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1

US EPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, January 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

540-R-070-002 540-R-070-002 OSWER 9285.7-82 January 2009 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment) Final Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Scope .........................................................................................................2 1.3 Effects on Other Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology

2

American Transmission Company Comments - 216h Interim Final Rules |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Transmission Company Comments - 216h Interim Final Rules American Transmission Company Comments - 216h Interim Final Rules American Transmission Company Comments - 216h Interim Final Rules American Transmission Company LLC, by its corporate manager, ATC Management Inc. (collectively "ATCLLC") is pleased to have the opportunity to provide the following comments on the additional matters to be considered by DOE in connection with the Rules. Interim Final Rule Comments, RIN 1901-AB18 Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities More Documents & Publications Comments of the Staff of the public utilities commission of the state of California on the interim final rule Comments on Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities

3

DOE lead agency interim final and proposed rules - EEI comments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

final and proposed rules - EEI comments 10-20-08.doc Consolidated Comments of the Edison Electric Institute ("EEI") on (1) DOE Interim Final Rule, RIN 1901-AB18, 73 Fed. Reg....

4

Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise...

5

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

retrieved, transferred and Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes file:I|Data%20Migration%20TaskEIS-0212-FEIS-Summary-1995.html6...

6

EPA issues interim final waste minimization guidance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a new and detailed interim final guidance to assist hazardous waste generators in certifying they have a waste minimization program in place under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA's guidance identifies the basic elements of a waste minimization program in place that, if present, will allow people to certify they have implemented a program to reduce the volume and toxicity of hazardous waste to the extent economically practical. The guidance is directly applicable to generators of 1000 or more kilograms per month of hazardous waste, or large-quantity generators, and to owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities who manage their own hazardous waste on site. Small-quantity generators that generate more than 100 kilograms, but less than 1,000 kilograms, per month of hazardous waste are not subject to the same program in place certification requirement. Rather, they must certify on their manifests that they have made a good faith effort to minimize their waste generation.

Bergeson, L.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings NRDC's comments on Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings

8

105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

E.G. Ison

2008-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] 1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes DOE/EIS-0212 VOLUME 1 OF 2 VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES Hanford Site Richland, Washington October, 1995 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NUCLEAR WASTE PROGRAM LACEY, WASHINGTON 98503 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE

10

Microsoft Word - HZEB_Retail_InterimReport_Final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

! ! ! Healthy!Zero!Energy!Buildings!(HZEB)!Program-! ! ! Interim!Report!on!Cross"Sectional!Study!of!Contaminant!! ! ! Levels,!Source!Strengths,!and!Ventilation!Rates!in!Retail!Stores! ! ! ! ! Wanyu!R.!Chan,!Meera!Sidheswaran,!Douglas!Sullivan,!! ! ! Sebastian!Cohn,!William!J.!Fisk!! ! ! ! Environmental!Energy!Technologies!Division! ! ! Indoor!Environment!Group! ! ! Lawrence!Berkeley!National!Laboratory! ! ! Berkeley,!CA!94720! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! November!5,!2012! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! The!research!reported!here!was!supported!by!the!California!Energy!Commission! ! ! Public!Interest!Energy!Research!Program,!Energy"Related!Environmental!! ! ! Research!Program,!award!number!500"09"049.!!The!project!was!also!supported! ! ! by!the!U.S.!Dept.!of!Energy!Building!Technologies!Program,!Office!of!Energy!

11

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Contaminant Specific\Iron\Eco-SSL for Iron.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-69 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR IRON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES - 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 2.0 IRON GEOCHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Weathering Processes Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 3 2.2 Soil Conditions Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4 3.0 EFFECTS OF IRON ON PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.1 Essentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.2 General Effects

12

FINAL DOE/OR/21950-1016 RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY= PRAXAIR INTERIM ACTIONS ENGINEERING  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p//l/ * :P/ p//l/ * :P/ 142366 _ FINAL DOE/OR/21950-1016 RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY= PRAXAIR INTERIM ACTIONS ENGINEERING EVALUATION/COST ANALYSIS (EEKA) TONAWANDA, NEW YORK MAY 1996 prepared by U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Off ice, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program with technical assistance from Science Applications International Corporation ESC-FUSRAP under Contract No. DE-AC05-91OR21950 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFTABLES ........................................... iii ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................... v 1. INTRODUCTION ......................................... 1 2. SCOPE AND ORGANIZATION OF THE RESPONSIVENESS SUMMARY ..... 1 3. COMMENTSANDRESPONSES ....................... .: ... . .... 1 3.1 THE PREFERRED REMEDY .............................

13

Microsoft Word - EM-TWS Interim Report 02-21-11 final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Environmental Management Tank Waste Subcommittee (EM-TWS) FY 2011 Work Plan Status Modeling for Life Cycle Cost Analysis (Interim Report) February 24, 2011 Hanford Tank Farms and WTP SRS Tank Farms Presented by the EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Las Vegas, Nevada EM-TWS Interim Report, February 2011 1 Business Sensitive INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Environmental Management Tank Waste Subcommittee (EM-TWS) Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Work Plan Status Modeling for Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Analysis (Interim Report) February 24, 2011 1. Introduction 1.1 DOE EM response to FY 2010 EM-TWS Phase 1 Report and Recommendations (Attachment 1) The DOE Office of Environmental Management has adopted most of the

14

Microsoft Word - DOE lead agency interim final and proposed rules - EEI comments 10-20-08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20004-2696 Telephone 202-508-5615 Fax 202-508-5673 www.eei.org EDWARD H. COMER Vice President & General Counsel October 20, 2008 Mr. John Schnagl Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Submitted electronically via email to: SEC216h@hq.doe.gov Re: Consolidated Comments of the Edison Electric Institute ("EEI") on (1) DOE Interim Final Rule, RIN 1901-AB18, 73 Fed. Reg. 54456 (Sept. 19, 2008) and (2) DOE Proposed Rule, RIN 1901-AB18, 73 Fed. Reg. 54461 (Sept. 19, 2008)

15

Microsoft Word - DOE lead agency interim final and proposed rules - EEI comments 10-20-08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20004-2696 Telephone 202-508-5615 Fax 202-508-5673 www.eei.org EDWARD H. COMER Vice President & General Counsel October 20, 2008 Mr. John Schnagl Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Submitted electronically via email to: SEC216h@hq.doe.gov Re: Consolidated Comments of the Edison Electric Institute ("EEI") on (1) DOE Interim Final Rule, RIN 1901-AB18, 73 Fed. Reg. 54456 (Sept. 19, 2008) and (2) DOE Proposed Rule, RIN 1901-AB18, 73 Fed. Reg. 54461 (Sept. 19, 2008)

16

Interim guidelines for protecting fire-fighting personnel from multiple hazards at nuclear plant sites: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides interim guidelines for reducing the impact to fire fighting and other supporting emergency response personnel from the multiple hazards of radiation, heat stress, and trauma when fighting a fire in a United States commercial nuclear power plant. Interim guidelines are provided for fire brigade composition, training, equipment, procedures, strategies, heat stress and trauma. In addition, task definitions are provided to evaluate and further enhance the interim guidelines over the long term. 19 refs.

Klein, A.R.; Bloom, C.W.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM/FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracker Inverter for Photovoltaic Systems with Energy Storage and Dispatchability DECEMBER 2011 CEC Point Tracker Inverter for Photovoltaic Systems with Energy Storage and Dispatchability. California Inverter for Photovoltaic Systems With Energy Storage and Dispatchability is the final report for the SMUD

18

Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)  

SciTech Connect

Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

NONE

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Interim Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interim Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the MELCOR computer code for leak path factor applications, relative to established requirements. This evaluation, a “gap analysis, ” is performed to meet Commitment 4.2.1.3 of the Department of Energy’s Implementation Plan to resolve SQA issues identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1. Suggestions for corrections or improvements to this document should be addressed to:

Melcor Gap Analysis; Intentionally Blank; Chip Lagdon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal. Chemical reactions that result in carbon-sulfur bond cleavage are an essential aspect of any protocol designed to remove organic sulfur from coal. In the second year of the project {open_quotes}Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal, the author has completed investigations of reactions in which organic sulfur-containing coal model compounds are subjected to different conditions of temperature, solvent mixtures, reagents, and radiation. He has also undertaken a series of reactions in which physically cleaned Illinois coal has been subjected to many of the same reaction conditions that were shown, via the use of model sulfides, to result in substantial C-S bond cleavage and or sulfur oxidation. Therefore, summarized in this interim final report are results of the investigations of the photooxidation reactions of coal model sulfones and sulfides; the photolytic desulfurization of coal; and various other topics, including a summary of the endeavors aimed at initiating C-S bond cleavage reactions using oxidation/chlorination/desulfurization protocols, and various tellurium reagents. Important experiments remain to be completed on this project; therefore, efforts in these areas will continue through the end of calendar year 1993.

Bausch, M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

DOE/EA-1463 Environmental Assessment for Interim Final Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2007 , 2007 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

25

DOE/EA-1463 Environmental Assessment for Interim Final Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

26

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere.

Abotsi, G.M.K. [Clark Atlanta Univ., GA (United States); Bostick, D.T.; Beck, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Lube Oil PdM, Handling, and Quality Assurance Guideline, Final Report: An Addendum to the Lube Oil PdM Handling and Quality Assuranc e Interim Guideline, Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as an addendum to the interim guideline that was prepared by an EPRI team to assist the member utilities in the further improvement of maintenance processes by presenting, in detail, the Key Elements of conducting comprehensive evaluations of lubrication programs and the Key Elements of setting up a well-organized lubrication program. EPRI believes that improvements will yield optimal lubrication programs. This guideline addendum also serves as an excellent reference document in that i...

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interim Action Determination Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national

30

Interim storage study report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

Rawlins, J.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Interim readiness plan  

SciTech Connect

This report provides rough designs and costs for 3 payloads which can be built on a relatively fast time scale. With these, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) could measure neutrons and X-rays from high altitude shots. No measurements of soft X-rays (less than or approximately equal to 5 kev), hard X- rays (greater than or approximately equal to 60 kev), or gamma rays would be made. Plans could be made to fly the Simplex payload as part of the spring Lapwing exercise. Some interim capability exists from other sources which might compliment the above measurements. Sandia has developed a mylar sail sampler which could be used for debris experiments. There is a LASL/Sandia scan converter which could be fielded to make fast time-history measurements of the X-ray or gamma ray pulse. Interval time could be measured with a ground based EMP detector. The LRL cost of this interim rocket program is approximately 5 man years of effort and about $140,000 of major procurement. Sandia would need approximately $450,000 to stockpile payloads. I believe the necessary rockets are already stockpiled but some work on the ranges might be required. For example, more launchers are needed on Johnston Atoll. All this money and effort would be expended in FY- 1970 and these rocket experiments would be ready (`on the shelf` or close) by June 1970.

Seward, F. D.

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Preventing Biogas Generation in Low Level Waste: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes actions that can be taken to control and prevent biogas generation in waste containers and plant systems. In addition, it describes additional work in progress that will form the basis for the final report. This research was undertaken in response to nuclear power stations experiencing biogas generation from plant systems and low level waste containers.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) Area Expansion at the Savannah River Site) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) Area Expansion at the Savannah River Site) In order to meet the safe, secure storage demand for pit disassembly metals and non-pit plutonium that may be available soon after the SPD SEIS ROD, DOE has a need to initiate storage area construction preparations in advance of the SPD SEIS ROD. Specifically, beginning in May 2013, DOE plans to extend the KAMS Area into the current Final Storage Area and Presentation Room to store additional quantities of surplus plutonium, and, potentially, plutonium alloys. EIS-0283-S2-InterimActionDetermination_04_25_13.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

35

Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan  

SciTech Connect

Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. The plan is based on realistic assumptions and addresses three separate funding scenarios.

Ross, W.E.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

36

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

37

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

Demand reduction attachments for Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Aberdeen, Maryland. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This group of attachments includes: Electric Rates and Riders; BGE Substation Requirements; Electric Utility Bills; BGE `Billing Interface Data`; Metering Data; Incremental Cost Calculations; Electric Submeter Readings; Natural Gas Bills LCCID Data; LCCID - Energy Escalation Values; Scope of Architect and Engineer Services; Interim Review Comments; Interim Review Responses; Interim Review Meeting Minutes; Telephone Conversation Minutes and Conversations; and Pre-Final Review Comments.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

AGR-1 Data Qualification Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Projects for the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR Program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are (1) qualified for use, (2) stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and (3) analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the data streams associated with the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) experiment, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY09 qualification status of the AGR-1 data to date. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category, which is assigned by the data generator, and include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing, to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documentation that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent QA program. The interim qualification status of the following four data streams is reported in this document: (1) fuel fabrication data, (2) fuel irradiation data, (3) fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data, and (4) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operating conditions data. A final report giving the NDMAS qualification status of all AGR-1 data (including cycle 145A) is planned for February 2010.

Machael Abbott

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

2010 Interim Laws and Regulations Pub 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... offer an opportunity for the creation and implementation ... CWMA Interim Meeting, an energy company representative ... floor and believes their job is to ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

National Source Tracking System & Interim Inventory  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for rule and placed requirements on system 3 Approach * Two phase - Interim inventory now provides database on sources - short term solution; gathered valuable data to...

42

National Source Tracking System & Interim Inventory  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

other Federal agencies, States and internationally 3 Approach * Two phase - Interim inventory now provides database on NRC and Agreement State sources - short term solution;...

43

SG Network System Requirements Specification- Interim Release...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specification- Interim Release 3 This document has been created to support NIST Smart Grid Interoperability Priority Action Plans (PAP) 1 & 2 and provide Utilities,...

44

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas...

45

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

46

Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

Saito, G.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EMAB Risk Subcommittee Interim Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRST INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Incorporating Risk and Sustainability into Decision Making Submitted by the EMAB Risk Subcommittee December 3, 2012 Background: In December 2011, then Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management David Huizenga, asked the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) to establish a Risk Subcommittee. In February 2012, the Subcommittee's Work Plan was approved. Under the Work Plan, the purpose of the Subcommittee is to evaluate "risk-informed decision making," specifically whether the prioritization tool developed by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) for use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (Oak Ridge) is one that

48

Fusion Breeder Program interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

1982-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

EA-0300: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

300: Final Environmental Assessment 300: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0300: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted this environmental assessment to address the possible incremental environmental effects of the proposed standards on residential buildings constructed for the federal sector. If promulgated by the DOE, the proposed standard would serve as an interim mandatory standard for federal sector construction of residential buildings and as voluntary guidelines for the private sector. Environmental Assessment In Support of Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings, DOE/EA-0300, July 1986 More Documents & Publications

50

Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This supporting document provides a list of the Essential and Support drawings for the Interim Stabilization project equipment.

KOCH, M.R.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document provides a list of the Essential and Support drawings for the Interim Stabilization project equipment.

KOCH, M.R.

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration iii Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates Preface This report, ...

53

Expedited approach to a carbon tetrachloride spill interim remedial action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitored natural attenuation was selected as an interim measure for a carbon tetrachloride spill site where source removal or in situ treatment cannot currently be implemented due to the surrounding infrastructure. Rather than delay action until the site is more accessible to an interim action, this more expedited approach would support a final action. Individual Hazard Substance Site (IHSS) 118.1 is a former underground storage tank at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) that stored carbon tetrachloride for process use. Inadvertent releases associated with filling and failure of the tank system resulted in an accumulation of carbon tetrachloride in a bedrock depression around a group of former process waste tanks. Access to the source of contamination is obstructed by numerous utilities, the process waste tanks, and other components of the site infrastructure that limit the ability to conduct an effective remedial action. A preremedial field investigation was conducted in September 1997 to identify and delineate the extent of the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. Data collected from the investigation revealed that natural processes might be limiting the migration of contaminants from the source area.

