) Monthly

  13. Materials Considerations and Data Base APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Materials Considerations and Data Base APEX Interim Report November, 1999 13-1 CHAPTER 13: MATERIALS CONSIDERATIONS AND DATA BASE Contributors Lead Author: S.J. Zinkle S. Majumdar N.M. Ghoniem S. Sharafat. #12;Materials Considerations and Data Base APEX Interim Report November, 1999 13-2 13. MATERIALS

  14. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

  15. Flatiron AGC Interim Controller. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gish, W.B.; Whittemore, T.R.; Lennon, C.A. Jr.; Stitt, S.C.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flatiron Interim Automatic Generation Controller has been placed in service for the Lower Missouri Western Area Power Administration Control Area. This controller meets the requirements of the National Electric Reliability Council and controls the energy generation and transfers in northern Colorado, Wyoming, western Nebraska, western South Dakota, and southern Montana. The master controller is based on five interacting microprocessors with unique communication structures and data storage methods. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation details for the master station and the remote stations, including flow charts, schematics, and wiring diagrams, are in this four-volume series.

  16. Interim Solution 2.0 Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National Nuclear SecurityIntellectualInterconnectingInterim

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Declining coal stockpiles are a normal pattern most years from January to February as coal-fired generators meet winter electricity demand. The month-to-month stockpile change...

  18. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAY TH

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

  19. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17, 2015 - SEAB8 An employee7693 May

  20. AGR-1 Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machael Abbott

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) experiment, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY09 qualification status of the AGR-1 data to date. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category, which is assigned by the data generator, and include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent QA program. The interim qualification status of the following four data streams is reported in this document: (1) fuel fabrication data, (2) fuel irradiation data, (3) fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data, and (4) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operating conditions data. A final report giving the NDMAS qualification status of all AGR-1 data (including cycle 145A) is planned for February 2010.

  1. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  2. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT SOLAR REFLECTANCES OF ROOFS: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Solar Reflectances

  3. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  4. Electromagnetically Restrained Lithium Blanket APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    to avoid corrosion or fire. Lithium's high electrical conductivity may possibly permit efficient, compactElectromagnetically Restrained Lithium Blanket APEX Interim Report November, 1999 6-1 CHAPTER 6: ELECTROMAGNETICALLY RESTRAINED LITHIUM BLANKET Contributors Robert Woolley #12;Electromagnetically Restrained Lithium

  5. area interim storage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spot Height Northern British Columbia, University of 3 In Situ Bioremediation Interim Remedial Action Report, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B CiteSeer Summary: This...

  6. Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

  7. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  8. SAHP Faculty Assembly Resolution 04-01 Commendation of Performance of Jimmy Cairo, Ph.D. as Interim Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAHP Faculty Assembly Resolution 04-01 Commendation of Performance of Jimmy Cairo, Ph.D. as Interim the performance of Jimmy Cairo, Ph.D. while he has served as Interim Dean for the SAHP. While serving as Interim

  9. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  10. ORSSAB monthly meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This month's ORSSAB board meeting will focus on the ETTP Zone 1 soils proposed plan. The meeting is open to the public.

  11. Native American Heritage Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This month, we celebrate the rich heritage and myriad contributions of American Indians and Alaska Natives, and we rededicate ourselves to supporting tribal sovereignty, tribal self-determination,...

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains...

  13. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO...

  14. National Osteoporosis Prevention Month

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAY National Osteoporosis Prevention Month JUNE National Dairy Month Texas AgriLife Extension - Bone Health Power Point # P4-1 Eat Smart for Bone Health # P4-2 Osteoporosis Disease Statistics # P4-3 Osteoporosis = Porous Bones # P4-4 Risk Factors # P4-5 Risk Factors (continued) # P4-6 Steps to Prevention # P4

  15. National Women's History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During Women's History Month, we recall that the pioneering legacy of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers is revealed not only in our museums and history books, but also in the fierce...

  16. ORSSAB monthly board meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB monthly board meeting is open to the public. The board will receive an update on the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee efforts at the East Tennessee Technology Park.

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New England and New York City. In the electricity markets, 12-month lows were set at all pricing points except Louisiana and Northwest. Even more unique is that these low prices...

  18. Disability Employment Awareness Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utilizing the talents of all Americans is essential for our Nation to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world.  During National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we...

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    while warm weather caused low demand levels in the West. The natural gas price for New York City (Transco Zone 6 NY) saw a significant increase in price from the previous month,...

  20. Black History Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During National African American History Month, we pay tribute to the contributions of past generations and reaffirm our commitment to keeping the American dream alive for the next generation.  In...

  1. BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” created by historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating black history.

  2. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  3. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. The plan is based on realistic assumptions and addresses three separate funding scenarios.

  4. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  5. Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehm, J.R.; Deobald, T.L.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings.

  6. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly5 Monthly

  7. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly5 Monthly

  8. September 2015 Monthly Planner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On Monthly Pay Day 2 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On 3 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On 4 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On 5 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On 6 All HR/Payroll Responsibilities On BW PPE Sch Disabled @5:00pm - HRMS Specialist - Fac

  9. Monthly energy review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  10. Monthly energy review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information are provided on the topics of energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. (VC)

  11. Monthly Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  12. Monthly energy review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  13. Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports Energy Action Month by offering materials that promote energy- and water-saving practices in Federal facilities. This year's outreach materials call on Federal employees to take action and empower leadership, innovation, and excellence to realize a secure energy future.

  14. November 2010 monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Warren E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    These viewgraphs are to be provided to NNSA to update the status of the B61 Life Extension Project work and activities. The viewgraphs cover such issues as budget, schedule, scope, and the like. They are part of the monthly reporting process.

  15. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  16. Single Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VLADIMIROFF, D.T.; BOYLES, V.C.

    2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  17. Division of Residential and Campus Communities Review Interim Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    Division of Residential and Campus Communities Review Interim Report December 2013 As stressed in the University's strategic plan ANU by 2020, the residential experience is a key aspect of the holistic ANU experience of all students by providing a richer residential experience for on-campus students and more

  18. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  19. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  20. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  2. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  3. Monthly energy review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Monthly Energy Review contains preliminary energy summary data for 1982. A 4.3% decline in total energy consumption marked the third year in a row that domestic energy consumption fell. Decreases in the consumption of petroleum, natural gas, and coal contributed to the decline but were offset somewhat by increased use of hydroelectric and nuclear power. Because demand for energy was down, a lower level of imports was sufficient to meet US energy needs.

  4. Petroleum marketing monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State1,237ContactElectricity Monthly

  6. Project of the Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM Exit Procedures.docTheproject-of-the-month Office of

  7. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40Monthly Biodiesel

  8. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40Monthly BiodieselU.S.

  9. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40Monthly BiodieselU.S.U.S.

  10. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40Monthly

  11. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40MonthlyBiodiesel producers

  12. Monthly Biodiesel Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40MonthlyBiodiesel

  13. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJuly 28,September 25,1Monthly

  14. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJuly 28,September 25,1Monthly3

  15. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.1 Monthly

  16. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.1 Monthly0

  17. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.1 Monthly02

  18. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.1 Monthly025

  19. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.1 Monthly0256

  20. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19 Monthly

  1. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19 Monthly1

  2. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19 Monthly13

  3. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19 Monthly132

  4. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.197 Monthly

  5. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.197 Monthly4

  6. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.197 Monthly46

  7. Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19749 Monthly

  8. Monthly Reports 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010Monthly Reports

  9. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly

  10. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly5

  11. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly5

  12. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly52

  13. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly521

  14. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly5218

  15. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly52180

  16. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p3 Monthly521806

  17. Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

  18. Value Engineering

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that establishs and maintains cost-effective value procedures and processes.

  19. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  20. Immobilized high-level waste interim storage alternatives generation and analysis and decision report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a study of alternative system architectures to provide onsite interim storage for the immobilized high-level waste produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) privatization vendor. It examines the contract and program changes that have occurred and evaluates their impacts on the baseline immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) interim storage strategy. In addition, this report documents the recommended initial interim storage architecture and implementation path forward.

  1. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  2. Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

  3. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors More Documents & Publications Information Request, "THE REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT...

  4. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for July 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    River Protection Project (RPP) performance for the month of July 2000 was very good. The most significant accomplishments that occurred during the month include the following: The Interim Stabilization Project pumped approximately 30,000 gallons from four tanks. Project-to-date (since June 1998) volume pumped is approximately 808,000 gallons. Five tanks have been interim stabilized this fiscal year, and tanks 241-S-106,241-U-103, and 241-U-105 are being evaluated to determine if the stabilization criteria have been met. Out of the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 124 tanks have been stabilized. Pumping this waste from the single-shell tanks to more secure double-shell tanks (DSTs) supports stabilization of the waste tanks and mitigates leakage to the environment. The Interim Stabilization Project is planned to complete by September 2004. Waste Characterization obtained one grab sample in the month of July 2000. A total of 14 core samples, 12 grab samples, and 6 vapor samples have been taken fiscal year-to-date (FYTD) in support of three key FY 2000 sampling milestones. The Waste Treatment Plant Design and Operation organizations have been developed and staffed, including transitioning BNFL Inc./Bechtel National Inc. employees to CHG. Since the termination of the BNFL contract, CHG has temporarily assumed the work scope for design and operation of the Waste Treatment Plant. A new waste treatment facility will be built at the Hanford Site in which highly radioactive waste from the tanks will be turned into glass and permanently stored. Approval of the Notice of Construction (NOC) for the AN Farm tank retrieval system was received from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency on July 21,2000. This is a significant step forward for Project W-211, ''Initial Tank Retrieval Systems'' in preparing waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant.

  5. Monthly energy review, August 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistics are cumulated monthly and annually for production, consumption, and imports for petroleum, natural gas, coal and electric power.

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  8. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  9. Interim activities report. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majzlik, E.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several developments have occurred since the 32nd WANTO Meeting that effect the status of the Savannah River Site. A request to restart K-Reactor was issued after nearly three years of intensive engineering analysis, procedure revisions and enhanced operator training to upgrade all aspects of reactor operation. In early December 1991, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company requested permission from DOE to start the K-Reactor. In mid-December the DOE and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board concurred with readiness to operate and a Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against a lawsuit to delay restart until a cooling tower is completed. The K-Reactor was restarted and has been in an evaluation and testing mode. Full power operation at thirty percent of maximum capacity is projected for March 1992 after which actual tritium generation will begin. Operation will continue until October when the cooling tower will be tied into the reactor cooling system. In conjunction with the restart of K-Reactor, the P-Reactor has been placed in permanent shutdown status and the L-Reactor has been placed in warm stand-by. In another reactor related situation, the DOE will delay the decision on construction of the New Production Reactor (NPR) until 1993. The choice of reactor type and location of the NPR will be integrated into the overall programmatic decision on Reconfiguration of the Weapons Complex. Finally, construction of the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) was resumed in December 1991 after several months stoppage for evaluation and revision of project funding procedures.

  10. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

  11. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  12. Synergy between Liquid Walls and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Synergy between Liquid Walls and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999 15-1 CHAPTER 15: SYNERGISM BETWEEN LIQUID METAL WALLS, TOKAMAK PHYSICS PERFORMANCE, AND REACTOR ATTRACTIVENESS and Tokamak Physics Performance APEX Interim Report November, 1999 15-2 15. SYNERGISM BETWEEN LIQUID METAL

  13. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  14. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  15. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  16. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  17. Monthly energy review, September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal represents an important energy source in the United States, providing the fuel for over 50 percent of the Nation`s electricity since 1980. However, the amount of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, emitted into the atmosphere as a result of coal combustion is significant and has raised a concern over its possible contribution to global warming. The need to produce accurate estimates of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from coal consumption has led the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop carbon dioxide emission factors. This article presents the factors developed by EIA for use in estimating the carbon dioxide emissions from coal, and introduces a new appendix to the Monthly Energy Review. It describes the relationship between the carbon content and the heat value of coal, and the development of basic emission factors by coal rank and State of origin of the coal. It also describes how these basic emission factors are weighted by the specific rank and origin of the coal consumed by sector and State to produce a second set of emission factors that reflect accurate estimates of carbon dioxide emissions. The weighted factors, which were statistically tested by EIA, are the first factors to account for State-by-State variations within a given rank of coal. Carbon dioxide emission factors are expressed in pound per million Btu of energy. (The Btu, or British thermal unit, is a unit of measure of heat that allows analysts to compare different forms of energy).

  18. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, J.R.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell equipment developed and used for the first ten years of operation has been primarily devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the Interim Examina Examination and Maintenance Cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell's demonstrated versatility has shown its capability to support a challenging future. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  20. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single- and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and its performance as early as possible in the project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives.

  1. US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

  2. Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim Final Rule

  3. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim

  4. Monthly energy review, January 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Major activities covered include production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  5. Monthly energy review, December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  6. Monthly energy review, January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  7. Monthly energy review. May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents recent energy monthly statistics on the production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  8. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  9. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  11. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  12. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 75 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 91 tabs.

  15. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  17. Monthly energy review, November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  18. Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.

  19. Monthly energy review, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  20. Monthly energy review, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 74 tabs.

  1. Monthly energy review, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  3. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Monthly energy review, October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  6. Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomauske, B. R.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005.

  7. Natural gas monthly, June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural gas monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article for this month is Natural Gas Industry Restructuring and EIA Data Collection.

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  9. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  11. Monthly energy review, August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  12. Monthly energy review, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Activities covered include: U.S. production, consumption, trade, stock, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  13. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  14. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  15. Monthly energy review, March 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a monthly report by the Energy Information Administration on the production, consumption, stocks, imports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. International energy data is also presented. 46 figs., 58 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review, January 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly Energy Review contains statistical information on energy sources including petroleum, natural gas, coal and nuclear energy. Information on energy consumption, oil and gas resource development, electricity, energy prices and international energy is provided. (VC)

  17. Monthly energy review, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  18. Monthly Energy Review, August 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. The Monthly Energy Review is intended to provide timely energy information to members of Congress, to federal and state agencies, and to the general public.

  19. Monthly energy review, January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. The Monthly Energy Review is intended to provide timely energy information to Members of Congress, to Federal and State agencies, and to the general public.

  20. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  2. Natural gas monthly, October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Natural gas monthly, June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  4. Natural gas monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Natural gas monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. Monthly energy review, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy data. A brief summary of the monthly and historical comparison data is provided in Section 1 of the report. A highlight section of the report provides an assessment of summer 1997 motor gasoline price increases.

  12. Natural Gas Monthly, March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  13. Natural gas monthly, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Radiation site cleanup regulation: An interim progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 18 and 19, 1993, the 13 members of the National Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT) Subcommittee on Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations met in Washington D.C. at the invitation of EPA. The Subcommittee discussed a variety of topics relevant to the cleanup of sites contaminated with radiation, and to the regulations which EPA will promulgate to establish cleanup levels for radioactive sites. This Interim Progress Report: condenses and summarizes the major themes, issues, and concerns brought up during the NACEPT Subcommittee meeting in October; Provides a brief description of current Agency thinking regarding each of the major topic areas discussed by the NACEPT Subcommittee; and Serves as a discussion guide for NACEPT Subcommittee members. Four major topics were discussed by the NACEPT Subcommittee members during their first meeting in October 1993: Common Themes; Risk (or Cleanup Levels and Risk Levels); Future Land Use and Local Statutes; and Site-Specific Public Involvement.

  17. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  18. 1998 interim 242-A Evaporator tank system integrity assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Integrity Assessment Report (IAR) is prepared by Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) under contract to Lockheed-Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) for Waste Management Hanford (WMH), the 242-A Evaporator (facility) operations contractor for Fluor Daniel Hanford, and the US Department of Energy, the system owner. The contract specifies that FDNW perform an interim (5 year) integrity assessment of the facility and prepare a written IAR in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640. The WAC 173-303 defines a treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facility tank system as the ``dangerous waste storage or treatment tank and its ancillary equipment and containment.`` This integrity assessment evaluates the two tank systems at the facility: the evaporator vessel, C-A-1 (also called the vapor-liquid separator), and the condensate collection tank, TK-C-100. This IAR evaluates the 242-A facility tank systems up to, but not including, the last valve or flanged connection inside the facility perimeter. The initial integrity assessment performed on the facility evaluated certain subsystems not directly in contact with dangerous waste, such as the steam condensate and used raw water subsystems, to provide technical information. These subsystems were not evaluated in this IAR. The last major upgrade to the facility was project B-534. The facility modifications, as a result of project B-534, were evaluated in the 1993 facility interim integrity assessment. Since that time, the following upgrades have occurred in the facility: installation of a process condensate recycle system, and installation of a package steam boiler to provide steam for the facility. The package boiler is not within the scope of the facility TSD.

  19. ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

  20. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

  1. H.A.R. 11-265 - Hazardous Management: Interim Status Standard...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 11-265 - Hazardous Management: Interim Status Standard for Owners and OperatorsLegal Abstract The...

  2. TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director of Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director in the current fiscal year. Purchase Requisitions: Purchases under $10,000 (Includes Corporate Express) June 11

  3. Basis for Interim Operation for the K-Reactor in Cold Standby

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document for K Reactor in Cold Standby and the L- and P-Reactor Disassembly Basins was prepared in accordance with the draft DOE standard for BIO preparation (dated October 26, 1993).

  4. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  5. Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

  6. Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings for Victoria High School: Interim Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Reddy, T. A.; Katipamula, S.; Claridge, D. E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-92/12-03 Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings For Victoria High School Yue Liu, T. Agami Reddy, S. Katipamula and David E. Claridge. Interim Report Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 December... 1992 Calculating Energy and Demand Retrofit Savings For Victoria High School Yue Liu, T. Agami Reddy, S. Katipamula and David E. Claridge. Interim Report Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 December 1992 Abstract...

  7. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  8. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  9. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  10. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  11. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  13. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  14. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  15. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  16. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  17. Natural gas monthly, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article in this issue is a special report, ``Comparison of Natural Gas Storage Estimates from the EIA and AGA.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  19. Monthly energy review, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  1. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Natural gas monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  4. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  5. Natural gas monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  7. Petroleum marketing monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  8. Value Engineering

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that meets the requirements of Public Law 104-106, Section 4306 as codified by 41 United States Code 432. Canceled by DOE N 251.94. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

  10. National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, B

    2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for delivering this system will be decided at the national level, based on experiment campaign requirement dates that will be derived through this process. The current milestone date for achieving indirect-drive ignition on the NIF is December 2010. Maintaining this milestone requires that the cryogenic systems be complete and available for fielding experiments early enough that the planned experimental campaigns leading up to ignition can be carried out. The capability of performing non-ignition cryogenic experiments is currently required by March 2006, when the NIF's first cluster of beams is operational. Plans for cryogenic and non-cryogenic experiments on the NIF are contained in NNSA's Campaign 10 Program Plans for Ignition (MTE 10.1) and High Energy Density Sciences (MTE 10.2). As described in this document, the NCTS Program Manager is responsible for managing NIF Cryogenic Target Systems development, engineering, and deployment. Through the NIF Director, the NCTS Program Manager will put in place an appropriate Program Execution Plan (draft attached) at a later time consistent with the maturing and funding these efforts. The PEP will describe management methods for carrying out these activities.

  11. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the vadose zone by soil vapor extraction (SVE). (4) Volatilization of contaminants from portions of the affected aquifer that can be accessed from the former CCC/USDA property. The primary objective of the proposed removal action is removal of mass quantities of carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area, to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. This objective will be the basis for evaluating system performance. The scope of action outlined in the IMWP/D is limited to the five treatment zones defined by the LDB/SVE/AS locations. Surrounding soils and groundwater will benefit; however, remedial benefits to groundwater will be limited to the area of influence associated with the five treatment zones. While treatment should be aggressive in the vicinity of the LDB locations, the heterogeneity, clay content, and low permeability of the soils will place inherent limits on the area of influence.

  12. Monthly energy review, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  13. Monthly energy review, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  14. Monthly energy review, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal metric conversion factors are included.

  15. Monthly energy review, January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum,natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal metric conversion factors.

  16. Monthly energy review, November 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal and metric conversion factors are included.

  17. Monthly energy review, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  18. Monthly energy review, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains statistical data on the following: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. In addition, an energy overview is provided, and, for the April issue, Energy use and carbon emissions; Some international comparisons.

  19. Monthly energy review, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  20. Monthly energy review, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review provides information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  1. Monthly energy review, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  2. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  3. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  4. Monthly energy review, October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  5. Monthly energy review, November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly publication contains statistical data on energy resources in the United States. Petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy are covered. Additional sections include an energy overview, energy consumption, oil and gas resource development and energy prices. This issue includes features on energy-related housing characteristics and the propane-provider fleet.

  6. Monthly energy review, April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  7. Monthly energy review, July 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  8. Monthly energy review, February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  9. Monthly energy review, January 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  10. Monthly energy review, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  11. Monthly energy review, November 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  12. Monthly Energy Review, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  13. Monthly energy review, March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  14. Monthly Energy Review, September 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  15. Monthly energy review, May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information are provided on the topics of energy production and consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  16. Monthly energy review, February 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information has been compiled for the following topics: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy.