Cowdery, C.; Primrose, A. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Castaneda, N. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EMCS Retrofit Analysis - Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the interim results of analyses carried out in the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco from 1996 to 1998. The building is the site of a major demonstration of the BACnet communication protocol. The energy management and control systems (EMCS) in the building were retrofitted with BACnet compatible controllers in order to integrate certain existing systems on one common network. In this respect, the project has been a success. Interoperability of control equipment from different manufacturers has been demonstrated in a real world environment. Besides demonstrating interoperability, the retrofits carried out in the building were also intended to enhance control strategies and capabilities, and to produce energy savings. This report presents analyses of the energy usage of HVAC systems in the building, control performance, and the reaction of the building operators. The report does not present an evaluation of the performance capabilities of the BACnet protocol. A monitoring system was installed in the building that parallels many of the EMCS sensors and data were archived over a three-year period. The authors defined pre-retrofit and post-retrofit periods and analyzed the corresponding data to establish the changes in building performance resulting from the retrofit activities. The authors also used whole-building energy simulation (DOE-2) as a tool for evaluating the effect of the retrofit changes. The results of the simulation were compared with the monitored data. Changes in operator behavior were assessed qualitatively with questionnaires. The report summarizes the findings of the analyses and makes several recommendations as to how to achieve better performance. They maintain that the full potential of the EMCS and associated systems is not being realized. The reasons for this are discussed along with possible ways of addressing this problem. They also describe a number of new technologies that could benefit systems of the type found in the Philip Burton Federal Building.

Diamond, R.C.; Salsbury, T.I.; Bell, G.C.; Huang, Y.J.; Sezgen, A.O.; Mazzucchi, R.; Romberger, J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Mitigation Methods for Tubular Structures -- Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes the first year of a two-year testing program for methods to prevent or mitigate corrosion in the interior surfaces of steel tubular poles. Two methods are under study: cathodic protection that uses zinc or magnesium sacrificial anodes and rust inhibitors that protect interior surfaces.BackgroundUtilities have become increasingly aware of the potential problems associated with underground ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Comments on Interim Final Rule for Coordination of Federal Authorizati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Allegheny Energy Inc and its subsidiaries, Monogahela Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company, and West Penn Power Company, all doing business as the Allegheny Power,...

57

The Kelastic variable wall mining machine. Interim final report  

SciTech Connect

This machine cuts coal along a longwall face extending up to 500 feet by a rotating auger with bits. The machine also transports the coal that is cut acting as screw conveyor. By virtue of an integral shroud comprising part of the conveyor the machine is also amenable to a separation of the zones where men work from air being contaminated by dust and methane gas by the cutting action. Beginning as single intake air courses, the air separates at the working section where one split provides fresh air to the Occupied Zone (OZ) for human needs and the other split purges and carries away dust and methane from face fragmentation in the Cutting Zone (CZ). The attractiveness of the Variable Wall Mining Machine is that it addresses the limitations of current longwall mining equipment: it can consistently out-produce continuous mining machines and most longwall shearing machines. It also is amenable to configuring an environment, the dual-duct system, where the air for human breathing is separated from dust-laden ventilating air with methane mixtures. The objective of the research was to perform a mathematical and experimental study of the interrelationships of the components of the system so that a computer model could demonstrate the workings of the system in an animation program. The analysis resulted in the compilation of the parameters for three different configurations of a dual aircourse system of ventilating underground mines. In addressing the goal of an inherently safe mining system the dual-duct adaptation to the Variable Wall Mining Machine appears to offer the path to solution. The respirable dust problem is solvable; the explosive dust problem is nearly solvable; and the explosive methane problem can be greatly reduced. If installed in a highly gassy mine, the dual duct models would also be considerably less costly.

1995-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

Interim Final Rule and Opportunity for Public Comment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be so fundamental to nuclear safety for DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities that it is essential that these requirements be clearly enforceable under the...

59

Microsoft Word - DOE lead agency interim final and proposed rules...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rule will encourage federal permitting agencies to engage constructively in the siting of essential transmission facilities. C. DOE Has Important New Responsibilities Under FPA...

60

Interim consensus guidelines on fossil plant cycle chemistry. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US utilities have been faced with a multitude of water and steam control limits disseminated by various groups and manufacturers. These have provided disparate goals for plant personnel and management in determining the operating limits for their plants. EPRI authorized the preparation of guidelines on fossil plant cycle chemistry as part of a research program, RP2712, with the goal to reduce forced outages and efficiency losses related to water chemistry, corrosion, and deposition. This report is a unified, specific, and comprehensive document that provides the guidance needed for effective and economical control of corrosion and deposition. Implementation of these Guidelines will help reduce forced outages caused by corrosion-induced failures and thereby increase unit availability. The Guidelines provide a set of target values and action levels for critical sample points throughout the water and steam cycle for drum boilers with phosphate treatment; for drum boilers with all-volatile treatment; and for once-through boilers. They are applicable to baseload and to cycling and peaking operation. Corrective actions to be taken when the Guidelines are exceeded are also discussed. More general guidelines are given on management responsibilities, layup, representative sampling, analytical methods, continuous instrumentation, data collection and management, and other considerations. The Guidelines and the results of the other phases of the EPRI Research Project 2712 should bring significant benefits to US utilities at a moderate cost. Modification of portions of the Guidelines to reflect actual, plant-specific design characteristics and local operating experience is recommended when appropriately justified. 118 refs., 88 figs., 24 tabs.

Aschoff, A.F.; Lee, Y.H.; Sopocy, D.M.; Jonas, O.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Savannah River Operations Office Interim Management of Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 70 / Friday, April 11, 1997 / Notices 1 The term ''failed'' means that the cladding on the fuel has been breached. The ROD, 60 Fed. Reg. 65300 (December 19, 1995), stated that failed fuel is indicated by gas releases from a fuel storage canister or visible failure of the cladding or canisters. select samples for specialized surveys for example on children's services or on access for persons with disabilities. [FR Doc. 97-9341 Filed 4-10-97; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Savannah River Operations Office Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Supplemental record of decision and supplement analysis determination. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared a final

62

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual Supplemental Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-921314 1-921314 OSWER DIRECTIVE: 9285.6-03 March 25, 1991 RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE FOR SUPERFUND VOLUME I: HUMAN HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE "STANDARD DEFAULT EXPOSURE FACTORS" INTERIM FINAL Office of Emergency and Remedial Response Toxics Integration Branch U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. 20460 (202)475-9486 REPRODUCED BY U.S.DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA 22161 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 25 1991 S O L I D W A S T E A N D E M E R G E N C Y R E S P O N S E O F F I C E O F OSWER Directive 9285.6-03 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: FROM: Human Health Evaluation Manual, Supplemental Guidance: TO: Director, Waste Management Division, Regions I, IV, V, & VII Director, Emergency & Remedial Response Division,

63

TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Interim Report Third Interim Report Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Preface Executive Summary I. Introduction II. The TSPA-VA Base Case Analysis 1. The TSPA-VA Base Case Analysis A. Results of the TSPA-VA Base Case Analysis B. The Plausibility of the Base Case C. Sensitivity Studies III. Component Models of TSPA A. Unsaturated Zone Infiltration and Flow B. Thermohydrology C. Near-Field Geochemical Environment D. Waste Package Degradation E. Waste Form Alteration/Mobilization F. Unsaturated Zone Transport G. Saturated Zone Flow and Transport H. Biosphere I. Disruptive Events and Climate IV. Conclusions and Recommendations A. Introductory Comments B. Critical Observations and Findings C. Other Issues V. References

64

TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRST INTERIM REPORT FIRST INTERIM REPORT TOTAL SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT PEER REVIEW PANEL JUNE 20, 1997 i PREFACE The Peer Review Panel has written this report with two distinct audiences in mind: (1) those who are actively engaged in producing the Total Systems Performance Assessment and (2) those who are interested in the progress of the Total Systems Performance Assessment and its implications for future policy decisions. The first group will find some of the introductory information unnecessary and will want to concentrate on the technical findings and explanations. The Panel hopes that the report also contains enough background information and explanations of terms and is written clearly enough that it will be intelligible to the second group, namely those interested in the outcome, but not involved in the technical work. The Panel welcomes

65

TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECOND INTERIM REPORT SECOND INTERIM REPORT TOTAL SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT PEER REVIEW PANEL DECEMBER 12, 1997 i PREFACE This report is the second in a series from the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The Panel considers each successive report as an integral part of a series. Issues that have been covered previously will not be repeated unless new information or concerns arise. In preparing this report, the Panel has directed its primary attention to the methods, data, and assumptions that have been developed or identified for the Total System Performance Assessment to be used in the Viability Assessment. The Panel's goals have been to note weaknesses that can be ameliorated through the use of more appropriate models and data, to seek clarification of the bases for certain of the analytical approaches

66

Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills How Did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? R&D 100 Awards for New X-ray Technologies In Nature: Fischetti on Minibeams Sidorowicz of AES Earns UChicago Argonne, LLC Board of Governors Outstanding Service Award for 2010 APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences OCTOBER 1, 2010 Bookmark and Share G. Brian Stephenson Argonne Director Eric Isaacs has appointed G. Brian Stephenson as the Interim Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences, effective Oct. 1, 2010. The text of Director Isaacs' announcement is below. Sept. 30, 2010 To: All employees From: Eric Isaacs, Argonne Director

67

Decommissioning Pre-Planning Manual: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Interim Technical Report provides a framework for pre-planning for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. It identifies important planning decisions, tasks, and contributing disciplines, establishes activity precedence relationships and defines data requirements. The report identifies actions that utilities can take now to ease the transition to decommissioning status, and will be of value to utilities planning plant closures in the future.

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

Interim Report for Advanced Topology Estimator Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Topology Estimator is a critical component in an overall system that will allow operational models of large-scale interconnections to be built, validated, and maintained with a fraction of the time and effort required by traditional electricity management system (EMS) tools. This document provides an interim report on the development of the EPRI Advanced Topology Estimator, which will interface to the EPRI Control Center Application Program (CCAPI) Common Information Model (CIM).

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

Barnitt, R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE Names Interim Manager for Idaho Operations Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interim Manager for Idaho Operations Office Dennis Miotla, the Office of Nuclear Energy's Deputy Assistant Secretary Dennis Miotla for Nuclear Power Deployment, has been named the...

71

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program- Interim Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program- Interim Report on Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores Title Healthy...

72

Energy Policy Act Tranportation Study: Interim Report on Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates October 1995 ... tariff rates, including up-front capital costs, ...

73

Microsoft Word - Interim Use of Scott Mountain Communications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clearance Memorandum Cynthia Rounds Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Interim Use of Scott Mountain Communications Site Budget Information: Work Order 00004688, Task 04...

74

Presidential transition: The experience of two interim community college presidents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand the experiences of two community college interim presidents, their characteristics, and how they led institutions… (more)

Thompson, Matthew Dennis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Disposition of Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12/08/2008)

76

Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Interim Report on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ii Energy Information Administration/ Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Interim Report on Coal Transportation Contacts This report, Energy Policy Act ...

77

Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For your convenience the publication can be viewed or download by section or in its entirety. This report, "Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on ...

78

Microsoft Word - N01359_4.5AcreLDA Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Environmental Restoration Project Environmental Restoration Project Interim Remedial Action for Source Removal at the 4.5 Acre Site Final Report September 2009 LMS/PIN/N01359 This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01359 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Interim Remedial Action for Source Removal at the 4.5 Acre Site Final Report September 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Interim Remedial Action for Source Removal at the 4.5 Acre Site-Final Report September 2009 Doc. No. N01359 Page i Contents Abbreviations................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary.........................................................................................................................v

79

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report GlossaryEnergy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report Table of Contents Table of Contents i Glossary.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from...

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's natural gas supply is conveyed through a robust system of pipelines that run throughout the statePublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT MEMS Sensor Designs for Natural Gas for Natural Gas Pipelines is the interim report for the Natural Gas Pipeline Sensors project (contract number

82

Central waste complex interim safety basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim safety basis provides the necessary information to conclude that hazards at the Central Waste Complex are controlled and that current and planned activities at the CWC can be conducted safely. CWC is a multi-facility complex within the Solid Waste Management Complex that receives and stores most of the solid wastes generated and received at the Hanford Site. The solid wastes that will be handled at CWC include both currently stored and newly generated low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, contact-handled transuranic, and contact-handled TRU mixed waste.

Cain, F.G.

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

EA-0296: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

296: Final Environmental Assessment 296: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0296: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Commercial and Multifamily Highrise Residential Buildings Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted this environmental assessment to address the possible incremental environmental effects of the proposed standard on selected types of commercial buildings constructed for the federal sector. EA-0296-FEA-Summary-1986.pdf In Support of Proposed Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Commercial and Multifamily Highrise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications EA-0296: Finding of No Significant Impact Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

84

Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

Interim technical status report for the COthane contract  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each year millions of tons of dilute carbon monoxide in industrial waste streams are flared or vented to the atmosphere. In order to recover this wasted source of energy, Union Carbide has developed the COthane process for the direct conversion of the dilute carbon monoxide in such streams to pipeline quality natural gas (SNG). A three phase program has been planned for the commercialization of the COthane process. Phase I will define the process details. Phase II will further test the process with an integrated pilot unit operating on industrial waste streams. Phase III will monitor the operation of the first commercial unit. The purpose of this interim report is to describe the preliminary work done under these five tasks during the first fourteen months of the contract. The bench scale pilot unit has been built and initial test runs started. New catalysts have been developed and tested which incorporate different matrixing agents, metal components, stabilizing agents, and synthesis techniques. Finally, the technical and economic studies have shown that, under certain optimistic conditions, a COthane unit handling blast furnace off-gas will produce SNG at $3.17/MM Btu. This cost is probably competitive with currently priced natural gas, and is certainly competitive with SNG produced by the Lurgi process.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

I:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Dieldrin\July 2007\Eco-SSL for Dieldrin.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dieldrin Dieldrin Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-56 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2005 Revised April 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR DIELDRIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . .

89

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Barium\Eco-SSL for Barium.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Soil Screening Levels Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Barium Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7- 63 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 February 2005 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR BARIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6.1 Mammalian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

90

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Chromium\April 2008\Ecological S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chromium Chromium Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7- 66 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2005 Revised April 2008 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR CHROMIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

91

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Copper\February 2007\Eco-SSL for Copper Feb 2007.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-68 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 Issued July 2006 Revised February 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR COPPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . .

92

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Pentachlorophenol\April 2007\Eco-SSL for PCP April 2007.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pentachlorophenol Pentachlorophenol Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-58 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2005 Revised April 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR PENTACHLOROPHENOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . .

93

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Aluminum\November 2003\Eco-SSL for Aluminum .wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aluminum Aluminum Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-60 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY ECO-SSLs FOR ALUMINUM 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 2.0 ALUMINUM CHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 3.0 EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM ON PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3.1 General Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3.2 Essentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Effect on Phosphorus and Calcium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.4 Differential Tolerance of Plants to Aluminum Toxicity

94

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Silver\September 2006\Eco-SSL for Silver Sept 06.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silver Silver Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-77 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 September 2006 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR SILVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.0

95

Acquisition Career Management Program Manual Interim Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Program Manual Management Program Manual Interim Guidance Partial Revision Chapter 11 Contracting Officers Representatives (COR) Contracting Officers Representatives Background FAI published a report in 2003 on the competencies necessary for the COR job function and the US Merit Systems Protection Board published a report in 2005 entitled "Contracting Officer Representatives: Managing the Government's Technical Experts to Achieve Positive Contract Outcomes." Both reports are available at www.fai.gov. A common theme in these reports is the need to organize and support the COR community to ensure that acquisition management is implemented effectively. Some of the findings and recommendations of the reports are: * CORs must be formally delegated authority to work on particular contracts

96

Interim report on long range plan for nuclear physics  

SciTech Connect

The interim report on the updated NSAC Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics will be presented to the community for discussion and comment before submission to the funding agencies. The presentation will be coordinated by E. Moniz chair of NSAC.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

HOLM MJ

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Interim Storage of Used or Spent Nuclear Fuel Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports the safe, controlled, licensed, and regulated interim storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) (irradiated, spent fuel from a nuclear power reactor) until disposition can be determined and completed. ANS supports the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) determination that “spent fuel generated in any reactor can be stored safely and without significant environmental impacts for at least 30 years beyond the licensed life for operation. ” 1 Current operational and decommissioned nuclear power plants in the United States were licensed with the expectation that the UNF would be stored at the nuclear power plant site until shipment to an interim storage facility, reprocessing plant, or permanent storage. Because of delays in Federal programs and policy issues, utilities have been forced to store UNF. Current means of interim storage of UNF at nuclear power plant sites include storage of discharged fuel in a water-filled pool or in a sealed dry cask, both under safe, controlled, and monitored conditions. This UNF interim storage is designed, managed, and controlled to minimize or preclude potential radiological hazards or material releases. At nuclear power plant sites in the United States and internationally, this interim storage is regulated under site license requirements and technical specifications imposed by the national or state regulator. In the United States, NRC is the licensing and regulatory authority. ANS believes that UNF interim storage

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Amended Record of Decision for the Interim Management of Nuclear Materials (DOE/EIS-0220) (1/26/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88 88 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 18 / Friday, January 26, 2001 / Notices 1 A ''pit'' is a nuclear weapon component. 2 A physical blend of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Interim Management of Nuclear Materials AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Amended record of decision. SUMMARY: On December 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision (ROD) and Notice of Preferred Alternatives, 60 FR 65300 (December 19, 1995), for the final environmental impact statement, Interim Management of Nuclear Materials (IMNM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0220, October 20, 1995), at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. As part of its decision, DOE decided to construct a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to prepare, package, and store

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of ERA-interim and MERRA Cloudiness in the Southern Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern ocean cloud cover modeled by the ERA-interim and MERRA reanalyses are compared against MODIS and MISR observations. ERA-interim monthly mean cloud amounts match the observations within 5%, while MERRA significantly underestimates the ...

Catherine M. Naud; James F. Booth; Anthony D. Del Genio

103

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER | USEPA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclides (RSSG) Radionuclides (RSSG) RSSG Home RSSG Search Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Topics for Key Radiation Guidances and Reports These calculations are based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides. The guidance must be read before attempting to calculate values. The guidance is available through: Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides: User's Guide EPA Document Number: EPA/540-R-00-007 Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides: Technical Background Document EPA Document Number: EPA/540-R-00-006, October 2000 Highlight 1: Key Attributes of the Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Standardized equations are presented to address human exposure pathways in a residential setting consistent with Superfund's concept of "Reasonable Maximum Exposure" (RME).

105

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER | USEPA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radionuclides (RSSG) Radionuclides (RSSG) RSSG Home RSSG Search Soil Screening Guidance for Radionuclides Topics for Key Radiation Guidances and Reports Analytes for Soil Screening Calculations Select Analytes. Select one or more analytes for the screening (or click on the "Select All" check box), one or more pathways, and an output format. Then click on the "Next" button. The next page will prompt you for equation parameters. Ac-223 Ac-224 Ac-225 Ac-226 Ac-227 Ac-227+D Ac-228 Ag-102 Ag-103 Ag-104 Ag-104m Ag-105 Ag-106 Ag-106m Ag-108 Ag-108m Ag-109m Ag-110 Ag-110m Ag-111 Ag-112 Ag-115 Al-26 Al-28 Am-237 Am-238 Am-239 Am-240 Am-241 Am-242 Am-242m Am-242m+D Am-243 Am-243+D Am-244 Am-244m Am-245 Am-246 Am-246m Ar-37 Ar-39 Ar-41 As-69 As-70 As-71 As-72 As-73 As-74 As-76 As-77 As-78 At-207 At-211

106

USEPA: OSWER: Risk Assessment: Guidance for Superfund Volume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the specified body part GI Gastrointestinal GSD Geometric standard deviation HHEM Human Health Evaluation Manual IR Ingestion rate (for water, litersday) K ew Equilibrium...

107

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage and Limitations: thumbtack These calculations are based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Soil Screening Guidance. The guidance must be read before...

108

Databases and Tools | Waste and Cleanup Risk Assessment | OSWER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorthiophos Chromium (III) (Insoluble Salts) Chromium VI (particulates) Cobalt Coke Oven Emissions Copper Copper Cyanide Cresol, m- Cresol, o- Cresol, p- Crotonaldehyde,...

109

EA-0995: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations

110

Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

Nancy Lybeck

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Volume 5: Waste Forms for Interim Storage, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published a series of guidance reports on Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste due to concern that loss of access to disposal pathways might one day lead to the need for interim on-site storage of low level waste (LLW). With the closure of the Barnwell Disposal Site to out-of-compact waste in 2008, 85% of the industry has, in fact, been faced with the loss of a disposal pathway for their Class B and C LLW, resulting in the reality of on-sit...

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility  

SciTech Connect

This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings.

Brehm, J.R.; Deobald, T.L.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM REPORT SOLAR REFLECTANCES OF ROOFS/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Solar Reflectances of solar energy that is reflected by the roof. Reflectance tests were conducted following American

117

Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D&D activities beginning in 1997.

None

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

USING POLYMERIC HYDROGEN GETTERS TO PREVENT COMBUSTIBLE ATMOSPHERES DURING INTERIM SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) of WSRC has recently installed the capability to perform both non-destructive and destructive examination of 3013 containers of Pu oxide in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. The containers will be opened and the oxide will be sampled for analysis. The remaining bulk oxide must then be safely stored in a non-3013-compliant configuration. Available processing equipment and controls cannot prevent the oxide from adsorbing moisture during this process. Subsequent radiolysis of moisture during storage may generate combustible quantities of gases while waiting final processing, and satisfying DOE Interim Safe Storage Criteria (ISSC) would require that storage containers be vented at impractical frequencies. With support from an independent National Laboratory, WSRC/NMM has demonstrated that a commercial hydrogen getter material will effectively prevent the accumulation of combustible gas concentrations. A project overview, including storage requirements and strategies, as well as getter technology, current test results, and anticipated future developments will be addressed.

Woodsmall, T

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 3. Alternatives for interim storage and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for interim storage and transportation. Section titles are: interim storage of spent fuel elements; interim storage of chop-leach fuel bundle residues; tank storage of high-level liquid waste; interim storage of solid non-high-level wastes; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; and, transportation alternatives. (JGB)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Operational Implementation of the MARSSIM Process at the Wayne Interim Storage Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodologies behind the operational implementation of the Multi Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) process at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS). The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Environmental Chemical Corporation (ECC) have implemented the MARSSIM process using various surveys producing raw data. The final remedial status of a survey unit is derived through data reduction, while maintaining a high degree of efficiency in the construction aspects of the remedial action. Data reduction of field measurements is accomplished by merging the data outputs of a Digital Global Positioning System, an exposure rate meter, and laboratory analyses to produce maps which present exposure rates, elevations, survey unit boundaries, direct measurement locations, and sampling locations on a single map. The map serves as a data-posting plot and allows the project team to easily judge the survey unit's remedial status. The operational implementation of the MARSSIM process has been successful in determining the eligibility of survey units for final status surveys at the WISS and also in demonstrating final status radiological and chemical conditions while maintaining an efficient remedial action effort.

Hays, D. C. Jr.; Trujillo, P. A. IV.; Zoller, S. G.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task No. FC05.9400 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

123

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC99-03 This page intentionally blank Document Number Q0017700 Acronyms Contents Page ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................. V

124

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

King County Metro Transit King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

125

Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Microsoft Word - 06-22-09 FINAL ECAT Comments on OMB Recovery Act Guidance.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR AMERICAN TRADE EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR AMERICAN TRADE ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 900 17 th St., N.W., Suite 1150, Washington, D.C. 20006 Phone 202.659.5147 Fax 202.659.1347 www.ecattrade.com June 22, 2009 Ms. Marguerite Pridgen Office of Federal Financial Management Submitted via www.regulations.gov Office of Management and Budget Executive Office of the President New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503 Re: Comments on OMB's Interim Final Recovery Act Guidance Dear Ms. Pridgen: Please find below comments submitted on behalf of the Emergency Committee for American Trade (ECAT) on OMB's Interim Final Guidance regarding implementation of Section 1605 of the American

127

,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

" " ,,"PARS II Interim Migration Template" ,,"Fields","Data" ,,"DOE Project ID:","DOE Project # and Project Name" ,,"Year:","Please select a Year" ,,"Month:","Please select a Month" ,,"Fields","Data (Entered in $K) [Data Entry field]" ,,"BCWS ($K):",0 ,,"BCWP ($K):",0 ,,"ACWP ($K):",0 ,,"Management Reserves Remaining ($K):",0 ,,"Percent Complete (%):",0 ,,"Instructions" ,,"1. Log into PARS II" ,,"2. Select the appropriate Project" ,,"3. While still on the Projects screen, click on ""Attachments""" ,,"4. Click on ""Add"""

128

Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to list the Interim Stabilization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential or Support drawings. Essential Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment. Support Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems or components shown on essential drawings.

KOCH, M.R.

1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to list the Interim Stabilization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential or Support drawings. Essential Drawings are those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment. [CHG 2000a]. Support Drawings are those drawings identified by the facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems or components shown on essential drawings. [CHG 2000a].

HORNER, T.M.

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Vibration Monitoring and Analysis Program Development: Interim Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by an EPRI team and will serve as an interim guideline to assist the member utilities in the further improvement of maintenance processes by presenting, in detail, the key elements that should be included in a well-organized vibration monitoring and analysis program, as well as conducting comprehensive vibration program evaluations. This report uses the EPRI Monitoring and Diagnostics Center's "Spider Chart" approach to depict graphic representation of the vibration monitori...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Duke Energy Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project: 2013 Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update is an interim report summarizing the status of Duke Energy’s Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project, which involves integrating a 36-MW battery energy storage system (BESS) from Xtreme Power with the152.6-MW Notrees Wind Farm. Xtreme Power’s solid lead-acid battery represents one of an emerging number of energy storage devices endowed with the potential to serve multiple value-added utility applications. ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Risk-Managed Technical Specifications (RMTS) Guidelines: Interim Development Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents nuclear utilities with a technical framework and associated general guidance for implementation of risk-managed technical specifications (RMTS) as a partial replacement for existing conventional plant technical specifications. This interim report, intended for both Westinghouse and non-Westinghouse reactor plants and for future reference and application by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), will probably be updated in the future as risk-informed applications technology continues to ...

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Interim Storage of Hanford Spent Fuel & Associated Sludge  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site is currently dealing with a number of types of Spent Nuclear Fuel. The route to interim dry storage for the various fuel types branches along two different paths. Fuel types such as metallic N reactor fuel and Shippingport Core 2 Blanket assemblies are being placed in approximately 4 m long canisters which are then stored in tubes below grade in a new canister storage building. Other fuels such as TRIGA{trademark} and Light Water Reactor fuel will be relocated and stored in stand-alone casks on a concrete pad. Varying degrees of sophistication are being applied with respect to the drying and/or evacuation of the fuel interim storage canisters depending on the reactivity of the fuel, the degree of damaged fuel and the previous storage environment. The characterization of sludge from the Hanford K Basins is nearly complete and canisters are being designed to store the sludge (including uranium particles from fuel element cleaning) on an interim basis.

MAKENAS, B.J.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High level waste interim storge architecture selection - decision report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities (RL 1996a). This plan contains a two-phased approach. Phase I is a proof-of-principle/connnercial demonstration- scale effort and Phase II is a fiill-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE fumished. The high-level waste (BLW) interim storage options, or alternative architectures, were identified and evaluated to provide the framework from which to select the most viable method of Phase I BLW interim storage (Calmus 1996). This evaluation, hereafter referred to as the Alternative Architecture Evaluation, was performed to established performance and risk criteria (technical merit, cost, schedule, etc.). Based on evaluation results, preliminary architectures and path forward reconunendations were provided for consideration in the architecture decision- maldng process. The decision-making process used for selection of a Phase I solidified BLW interim storage architecture was conducted in accordance with an approved Decision Plan (see the attachment). This decision process was based on TSEP-07,Decision Management Procedure (WHC 1995). The established decision process entailed a Decision Board, consisting of Westinghouse Hanford Company (VY`HC) management staff, and included appointment of a VTHC Decision Maker. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation results and preliminary recommendations were presented to the Decision Board members for their consideration in the decision-making process. The Alternative Architecture Evaluation was prepared and issued before issuance of @C-IP- 123 1, Alternatives Generation and Analysis Procedure (WI-IC 1996a), but was deemed by the Board to fully meet the intent of WHC-IP-1231. The Decision Board members concurred with the bulk of the Alternative Architecture Evaluation results and recommendations. However, the Board required changes to some criteria definitions and weightings in establishing its own recommendation basis. This report documents information presented to the Decision Board, and the Decision Board`s recommendations and basis for these recommendations. The Board`s recommendations were fully adopted by the WHC Decision Maker, R. J. Murkowski, Manager, TWRS Storage and Disposal. The Decision Board`s recommendation is as follows. The Phase I BLW Interim storage concept architecture will use Vaults 2 and 3 of the Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, being located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area, and include features to faciliate addition of one or more vaults at a later date.

Calmus, R.B.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

Korinko, P.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 244-AR Vault Facility, constructed between 1966 and 1968, was designed to provide lag storage and treatment for the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) tank farm sludges. Tank farm personnel transferred the waste from the 244-AR Vault Facility to B Plant for recovery of cesium and strontium. B Plant personnel then transferred the treatment residuals back to the tank farms for storage of the sludge and liquids. The last process operations, which transferred waste supporting the cesium/strontium recovery mission, occurred in April 1978. After the final transfer in 1978, the 244-AR facility underwent a cleanout. However, 2,271 L (600 gal) of sludge were left in Tank 004AR from an earlier transfer from Tank 241-AX-104. When the cleanout was completed, the facility was placed in a standby status. The sludge had been transferred to Tank 004AR to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL] vitrification work. Documentation of waste transfers suggests that a portion of the sludge may have been moved from Tank 004AR to Tank 002AR in preparation for transfer back to the AX Tank Farm; however, quantities of the sludge that were moved to Tank 002AR from that transfer must be estimated.

LANEY, T.

2000-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

CONRAD EA

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

Burgard, K.C.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

SB 4 Interim Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Notice of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SB 4 Interim Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Notice of Proposed Emergency Rulemaking Action Page 1 of 10 SB 4 INTERIM WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS NOTICE OF PROPOSED EMERGENCY that the California Department of Conservation (Department) proposes to adopt emergency regulations necessary

144

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area at SRS, and disposal at WIPP, approximately 500 kg of surplus, non-pit plutonium. DOE finds that the analysis in the Interim Management of Nuclear Material EIS and the SRS Waste Management EIS are still representative of the impacts of disposal of these materials. Therefore, no adverse environmental impacts would result from disposal of these materials as TRU waste to WIPP and this action is clearly an allowable interim action in accordance with DOE regulations

145

Microsoft Word - Policy_Flash_09_01_Interim_Certification.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JANUARY 16, 2009 JANUARY 16, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PROGRAM ELEMENTS FROM: PMCDP CERTIFICATION REVIEW BOARD SUBJECT: Project Management Career Development Interim Certification The Project Management Career Development Program (PMCDP) Certification Review Board (CRB) established a new process whereby candidates with strong project management experience from outside the Department, hired into project director positions, may be granted an interim PMCDP certification. Interim certification allows the federal employee to act as a certified federal project director. Interim certifications are granted by the sponsoring CRB member, or their designee. If the sponsoring program office is not a voting member of the CRB, the Office of Engineering and Construction Management will act as the grantor of interim certification.