  17. Monthly energy review, May 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  18. Monthly energy review, September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. 46 figs., 56 tabs.

  19. Monthly energy review, December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides data on monthly energy use and fossil fuels. The following sections are included: Highlights: Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1985--1990; Highlights: assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities; energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices; and international energy.

  20. Monthly Energy Review, February 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  1. Monthly energy review, December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly publication contains statistical data on energy resources in the United States. Petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy are covered. Additional sections include an energy overview, energy consumption, oil and gas resource development and energy prices. This issue includes a market assessment of alternative-fuel vehicles in the Atlanta private fleet for 1994.

  2. Monthly energy review. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information are provided on the topics of energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. (VC)

  3. Monthly energy review, October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  4. Monthly energy review, June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  5. Monthly energy review, April 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  6. Monthly energy review, July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of the recent monthly energy statistics from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Statistical data covers activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels , nuclear energy, and electricity. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  7. Monthly energy review, June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  8. Natural gas monthly, December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights activities, events, and analysis of interest to the public and private sector associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also included.

  9. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  11. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  14. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  15. Lamar Low-Level Jet Program Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.; Shirazi, M.; Jager, D.; Wilde, S.; Adams, J.; Buhl, M.; Sullivan, P.; Patton, E.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report presents the results to date from the Lamar Low-Level Jet Program (LLLJP) that has been established as joint effort among the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and General Electric Wind Energy (GE Wind). The purpose of this project is to develop an understanding of the influence of nocturnal low-level jet streams on the inflow turbulence environment and the documenting of any potential operating impacts on current large wind turbines and the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) designs of the future. A year's record of detailed nocturnal turbulence measurements has been collected from NREL instrumentation installed on the GE Wind 120-m tower in southeastern Colorado and supplemented with mean wind profile data collected using an acoustic wind profiler or SODAR (Sound Detection and Ranging). The analyses of measurements taken as part of a previous program conducted at the NWTC have been used to aid in the interpretation of the results of representative case studies of data collected from the GE Wind tower.

  16. Safe Advantage on Dry Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em S.Paulo, Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to present the advantages of dry cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (cooling water pools) for SNF. When the nuclear fuel is removed from the core reactor, it is moved to a storage unit and it wait for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside water pools within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. After some period of time in pools, SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing facilities, or still, wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet facilities, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. Interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively wet and if the nuclear facility had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry facilities. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer then wet one. Casks, either concrete or metallic, are safer, especially on occurrence of earthquakes, like that occurred at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, in Japan on July 16, 2007. (authors)

  17. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  18. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  19. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  20. Energy Agency Coordinators for Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agency coordinators serve as primary Federal agency points of contact for Energy Action Month. Contact them if you have questions about implementing an Energy Action Month campaign.

  1. Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for February 2015...

  2. Monthly energy review, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Energy production during December 1997 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8 percent increase from the level of production during December 1996. Coal production increased 9.5 percent, natural gas production increased 3.9 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.9 percent from the level of production during December 1996.

  3. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  4. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  5. Natural Gas Monthly August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. Explanatory notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication.

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly, January 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for January, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This month's issue features Trends in Petroleum Product Consumption. This article describes the changing patterns of US petroleum product consumption in recent years, for the major projects and by end-use sectors.

  7. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  8. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: summary statistics; crude oil prices; prices of petroleum products; volumes of petroleum products; and prime supplier sales volumes of petroleum products for local consumption. 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  9. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product Sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  10. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  11. Monthly energy review, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided for oil and gas resource development. International energy statistics are given for petroleum production, consumption, and stocks, and for nuclear electricity gross generation. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  12. Electric power monthly, May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and Stage agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities in Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  13. Electric Power monthly, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  14. Monthly Energy Review, January 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data and trends for production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices for the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear powered facilities. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed with respect to current energy production, consumption, stocks, and prices.

  15. Monthly energy review, April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This April 1995 issue of the Monthly Energy Review contains an assessment of the market for alternative-fuel vehicles, the 1993 electric utility fleet survey. Highlights features commercial buildings energy consumption and expenditures for 1992. Regular features include statistical information in the following areas: Energy overview; Energy consumption; Petroleum; Natural gas; Oil and gas resource development; Coal; Electricity; Nuclear energy; Energy prices; and, International energy.

  16. Monthly energy review, December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. An energy preview of alternative fuel providers vehicle fleet surveys is included. The publication is intended for use by members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  17. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  18. Natural gas monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  19. Natural gas monthly, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  1. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  2. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  3. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  4. Natural gas monthly, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly contains estimates for March 1999 for many natural gas data series at the national level. Estimates of national natural gas prices are available through December 1998 for most series. Highlights of the data contained in this issue are listed below. Preliminary data indicate that the national average wellhead price for 1998 declined to 16% from the previous year ($1.96 compared to $2.32 per thousand cubic feet). At the end of March, the end of the 1998--1999 heating season, the level of working gas in underground natural gas storage facilities is estimated to be 1,354 billion cubic feet, 169 billion cubic feet higher than at the end of March 1998. Gas consumption during the first 3 months of 1999 is estimated to have been 179 billion cubic feet higher than in the same period in 1998. Most of this increase (133 billion cubic feet) occurred in the residential sector due to the cooler temperatures in January and February compared to the same months last year. According to the National Weather Service, heating degree days in January 1999 were 15% greater than the previous year while February recorded a 5% increase.

  5. INTERIM VALIDATION REPORT MIDDLE DISTILLATE PRICE MONITORING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopelain, D.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1977-1978 HEATING OIL PRICES II-1 II-3 II-3 Wholesale PricesMonthly U.S. Heating Oil Prices, 1970 - 1978 . . A-16 .H-3 .continuous No. 2 heating oil price information from 1970 to

  6. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  7. Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

  8. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - nuclear section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on nuclear electricity capacity, generation, and number of operable nuclear reactors.

  9. Monthly Energy Review, August 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. The United States produced 9.5% more energy during the first 8 months of 1984 than during the same period in 1983, and US energy consumption was up 6.6%. Net imports of all energy were 13.4% higher, with net imports of petroleum up 15.0% compared to those imports in the first 8 months of 1983. Energy production during August 1984 totaled 5.8 quadrillion Btu, a 9.8% increase compared to the level of production during August 1983. Coal production increased 22.3%, natural gas production was up 7.3%, and petroleum production increased 1.7%. Production of all other forms of energy combined increased 4.8% compared to production 1 year earlier. Energy consumption during August 1984 totaled 6.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.8% above the level of consumption during August 1983. Petroleum consumption increased 4.2%, natural gas consumption was up 2.4, and coal consumption increased 0.1%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 4.8% compared to consumption during August 1983. Net imports of energy during August 1984 totaled 0.6 quadrillion Btu, 24.4% below the level of net imports during August 1983. Net imports of petroleum decreased 21.8% while net imports of natural gas increased 4.0%. Net exports of coal were down 1.6% compared to the level in August 1983.

  10. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly: December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data are presented which describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. Data are presented in two sections: Summary Statistics, presenting a time series of selected petroleum data on a U.S. level, and Detailed Statistics, presenting statistics for the most current month available as well as year to date.

  12. Monthly energy review, September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided on international energy, including petroleum production, consumption, and stocks and nuclear electricity gross generation. This issues provides a brief industry overview and a detailed analysis of the spring 1996 gasoline price runup, crude oil supply issues, U.S. crude oil imports, petroleum stocks, futures markets, refining cash margin trends, and the financial performance of U.S. refining and marketing firms. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  14. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly, March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for March 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. 13 figs., 33 tabs.

  16. Monthly Petroleum Statement, December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for December, 1981. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks.

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly, April 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products through April, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks.

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for October 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administraction for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks.

  19. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  20. Petroleum marketing monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase prices, the f.o b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  2. Petroleum marketing monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  3. Petroleum marketing monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  4. Petroleum marketing monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, education institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  5. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed costs of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  6. Monthly Energy Review - February 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40MonthlyBiodieselO F F e b

  7. Monthly Performance Report October 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal SolarJulyOctober 2010 F.19749Monthly

  8. Prompt-Month Energy Futures

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 167,905.6576,194Prompt-Month

  9. Monthly Project Bulletin: April 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts |CatalysisDepartment of EnergyMonthly

  10. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  11. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim fiscal year (FY) 2011 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under the Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA)-1 guidelines and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from seven test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault, including tensile tests, creep tests, and cyclic tests. Of the 5,603,682 records currently in the vault, 4,480,444 have been capture passed, and capture testing is in process for the remaining 1,123,238.

  12. E-Area Performance Assessment Interim Measures Assessment FY2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallings, M

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After major changes to the limits for various disposal units of the E-Area Low Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) last year, no major changes have been made during FY2005. A Special Analysis was completed which removes the air pathway {sup 14}C limit from the Intermediate Level Vault (ILV). This analysis will allow the disposal of reactor moderator deionizers which previously had no pathway to disposal. Several studies have also been completed providing groundwater transport input for future special analyses. During the past year, since Slit Trenches No.1 and No.2 were nearing volumetric capacity, they were operationally closed under a preliminary closure analysis. This analysis was performed using as-disposed conditions and data and showed that concrete rubble from the demolition of 232-F was acceptable for disposal in the STs even though the latest special analysis for the STs had reduced the tritium limits so that the inventory in the rubble exceeded limits. A number of special studies are planned during the next years; perhaps the largest of these will be revision of the Performance Assessment (PA) for the ELLWF. The revision will be accomplished by incorporating special analyses performed since the last PA revision as well as revising analyses to include new data. Projected impacts on disposal limits of more recent studies have been estimated. No interim measures will be applied during this year. However, it is being recommended that tritium disposals to the Components-in-Grout (CIG) Trenches be suspended until a limited Special Analysis (SA) currently in progress is completed. This SA will give recommendations for optimum placement of tritiated D-Area tower waste. Further recommendations for tritiated waste placement in the CIG Trenches will be given in the upcoming PA revision.

  13. 1988 Federal Interim Storage Fee study: A technical and economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the latest in a series of reports that are published annually by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The information in this report, which was prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc., under subcontract to PNL, will be used by the DOE to establish a payment schedule for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel under the Federal Interim Storage (FIS) Program. The FIS Program was mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The information will be used to establish the schedule of charges for FIS services for the year commencing January 1, 1989. 13 refs.

  14. LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION BARRELS) FILE UPDATED April 2004 Line Month Low High Number Product Name Geography...