146

US PRACTICE FOR INTERIM WET STORAGE OF RRSNF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the United States and stored at Department of Energy storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper summarizes the current practices to provide for continued safe interim wet storage in the U.S. Aluminum fuel stored in poor quality water is subject to aggressive corrosion attack and therefore water chemistry control systems are essential to maintain water quality. Fuel with minor breaches are safely stored directly in the basin. Fuel pieces and heavily damaged fuel is safely stored in isolation canisters.

Vinson, D.

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interim Storage of Greater Than Class C Low Level Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim, on-site storage of low level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. This waste, referred to as greater than Class C (GTCC) waste, exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States. This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on site until a disposal facil...

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

Wight, R.H.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

DODD, E.N.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

1986 Federal Interim Storage fee study: a technical and economic analysis  

SciTech Connect

JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for federal interim storage (FIS) services and concluded that the combined interests of the Department and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with Section 136(e) of the Act, and (5) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells or silos). The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under- or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee (including savings due to rod consolidation), and (2) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). The module costs were included in the Initial Payment to preclude the possible need to obtain appropriations for federal funds to support the purchase of the modules in advance of receipt of the Final Payment. Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at actual cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings This document is functionally identical to the Environmental Assessment released in support of the Interim Final Rules published on December 4, 2006 (71 FR 70275). No findings or results have been changed. The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final

152

DOE/EIA-0193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

193/P 193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY OFFICE OF THE CONSUMPTION DATA SYSTEM OFFICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION AUGUST 1, 1979 PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Attached is the first report of the Office of the Consumption Data System, Office of Program Development, Energy Information Administration, presenting preliminary data from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). The focus of this report is the conservation activities performed by households since January 1977, and the status of households with respect to insulation, storm windows, and other energy conserving characteristics. These tables are from preliminary data files.

153

Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits:Interim CQA Report  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. Construction was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) under the Approval of Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, on January 6, 2011, pursuant to Subpart XII.8a of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The project is located in Area 5 of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, located in southern Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. The project site, in Area 5, is located in a topographically closed basin approximately 14 additional miles north of Mercury Nevada, in the north-central part of Frenchman Flat. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location, waste types and regulatory requirements: (1) Pit 3 Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU); (2) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111; (3) CAU 207; (4) Low-level waste disposal units; (5) Asbestiform low-level waste disposal units; and (6) One transuranic (TRU) waste trench.

The Delphi Groupe, Inc., and J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Guidance For Preparatioon of Basis For Interim Operation (BIO) Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3011-2002 3011-2002 December 2002 Superceding DOE-STD-3011-94 November 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF BASIS FOR INTERIM OPERATION (BIO) DOCUMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3011-2002 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

155

Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

Benson, B.

1991-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

National Interim Energy-Consumption Survey. Part VI. Energy assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of energy assessment of the housing unit is to obtain physical information which can be combined with other survey results to give a more complete picture of the residential environment. A limited pretest of an energy assessment procedure was carried out in April-June 1979 with a subsample of 44 households that had been originally interviewed in the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey. In order to gain experience under a variety of environmental conditions, the pretest sites included locations in the Northeast, North Central, and South regions. As developed for the pretest, the energy assessment was a 90-minute inspection of the housing unit by a trained technician. Data collected during the inspection included square footage of the unit; age, make, and characteristics of appliances; insulation characteristics, characteristics of siting and apertures; and detailed information on the heating and cooling systems in the unit. The report describes the data collection procedures for the pretest.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

OE/EIA-0272 The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

272 272 The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey: Exploring the Variability in Energy Consumption July 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Industrial Data Systems Division This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, at the following address: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Order Desk: (202) 783-3238 Stock Number: 061-003-00205-6 Price: $4.25 For questions on energy statistics or information on availability of other EIA publications, contact: National Energy Information Center, El-20 Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585

158

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete June 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Mark McKenna mmckenna@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9032 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has completed placing N Reactor in interim safe storage, a process also known as "cocooning." N Reactor was the last of nine plutonium production reactors to be shut down at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. It was Hanford's longest-running reactor, operating from 1963 to 1987. "In the 1960's, N Reactor represented the future of energy in America.

160

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

File:Cwa-401-handbook-2010-interim.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Cwa-401-handbook-2010-interim.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata...

162

Basis for Interim Operation for the K-Reactor in Cold Standby  

SciTech Connect

The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document for K Reactor in Cold Standby and the L- and P-Reactor Disassembly Basins was prepared in accordance with the draft DOE standard for BIO preparation (dated October 26, 1993).

Shedrow, B.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

Pickett, W.W.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Interim Storage of Low and Intermediate Level Wastes: Guidelines for Extended Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic utilities are responding to impending changes in low-level waste (LLW) disposal site facility availability by extending their capabilities for interim on-site storage of LLW. International utilities likewise face challenges in implementing complete low and intermediate waste disposal options. Therefore, our members asked EPRI to revise and update our series of documents devoted to on-site interim LLW storage. This report represents the key guidelines document for the series.

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project  

SciTech Connect

The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Guidelines for Operating an Interim On Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial USA nuclear stations have constructed on-site LLW storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. These Guidelines focus on operational considerations and incorporate many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW storage facilities. This document was reviewed by the USNRC. Subsequently, the USNRC issued RIS 2008-32, Interim LLRW Storage at NPPs, which recognizes the meth...

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Process: Interim Actions (6/17/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exhibit 3 Exhibit 3 Steps to Follow for Determining Whether Actions May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions Would the Interim Action Prejudice the Ultimate Programmatic Decision (i.e., would it tend to determine subsequent development or Limit alternatives)? Is the Proposed Interim Action Within the Scope of a Programmatic or Project-Specific EIS that is Being Prepared? Is the EIS Programmatic in Nature? (If proposed interim action is covered by a CX or EA/FONSI,see footnote 4, page 4, of text) Provisions of 40 CFR 1506.1 Do Not Apply: Follow Normal DOE NEPA Review and Documentation Procedures No Yes No No Would the Interim Action Have An Adverse Impact? Would the Interim Action Limit the Choice of Reasonable Alternatives (e.g., by level of resources

168

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Attachments\Attachment 4-4\Final Eco-SSL Attachment 4-4.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Eco-SSL Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) # 5: Wildlife TRV Data Evaluation OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank Attachment 4-4 Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) #5: Wildlife Toxicity Reference Value Data Evaluation for Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 Prepared for USEPA Region 8 by Syracuse Research Corporation 999 18th Street, Suite 1975 North Tower Denver, CO 80202 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 THE SCORING SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4.0 EVALUATION AND SCORING OF STUDY ATTRIBUTES .

169

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\PAHs\June 2007\Eco-SSL for PAHs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-78 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 June 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR PAHs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.1 Mammalian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . .

170

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Selenium\June 2007\Eco-SSL for S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-72 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 July 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR SELENIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

171

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Lead\November 2003\Eco-SSL for Lead_v2.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead Lead Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-70 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2005 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR LEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE

172

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Cadmium\November 2003\Eco-SSL for Cadmium v2.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cadmium Cadmium Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-65 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2005 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR CADMIUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 6.1 Mammalian TRV

173

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Nickel\March 2007\Eco-SSL for Nickel.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-76 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR NICKEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

174

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Zinc\June 2007\Eco-SSL for Zinc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-73 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 June 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR ZINC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

175

DRAFT REVISION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Handling h. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directive No. 9833.3A-1, December 1990, Final Guidance on...

176

The value of distributed generation: The PVUSA grid-support project serving Kerman Substation. Interim report, April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A common practice of electric utilities experiencing transmission and distribution (T and D) system overloads is to expand the substation, add lines, or upgrade equipment, all of which are capital intensive options. In 1988, it was hypothesized that strategically sited photovoltaics (PV) could benefit parts of T and D systems near or at overloaded conditions. An evaluation methodology was developed and applied to a test case (Kerman Substation near Fresno, California). Analytical results suggested that the value of PV to the T and D system could substantially exceed its energy and generation capacity value. The importance of this finding indicated the need for empirical validation. This led to the construction of a 0.5 MW PV demonstration plant by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) at Kerman, California as part of the PVUSA (PV for Utility Scale Applications) project. PVUSA is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic electric generation systems. The Kerman PV plant, commissioned for commercial operation in June, 1993, is reported to be the first grid-support PV demonstration plant in the world. This Interim Report focuses on validating the technical aspects of grid-support PV. It provides interim validation results for four of the eight identified value components that stack up to make the ``value bar``, and compares them to 1992 Case Study estimates. Results are based on improved technical evaluation methodologies, measured plant performance under a variety of conditions, and long-term plant performance estimated using a validated computer simulation program. This report is not intended to be exhaustive in scope. It does, however, provide a thorough progress update of the validation project. Complete documentation of test procedures, data, and evaluation methods will be presented in the Final Report.

Hoff, T.; Wenger, H. [Pacific Energy Group (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the vadose zone by soil vapor extraction (SVE). (4) Volatilization of contaminants from portions of the affected aquifer that can be accessed from the former CCC/USDA property. The primary objective of the proposed removal action is removal of mass quantities of carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area, to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. This objective will be the basis for evaluating system performance. The scope of action outlined in the IMWP/D is limited to the five treatment zones defined by the LDB/SVE/AS locations. Surrounding soils and groundwater will benefit; however, remedial benefits to groundwater will be limited to the area of influence associated with the five treatment zones. While treatment should be aggressive in the vicinity of the LDB locations, the heterogeneity, clay content, and low permeability of the soils will place inherent limits on the area of influence.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Memorandum, Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing PIV Cards - July 31,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum, Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing PIV Cards - Memorandum, Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing PIV Cards - July 31, 2008 Memorandum, Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing PIV Cards - July 31, 2008 July 31, 2008 Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing Personal Identity Verification Cards under HSPD-12 "This memorandum provides final government-wide credentialing standards to be used by all Federal departments and agencies in determining whether to issue or revoke personal identity verification (PIV) cards to their employees and contractor personnel, including those who are non-United States citizens. These standards replace the interim standards issued in December 2007. The authority is section 2.3(b) of Executive Order 13467 of June 30, 2008.1 In addition to the requirements in this memorandum, credentialing

180

International Programs and Agreements in Geothermal Energy. An Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the interim results of a study for the Division of Geothermal Energy on the Division's international programs and activities. The complete research program, which is scheduled to be finished i November 1978, will have the following elements: (1) an assessment of objectives that have motivated the formulation of international programs and an explanation of any changes in the evolution of those programs. These objectives will be assessed for their internal consistency, degree of governmental consensus, their practicality, the current status of their accomplishments, and the implications of their accomplishments for the role of DGE. (2) An assessment of organizational structures and teams, including the identity of key decisionmakers, the nature of the interagency process, procedures for generating nongovernmental support for international programs and the success of these procedures, and the effectiveness of the interface with foreign partners. (3) Assessment of results of international cooperative programs, which involve the development of an overall balance sheet of benefits and disbenefits attributed to each international program. (4) The formulation of future international cooperative programs based on the assessments described. These programs may involve the development of new exchanges, alteration or elimination of existing exchanges, and revisions in the management of exchanges by US government agencies.

Oppenheimer, M.; Fein, E.; Bye, J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture  

SciTech Connect

Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Final Reminder:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

184

EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah Certain Plutonium Materials at the K-Area Complex, Savannah River Site DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to preparation for disposition in the HB-Line and K-Area at SRS, and disposal at WIPP, approximately 500 kg of surplus, non-pit plutonium. DOE finds that the analysis in the Interim Management of Nuclear Material EIS and the SRS Waste Management EIS are still representative of the impacts of disposal of these materials. Therefore, no adverse environmental impacts would result from disposal of these materials as TRU waste to WIPP and this action is clearly an allowable interim action in accordance with DOE regulations for implementing NEPA. EIS-0283-S2-Amended_IAD-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

185

Request for Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Request for Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Federal Power Act § 313, David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, through his counsel Robert F. McDonnell, the Attorney General of Virginia, requests rehearing of Order No. 202-05-3 entered by the Secretary of Energy on December 20, 2005. Specifically, Director Paylor requests rehearing based on the following assignments of error: 1. The Secretary erred by holding that the FPA preempts the Clean Air Act and related state laws;

186

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

187

Interim Transmittal Letter dated July 27 2005 | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Interim Transmittal Letter dated July 27 2005 Interim Transmittal Letter dated July 27 2005 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Members .pdf file (20KB) Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (44KB) HEP Committees of Visitors HEP Home Charges/Reports Interim Transmittal Letter dated July 27 2005 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page July 27, 2005 Harold T. Shapiro, Chair Sally Dawson, Vice Chair Elementary Particle Physics 2010 Committee The National Academies 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Dear Harold and Sally, Thank you again for your letter of March 15, 2005 to me as Chair of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) and for the opportunity to answer your questions about the International Linear Collider (ILC) along the broad themes of 1) the physics case, 2) the research and development

188

Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interim Test Procedures for Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications S. Chakraborty, W. Kramer, B. Kroposki, G. Martin, P. McNutt, M. Kuss, T. Markel, and A. Hoke Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-51001 June 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications S. Chakraborty, W. Kramer, B. Kroposki, G. Martin, P. McNutt, M. Kuss, T. Markel,

189

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total energy. Owing to breakthroughs in technology, production from shale formations has gone from a negligible amount just a few years ago to being almost 30 percent of total U.S. natural gas production. This has brought lower prices, domestic jobs, and the prospect of enhanced national security due to the potential of substantial

190

The Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal District: An Interim View | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal District: An Interim View The Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal District: An Interim View Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: The Humboldt House-Rye Patch Geothermal District: An Interim View Abstract The Humboldt House - Rye Patch Geothermal District extends about 6 miles along the northwestern flank of the Humboldt Range in Pershing County, Nevada and is composed of a number of geothermal cells. The northern Humboldt House portion of the district hosts hot wells and silicic sinter deposits extending from within the Humboldt Range, westward for at least four miles, out into the Humboldt River Valley. The southern Rye Patch portion of the District has scant surface geothermal features, and is identified from well data. Exploration in the District in the mid to late

191

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

700 700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report October through December 2002 January 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107 Document Number N0057700 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site NAPL Interim Measures Progress Report January 2003 Page ii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................ iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

192

Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

193

FY 1999 Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to present in one place the near and long-term plans for safe management of SRS SNF inventories until final disposition has been identified and implemented.

Dupont, M.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Interfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The cost of energy to pump oil through a pipe line is greatly reduced if the ow is not turbulent in this area, in part, because oil companies have only recently considered pumping oil through pipesInterfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil D. Van Vliet and B. R

Sutherland, Bruce

195

Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Engineering Task Plan for Hose In Hose Transfer Lines for the Interim Stabilization Program  

SciTech Connect

The document is the Engineering Task Plan for the engineering, design services, planning, project integration and management support for the design, modification, installation and testing of an over ground transfer (OGT) system to support the interim stabilization of S/SX and U Tank Farms.

TORRES, T.D.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Engineering Task Plan for Hose In Hose Transfer Lines for the Interim Stabilization Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the Engineering Task Plan for the engineering, design services, planning, project integration and management support for the design, modification, installation and testing of an over ground transfer (OGT) system to support the interim stabilization of nine tanks in the 241-S/SX Tank Farms.