  15. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The earliest 300 °F GLT O-ring fixture failure was observed at 34 months. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 72 - 96 months, which bounds O-ring temperatures anticipated during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the 200 ºF fixtures will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures, thus providing additional time to failure data. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 54 - 57 months. No additional O-ring failures have been observed since the last interim report was issued. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures. Additional irradiation of several fixtures is recommended to maintain a balance between thermal and radiation exposures similar to that experienced in storage, and to show the degree of consistency of radiation response between GLT and GLT-S O-rings.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report for March 1995, provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly. A glossary is included.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly, May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products through May, 1985. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This issue features a ''Mid-Year Petroleum Review'', beginning on page xiii and focusing on major petroleum supply developments in the first half of 1985 and the outlook for the remainder of the year. The article discusses changes in consumption, domestic crude oil production, refinery operations, foreign trade, stocks (including the Strategic Petroleum Reserve) and prices. 33 tabs.

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly, November 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for November 1984. Information on crude oil, gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Summary statistics include data from 1973 to 1984. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude oil, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied,and ending stocks. The focus article, US Petroleum Developments - - 1984., summarizes changes in consumption, refinery operations, petroleum stocks, imports, production and prices. The article includes an update on refinery closings.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for July 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. This issue also presents IEA's winter 1984-1985 distillate fuel outlook and an overview of distillate fuel oil. These articles focus on the respective roles of production, imports, and stocks in meeting distillage fuel oil demand. Regional supply patterns, especially for the East Coast are also discussed. 33 tables. (DMC)

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly, December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for December 1984. Information on crude oil, gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gases are included. Summary statistics include data from 1973 through January 1985. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tubulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude oil, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. The featured article, US Petroleum Import/Export Trends, highlights 1984 activities and discusses historical US trade patterns for crude oil and petroleum products. 12 figures, 33 tables.

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed statistics on the supply and disposition of petroleum and petroleum products for September 1984. Information on crude oil, finished motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases are included. Detailed statistics show production for the current month as well as the year-to-date. Data are also tabulated for the US Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts which include field production, refinery production, imports, stock withdrawal or addition, unaccounted for crude, net receipts, crude losses, refinery inputs, exports, products supplied, and ending stocks. The focus article discusses EIA data series for crude oil imports, motor gasoline supplied, and distillate and residual fuel oil supplied, as well as crude oil production. A companion article, An Evaluation of Crude Oil Production Statistics beginning on page xvii compares crude oil production volumes reported in EIA's petroleum supply publications with those shown in state reports.

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  6. Choice set as an indicator for choice behavior when lanes are managed with value pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastako, Kimberley Allen

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    (Interim Head of Department) December 2003 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ABSTRACT Choice Set as an Indicator for Choice Behavior When Lanes Are Managed with Value Pricing. (December 2003) Kimberley Allyn Mastako, B.S., California... users, non users, and businesses. Prior to the first round of project evaluations in the late 1990s, researchers relied on experience with changes in bridge and turnpike tolls, transit fares, and parking fees to identify the range of possible...

  7. Interim salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualification monosodium titanate and cesium mass transfer tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. This qualification material was a set of six samples from Tank 21H in October 2012. This sample was used as a real waste demonstration of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests process. The Tank 21H sample was contacted with a reduced amount (0.2 g/L) of MST and characterized for strontium and actinide removal at 0 and 8 hour time intervals in this salt batch. {sup 237}Np and {sup 243}Am were both observed to be below detection limits in the source material, and so these results are not reported in this report. The plutonium and uranium samples had decontamination factor (DF) values that were on par or slightly better than we expected from Batch 5. The strontium DF values are slightly lower than expected but still in an acceptable range. The Extraction, Scrub, and Strip (ESS) testing demonstrated cesium removal, stripping and scrubbing within the acceptable range. Overall, the testing indicated that cesium removal is comparable to prior batches at MCU.

  8. Interim-status groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the groundwater monitoring plan, under RCRA regulations in 40 CFR 265 Subpart F and WAC173-300-400, for the 216-B-63 Trench. This interim status facility is being sampled under detection monitoring criteria and this plan provides current program conditions and requirements.

  9. Safety evaluation for the interim stabilization of Tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geschke, G.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the basis for interim stabilization of tank 241-C-103. The document covers the removal of the organic liquid layer and the aqueous supernatant from tank 241-C-103. Hazards are identified, consequences are calculated and controls to mitigate or prevent potential accidents are developed.

  10. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    because natural gas fired electric generating plants are on the margin much of the time in Western marketsBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Interim Report on Electric Price Forecasts Electricity prices in the Council's Power Plan are forecast using the AURORATM Electricity Market Model of the entire

  11. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  12. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  13. Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  14. Healthy!Zero!Energy!Buildings!(HZEB)!Program! ! ! Interim!Report!on!Cross"Sectional!Study!of!Contaminant!!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ! ! Healthy!Zero!Energy!Buildings!(HZEB)!Program­! ! ! Interim!R.!Chan,!Meera!Sidheswaran,!Douglas!Sullivan,!! ! ! Sebastian!Cohn,!William!J.!Fisk!! ! ! ! Environmental!Energy!Technologies!Division! ! ! Indoor,!2012! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! The!research!reported!here!was!supported!by!the!California!Energy!Commission! ! ! Public!Interest!Energy!Research!Program,!Energy

  15. UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy # III-1.11.02 Page 1 of 4 UMBC INTERIM POLICY ON INDIVIDUAL FINANCIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST IN PHS RESEARCH UMBC # III-1.11.02 I. POLICY STATEMENT Externally sponsored research is a vital FOR POLICY UMBC strives for excellence and academic integrity in its research enterprise while also promoting

  16. The development of a management strategy for interim storage and final disposal of nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, H.J.; Popp, F.W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau and Betrieb von Endglagern fuer Abfallostofe mbH, Peine (Germany); Arntzen, P.; Botzem, W. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Soucek, B. [Czech Power Board, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall waste management strategy for alternative routes from reactor to final disposal, including dry interim storage, is discussed. Within the framework of a preliminary structure plan possible technical solutions must be investigated, and with sufficient relevant information available the future progress of the project, can be addressed on the base of a decision analysis.

  17. To: All members of the Trinity College community From: Michael Ratcliffe, Interim Provost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Memo To: All members of the Trinity College community From: Michael Ratcliffe, Interim Provost Re with Trinity College academically as teachers, may be appointed Associates of the College for a term of two to me by email via Cera Maugey (cera@trinity.utoronto.ca) and include the following information

  18. Medical Physics Letter Digital tomosynthesis of the chest for lung nodule detection: Interim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medical Physics Letter Digital tomosynthesis of the chest for lung nodule detection: Interim tomosynthesis for improving detectability of small lung nodules. Twenty-one patients under- going computed tomography CT to follow up lung nodules were consented and enrolled to receive an additional digital PA chest

  19. Slideshow, National Safety Month- June 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Safety Month is recognized by employers, employees, and safety and health professionals throughout the country. During the month of June, HSS provided information, activities, and events pertaining to weekly themes.

  20. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  1. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

  2. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  4. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

  6. Monthly Energy Review, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Energy production during November 1997 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.3-percent decrease from the level of production during November 1996. Natural gas production increased 2.8 percent, production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.7 percent, and coal production decreased 1.6 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 1.1 percent from the level of production during November 1996. Energy consumption during November 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 0.1 percent above the level of consumption during November 1996. Consumption of natural gas increased 1.5 percent, consumption of coal fell 0.3 percent, while consumption of petroleum products decreased 0.2 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during November 1997 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 8.6 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 6.3 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 1.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 17.8 percent from the level in November 1996.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication, the Natural Gas Monthly, presents the most recent data on natural gas supply, consumption, and prices from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Of special interest in this issue are two articles summarizing reports recently published by EIA. The articles are {open_quotes}Natural Gas Productive Capacity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Outlook for Natural Gas Through 2015,{close_quotes} both of which precede the {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} section. With this issue, January 1997, changes have been made to the format of the Highlights section and to several of the tabular and graphical presentations throughout the publication. The changes to the Highlights affect the discussion of developments in the industry and the presentation of weekly storage data. An overview of the developments in the industry is now presented in a brief summary followed by specific discussions of supply, end-use consumption, and prices. Spot and futures prices are discussed as appropriate in the Price section, together with wellhead and consumer prices.

  9. IBM Internet Security Systems Threat Insight Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly www.iss.netwww.iss.net February 2007 Contents www.iss.netwww.iss.net IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly February 2007 #12;X-Force® Threat Insight Monthly > February 2007 www.iss.netwww.iss.net About this report

  10. IBM Internet Security Systems Threat Insight Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly www.iss.netwww.iss.net June 2007 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Contents www.iss.netwww.iss.net IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly June 2007 #12;X-Force® Threat Insight Monthly > June 2007 www.iss.netwww.iss.net About this report

  11. American Heart Month National High Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart-1 Eat Smart for Heart Health - Cholesterol/Saturated Fat # P3-2 Cardiovascular Disease Statistics # P3

  12. American Heart Month National High Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart Health Heart Health - Lesson 1 Contents: Lesson - Heart Health Power Point # P1-1 Eat Smart for Heart

  13. American Heart Month National High Blood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart for Heart Health # P2-2 Risk Factors - High Blood Pressure # P2-3 Sodium is needed to. . . # P2-4 Sources

  14. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    TR- 117 1981 Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas, Interim Report M.G. DeHaven W.H. Blackburn R.W. Knight A.T. Weichert...

  15. Feather weights : rapid redeployable structures for interim use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Robin (Robin Christian)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines vacant urban parcels that are either unviable for development or stalled as a result of the economic crisis, and asks: How is it possible to generate both economic and urban value on these sites until ...

  16. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

  17. Monthly energy review, December 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  18. Monthly energy review, January 1993. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review contains summary data on energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaigns | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Each year the OCIO recognizes October as National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, or NCSAM. This awareness event is a collaborative effort with the Department of Homeland Security...

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  4. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voegele, Michael D. [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)] [Consultant, Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States); Vieth, Donald [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)] [1154 Chelttenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste legislation to the floor of the Senate, overcoming existing House support for Yucca Mountain; 3. Change the longstanding focus of Congress from disposal to storage; 4. Change the funding concepts embodied in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to allow the Nuclear Waste fund to be used to pay for interim storage; 5. Reverse the Congressional policy not to give states or tribes veto or consent authority, and to reserve to Congress the authority to override a state or tribal disapproval; 6. Promulgate interim storage facility siting regulations to reflect the new policies after such changes to policy and law; 7. Complete already underway changes to storage and transportation regulations, possibly incorporating changes to reflect changes to waste disposal law; 8. Promulgate new repository siting regulations if the interim storage facility is to support repository development; 9. Identify volunteer sites, negotiate agreements, and get Congressional approval for negotiated benefits packages; 10. Design, License and develop the interim storage facility. The time required to accomplish these ten items depends on many factors. The estimate developed assumes that certain of the items must be completed before other items are started; given past criticisms of the current program, such an assumption appears appropriate. Estimated times for completion of individual items are based on historical precedent. (authors)

  7. Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JANIN, L.F.

    2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

  8. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I. Interim definition of terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.

    1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents interim definitions of terms in the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Intent is to establish a common-based terminology integral to the probabilistic methods that predict more realistically the behavior of nuclear power plants during an earthquake. These definitions are a response to a request by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards at its meeting held November 15-16, 1979.

  9. Safety of interim storage solutions of used nuclear fuel during extended term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, C.; Bader, S.; Issard, H.; Arslan, M. [AREVA, 7135 Minstrel Way, Suite 300 Columbia, MD 21045 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2013, the total amount of stored used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the world will reach 225,000 T HM. The UNF inventory in wet storage will take up over 80% of the available total spent fuel pool (SFP) capacity. Interim storage solutions are needed. They give flexibility to the nuclear operators and ensure that nuclear reactors continue to operate. However, we need to keep in mind that they are also an easy way to differ final decision and implementation of a UNF management approach (recycling or final disposal). In term of public perception, they can have a negative impact overtime as it may appear that nuclear industry may have significant issues to resolve. In countries lacking an integrated UNF management approach, the UNF are being discharged from the SFPs to interim storage (mostly to dry storage) at the same rate as UNF is being discharged from reactors, as the SFPs at the reactor sites are becoming full. This is now the case in USA, Taiwan, Switzerland, Spain, South Africa and Germany. For interim storage, AREVA has developed different solutions in order to allow the continued operation of reactors while meeting the current requirements of Safety Authorities: -) Dry storage canisters on pads, -) Dual-purpose casks (dry storage and transportation), -) Vault dry storage, and -) Centralized pool storage.

  10. Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

  11. IBM Internet Security Systems Threat Insight Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly www.iss.netwww.iss.net May 2007 #12 The Emerging Threat Landscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mobile Security Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Contents www.iss.netwww.iss.net IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly May

  12. IBM Internet Security Systems Threat Insight Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of cryptography as it relates to the computer security industry. We will look at some of the underlying technologyIBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly www.iss.netwww.iss.net September . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Contents www.iss.netwww.iss.net IBM Internet Security Systems X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly

  13. 6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan #12;2009/10 Emissions MMU Carbon Footprint Trajectory Project Footprint MMU Actual Carbon Footprint Projects that Reduced the 2009/10 CO2 Footprint #12;2010/11 Emissions6 Monthly Report on MMU Carbon Management Plan June 2011 let's make a sustainable planet #12

  14. Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a monthly progress report from the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of January 1993. It has sections with work in the areas of reactor safety, tritium processes and absorption, separations programs and wastes, environmental concerns and responses, waste management practices, and general concerns.

  15. Sustainable value analysis tool for value creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Miying; Vladimirova, Doroteya; Rana, Padmakshi; Evans, Steve

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities in the company. For example, the waste of low-grade heat and water was identified to be a major value uncaptured in the MOL, and the value opportunity is that it can be used to produce electricity or drive the compressor, or vaporize the liquid O2... to environment and society. However, the concept of value missed needs further clarity – value currently squandered, wasted or inadequately captured by a current business model. Besides, selling service is intangible, flexible and unpredictable, therefore...

  16. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  17. National Federal Fleet Loaner Program, Interim Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, James Edward

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loaner Program is to increase the awareness, deployment, and use of electric vehicles (EVs) in Federal fleets. The Loaner Program accomplishes this by providing free EVs to Federal fleets on a loaner basis, generally for 1 or 2 months. The Program partners DOE with six electric utilities, with DOE providing financial support and some leads on Federal fleets interested in obtaining EVs. The utilities obtain the vehicles, identify candidate loaner fleets, loan the vehicles, provide temporary charging infrastructure, provide overall support to participating Federal fleets, and support fleets with their leasing decisions. While the utilities have not had the success initially envisioned by themselves, DOE, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas, the utilities can not be faulted for their efforts, as they are not the entity that makes the ultimate lease or no-lease decision. Some external groups have suggested to DOE that they direct other federal agencies to change their processes to make loaning vehicles easier; this is simply not within the power of DOE. By law, a certain percentage of all new vehicle acquisitions are supposed to be alternative fuel vehicles (AFV); however, with no enforcement, the federal agencies are not compelled to lease AFVs such as electric vehicles.

  18. Monthly energy review, January 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly Energy Review contains statistical information on energy sources including petroleum, natural gas, coal and nuclear energy. Information on energy consumption, oil and gas resource development, electricity, energy prices and international energy is provided. (VC)

  19. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report February 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of handling both volcanic ash and radiological #12;2 Figure 1. Salt Lake City, UT ­ showing peak SF6 locations SURFRAD facility. The site should be on line in less than a month. Software for real-time processing

  20. Golden Field Office Disability Awareness Month Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Come join us for a Disability Awareness Month program on Monday, October 29, 2012 in Bldg. 17, 4th floor, from 10:00-11:00 am.   We will have a couple  of performers from a Theatre group named...

  1. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    while warm weather caused low demand levels in the West. The natural gas price for New York City (Transco Zone 6 NY) saw a significant increase in price from the previous month,...

  2. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report for the month of June 1995 presents information on the typical topics of tritium processing, environmental studies, waste management issues, and miscellaneous projects. The document consists many small reports by individuals or small groups.

  3. EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914: Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Page 1 of 38 EIA-914 Monthly Natural...

  4. Correlation analysis of mean global radiation values with mean brightness values for one year 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolczynski, Edward Franklin

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantities of global radiation, = kb. sin h i oi where i denotes the number of the month (1 to 12), Q. is the individual monthly quantity of global radiation, h . is the solar altitude relat- oi ed to noon of the middle day of the month, and k is the coei... which now exists in the data bank of this field. B. ~Db' t' The objective of the proposed research is to investigate a pos- sible relationship between global radiation, as measured from ground- based instruments, and mean brightness values...

  5. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DOE INTERIM ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW FEDERAL RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A. D.; Baechler, H. C.; Di Massa, F. V.; Lucas, R. G.; Shankle, D. L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with federal legislation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a study to demonstrate use of its Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings. The demonstration study was conducted by DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The demonstration is the second step in a three-step process: I) development of interim standards, 2) demonstration of the interim standards, and 3) development of final standards. The standards are mandatory for federal agency housing procurements. Nevertheless, PNL found at the start of the demonstration that agency use of the interim standards had been minimal. The purpose of the standards is to improve the energy efficiency of federal housing and increase the use of nondepletable energy sources. In accordance with the legislation, the standards were to be performance-based rather than prescribing specific energy conservation measures. To fulfill this aspect of the legislation, the standards use a computer software program called COSTSAFR which generates a point system that individualizes the standards to specific projects based on climate, housing type, and fuel costs. The standards generate minimum energy-efficiency requirements by applying the life-cycle cost methodology developed for federal projects. For the demonstration, PNL and DOE chose five federal agency housing projects which had been built in diverse geographic and climate regions. Participating agencies were the Air Force, the Army (which provided two case studies), the Navy, and the Department of Health and Human Services. PNL worked with agency housing procurement officials and designers/architects to hypothetically apply the interim standards to the procurement and design of each housing project. The demonstration started at the point in the project where agencies would establish their energyefficiency requirements for the project and followed the procurement process through the designers' use of the point system to develop a design which would comply with the standards. PNL conducted extensive interviews with the federal agencies and design contractors to determine what impacts the standards would have on the existing agency procurement process as well as on designers. Overall, PNL found that the interim standards met the basic intent of the law. Specific actions were identified, however, that DOE could take to improve the standards and encourage the agencies to implement them. Agency personnel found the minimum efficiency levels established by the standards to be lower than expected, and lower than their existing requirements. Generally, this was because the standards factor in fuel costs, as well as energy savings due to various conservation measures such as insulation, when they determine the minimum efficiency levels required. The demonstration showed that federal agencies often pay low prices for heating fuel and electricity; these lower costs "tipped the scales," allowing designers to meet the efficiency target with designs that were relatively inefficient. It appeared, however, that the low prices paid by agencies directly to suppliers did not capture the agencies' full costs of providing energy, such as the costs of distribution and storage. Agency personnel expressed some concern about the standards' ability to incorporate new energy-efficient technologies and renewable resource technologies like solar heating systems. An alternative compliance procedure was developed to incorporate new technologies; however, demonstration participants said the procedure was not well documented and was difficult and time consuming to use. Despite these concerns, most agency personnel thought that the standards would fit into current procurement procedures with no big changes or cost increases. Many said use of the standards would decrease the time and effort they now spend to establish energy-efficiency requirements and to confirm that proposed designs comply. Personnel praised the software and documentation for being easy to use and providing energ

  6. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Permits and interim status (40 CFR part 270) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The module presents an overview of the RCRA permitting process and the requirements that apply to treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) operating under interim status until a permit is issued. It lists the types of activities that do and do not require a permit. It provides CFR cites for definitions of existing hazardous waste facility and new hazardous waste facility and identifies CFR sections relevant to Part A and Part B permit information requirements and describes the difference between them. It outlines steps in the process from interim status to receipt of permit. It identifies the differences among permit modification classes, and lists the special forms of permits. It lists the permit-by-rule applications, status and eligibility requirements for interim status and the conditions for termination of interim status and lists the conditions for changes during interim status.

  7. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration—Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank of the 241-T Tank Farm in 1973. Five tanks are assumed to have leaked in the TY Farm. Many of the contaminants from those leaks still reside within the vadose zone within the T and TY Tank Farms. The Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection seeks to minimize the movement of these contaminant plumes by placing interim barriers on the ground surface. Such barriers are expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plumes and moving them further. The soil water regime is monitored to determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barriers. Soil-water content and water pressure are monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. Four instrument nests were installed in the T Farm in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2007; two nests were installed in the TY Farm in FY2010. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, and four heat-dissipation units. A meteorological station has been installed at the north side of the fence of the T Farm. This document summarizes the monitoring methods, the instrument calibration and installation, and the vadose zone monitoring plan for interim barriers in T farm and TY Farm.