RUNG, M.P.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Design Analysis Report for 244-AR Interim Stabilization Exhaust Ventilation Ducting  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the design analysis performed for the exhaust ducting associated with the 244-AR Interim Stabilization Project. The exhaust ducting connects portable exhausters PORO5 and PORO6 to the existing east dog house of the 291-AR filter vault and the vessel ventilation system. This analysis examines loads on the ductwork and ductwork supports.

RUTHERFORD, J.

2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)  

SciTech Connect

Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified additional components and actions in Section 3.0 and Table 3 that require further evaluation. The purpose of this report is to evaluate another portion of the remaining inventory (i.e., delayed neutron signal fuel, blanket assemblies, highly enriched assemblies, newly loaded Ident-69 pin containers, and returned fuel) to ensure it can be safely off loaded to the FFTF spent fuel storage system.

CHASTAIN, S.A.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Attachments\Attachment 4-3\Revised TRV SOP 12012002.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Eco-SSL Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) #4: Wildlife Toxicity Reference Value Literature Review, Data Extraction and Coding OSWER Directive 92857-55 Issued November 2003 Revised October 2005 This page left intentionally blank Attachment 4-3 Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) #4: Wildlife Toxicity Reference Value Literature Review, Data Extraction and Coding for Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) OSWER Directive 92857-55 October 2005 Prepared for USEPA Region 8 by Syracuse Research Corporation Denver, Colorado 80123 maintained by Computer Sciences Corporation Duluth, Minnesota 55804 Contract 68-W01-032, Task Order No. 24 This page left intentionally blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION

202

FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

203

HVDC Overhead Line Design Guide: 2013 Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report HVDC Overhead Line Design Guide (1024326). An outline developed in 2012 identified all of the topics to be covered by the report. A draft for high-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) ground electrodes and another for HVDC conductor selection were also included in the 2012 version. These topics were finalized in 2013, and the topics of HVDC line performance and insulation were added to the report. All four ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New York City Transit Hybrid New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

205

Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report-January through March 2003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4-TAC 4-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project January through March 2003 Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April 2003 Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. N0060900 GJO-2003-434-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report January through March 2003 April 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Task Order Number ST03-107

206

In Situ Bioremediation Interim Remedial Action Report, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Interim Remedial Action Report is for the in situ bioremediation remedial component of Operable Unit 1-07B at Test Area North at the Idaho National Laboratory. Under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance, an interim report for a long-term groundwater remedial action provides a chronology of events and a description of the remedial action facilities, systems, components, and operating documents that lead to a declaration that the system is operational and functional. It is the conclusion of this report that the in situ bioremediation remedial component includes the infrastructure and programs necessary to achieve the objectives of the in situ bioremediation remedial component for contaminated groundwater in the vicinity of the TSF-05 well; therefore, it can be deemed operational and functional. iii ivCONTENTS ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................................................iii

Unit -b; Prepared For The

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

Pickett, W.W.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Field Testing of Location Tracking Technologies for Radiation Management: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry is challenged with monitoring an ever-increasing load of work activities and workers, while cost effective measures have greatly reduced the number of staff able to perform job coverage. The adoption of location tracking technologies may assist plant staff in maintaining safe operation of nuclear power plants. Performing field tests of the available equipment will help the industry understand the set up requirements and limitations of coverage. This interim report provides info...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effective Personnel Exposure Control in Shortened Refueling Outages: Interim Report: Review of Remote Monitoring Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are currently investigating technologies such as remote monitoring systems (RMS) to optimize their radiation protection capabilities. This interim report provides a brief description of the hardware and features of remote monitoring systems at four nuclear power plants, and serves as the basis for EPRI work dedicated to the advancement of RMS technology for radiation protection applications. This information can significantly benefit those utilities presently planning major RMS installations.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

210

2011 Interim Review of the Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines -- Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI periodically updates its PWR water chemistry guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). An industry review committee meeting in September 2011 determined that a revision of the 2009 version of EPRI's Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines is not warranted at this time, nor is interim guidance required.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Interim action record of decision remedial alternative selection: TNX area groundwater operable unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the selected interim remedial action for the TNX Area Groundwater Operable Unit at the Savannah River Site (SRS), which was developed in accordance with CERCLA of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution contingency Plan (NCP). This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific CERCLA unit.

Palmer, E.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Design requirements document for project W-465, immobilized low activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this design requirements document is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Operations and Maintenance Concept Plan for the Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This O&M Concept looks at the future operations and maintenance of the IHLW/CSB interim storage facility. It defines the overall strategy, objectives, and functional requirements for the portion of the building to be utilized by Project W-464. The concept supports the tasks of safety basis planning, risk mitigation, alternative analysis, decision making, etc. and will be updated as required to support the evolving design.

JANIN, L.F.

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nondestructive Evaluation: Buried Pipe NDE Technology Assessment and Development Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim progress report for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project “Assessment and Development of Buried Pipe Nondestructive Evaluation Technology,” which is planned to continue through 2013. The project is a part of EPRI’s overall strategy to close the industry’s underground pipe infrastructure gaps, as described in the nuclear power industry’s “Underground Piping and Tank Integrity Strategic Roadmap.” ...

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

EVALUATION OF ULTIMATE DISPOSAL METHOD FOR LIQUID AND SOLID RADIOACTIVE WASTES. PART I. INTERIM LIQUID STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

As the first part of a study to evaluate the economics of the various steps leading to and including the permanent disposal of high-activity liquid and solid radioactive waste, costs of interim liquid storage of acid and alkaline Purex and Thorex wastes were estimated for storage times of 0.5 to 30 years. A 6- ton/day plant was assumed, processing 1500 tons/year of uranium converter fuel at a burnup of 10,000 Mwd/ton and 270 tons/year of thorium converter fuel at a burnup of 20,000 Mwd/ton. Tanks of Savannah River design were assumed, with stainless steel construction for acid wastes and mild steel construction for neutralized wastes. The operating cycle of each tank was assumed to consist of equal filling and emptying periods plus a full (or dead) period. With interim storage time defined as filling time plus full time, tank costs were minimum when full time was 40 to 70% of the interim storage time, using present worth considerations. For waste storage times of 0.5 to 30 years, costs ranged from 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ to 9.5 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for acid wastes and from 1.7 x 10/sup -3/ to 5.1 x 10/sup -3/ mill/kwh/sub e/ for neutralized wastes. (auth)

Bradshaw, R.L.; Perona, J.J.; Roberts, J.T.; Blomeke, J.O.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES Item Subject FAR Case  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CIRCULARS 2005-56 and -57 CIRCULARS 2005-56 and -57 SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES Item Subject FAR Case FAC 56-Miscellaneous I. Women-Owned Small Business Program 2010-015 II. Proper Use and Management of Cost-Reimbursement Contracts 2008-030 III. Requirements for Acquisitions Pursuant to Multiple-Award Contracts 2007-012 IV. Socioeconomic Program Parity 2011-004 V. Trade Agreements Thresholds 2012-002 VI. New Designated Country (Armenia) and Other Trade Agreements Updates 2011-30 VII. Government Property 2010-009 VIII. Technical Amendments FAC 57- Korea Free trade Agreement Item I-Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program (FAR Case 2010-015) This rule adopts as final, with changes, an interim rule published in the Federal Register at 76 FR

217

FEDERAL ACQUISITION CIRCULAR 2005-56 SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 56 SUMMARY OF FINAL RULES Item Subject FAR Case I. Women-Owned Small Business Program 2010-015 II. Proper Use and Management of Cost-Reimbursement Contracts 2008-030 III. Requirements for Acquisitions Pursuant to Multiple-Award Contracts 2007-012 IV. Socioeconomic Program Parity 2011-004 V. Trade Agreements Thresholds 2012-002 VI. New Designated Country (Armenia) and Other Trade Agreements Updates 2011-30 VII. Government Property 2010-009 VIII. Technical Amendments Item I--Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB) Program (FAR Case 2010-015) This rule adopts as final, with changes, an interim rule published in the Federal Register at 76 FR 18304 on April 1, 2011, which provides a tool to assist Federal agencies in achieving the 5

218

Nuclear Safety Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR 1810), Federal Register (Fed Reg), 1/10/2001 Nuclear Safety Management, Final Rule amending 10 CFR Part 830 (66 FR 1810), Federal Register (Fed Reg), 1/10/2001 SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) adopts, with minor changes, the interim final rule published on October 10, 2000, to amend the DOE Nuclear Safety Management regulations. EFFECTIVE DATE: This final rule is effective on February 9, 2001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Black, Director, Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy, 270CC, Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874; telephone: 301-903-3465; email: Richard.Black@eh.doe.gov SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Introduction and Summary On October 10, 2000, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an

219

Documents: Final PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final PEIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Final Programmatic EIS DOEEIS-0269 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for...

220

Base program interim phase test procedure - Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS). Final report, September 27, 1994--January 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the CLVS research project is to develop a prototype fiber-optic based Coherent Laser Vision System suitable for DOE`s EM Robotics program. The system provides three-dimensional (3D) vision for monitoring situations in which it is necessary to update geometrics on the order of once per second. The CLVS project plan required implementation in two phases of the contract, a Base Contract and a continuance option. This is the Test Procedure and test/demonstration results presenting a proof-of-concept for a system providing three-dimensional (3D) vision with the performance capability required to update geometrics on the order of once per second.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

Gage, M.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Phase 1, Interim/final report: Volume 1, Technical and economic analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical and economic feasibility of using oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) and preheated oxygen enriched combustion (POEC) for industrial furnace applications was evaluated. The potential for fuel savings and productivity improvements with OEC/POEC systems was parametrically analyzed for a broad range of furnace conditions including those for steel heating, glass melting and aluminum melting. The changes in combustion characteristics with OEC were reviewed and their effects on furnace applications discussed. Relative advantages of different enrichment techniques, safety considerations and the effects of OEC on combustion-generated pollutants were also evaluated. The characteristics and economics of the state-of-the-art oxygen generation methods including PSA, membrane and cryogenic systems were evaluated to identify cost effective methods of supplying oxygen enriched air. The potential synergistic effects of combining preheating and oxygen enrichment were investigated by analyzing fuel savings and the capital and operating costs. The overall process economics of conventional heat recovery systems, and various OEC/POEC systems were compared.

Kobayashi, Hisashi

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the results of a DOE funded joint effort of Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR), SRI International (SRI), and ABB Lummus (ABB) to develop facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separations. Currently, olefin/paraffin separation is done by distillation—an extremely energy-intensive process because of the low relative volatilities of olefins and paraffins. If facilitated transport membranes could be successfully commercialized, the potential energy savings achievable with this membrane technology are estimated to be 48 trillion Btu per year by the year 2020. We discovered in this work that silver salt-based facilitated transport membranes are not stable even in the presence of ideal olefin/paraffin mixtures. This decline in membrane performance appears to be caused by a previously unrecognized phenomenon that we have named olefin conditioning. As the name implies, this mechanism of performance degradation becomes operative once a membrane starts permeating olefins. This project is the first study to identify olefin conditioning as a significant factor impacting the performance of facilitated olefin transport membranes. To date, we have not identified an effective strategy to mitigate the impact of olefin conditioning. other than running at low temperatures or with low olefin feed pressures. In our opinion, this issue must be addressed before further development of facilitated olefin transport membranes can proceed. In addition to olefin conditioning, traditional carrier poisoning challenges must also be overcome. Light, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and acetylene exposure adversely affect membrane performance through unwanted reaction with silver ions. Harsh poisoning tests with these species showed useful membrane lifetimes of only one week. These tests demonstrate a need to improve the stability of the olefin complexing agent to develop membranes with lifetimes satisfactory for commercial application. A successful effort to improve membrane coating solution stability resulted in the finding that membrane performance loss could be reversed for all poisoning cases except hydrogen sulfide exposure. This discovery offers the potential to extend membrane lifetime through cyclic regeneration. We also found that certain mixed carriers exhibited greater stability in reducing environments than exhibited by silver salt alone. These results offer promise that solutions to deal with carrier poisoning are possible. The main achievement of this program was the progress made in gaining a more complete understanding of the membrane stability challenges faced in the use of facilitated olefin transport membranes. Our systematic study of facilitated olefin transport uncovered the full extent of the stability challenge, including the first known identification of olefin conditioning and its impact on membrane development. We believe that significant additional fundamental research is required before facilitated olefin transport membranes are ready for industrial implementation. The best-case scenario for further development of this technology would be identification of a novel carrier that is intrinsically more stable than silver ions. If the stability problems could be largely circumvented by development of a new carrier, it would provide a clear breakthrough toward finally recognizing the potential of facilitated olefin transport. However, even if such a carrier is identified, additional development will be required to insure that the membrane matrix is a benign host for the olefin-carrier complexation reaction and shows good long-term stability.

Merkel, T.C.; Blanc, R.; Zeid, J.; Suwarlim, A.; Firat, B.; Wijmans, H.; Asaro, M. (SRI); Greene, M. (Lummus)

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Interim report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the environment and cost reduction are the driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. Preliminary activities included surveying the directional drilling access needs of various DOE sites, identifying an existing class of machinery that could be enhanced for environmental work through development, and establishing a mutually beneficial working relationship with an industry partner. Since that time the project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, and SNL. The project continues to test and develop the machinery and technique refinements needed for future applications at DOE, DOD, and private sector sites. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of ``cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid`` to an environmental problem site. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and ultimately should result in commercial availability of the machinery. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques will be a final project goal.

Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration—Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank of the 241-T Tank Farm in 1973. Five tanks are assumed to have leaked in the TY Farm. Many of the contaminants from those leaks still reside within the vadose zone within the T and TY Tank Farms. The Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection seeks to minimize the movement of these contaminant plumes by placing interim barriers on the ground surface. Such barriers are expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plumes and moving them further. The soil water regime is monitored to determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barriers. Soil-water content and water pressure are monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. Four instrument nests were installed in the T Farm in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2007; two nests were installed in the TY Farm in FY2010. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, and four heat-dissipation units. A meteorological station has been installed at the north side of the fence of the T Farm. This document summarizes the monitoring methods, the instrument calibration and installation, and the vadose zone monitoring plan for interim barriers in T farm and TY Farm.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging Station Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been awarded $6.8 million in the Department of Energy (DOE) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds as part of an overall $114.8 million ECOtality grant with matching funds from regional partners to install 125 solar-assisted Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations across Knoxville, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis. Significant progress has been made toward completing the scope with the installation of 25 solar-assisted charging stations at ORNL; six stations at Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); and 27 stations at Nissan's Smyrna and Franklin sites, with three more stations under construction at Nissan's new lithium-ion battery plant. Additionally, the procurement process for contracting the installation of 34 stations at Knoxville, the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), and Nashville sites is underway with completion of installation scheduled for early 2012. Progress is also being made on finalizing sites and beginning installations of 30 stations in Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis by EPRI and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The solar-assisted EV charging station project has made great strides in fiscal year 2011. A total of 58 solar-assisted EV parking spaces have been commissioned in East and Middle Tennessee, and progress on installing the remaining 67 spaces is well underway. The contract for the 34 stations planned for Knoxville, UTK, and Nashville should be underway in October with completion scheduled for the end of March 2012; the remaining three Nissan stations are under construction and scheduled to be complete in November; and the EPRI/TVA stations for Chattanooga, Vanderbilt, and Memphis are underway and should be complete by the end of March 2012. As additional Nissan LEAFs are being delivered, usage of the charging stations has increased substantially. The project is on course to complete all 125 solar-assisted EV charging stations in time to collect meaningful data by the end of government fiscal year 2012. Lessons learned from the sites completed thus far are being incorporated and are proving to be invaluable in completion of the remaining sites.

Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Durfee, Norman [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Overbey, Randall M [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Department of Energy Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES&H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES&H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public.

Bickford, W.E.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Interim Storage of Greater than Class C Low Level Waste, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as a guideline for the safe, interim on-site storage of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) that exceeds the activity limitations for near-surface disposal set forth in 10 CFR 61.55. The nuclear industry refers to this waste as "greater than Class C (GTTC) waste" as it exceeds the Class C limits in the referenced regulation. At the present time, there is no licensed disposal facility for GTCC waste in the United States . This situation forces commercial nuclear reactors to store it on si...

2003-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hydrogen combustion in an MCO during interim storage (fauske and associates report 99-14)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flammable conditions are not expected to develop in an MCO during interim storage. This report considers potential phenomena which, although not expected t o occur, could lead t o flammable conditions. For example, reactions of hydrogen w i t h fuel over decades a r e postulated t o lead t o flammable atmospheric mixtures. For the extreme cases considered in this report, the highest attainable post-combustion pressure is about 13 atmospheres absolute, almost a factor of two and a half below the MCO design pressure of 31 atmospheres.

PLYS, M.G.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Recommended Changes to Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility - For NRC Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of commercial U.S. nuclear stations have constructed on-site low-level waste (LLW) storage facilities, and most of these same utilities are experiencing or have experienced at least one period of interim on-site storage. EPRI has issued two revisions of Guidelines for Operating an Interim On-Site Low Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility. Revision 1 of these Guidelines focused on operational considerations and incorporated many of the lessons learned while operating various types of LLW s...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Identifying Potential Areas for Siting Interim Nuclear Waste Facilities Using Map Algebra and Optimization Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewed interest in siting new nuclear power plants in the United States has brought to the center stage, the need to site interim facilities for long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In this paper, a two-stage approach for identifying potential areas for siting interim SNF facilities is presented. In the first stage, the land area is discretized into grids of uniform size (e.g., 100m x 100m grids). For the continental United States, this process resulted in a data matrix of about 700 million cells. Each cell of the matrix is then characterized as a binary decision variable to indicate whether an exclusion criterion is satisfied or not. A binary data matrix is created for each of the 25 siting criteria considered in this study. Using map algebra approach, cells that satisfy all criteria are clustered and regarded as potential siting areas. In the second stage, an optimization problem is formulated as a p-median problem on a rail network such that the sum of the shortest distance between nuclear power plants with SNF and the potential storage sites from the first stage is minimized. The implications of obtained results for energy policies are presented and discussed.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DOE/EA=O995 Final ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA=O995 DOE/EA=O995 Final ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING-OF-NO-SIGNIFIC ANT-IMPACT Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations United States Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Golden, Colorado September 1994 DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

235

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.5 Household Demographics of U.S....

236

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.8 Household Demographics of Homes...

237

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.1 Household Demographics of U.S....

238

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.7 Household Demographics of U.S....

239

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.6 Household Demographics of U.S....

240

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.3 Household Demographics of U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.4 Household Demographics of U.S....

242

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.11 Household Demographics of Homes...

243

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.10 Household Demographics of Homes...

244

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.9 Household Demographics of Homes...

245

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.2 Household Demographics of U.S....

246

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part I: Climatology and potential vorticity evolution.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global climatology of warm conveyor belts (WCBs) is presented for the years 1979-2010, based upon trajectories calculated with ERA-Interim reanalyses. WCB trajectories are identified as strongly ascending air parcels (600 hPa in 2 days) near ...

Erica Madonna; Heini Wernli; Hanna Joos; Olivia Martius

247

Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys II Interim Report on Contract 1DX-SY382V  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality and potential creep performance (particularly) in the consolidated, release condition. The interim defined in the micrograph. However, the transformation is obvious if compared with a fine-grained region. The system pressure was also monitored with an ion gauge. The mass spectrometer and thermocouples can

248

DOE/EIA-0272/S The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

272/S 272/S The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey: Exploring the Variability in Energy Consumption - A Supplement October 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Order Desk: (202) 783-3238 Stock Number: 061-003-00217-0 Price: $3.25 For questions on energy statistics or information on availability of other EIA publications, contact. National Energy Information Center, El-20 Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 252-8800 For those living and working in the Mountain and Pacific time zones, you may call:

249

Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy conservation potential of the US Department of Energy interim commercial building standards  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project conducted to demonstrate the whole-building energy conservation potential achievable from full implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Interim Energy Conservation Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings. DOE`s development and implementation of energy performance standards for commercial buildings were established by the Energy Conservation Standards for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, Public Law (PL) 94-385, 42 USC 6831 et seq., hereinafter referred to as the Act. In accordance with the Act, DOE was to establish performance standards for both federal and private sector buildings ``to achieve the maximum practicable improvements in energy efficiency and use of non-depletable resources for all new buildings``.

Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

Ayers, C.W.

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electric car design. Interim summary report, Phase I: deliverable item 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work included in this Interim Summary Report is part of the Electric Car Program, the goal of which is to develop by 1979 a totally new electric car with substantially improved performance over those electric cars available in 1976. The rationale used in designing a four-passenger electric car for use in an urban environment is presented. The approach taken was to design an electric car utilizing current technology. On the basis of tradeoff analyses, upgrading improvements were identified which would permit the electric car to more nearly meet all of the ERDA near-term goals. The electric car design, including the chassis, drive train, major components, and the control are summarized. The Phase I electric car design will meet many of the ERDA near-term goals. Upgrading development programs are identified which, when incorporated in Phase II vehicle development, will result in upgraded performance, which essentially meets ERDA's near-term goals.

Not Available

1977-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray  

SciTech Connect

This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

Gardner, S; Jaing, C

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

On the Annual Cycle, Variability, and Correlations of Oceanic Low-Topped Clouds with Large-Scale Circulation Using Aqua MODIS and ERA-Interim  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight years of Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 cloud data in conjunction with collocated Interim ECMWF Re-Analysis are used to investigate relationships between isolated low-topped cloud fraction (LCF) and ...

Terence L. Kubar; Duane E. Waliser; J.-L. Li; Xianan Jiang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Final Design (FD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists Department of Energy (DOE) federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the final design prior to CD-3...

259

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.10 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

260

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.11 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

262

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

263

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

264

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

265

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

266

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

267

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

268

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

269

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

270

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

271

NGP Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppression in aircraft. The enclosed CD compiles the collected publications from the program. Final Report (NIST SP 1069). ...

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microsoft Word - APMS Report 24 Feb 2011 EMAB Meeting. FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract...

273

Joint DOE/EPA Interim Policy Statement on Leasing Under the "Hall Amendment"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Protection Agency June 23, 1998 Washington, D.C. JUN 30 1998 MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: Joint DOE/EPA Interim Policy Statement on Leasing Under the "Hall Amendment" FROM: Timothy Fields, Jr. Assistant Administrator, Office of Solid Waste and Energy Response (Acting) United States Environmental Protection Agency James M. Owendoff Assistant Secretary Environmental Management (Acting) United States Department of Energy Robert W. DeGrasse, Jr. Director, Office of Worker and Community United States Department of Energy G. Thomas Todd Director, Office of Field Management United States Department _______________________________________________________________ Attached is a joint statement between the United States Environmental Protection Agency. (U.S., EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) providing interim policy on processing

274

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY - INTERIM RECORD OF DECISION FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM, WASTE TANKS 17 AND 20  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 April 30, 2013 NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY - INTERIM RECORD OF DECISION FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM, WASTE TANKS 17 AND 20 The Interim Record of Decision (IROD) Remedial Alternative Selection for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF), Waste Tanks 17 and 20, is being issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS), with concur- rence by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Region 4 (EPA), and South Carolina Department of Health and Environ- mental Control (SCDHEC). The IROD was completed to facilitate the terms of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for SRS governing the investigation and cleanup of waste units. The FFA integrates the requirements of Resource Conservation and Re- covery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.

275

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

276

Characteristics of Pipe-Type Cable Fluids and Development of Risk-Based Cleanup Goals: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground transmission cables transmit electricity in many urban areas of the United States. In high-pressure fluid-filled (HPFF) pipe-type cables, the cable interior is filled with insulating fluid. Occasionally, cables can leak, and the fluid can contaminate surrounding soil. This report presents interim results of a project to characterize the physical and chemical properties of HPFF cable fluids, evaluate their fate and transport in the environment, and develop soil cleanup levels for the fluids th...

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microsoft PowerPoint - Final Presenattion - Ferrigno-Papay.EM-TWS 2 24 11 Report Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM-TWS) EM-TWS) status report to Environmental Management Advisory Board FY 2011 Phase Two Work Plan Status with focus on Modeling for Life Cycle Cost Analysis (Interim Report) 1 1 Modeling for Life Cycle Cost Analysis (Interim Report) February 24, 2011 Agenda Agenda Phase Two Work Plan Phase Two Work Plan Phase Two Schedule Phase Two Schedule Review of Charges 1A/1B through 6 Review of Charges 1A/1B through 6 Status of Charge 1A: Status of Charge 1A: Liquid Tank Waste Processing Liquid Tank Waste Processing 2 2 Status of Charge 1A: Status of Charge 1A: Liquid Tank Waste Processing Liquid Tank Waste Processing Program: Modeling for Life Cycle Cost Analysis Program: Modeling for Life Cycle Cost Analysis (Interim (Interim Report) Report) EM EM- -TWS Phase 2 Work Plan

278

Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing Personal Identity Verification Cards under HSPD-12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July July 31, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: LINDA M. SPRINGER DIRECTOR ~ SUBJECT: Final Credentialing Standards for Issuing Personal Identity Verification Cards under HSPD-12 This memorandum provides final government-wide credentialing standards to be used by all Federal departments and agencies in determining whether to issue or revoke personal identity verification (PIV) cards to their employees and contractor personnel, including those who are non-United States citizens. These standards replace the interim standards issued in December 2007. The authority is section 2.3(b) of Executive Order 13467 of June 30, 2008.1 In addition to the requirements in this memorandum, credentialing determinations are also subject to the requirements of Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD) 12 and issuances developed by the National Institute

279

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas...

280

Final Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final...

282

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South...

283

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle...

284

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Attachments\Attachment 1-2 Microbial Processes\Final Eco-SSL Guidance Attachment 1-2.w  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Assessment of Whether to Develop Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Microbes and Microbial Processes OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 This page left intentionally blank Guidance for Developing Eco-SSLs Attachment 1-2 November 2003 1 Assessment of Whether to Develop Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Microbes and Microbial Processes Executive Summary Bacteria and fungi (i.e., microbes) are essential components of soil systems and the importance of microbial processes in terrestrial systems is well recognized. The Eco-SSL workgroup had lengthy discussions as to the merits of deriving microbial Eco-SSLs, and the potential significance of either having or not having Eco-SSLs for microbes in this guidance. As an

285

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.  

SciTech Connect

Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Large Power Transformers; Interim Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively conducting research to develop and demonstrate online monitoring (OLM) capabilities for active components in existing Nuclear Power Plants. A pilot project is currently underway to apply OLM to Generator Step-Up Transformers (GSUs) and Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs). INL and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) are working jointly to implement the pilot project. The EPRI Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Software Suite will be used to implement monitoring in conjunction with utility partners: the Shearon Harris Nuclear Generating Station (owned by Duke Energy for GSUs, and Braidwood Generating Station (owned by Exelon Corporation) for EDGs. This report presents monitoring techniques, fault signatures, and diagnostic and prognostic models for GSUs. GSUs are main transformers that are directly connected to generators, stepping up the voltage from the generator output voltage to the highest transmission voltages for supplying electricity to the transmission grid. Technical experts from Shearon Harris are assisting INL and EPRI in identifying critical faults and defining fault signatures associated with each fault. The resulting diagnostic models will be implemented in the FW-PHM Software Suite and tested using data from Shearon-Harris. Parallel research on EDGs is being conducted, and will be reported in an interim report during the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

Nancy J. Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh T. Pham; Heather D. Medema; Kirk Fitzgerald

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The power transfer potential for bringing renewable energy into the Southeast in response to a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors. This interim report examines how the commonly used EIA NEMS and EPRI NESSIE energy equilibrium models are considering such power transfers. Using regional estimates of capacity expansion and demand, a base case for 2008, 2020 and 2030 are compared relative to generation mix, renewable deployments, planned power transfers, and meeting RPS goals. The needed amounts of regional renewable energy to comply with possible RPS levels are compared to inter-regional transmission capacities to establish a baseline available for import into the Southeast and other regions. Gaps in the renewable generation available to meet RPS requirements are calculated. The initial finding is that the physical capability for transferring renewable energy into the SE is only about 10% of what would be required to meet a 20% RPS. Issues that need to be addressed in future tasks with respect to modeling are the current limitations for expanding renewable capacity and generation in one region to meet the demand in another and the details on transmission corridors required to deliver the power.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable ClassroomField Study Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This report presents an interim status update and preliminary findings from energy and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) measurements in sixteen relocatable classrooms in California. The field study includes measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions. Ten of the classrooms were equipped with a new HVAC technology and six control classrooms were equipped with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters have been monitored continuously, while unoccupied acoustic measurements were measured in one of four planned seasonal measurement campaigns. Continuously monitored data are remotely accessed via a LonWorks{reg_sign} network and stored in a relational database at LBNL. Preliminary results are presented here.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Hotchi,Toshifumi; Spears,Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for monitoring for radioactive and non-radioactive parameters, summaries of environmental program at HISS, a summary of the results, and the calculated hypothetical radiation dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) began environmental monitoring of HISS in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and subsequent to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). Contamination at HISS originated from uranium processing work conducted at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) from 1942 through 1957.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, dose to the offsite population, and summaries of environmental programs at CISS. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Appendix A contains a discussion of the nature of radiation, the way it is measured, and common sources of it. The primary environmental guidelines and limits applicable to CISS are given in US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and mandated by six federal acts: the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Toxic Substances Control Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). DOE began environmental monitoring of CISS in 1984 when DOE was authorized by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to conduct a decontamination research and development program at the site. The site was subsequently assigned to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, 9200 Latty Avenue, Hazelwood, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Hazelwood Interim storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, provides the results for 1992, and discusses applicable environmental standards and requirements with which the results were compared. HISS is located in eastern Missouri in the City of Hazelwood (St. Louis County) and occupies approximately 2.2 ha (5.5 acres). Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), which was established to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. In 1992 there were no environmental occurrences or unplanned contaminant releases as defined in DOE requirements and in the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III of CERCLA.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Interim report on verification and benchmark testing of the NUFT computer code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents results of work completed in the ongoing verification and benchmark testing of the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) computer code. NUFT is a suite of multiphase, multicomponent models for numerical solution of thermal and isothermal flow and transport in porous media, with application to subsurface contaminant transport problems. The code simulates the coupled transport of heat, fluids, and chemical components, including volatile organic compounds. Grid systems may be cartesian or cylindrical, with one-, two-, or fully three-dimensional configurations possible. In this initial phase of testing, the NUFT code was used to solve seven one-dimensional unsaturated flow and heat transfer problems. Three verification and four benchmarking problems were solved. In the verification testing, excellent agreement was observed between NUFT results and the analytical or quasianalytical solutions. In the benchmark testing, results of code intercomparison were very satisfactory. From these testing results, it is concluded that the NUFT code is ready for application to field and laboratory problems similar to those addressed here. Multidimensional problems, including those dealing with chemical transport, will be addressed in a subsequent report.