  8. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

  9. Hydrogen combustion in an MCO during interim storage (fauske and associates report 99-14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Flammable conditions are not expected to develop in an MCO during interim storage. This report considers potential phenomena which, although not expected t o occur, could lead t o flammable conditions. For example, reactions of hydrogen w i t h fuel over decades a r e postulated t o lead t o flammable atmospheric mixtures. For the extreme cases considered in this report, the highest attainable post-combustion pressure is about 13 atmospheres absolute, almost a factor of two and a half below the MCO design pressure of 31 atmospheres.

  10. Flatiron agc (automatic generation control) interim controller. Master station. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lennon, C.A. Jr; Whittemore, T.R.; Stitt, S.C.; Gish, W.B.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flatiron Interim Automatic Generation Controller has been placed in service for the Lower Missouri Western Area Power Administration Control Area. This controller meets the requirements of the National Electric Reliability Council and controls the energy generation and transfers in northern Colorado, Wyoming, western Nebraska, western South Dakota, and southern Montana. The master controller is based on five interacting microprocessors with unique communication structures and data storage methods. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation details for the master station and the remote stations, including flow charts, schematics, and wiring diagrams, are in this four-volume series.

  11. Department of Energy Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, W.E.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES&H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES&H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public.

  12. Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 70275,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim Final Rule10

  13. Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA1Interim2015 and 2020

  14. Environmental surveillance results for 1994 for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site. FUSRAP technical memorandum Number 140-95-011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szojka, S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents analytical results and an interpretation of the results for samples collected as part of the 1994 environmental surveillance program for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) for the interim storage of radiologically contaminated soils. The discussion provides a comparative analysis of local background conditions and applicable regulatory criteria to results reported for external gamma radiation and for samples from the media investigated (air, surface water, sediment, groundwater, and stormwater). Results from the 1994 environmental surveillance program at HISS indicate that Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines were not exceeded for the calculated airborne particulate dose or for the monitored constituents.

  15. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  16. Training new operators - the first six months

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthel, B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Operations Department takes about two years to train a new Operator. The Operator's introductory (Concepts) On-the-Job-Training (OJT) gives him or her an overview of the laboratory, teaches the basic facts about all the accelerators, and it also teaches the new operator the training process used for all the rest of their OJT training. The Concepts OJT takes about four to six months for most people to complete. This paper will explain how this first six months of training sets the new employee on their path to becoming a fully trained Operator.

  17. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    as measured using earned value techniques. The earned value measurement includes all tasks completed to date Capability Mar-2007 Project Completion & Closeout Sep-2011 Total Project Cost $274.1 Value of Foreign.4 1313.2 251125.5 249812.4 1313.2 54.4% 52.2% 51.7% Management Reserve Total Contingency 22,992.2 24

  18. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration--Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Strickland, Christopher E.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim barrier on the surface. Such a barrier is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. A plan has been prepared to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barrier. Soil water content and water pressure will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests were installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, four heat-dissipation units, and a drain gauge to measure soil water flux. A meteorological station has been installed outside of the fence. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests are planned to be installed beneath the proposed barrier.

  19. Interim data quality objectives for waste pretreatment and vitrification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Conner, J.M.; Kirkbride, R.A.; Mobley, J.R.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is responsible for storing, processing, and immobilizing the Hanford Site tank wastes. Characterization information on the tank wastes is needed so that safety concerns can be addressed, and retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes can be designed, permitted, and implemented. This document describes the near-term tank waste sampling and characterization needs of the Pretreatment, High-Level Waste (HLW) Disposal, and Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Programs to support the TWRS disposal mission. The final DQO (Data Quality Objective) will define specific waste tanks to be sampled, sample timing requirements, an appropriate analytical scheme, and a list of required analytes. This interim DQO, however, focuses primarily on the required analytes since the tanks to be sampled in FY 1994 and early FY 1995 are being driven most heavily by other considerations, particularly safety. The major objective of this Interim DQO is to provide guidance for tank waste characterization requirements for samples taken before completion of the final DQO. The characterization data needs defined herein will support the final DQO to help perform the following: Support the TWRS technical strategy by identification of the chemical and physical composition of the waste in the tanks and Guide development efforts to define waste pretreatment processes, which will in turn define HLW and LLW feed to vitrification processes.

  20. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  1. COMPLETION OF THE FIRST INTEGRATED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSSHIPMENT/INTERIM STORAGE FACILITY IN NW RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.S.; Barnes, E.; Snipes, R.L.; Hoeibraaten, S.; Gran, H.C.; Foshaug, E.; Godunov, V.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Northwest and Far East Russia contain large quantities of unsecured spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from decommissioned submarines that potentially threaten the fragile environments of the surrounding Arctic and North Pacific regions. The majority of the SNF from the Russian Navy, including that from decommissioned nuclear submarines, is currently stored in on-shore and floating storage facilities. Some of the SNF is damaged and stored in an unstable condition. Existing Russian transport infrastructure and reprocessing facilities cannot meet the requirements for moving and reprocessing this amount of fuel. Additional interim storage capacity is required. Most of the existing storage facilities being used in Northwest Russia do not meet health and safety, and physical security requirements. The United States and Norway are currently providing assistance to the Russian Federation (RF) in developing systems for managing these wastes. If these wastes are not properly managed, they could release significant concentrations of radioactivity to these sensitive environments and could become serious global environmental and physical security issues. There are currently three closely-linked trilateral cooperative projects: development of a prototype dual-purpose transport and storage cask for SNF, a cask transshipment interim storage facility, and a fuel drying and cask de-watering system. The prototype cask has been fabricated, successfully tested, and certified. Serial production is now underway in Russia. In addition, the U.S. and Russia are working together to improve the management strategy for nuclear submarine reactor compartments after SNF removal.

  2. Interim Action Proposed Plan for the old radioactive waste burial ground (643-E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFalls, S.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Interim Action Proposed (IAPP) is issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which functions as the lead agency for SRS remedial activities, and with concurrence by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The purpose of this IAPP is to describe the preferred interim remedial action for addressing the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) unit located in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. On December 21, 1989, SRS was included on the National Priorities List (NPL). In accordance with Section 120 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), DOE has negotiated a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA, 1993) with EPA and SCDHEC to coordinate remedial activities at SRS. Public participation requirements are listed in Sections 113 and 117 of CERCLA. These requirements include establishment of an Administrative Record File that documents the selection of remedial alternatives and allows for review and comment by the public regarding those alternatives. The SRS Public Involvement Plan (PIP) (DOE, 1994) is designed to facilitate public involvement in the decision-making process for permitting closure, and the selection of remedial alternatives. Section 117(a) of CERCLA, 1980, as amended, requires publication of a notice of any proposed remedial action.

  3. INTERIM BARRIER AT HANFORDS TY FARM TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARKER DL; HOLM MJ; HENDERSON JC; LOBER RW

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative interim surface barrier was constructed as a demonstration project at the Hanford Site's TY Tank Farm. The purpose of the demonstration barrier is to stop rainwater and snowmelt from entering the soils within the tank farm and driving contamination from past leaks and spills toward the ground water. The interim barrier was constructed using a modified asphalt material with very low permeability developed by MatCon{reg_sign}. Approximately 2,400 cubic yards of fill material were added to the tank farm to create a sloped surface that will gravity drain precipitation to collection points where it will be routed through buried drain lines to an evapotranspiration basin adjacent to the farm. The evapotranspiration basin is a lined basin with a network of perforated drain lines covered with soil and planted with native grasses. The evapotranspiration concept was selected because it prevents the runoff from percolating into the soil column and also avoids potential monitoring and maintenance issues associated with standing water in a traditional evaporation pond. Because of issues associated with using standard excavation and earth moving equipment in the farm a number of alternate construction approaches were utilized to perform excavations and prepare the site for the modified asphalt.

  4. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY08 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The surface barrier is designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the contaminated soil zone created by the Tank T-106 leak and minimize movement of the contamination. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier.

  5. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DOE INTERIM ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW FEDERAL RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A. D.; Baechler, M / C.; Di Massa, F. V.; Lucas, R. G.; Shankle, D. L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with federal legislation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) bas conducted a project to demonstrate use of its Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings. The demonstration is the second step in a three-step process: development of interim standards, demonstration of the interim standards, and development of final standards. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) collected information from the demonstration project and prepared this report under a contract with DOE. The purpose of the standards is to improve the energy efficiency of federal housing and increase the use of nondepletable energy sources. In accordance with the legislation, the standards were to be performance-based rather than prescribing specific energy conservation measures. The standards use a computer software program called COSTSAFR which individualizes the standards based on climate, housing type, and fuel costs. The standards generate minimum energy-efficiency requirements by applying the life-cycle cost methodology developed for federal projects, For the demonstration, the DOE chose live federal agency housing projects: four military housing projects and one project for the Department of Health and Human Services. DOE and PNL worked with agency housing procurement officials and designers/architects to hypothetically apply the interim standards to each housing project. PNL conducted extensive interviews with the federal agencies and design contractors to determine what impacts the standards would have on the existing agency procurement process as well as on designers. Overall, PNL found that the interim standards met the basic intent of the law. Specific actions were identified, however, that DOE could take to improve the standards and encourage the agencies to implement them. Agency personnel and designers expressed similar concerns about the standards: the minimum efficiency levels established by the standards were lower than expected and the standards did not provide an easy way to incorporate new energy-efficient and renewable resource tec.:hnolog:ies like solar heating systems. Agency personnel said the standards would fit into current procurement procedures with no big changes or cost increases, Many said the standards would decrease the time and effort they now spend to establish energy-efficiency requirements and to confirm that proposed designs comply with those requirements. Agency personnel praised the software and documentation for being easy to use and providing energy-efficiency requirements in energy dollars. Housing designers agreed that the DOE standards were easy to use to determine that their designs meet energy-efficiency goals. Many felt the information provided by the standards could be useful in the design process. Based on the demonstration, PNL recommends establishing task forces that will actively involve agency personnel and others in future revisions and development of the final standards. PNL also recommends that DOE and federal agencies investigate the use of market fuel and energy prices in the standards, rather than the prices paid by the agencies, to better reflect actual costs. A number of recommendations are made for improving communications between DOE and the users of the standards and for enhancing tools to implement the standards. Several recommendations are made for increasing the number of renewable resources that are included in the standards. Finally, PNL recommends ongoing monitoring activities to continue to identify ways in which the standards can be improved.

  6. Monthly energy review, July 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  7. Monthly energy review, June 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  8. Monthly energy review, May 1992. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information are provided on the topics of energy production and consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  9. Monthly energy review, February 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information has been compiled for the following topics: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy.

  10. Monthly Energy Review, 1991 Annual Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Statistical data and information has been compiled for the following topics: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, and International Energy.

  11. Natural gas monthly, October 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reporting ozonesonde stations), the ozone in the 16-24 km layer of the low stratosphere decreased by aboutNOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Extreme Turbulence (ET) Probe 2. Climate Research Committee Report 3. Global

  13. Natural gas monthly, September 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  14. Monthly Theme Hazardous Waste Disposal July 2009 Monthly Theme for discussion at Department Meetings -July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Monthly Theme ­ Hazardous Waste Disposal ­ July 2009 Monthly Theme for discussion at Department Meetings - July 2009 Hazardous Waste Disposal Often a waste pick-up is initiated but the waste isn't picked that it would be beneficial to have a stand and deliver course on Hazardous Waste Disposal offered

  15. Monthly Theme January 2010 Movement of Hazardous Materials between or within buildings Monthly Theme January 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Monthly Theme January 2010 ­ Movement of Hazardous Materials between or within buildings Monthly Theme ­ January 2010 MOVEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS BETWEEN OR WITHIN BUILDINGS Effective immediately for pick-up. This will reduce the transport hazard and cost when purchasing from Chemistry Stores (40% mark

  16. A Comparison of Extra-tropical Cyclones in Recent Re-analyses; ERA-INTERIM, NASA-MERRA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, Kevin

    separation of the identically same cyclones is typically less than 20 geodesic in both hemispheresA Comparison of Extra-tropical Cyclones in Recent Re-analyses; ERA-INTERIM, NASA-MERRA, NCEP Corresponding author: Kevin Hodges email: kih@mail.nerc-essc.ac.uk #12;Abstract Extra-tropical cyclones

  17. A monthly climatological study of cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics throughout the contiguous United States: 1989-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Alan Corey

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    higher values, appeared from Minnesota southwestward into Colorado from April through August. Mean monthly percentage positive lightning was highest in December at 16.0% and lowest in August at 3.0%. The mean monthly negative multiplicity ranged from 2...

  18. LNG Monthly Report - August 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Monthly Report - August 2014 LNG Monthly Report - August 2014 LNG Monthly Report - August 2014 Aug14LNG.pdf More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2013 LNG Annual Report...

  19. HyperionOpexModule Budget/8MonthReview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    HyperionOpexModule­ Budget/8MonthReview #12;Hyperion Opex Module ­ Budget/8 Month Review 1 ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Step 4 ­ Enter the Forecast and Budget .............................................................................................................................. 14 Copy 8 Month Review into next year's budget

  20. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    the planned performance of 58.0% complete as measured using earned value techniques. The earned value ICECUBE Project Cost $273.1 Value of Foreign Contributions $31.0 NSF Funding $242.1 Contingency as % of Remaining.8 58.0% 55.3% 54.1% Management Reserve Total Contingency 35,334.8 38,230.6 2,895.8 Items Outside

  1. Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

  2. Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory for K-Area Interim Surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefek, T. M.

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE 3013 storage standard requires nested, welded 300 series stainless steel containers to store plutonium-bearing materials for up to 50 years. Packaged contents include stabilized plutonium-bearing residues that contain chloride salts and a low (< 0.5 weight %) water content. The DOE 3013 STD requires surveillance of the packages over the 50 year lifetime. These surveillance requirements have been further defined by the Integrated Surveillance Program to include both non-destructive examination (NDE) and destructive examination (DE) of the 3013 container. The DE portion of surveillance involves examining the 3013 nested containers, analyzing the head space gas, and evaluating the plutonium oxide chemistry. At SRS, the stored 3013 containers will undergo preparation for the DE surveillance activities in facilities located in K-Area. The actual DE surveillance will be performed in SRNL. This report provides preliminary functional requirements for the destructive examination (DE) of plutonium-bearing oxide materials and containers in support of K-Area Interim Surveillance (KIS). The KIS project will install interim facilities to prepare the samples for analysis in SRNL. This document covers the requirements for the interim period beginning in 2007, and lasting until the Container Storage and Surveillance Capability (CSSC) project provides the permanent facilities in K-Area to perform sampling and repackaging operations associated with the 3013 container storage and surveillance program. Initial requirements for the CSSC project have been previously defined in WSRC-TR-2004-00584 ''Plutonium Surveillance Destructive Examination Requirements at Savannah River National Laboratory''. As part of the Plutonium Surveillance Program of 3013 Containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will receive the emptied 3013 container components, plutonium oxide samples and headspace gas samples from K-Area. The DE program scope includes chemical and metallurgical analyses for a maximum of 25 DE sets a year to provide essential data in support of the SRS Plutonium Surveillance Program. The normal operation is expected to be approximately 15 DE sets a year.

  3. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATEPHASE II INTERIM REPORT FOR EXTERNAL RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Mary Thompson, M

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an interim summary report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST materials. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger laboratory scale, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and characterization of the modified MST. Key findings and conclusions include the following: (1) Samples of the modified MST prepared by Method 2 and Method 3 exhibited the best combination of strontium and actinide removal. (2) We selected Method 3 to scale up and test performance with actual waste solution. (3) We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using the Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. (4) Performance tests indicated successful scale-up to the 25-gram scale with excellent performance and reproducibility among each of the three batches. For example, the plutonium decontamination factors (6-hour contact time) for the modified MST samples averaged 13 times higher than that of the baseline MST sample at half the sorbent concentration (0.2 g L{sup -1} for modified MST versus 0.4 g L{sup -1} for baseline MST). (5) Performance tests with actual waste supernate demonstrated that the modified MST exhibited better strontium and plutonium removal performance than that of the baseline MST. For example, the decontamination factors for the modified MST measured 2.6 times higher for strontium and between 5.2 to 11 times higher for plutonium compared to the baseline MST sample. The modified MST did not exhibit improved neptunium removal performance over that of the baseline MST. (6) Two strikes of the modified MST provided increased removal of strontium and actinides from actual waste compared to a single strike. The improved performance exhibited by the modified MST indicates that fewer strikes of the modified MST would be needed to successfully treat waste that contain very high activities of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST. (7) Reuse tests with actual waste confirmed that partially loaded MST exhibits reduced removal of strontium and actinides when contacted with fresh waste. (8) Samples of modified MST prepared by Method 3 and the baseline MST exhibited very similar particle size distributions. (9) Dead-end filtration tests showed that the modified MST samples exhibited similar filtration characteristics as the baseline MST sample. (10) Performance testing indicated no change in strontium and neptunium removal after storing the modified MST for 6-months at ambient temperature. The results suggested that plutonium removal performance may be decreased slightly after 6-months of storage. However, the change in plutonium removal is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence limit. Based on these findings we recommend continued development of the modified MST as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  4. Historical monthly energy review, 1973--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Historical Monthly Energy Review (HMER) presents monthly and annual data from 1973 through 1992 on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. This edition of the HMER extends the original HMER in several ways: (1) Four additional years of monthly data, 1989--1992, have been added. (2) This report fully replaces the earlier one; each data cell that has been revised since the original HMER is marked with an ``R`` so that changes can be quickly noted. (3) Section 1 has been expanded to include Tables 1.7--1.13, which were not available in the first HMER. (4) Tables 3.9 on propane and Table 4.3 on natural gas trade, which have been added to the MER since the release of the first HMER, are included in this edition. In addition, Table 10.4 on nuclear electricity gross generation has been reorganized to align more closely with the current presentation in the MER.

  5. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    versus the planned performance of 55.8% complete as measured using earned value techniques. The earned safety training for drilling and installation managers, safety leads and a few other on- ice personnel Project Cost $274.3 Value of Foreign Contributions $32.2 NSF Funding $242.1 Contingency as % of Remaining

  6. PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

  7. Interim-status groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the groundwater monitoring plan for interim-status detection-level monitoring of the 216-B-63 Trench. This is a revision of the initial groundwater monitoring plan prepared for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Bjornstad and Dudziak (1989). The 216-B-63 Trench, located at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State, is an open, unlined, earthern trench approximately 1.2 m (4 ft) wide at the bottom, 427 m (1400 ft) long, and 3 m (10 ft) deep that received wastewater containing hazardous waste and radioactive materials from B Plant, located in the 200 East Area. Liquid effluent discharge to the 216-B-63 Trench began in March 1970 and ceased in February 1992. The trench is now managed by Waste Tank Operations.

  8. PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

  9. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Interim Post-Desiccation Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Johnson, Christian D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test of desiccation is being conducted as an element of the deep vadose zone treatability test program. Desiccation technology relies on removal of water from a portion of the subsurface such that the resultant low moisture conditions inhibit downward movement of water and dissolved contaminants. Previously, a field test report (Truex et al. 2012a) was prepared describing the active desiccation portion of the test and initial post-desiccation monitoring data. Additional monitoring data have been collected at the field test site during the post-desiccation period and is reported herein along with interpretation with respect to desiccation performance. This is an interim report including about 2 years of post-desiccation monitoring data.

  10. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  11. Interim storage cask (ISC), a concrete and steel dry storage cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenier, R.M.; Koploy, M.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    General Atomics (GA) has designed and is currently fabricating the Interim Storage Cask (ISC) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The ISC is a dry storage cask that will safely store a Core Component Container (CCC) with Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel assemblies or fuel pin containers for a period of up to 50 years at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The cask may also be used to transfer the fuel to different areas within the Hanford site. The ISC is designed to stringent criteria from both 10CFR71 and 10CFR72 for safe storage and on-site transportation of FFTF spent fuel and fuel pin containers. The cask design uses a combination of steel and concrete materials to achieve a cost-effective means of storing spent fuel. The casks will be extensively tested before use to verify that the design and construction meet the design requirements.

  12. Energy conservation potential of the US Department of Energy interim commercial building standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a project conducted to demonstrate the whole-building energy conservation potential achievable from full implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Interim Energy Conservation Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings. DOE`s development and implementation of energy performance standards for commercial buildings were established by the Energy Conservation Standards for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, Public Law (PL) 94-385, 42 USC 6831 et seq., hereinafter referred to as the Act. In accordance with the Act, DOE was to establish performance standards for both federal and private sector buildings ``to achieve the maximum practicable improvements in energy efficiency and use of non-depletable resources for all new buildings``.

  13. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  14. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  15. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  16. Interim report on the Causes of and Circumstances attending the Explosion which occured at Whitehaven William Colliery, Cumberland, on the 15th August, 1947 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, A. M.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER INTERIM REPORT On the Causes of and Circumstances attending the Explosion which occurred at Whitehaven "William" Colliery, Cumberland, on the 15th August, 1947 By A. M. BRYAN, Esq., J.P., ...