Lee, K.H.; Nitao, J.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kulshrestha, A. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Interim test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides test methods and procedures for determining the performance of small stand-alone and utility-grid connected PV systems. The procedures in this document provide a common approach for evaluating whether a given PV system is suitable to perform the function it was designed and manufactured to accomplish and meet the application load. This test document fills a testing void and provides the catalyst and focus for establishing the technical foundation and bridging the institutional barriers needed to reduce uncertainty that a system`s performance will be what its designers and builders claim. The need for this document was recently made more apparent with the initiation of a PV Global Approval Program (PVGAP) at the international level and is in response to concerns that PV systems being fielded must meet performance standards and that these standards include system-level performance type tests. The title of these test procedures is prefaced with the word interim because experience in using the procedures is needed before a consensus standard is developed and accepted by the PV community through its activities with the IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21 (SCC21) and International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 82 (IEC TC82) national and international standards-making bodies. Both entities have initiated projects to develop test standards and will need the technical basis and validation of test procedures such as those presented in this document before a consensus is achieved by the PV community.

McNutt, P.; Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.; DeBlasio, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Behavior of spent nuclear fuel and storage system components in dry interim storage. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated nuclear fuel has been handled under dry conditions since the early days of nuclear reactor operation, and use of dry storage facilities for extended management of irradiated fuel began in 1964. Irradiated fuel is currently being stored dry in four types of facilities: dry wells, vaults, silos, and metal casks. Essentially all types of irradiated nuclear fuel are currently stored under dry conditions. Gas-cooled reactor (GCR) and liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuels are stored in vaults and dry wells. Certain types of fuel are being stored in licensed dry storage facilities: Magnox fuel in vaults in the United Kingdom; organic-cooled reactor (OCR) fuel (clad with a zirconium alloy) in silos in Canada; and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel (clad with Zircaloy) in a metal storage cask in Germany. Dry storage demonstrations are under way for Zircaloy-clad fuel from BWRs, pressurized heavy-water reactors (PHWRs), and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in all four types of dry storage facilities. The demonstrations and related hot cell and laboratory tests are directed toward expanding the data base and establishing a licensing basis for dry storage of water reactor fuel. This report reviews the scope of dry interim storage technology, the performance of fuel and facility materials, the status of programs in several countries to license dry storage of water reactor fuel, and the characteristics of water reactor fuel that relate to dry storage conditions. 110 refs., 22 figs., 28 tabs.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interim report:feasibility of microscale glucose reforming for renewable hydrogen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-scale aqueous steam reforming of glucose is suggested as a novel method of H{sub 2} production for micro fuel cells. Compact fuel cell systems are a viable alternative to batteries as a portable electrical power source. Compared with conventional lithium polymer batteries, hydrocarbon powered fuel cells are smaller, weigh less, and have a much higher energy density. The goal of this project is to develop a hydrocarbon powered microfuel processor capable of driving an existing microfuel cell, and this interim report provides a summary of the engineering information for microscale reforming of carbohydrates and the summarizes the work completed as of September 2006. Work on this program will continue. Gas analysis of the gas evolved from glucose breakdown using a quadrupole mass spectrometer is now possible due do significant modifications to the vacuum chamber and to the mass spectrometer electronics. Effective adhesion of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 316SS microstructured catalyst plates is still under investigation. Electrophoretic and dip coat methods of catalyst deposition have produced coatings with poor adhesion and limited available Pt surface area.

Norman, Kirsten (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Emergency Diesel Generators - Interim Report for FY 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is actively conducting research to develop and demonstrate online monitoring capabilities for active components in existing nuclear power plants. Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute are working jointly to implement a pilot project to apply these capabilities to emergency diesel generators and generator step-up transformers. The Electric Power Research Institute Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite will be used to implement monitoring in conjunction with utility partners: Braidwood Generating Station (owned by Exelon Corporation) for emergency diesel generators, and Shearon Harris Nuclear Generating Station (owned by Duke Energy Progress) for generator step-up transformers. This report presents monitoring techniques, fault signatures, and diagnostic and prognostic models for emergency diesel generators. Emergency diesel generators provide backup power to the nuclear power plant, allowing operation of essential equipment such as pumps in the emergency core coolant system during catastrophic events, including loss of offsite power. Technical experts from Braidwood are assisting Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Power Research Institute in identifying critical faults and defining fault signatures associated with each fault. The resulting diagnostic models will be implemented in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Software Suite and tested using data from Braidwood. Parallel research on generator step-up transformers was summarized in an interim report during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

Binh T. Pham; Nancy J. Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

C:\Eco-SSLs\Check of Attachment 4-1\Draft Final December 2004\Text\Eco-SSL Attachment 4-1 v5.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Exposure Factors and Bioaccumulation Models for Derivation of Wildlife Eco-SSLs OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 Issued November 2003 Revised February 2005 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 1.1 Basic Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 1.2 Dealing with Variability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 2 2.0 CALCULATION OF GROUP-SPECIFIC ECO-SSLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Food Ingestion Rate (FIR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.2 Soil Intake (P s ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 2 3.0 ESTIMATING BIOACCUMULATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

303

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Postconstruction report for the mercury tanks interim action at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Three underground concrete settling tanks (tanks 2101-U, 2104-U, and 2100-U) at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, contained contaminated sludges contributing mercury to the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC). These tanks were cleaned out as an interim action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act as part of the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent subproject. Cleaning out these tanks prevented the sludge that had settled in the bottom from resuspending and carrying mercury into UEFPC. Tanks 2104-U and 2100-U were returned to service and will continue to receive effluent from buildings 9201-4 and 9201-5. Tank 2101-U had been abandoned and its effluent redirected to Tank 2100-U during previous activities. This interim action permanently sealed Tank 2101-U from the storm sewer system. Upon removal of materials and completion of cleanup, inspections determined that the project`s cleanup criteria had been met. The structural integrity of the tanks was also inspected, and minor cracks identified in tanks 2101-U and 2104-U were repaired. This project is considered to have been completed successfully because it met its performance objectives as addressed in the Interim Record of Decision and the work plan: to remove the waste from the three storage tanks; to ensure that the tanks were cleaned to the levels specified; to return tanks 2100-U and 2104-U to service; to isolate Tank 2101-U permanently; and to manage the wastes in an appropriate fashion.

Voskuil, T.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

Harrison, M.

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electic Drive System Interim Report - Revised  

SciTech Connect

The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Both of these motive power sources are capable of providing mechanical drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak power output of 50 kW at 1300 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

Ayers, C.W.; Hsu, J.S.; Marlino, L.D.; Miller, C.W.; Ott, G.W., Jr.; Oland, C.B.; Burress, T.A.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

PM Motor Parametric Design Analyses for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Application: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Vehicle Technologies has a strong interest in making rapid progress in permanent magnet (PM) machine development. The program is directing various technology development projects that will advance the technology and lead to request for proposals (RFP) for manufacturer prototypes. This aggressive approach is possible because the technology is clearly within reach and the approach is deemed essential, based on strong market demand, escalating fuel prices, and competitive considerations. In response, this study began parallel development paths that included a literature search/review, development and utilization of multiple parametric models to determine the effects of design parameters, verification of the modeling methodology, development of an interior PM (IPM) machine baseline design, development of alternative machine baseline designs, and cost analyses for several candidate machines. This interim progress report summarizes the results of these activities as of June 2004. This report provides background and summary information for recent machine parametric studies and testing programs that demonstrate both the potential capabilities and technical limitations of brushless PM machines (axial gap and radial gap), the IPM machine, the surface-mount PM machines (interior or exterior rotor), induction machines, and switched reluctance machines. The FreedomCAR program, while acknowledging the progress made by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Delphi, Delco-Remy International, and others in these programs, has redirected efforts toward a ''short path'' to a marketable and competitive PM motor for hybrid electric vehicle traction applications. The program has developed a set of performance targets for the type of traction machine desired. The short-path approach entails a comprehensive design effort focusing on the IPM machine and meeting the performance targets. The selection of the IPM machine reflects industry's confidence in this market-proven design that exhibits a power density surpassed by no other machine design.

Staunton, R.H.

2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Comparison of cask and drywell storage concepts for a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, through its Richland Operations Office is evaluating the feasibility, timing, and cost of providing a federal capability for storing the spent fuel, high-level wastes, and transuranic wastes that DOE may be obligated by law to manage until permanent waste disposal facilities are available. Three concepts utilizing a monitored retrievable storage/interim storage (MRS/IS) facility have been developed and analyzed. The first concept, co-location with a reprocessing plant, has been developed by staff of Allied General Nuclear Services. the second concept, a stand-alone facility, has been developed by staff of the General Atomic Company. The third concept, co-location with a deep geologic repository, has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory with the assistance of the Westinghouse Hanford Company and Kaiser Engineers. The objectives of this study are: to develop preconceptual designs for MRS/IS facilities: to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facilities, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such facilities; and to estimate the life-cycle costs of the facilities when operated in response to a set of scenarios that define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, generally spanning the years 1989 to 2037. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life-cycle costs for the MRS/IS facilities. In the first scenario, the reprocessing plant is placed in service in 1989 and HLW canisters are stored until a repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at intervals as needed to meet the demand. In the second scenario, the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Rasmussen, D.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

313

CFC Charity Fair Finale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Finish out the 2012 CFC with the Charity Fair Finale! Buy cookies, participate in a putt-putt golf game, eat some popcorn, and meet and talk with CFC charity representatives.

314

Microsoft Word - Final Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 CFR, part 835 Docket No. HS-RM-09-835 RIN 1992-AA-45 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Office of Health, Safety and Security Department of Energy ACTION: Final Rule...

315

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

316

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

317

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

318

Final Beamline Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

319

Microsoft Word - Final Eco-SSL Attachment 1-3.DOC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Evaluation of Dermal Contact and Inhalation Exposure Pathways for the Purpose of Setting Eco-SSLs OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank Guidance for Developing Eco-SSLs Attachment 1-3 November 2003 1 EVALUATING THE DERMAL CONTACT AND INHALATION EXPOSURE PATHWAYS FOR THE PURPOSE OF SETTING ECO-SSLs 1.0 POTENTIAL EXPOSURE PATHWAYS Pursuant to USEPA guidance, a complete exposure pathway consists of the following four elements: 1) sources and release mechanisms, 2) retention and transport media, 3) exposure points, and 4) exposure routes (USEPA, 1989). If any of these elements are missing, the pathway is considered to be incomplete. Exposure pathways can be characterized as incomplete,

320

Cost Estimate for an Away-From-Reactor Generic Interim Storage Facility (GISF) for Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants began to run out of storage capacity in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage pools, many nuclear operating companies added higher density pool storage racks to increase pool capacity. Most nuclear power plant storage pools have been re-racked one or more times. As many spent fuel storage pools were re-racked to the maximum extent possible, nuclear operating companies began to employ interim dry storage technologies to store SNF in certified casks and canister-based systems outside of ...

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

Boehlecke, R. F.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

final_report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 - December 31, 2011 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Submitted by: The University of Chicago 5801 S. Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Principal Author: David Archer Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 10, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Final Scientific/Technical Report submitted by David Archer 1 and Bruce Buffett 2 Submitted 4-10-2012 1 Department of the Geophysical Sciences University of Chicago Chicago IL 60637 2 University of California, Berkeley Earth & Planetary Science 383 McCone Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-5800 Agency Award Number: DE-NT0006558 Award Dates 1/1/08 to 12/31/11

324

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Porject - Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Options in the Eleventh Year for Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts  

SciTech Connect

The Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts (ISM), under which most of the geothermal industry is selling power (outside of The Geysers), has an initial ten year period of known fixed energy payments. In the eleventh year, the price goes to the Avoided Cost of the buying utility. The specific contract language is ''Seller will be paid at a rate equal to the utilities' published avoided cost of energy as updated and authorized by the Commission (CPUC)''. The first geothermal contract will reach the end of the initial 10 year period in early 1994, a few will end in 1995 and 1996, and the majority will end in the 1997-2000 period. This is beginning to be focused upon by the utilities, lenders and, of course, the operators themselves. The prime reason for focusing on the issue is that avoided costs of the utilities directly track the delivered cost of the natural gas, and most forecasts are showing that the price of gas in the eleventh year of the contracts will be significantly lower than the last year of the fixed period of energy payments. There are many forums in which the predication of natural gas prices are discussed. In the State of California, the agency responsible for the official forecast is the California Energy Commission. Every two years, the CEC holds hearings for input into its biennial Fuels Report (FR) which establishes the forecast of natural gas prices in addition to other parameters which are used in the planning process. The attached Exhibit I is an excerpt out of the 1991 Fuels Report (FR91). Figure 1 compares the forecast of FR89 and FR91 for the Utility Electric Generation (UEG) in PG&E's service area, and Figure 2, the forecast in the SOCAL service area. The FR91 SOCAL service area forecast indicates a bottoming of the gas price in 1994 at $2.50/mmbtu. Recent prices in 1992 are already at these levels. Converting this to an avoided energy cost brings about a price of 2 to 2-1/2 Cents/kWh. The 1992 energy price in the IS04 contract is 9.3 Cents/kWh.

Hinrichs, Thomas C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior to deployment and a second ITR to evaluate Phase I performance in September 2010. In this report, these ITR efforts are referenced as the '2007 ITR' and the 'current ITR', respectively. The 2007 ITR document (Looney et al., 2007) provided a detailed technical evaluation that remains relevant and this report builds on that analysis. The primary objective of the current ITR is to provide an expedited assessment of the available Phase I data to assist the PGDP team as they develop the lessons learned from Phase I and prepare plans for Phase II.

Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Options in the Eleventh Year for Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Interim Standard Offer Number Four Contracts (ISM), under which most of the geothermal industry is selling power (outside of The Geysers), has an initial ten year period of known fixed energy payments. In the eleventh year, the price goes to the Avoided Cost of the buying utility. The specific contract language is ''Seller will be paid at a rate equal to the utilities' published avoided cost of energy as updated and authorized by the Commission (CPUC)''. The first geothermal contract will reach the end of the initial 10 year period in early 1994, a few will end in 1995 and 1996, and the majority will end in the 1997-2000 period. This is beginning to be focused upon by the utilities, lenders and, of course, the operators themselves. The prime reason for focusing on the issue is that avoided costs of the utilities directly track the delivered cost of the natural gas, and most forecasts are showing that the price of gas in the eleventh year of the contracts will be significantly lower than the last year of the fixed period of energy payments. There are many forums in which the predication of natural gas prices are discussed. In the State of California, the agency responsible for the official forecast is the California Energy Commission. Every two years, the CEC holds hearings for input into its biennial Fuels Report (FR) which establishes the forecast of natural gas prices in addition to other parameters which are used in the planning process. The attached Exhibit I is an excerpt out of the 1991 Fuels Report (FR91). Figure 1 compares the forecast of FR89 and FR91 for the Utility Electric Generation (UEG) in PG&E's service area, and Figure 2, the forecast in the SOCAL service area. The FR91 SOCAL service area forecast indicates a bottoming of the gas price in 1994 at $2.50/mmbtu. Recent prices in 1992 are already at these levels. Converting this to an avoided energy cost brings about a price of 2 to 2-1/2 Cents/kWh. The 1992 energy price in the IS04 contract is 9.3 Cents/kWh.