  17. Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  18. Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  19. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    is the culmination of a series of ICECUBE - TOTAL US and NON-US 20.8% 19.4% 17.6% 6.6% 20.4% 19.0% 16.9% 6.6% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% 3FY02-2FY03 3FY03-2FY04 A-04 M -04 J-04 J-04 A and Safety ­ This month the IceCube Safety and Quality Assurance Manager participated in site visits

  20. Petroleum Marketing Monthly, January 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 55 tabs.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 53 tabs.

  2. Electric power monthly, January 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  3. Project of the Month | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM Exit Procedures.docTheproject-of-the-month Office

  4. Project of the Month | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM Exit Procedures.docTheproject-of-the-month OfficeAugust

  5. Monthly Minutes | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurityMaintaining theSan Jose-San| National NuclearMonthly

  6. EIA-914 Monthly Gas Production Report Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19, 4:00Markets914 Monthly

  7. Valley Entrepreneurs' Network (VEN) Monthly Network Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps toValidatingCloudPoissonVEN Monthly Network

  8. Monthly Newsblast December 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvania |February 2013 Monthly

  9. ORSSAB monthly meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM Policy Acquisition Guides OPAMOREMORSSAB monthly meeting

  10. EIA-812, Monthly Product Pipeline Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2, Monthly Product Pipeline

  11. EIA-819, Monthly Oxygenate Report Page 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7, Monthly

  12. A Month to Remember | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month to Remember June 12,

  13. BETO Monthly News Blast, August 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAvi ShultzMonthly News

  14. BETO Monthly News Blast, July 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAvi ShultzMonthly NewsJuly 2014

  15. BETO Monthly News Blast, June 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAvi ShultzMonthly NewsJuly

  16. BETO Monthly News Blast, September 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource1-01 Audit LetterYearAvi ShultzMonthly

  17. Evaluation of Shear Strength Threshold of Concern for Retrieval of Interim-Stored K-Basin Sludge in the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K-Basin sludge will be recovered into the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) and will be stored in the T Plant for interim storage (at least 10 years). Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show that high uranium content K Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has "paste" and "chunks" with shear strengths of approximately 3~5 kPa and 380 ~ 770 kPa, respectively. High uranium content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185°C, 10 h) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. After interim storage at T Plant, the sludge in the STSCs will be mobilized by water jets impinging the sludge. The objective of the evaluation was to determine the range of sludge shear strength for which there is high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from STSCs. The shear strength at which the sludge can be retrieved is defined as the "shear strength threshold of concern." If the sludge shear strength is greater than the value of the shear strength threshold of concern, a water-jet retrieval system will be unlikely to mobilize the sludge up to the container’s walls. The shear strength threshold of concern can be compared with the range of possible shear strengths of K-Basin stored sludge to determine if the current post interim-storage, water-jet retrieval method is adequate. Fourteen effective cleaning radius (ECR) models were reviewed, and their validity was examined by applying them to Hanford 241-SY-101 and 241-AZ-101 Tanks to reproduce the measured ECR produced by the mixer pumps. The validation test identified that the Powell-3 and Crowe-2 ECR models are more accurate than other ECR models reviewed. These ECR models were used to address a question as to whether the effective cleaning radius of a water jet is sufficient or if it can be readily expanded to cover the range of possible shear strengths. These results will assist CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to establish the technical basis of the feasibility of the sludge retrieval and storage plan and to develop an adequate water jet system to retrieve the stored K-Basin sludge in the STSCs. The STSCs are 2:1 elliptical-head vessels, 58 inches in diameter and 105 inches tall. Each STSC will contain 0.5 to 2.1 m3 of settled sludge with the specific loading dependent upon sludge type.

  18. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  19. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  20. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Permits and interim status (40 cfr part 270) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Owners/operators of facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste must obtain an operating permit, as required by Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The module presents an overview of the RCRA permitting process and the requirements that apply to TSDFs operating under interim status until a permit is issued. The regulations governing the permit process are found in 40 CFR Parts 124 through 270.

  1. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project Monthly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, S.M. (comp.)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The US Department of Energy (DOE) funds the project. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks address each of the primary steps in the path from radioactive releases to dose estimates source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, and food habits, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  2. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. P. Leach

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 10, 1980, LOFT conducted its fifth nuclear test in the L3 Series (small break) as well as the first in the L8 Series (core uncovery). The tests, designated L3-6/L8-1, were run in series with each experiment designated to address specific safety questions. Test L3-6 simulated a four-inch break in a commercial pressurized water reactor. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the influence of main coolant pump operation on the quantity of fluid which leaves the system and the quantity of fluid in the reactor core region during the experiment. The results of L3-6 are being compared with the results of a previous LOFT test, designated L3-5, which was performed on September 29, 1980. On December 9 and 10, a special review group committee, commissioned by the NRC, visited LOFT. The purpose of the committee's presence here was to study and evaluate the LOFT project, and then report recommendations to the NRC. The NRC would then use this information to help determine how the resources of the project could best be utilized, and which kind and how many tests should be conducted over how long a time period. Recommendations of this committee are expected to be announced early in February. The Quick Look Report on experiment L3-6/L8-1, reviewing initial conditions and limited experimental results, was published during the month. More extensive data analysis will continue for the next several months. The current planned LOFT test schedule and target dates were rescheduled in December which resulted in a major budget revision to the baseline. Successful completion and approval is anticapted by mid-January 1981. Overall current costs are in good agreement with budgets and authorized funding levels.

  3. LOFT Monthly Progress Report for October 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. C. Kaufman

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the month of October, several significant events occurred. Three tests, L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3, in the anticipated transient series were completed. These tests were conducted to provide information on plant control systems and operator responses to transients in which the initiating event was not a loss of primary coolant. These transient tests and others scheduled for the future will add greatly to predicting responses for such transient conditions. On the 16th and 17th of October, LOFT hosted a technology transfer meeting in which representatives from more than sixty power utilities in the United States and several foreign countries participated. The purpose of this LOFT/Utility Technology Transfer meeting was to provide an open forum through which utility personnel could become better informed about the LOFT project, its past, present, and future experimental program, and how this program could serve industry needs. Several recommendations for LOFT were made by the utility community; these suggestons are being looked at very closely and correspondence with the utility representatives continues. Members of the ACRS committee met in Idaho Falls during October to review the scope of the LOFT program. General approval of the LOFT program was expressed by the ACRS, and several recommendations were made. Requests were also made for additional briefings when LOFT has further scoped the potentially more severe large break transients. Plant preparations were underway during October for the next LOFT test scheduled for mid-December. This test, designated L3-6, will be another in the small break series, with the break occurring in the intact loop of the cold leg. Budget and actuals are showing good agreement for the first month of FY-81, except for a small underrun in the manpower level which is expected to be corrected in the near future.

  4. Economic Value of Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Value of Agricultural Research Public Investment in Texas Agricultural Research Yields Significant Economic Returns #12;Texas agricultural producers and especially consumers benefit directly from public investment in agricultural research. According to a 2006 study (Huffman and Evenson), the overall

  5. Photovoltaics Value Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, J.L.; Frantzis, L.; Blazewicz, S.; Pinault, D.; Sawyer, H.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this report are to identify best practices in methodologies for estimating the value of distributed PV technologies, identify gaps in existing knowledge, and outline R&D opportunities.

  6. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Morency, Christina

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  7. Value of Information References

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  8. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    .2% complete, as measured using earned value techniques. The contingency % of the remaining work is 28.3%. #12 with critical dates and activities managed by both Raytheon Polar Services Company and the UW is set Division Management, and FY08 Actual costs for On-Ice Support that were less than planned. 5/31/08 Change

  9. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. · Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice activities that is coordinated with the Raytheon on-ice schedules. Construction Cost accurate application of escalation rates and revisions to actual cost data. Raytheon earned value data

  10. APPENDIX A: MONTHLY AVERAGED DATA In many instances monthly averaged data are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    for solar energy and climatic applications. Click on the buttons on the left to find out more about the lab for preliminary estimates of solar system performance. This section provides a summary of monthly averaged data for all sites in watt hours/meter2 per hour or day. For each site and each solar measurement the data

  11. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - natural gas section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual time-series and recent statistics on natural gas supply, disposition, and price.

  12. Monthly progress report for April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments for the month of April are described briefly for the following tasks: energy production research; fuels research; and supplemental government program. Energy production research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved chemical flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteratom-containing compounds. Supplemental government program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; process- engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; DOE education initiative project; field application of foams for oil production symposium; technology transfer to independent producers; compilations and analysis of outcrop data from the Muddy and Almond Formations; implementation of oil and gas technology transfer initiative; and horizontal well production from fractured reservoirs.

  13. Earned Value Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, J

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earned Value Management is a methodology used to measure and communicate the real physical progress of a project and show its true cost situation. This tool was developed by the US Department of Defense in 1967 and later used successfully for monitoring DOE projects, in particular the US LHC accelerator project. A clear distinction must be made between an earned value management system and other tools under consideration or already existing at CERN which permit accurate predictions of the amount and date of future payments or a detailed follow up of contracts.

  14. Value of Information spreadsheet

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Júlíusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  15. Value of Information spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Júlíusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  16. Internet Security Systems, an IBM Company Threat Insight Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internet Security Systems, an IBM Company X-Force ® Threat Insight Monthly www . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Contents www.iss.netwww.iss.net Internet Security Systems, an IBM Company X-Force Threat Insight Monthly April 2007 #12;X-Force® Threat Insight Monthly > April 2007 www.iss.netwww.iss.net About

  17. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Hazelwood Interim storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, provides the results for 1992, and discusses applicable environmental standards and requirements with which the results were compared. HISS is located in eastern Missouri in the City of Hazelwood (St. Louis County) and occupies approximately 2.2 ha (5.5 acres). Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), which was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. In 1992 there were no environmental occurrences or unplanned contaminant releases as defined in DOE requirements and in the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III of CERCLA.

  18. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information derived from the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. This volume contains the main text. Volume 2 contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text. This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report are the preliminary interpretations of the hydrogeologic environment of six low-level burial grounds, which comprise four waste management areas (WMAs) located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretations were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the construction of 35 ground-water monitoring wells as well as a multitude of previously existing boreholes. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a ground-water monitoring program initiated in 1986. This ground-water monitoring program is based on requirements for interim status facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976).

  19. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for monitoring for radioactive and non-radioactive parameters, summaries of environmental program at HISS, a summary of the results, and the calculated hypothetical radiation dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) began environmental monitoring of HISS in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and subsequent to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). Contamination at HISS originated from uranium processing work conducted at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) from 1942 through 1957.

  20. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.