Hinrichs, Thomas C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SWERA_Final_Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopian Rural Energy Development Ethiopian Rural Energy Development and Promotion Center Final Report Country background information Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios October 2007 Ethio Resource Group with Partners i Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... ii 1 Introduction.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Overview.....................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Objective of the study .................................................................................1-1

333

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

BPA-Solicited Technical Review of "Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline", Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to provide, at BPA's request, a technical review of interim products received for Project 2001-015-00 under contract 6925. BPA sometimes solicits technical reviews for Fish and Wildlife products or issues where outside expertise is required. External review of complex project deliverables assures BPA as a funding agency that the contractor is continuing with scientifically-credible experimental techniques envisioned in the original proposal. If the project's methodology proves feasible, there could be potential applications beyond the project area to similar situations in the Columbia Basin. The Experiment involves artificial flooding during high flow periods and a determination of the portion of the return flows that end up in the Umatilla River during low flow months and within acceptable water quality parameters (e.g., low temperature, few contaminants). Flooding could be a critical water source for aquatic organisms at times of the year when flows in the lower reaches of the Umatilla River are low and water is warmer than would be desired. The experiment was proposed to test whether 'this process, recharges the shallow aquifers of the old flood plain, for natural filtration through the alluvial soils as it returns to the Umatilla River, cleaner and cooler (about 50 degree Fahrenheit) five to six month later (about July and August) substantially cooling the river and [making it] more beneficial to anadromous [fish]'. A substantial amount of preliminary data had been collected and preliminary results were submitted in an interim report 'Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline (December 2002)'. A substantial amount of addition funding was provided for the last cycle of flooding (Phases II) and final analyses of the full compliment of data collected over the life of the contract (Phase III). Third party scientific review may assist the contractor in producing a higher quality Final Report with completion of the final 2 phases of the project.

Morgan, David

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Conceptual design of a coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline commercial plant. Volume V. Alternate design studies. Second interim final report, August 31, 1977-March 1, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Three design cases have been investigated for converting methanol to gasoline using the Mobil process. These are defined as Case A, which produces gasoline and byproduct LPG; Case B, which produces gasoline, high Btu gas, and byproduct LPG; and Case C which produces gasoline only. The LPG includes propane LPG and high purity isobutane. Base Case B is described in Volumes I and IV of this report. Alternate Cases A and C are described in part I of Volume V. Part II of this volume (V) contains additional process studies. Under Contract EX-76-C-01-2416 Modification No. A006, item (4) of the General Requirements requires economy of scale evaluations, and item (24) of the Scope of Work includes studies of Lurgi methanol synthesis recommendations, integration of Methanol-to-Gasoline facilities with a refinery, and recovery of aromatics from stabilized synthetic gasoline.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Savannah River Operations Office; Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

474 474 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 179 / Friday, September 13, 1996 / Notices James R. Holbein, United States Secretary, NAFTA Secretariat, Suite 2061, 14th and Constitution Avenue, Washington, DC 20230, (202) 482-5438. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On April 30, 1996 the Binational Panel issued its decision affirming in part and remanding in part the Final Determination in this matter. The Determination Remand was filed by the International Trade Administration on June 14, 1996. No challenge to that Redetermination on Remand was filed under Rule 73 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules. Therefore, pursuant to Rule 73(5) the Panel issued an Order on July 19, 1996 affirming the Redetermination on Remand and instructing the Secretariat to issue a Notice of Final Panel Action. The Notice of Final Panel Action was

338

RPSEA Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Final Report 08122-36.Final Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery and Salt Production 08122-36 January 26, 2012 Principal Investigator: James M. Silva Senior Chemical Engineer General Electric Global Research Center 1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309 ii Legal Notice This report was prepared by General Electric Global Research as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA, members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

339

Final Notice of Violation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8,2011 8,2011 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Jolm J. Grossenbacher Director, Idaho National Laboratory and President, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC P. O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3695 SEA-2011-01 Dear Mr. Grossenbacher: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (the Act), and the Department of Energy's (DOE) regulations at 10 C.F.R . §§ 824.4(a)(3) and 824.7(b), DOE is issuing this Final Notice of Violation (FNOV) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) for multiple violations of classified information security requirements. The FNOV is based upon the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement May 11, 2010, Investigation Report and an evaluation of the evidence presented to DOE by BEA, including BEA's final

340

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sage Final EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR SAGE ELECTROCHROMICS SAGEGLASS® HIGH VOLUME MANUFACTURING (HVM) FACILITY IN FARIBAULT, MN U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2009 DOE/EA-1645 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Sage Electrochromics SageGlass® High Volume Manufacturing Facility in Faribault, MN DOE/EA-1645 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 7 2.3 No Action Alternative 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 9

342

Final - Gasbuggy S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasbuggy S Gasbuggy S i t e Environmental Management End State Vision - January 2005 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Gasbuggy Site ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT END STATE VISION Final Final - Gasbuggy Site Environmental Management End State Vhion - fanuaty 2005 Executive Summary The Environmental Management End State Vision is to be used as the primary tool for communicating the individual site end state to the involved parties (e.g., U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], regulators, public stakeholders, Tribal Nations). The end state document is not a decisional document. If the DOE decides to seek changes to the current compliance agreements, decisions, or statutoqdregulatory requirements, those changes will be made in accordance with applicable requirements (DOEIEM, 2003).

343

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nickel-zinc batteries for RPV applications. Interim technical report 15 Nov 78-15 Dec 79  

SciTech Connect

Interim results are presented for a program dealing with the placement of nickel-zinc batteries in specific military applications, namely the BQM-34A and the PQM-102 Remotely Piloted Vehicles. The nickel-zinc system was chosen for these applications because RPV's demand a high quality secondary battery that offers a compromise between long life (calendar and cycle) and low weight and volume. Program tasks include continued development of the nickel zinc system, calendar and cycle life testing of the two candidate batteries, qualification testing, and flight testing in operational RPV's. Test results of developmental cells and batteries include cycle life testing of various separator materials, high rate/low temperature discharges with various types of nickel electrodes, zinc electrode substrate, and charging methods. Calendar and cycle life testing is underway which will demonstrate the ability of the nickel-zinc system to be routinely cycled over an extended period of time.

Dappert, D.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTERIM SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 7 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST SOLIDS SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 7 processing. The Marcrobatch 7 material was received with visible fine particulate solids, atypical for these samples. The as received material was allowed to settle for a period greater than 24 hours. The supernatant was then decanted and utilized as our clarified feed material. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test using the clarified feed material. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake after filtration from H-Tank Farm (HTF) feed salt solution. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

Washington, A.; Peters, T.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

Data management implementation plan for interim action at the Gunite and Associated Tanks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Project is currently conducting a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Interim Remedial Action to reduce uncertainties on the potential cost and effectiveness of remote tank cleaning equipment being produced jointly between the US Department of Energy (DOE); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc.; and associated subcontractors with the DOE EM-50 Program. The goal of this document is to ensure that all procedures have been followed to provide reliable, verifiable data that are technically defensible. The data collected will be used to support closure of the tanks, compare the expected versus actual waste volume and curies to aid in conducting operations, and verify the performance of developmental equipment.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 2: NO{sub x} Adsorber Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report discusses the results of the DECSE test program that demonstrates the potential of NOx adsorber catalyst technology across the range of diesel engine operation with a fuel economy penalty less than 4%.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Statement of work for conceptual design of solidified high-level waste interim storage system project (phase I)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has embarked upon a course to acquire Hanford Site tank waste treatment and immobilization services using privatized facilities. This plan contains a two phased approach. Phase I is a ``proof-of-principle/commercial demonstration- scale`` effort and Phase II is a full-scale production effort. In accordance with the planned approach, interim storage (IS) and disposal of various products from privatized facilities are to be DOE furnished. The path forward adopted for Phase I solidification HLW IS entails use of Vaults 2 and 3 in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building, to be located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This Statement of Work describes the work scope to be performed by the Architect-Engineer to prepare a conceptual design for the solidified HLW IS System.

Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95 95 :&,, ' - , i . -- Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly - Facility Operations f 3: >fi - , - , ' , 7 - . ' ' , , . I 8 ' , :-<:- L , a . ' ' ' -L. -1 , , ~ e m - . - I ! - , - # 8 , r I I , , , - , . .-- - ' - I S - . ! - , - , Y 2 L - . . 8 : L.-- , r Nevada ' f e s t ~ h e , Nye county, Nevada U. S. Department Of Energy - , 8 - - . 8 - I,, ' - 8 - - , , 8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for DEVICE ASSEMBLY FACIUTY OPERATIONS MAY 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFFIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv USTOFTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv A. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

351

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

352

SIM Metrology School FINAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ph – Photometry (M. Nadal, 22/B317) P – Pressure (Doug Olson, 220/B39) SIM Metrology School FINAL PROGRAM TIMETABLE ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Final Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced Resources International 9801 Westhemier, Suite 805 Houston, Texas 77042 and Buckley Walsh Oneok Resources 100 West Fifth Street Tulsa, OK 74103-0871 September, 2002 U.S. Department of Energy DE-FG26-00NT40789 i Disclaimers U.S. Department of Energy This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

355

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy Technology International Inc.: Seismic While Drilling Project Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the period of June 11-14, 2008 Completed February 2009 This document may contain protected Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) information and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. DISCLAIMER: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied,

356

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

357

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Detection of Natural Gas Pipeline Defects and Leaks Final Report February 2003 Submitted by Michael Hassard and Gerald Stoker Advanced Diagnostics and Production Testing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0555 And Mark Vaughn and Bob Bickerstaff Mobile Robotics Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS1125 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, Natural Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy ABSTRACT When examining the condition of a pipeline, In-Line Inspection (ILI) utilizing various Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods is an essential tool and a significant factor in establishing a quality management

358

FINAL CEf VED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOElEA 1147 DOElEA 1147 FINAL CEf VED 6 I 3 I996 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME ~ ~ O S T I for the LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR TECHNICAL AREA 53 LUS ALAMUS NATFUNAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO . . - . - . I Date Prepared: April 1, 1996 ~ Prepared for: Office of Defense Programs US Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Q S c e DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any

359

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Pipeline Leaks Final Report August 2004 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas, Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues indicated by

360

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 V e h i c l e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d D u r a b i l i t y FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Blackout Final Implementation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors are listed in Annex 1. The staff wish to acknowledge the contributions of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Ontario Ministry of Energy. The staff also wish to acknowl- edge the support and cooperation of the North American Electric Reliability Council and, in particular, of Mr. David Nevius, Senior Vice President and Direc- tor of Reliability Assessment & Performance

362

Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

Josef Michl

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

AIPM Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

John Mookken

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy 2 Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues caused by leaks.

366

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

2 2 P r o j e c t D e s i g n a n d I m p l e m e n t a t i o n FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

367

Materials Reliability Program: Determination of Crack Growth Rates for Alloy 82 at Low K Values Under PWR Primary Water Environment: 2011 Interim Report (MRP-337)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack propagation experiments, which were performed in the past on nickel-based materials under pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments, have left some open questions that need to be answered. In particular, no crack growth rate (CGR) data for control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle materials are available at low stress intensity (K) values (K 15 MPam). This interim report summarizes the work done during 2011 on a cooperative project to generate CGR data at low K values for alloy 82 ...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Interim Guidelines for In Situ Visual Inspection of Inlet and Outlet Turbine Stages: Part 2: Experiences, Approaches and Improvement s in Remote Visual Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ inspection of steam turbine rotors will minimize the length of planned outages by reducing the amount of equipment disassembly required. This interim report provides a state-of-the-art review of in situ visual inspection of steam turbine rotors, also known as remote visual inspection (RVI). The report also proposes an approach for the next phase of this project, which will promote not only application of RVI technology but also delivery of advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) equipment to cri...

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

L. V. Street

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 4, Part 3: Waste Container Closures, Seals, and Gas Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Interim On-Site Storage report series supplements Volume 4, Part 1, which includes an extensive methodology and detailed information on the types and availability of low-level waste (LLW) containers and container coatings for extended storage. Part 2, soon to be published, addresses monitoring and inspection requirements for stored LLW containers. Part 3 continues the series by providing detailed guidance on container closures, seals, and gas vents, including performance goals and key ...

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 3, Part 2: User's Manual and Lotus Spreadsheet for Estimating LLW Volumes and Act ivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the "Interim On-Site Storage" report series supplements Volume 3, Part 1, "Waste Volume Projections and Data Management." Because that volume includes an extensive methodology and a number of worksheets requiring many calculations, users requested a computer program for easily storing, managing, and manipulating applicable data. Volume 3, Part 2 consists of a user's manual and a Lotus spreadsheet macro to meet this utility need.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

1985 Federal Interim Storage Fee Study: a technical and economic analysis  

SciTech Connect

JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for FIS services and concluded that the combined interests of the Deaprtment and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with section 136(e) of the Act, and (5) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells or silos). The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under-or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee (including savings due to rod consolidation), and (2) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). The module costs were included in the Initial Payment to preclude the possible need to obtain appropriations for federal funds to support the purchase of the modules in advance of receipt of the Final Payment. Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at actual cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microsoft Word - Policy_Flash_09_02_Interim_Certification.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 13, 2009 March 13, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ALL PROGRAM ELEMENTS FROM: PMCDP CERTIFICATION REVIEW BOARD SUBJECT: Temporary Project Management Career Development Certification The Project Management Career Development Program (PMCDP) Certification Review Board (CRB) established a new process whereby candidates with strong project management experience from outside the Department, hired into project director positions, may be granted a temporary PMCDP certification. Temporary certification allows the federal employee to be assigned project manager responsibilities on capital asset project while simultaneously completing DOE-specific training and preparing their certification packages for final CRB action. Temporary certification will be good for one calendar year.

374

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Corrective Action Glossary  

SciTech Connect

The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

Alexander Fridman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Final Report to DOE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

Ismail Gultepe

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

Alexander Pigarov

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

379

Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blackout Final Implementation Report Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and...

380

Final ECR 2008 Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution Third Annual Report January 2009 More Documents & Publications ECR Annual Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Natural gas liquefier for vehicle fuel. Interim report, January-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project was a continuation and refinement of a feasibility prototype natural gas liquefier that had been designed, fabricated, and tested under a U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Extensive performance testing was conducted to characterize the natural gas liquefier refrigeration capability and to collect data for diagnostic purposes. Analysis of the effectiveness of the regenerator concluded that the current design would require substantial empirical iterations. The final prototype with a design target of 1,000 Watts (W) refrigeration was able to achieve only 400 W of refrigeration, projected to 550 W at a higher charge pressure. Recommendations are made for further testing, analysis, and correlation to achieve a better optimized regenerator design for a second generation prototype natural gas liquefier.

Owens, E.C.; Kohuth, K.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Household energy handbook: an interim guide and reference manual. World Bank technical paper  

SciTech Connect

A standard framework for measuring and assessing technical information on the household energy sector in developing countries is needed. The handbook is intended as a first step toward creating such a framework. Chapter I discusses energy terms and principles underlying the energy units, definitions, and calculations presented in the following chapters. Chapter II describes household consumption patterns and their relationship to income, location, and household-size variables. Chapter III evaluates energy end uses and the technologies that provide cooking, lighting, refrigeration, and space-heating services. Chapter IV examines household energy resources and supplies, focusing on traditional biomass fuels. Finally, Chapter V demonstrates simple assessment methods and presents case studies to illustrate how household energy data can be used in different types of assessments.

Leach, G.; Gowen, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MTX final report  

SciTech Connect

The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

Hooper, E.B. [ed.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone 1, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zone 1 is a 1400-acre area outside the fence of the main plant at The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone, ETTP (Zone 1 Interim ROD) (DOE 2002) identifies the remedial actions for contaminated soil, buried waste, and subsurface infrastructure necessary to protect human health and to limit further contamination of groundwater. Since the Zone 1 Interim Record of Decision (ROD) was signed, new information has been obtained that requires the remedy to be modified as follows: (1) Change the end use in Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA) from unrestricted industrial to recreational; (2) Remove Exposure Units (EU5) ZI-50, 51, and 52 from the scope of the Zone I Interim ROD; (3) Change the end use of the duct bank corridor from unrestricted industrial to restricted industrial; and (4) Remove restriction for the disturbance of soils below 10 feet in Exposure Unit (EU) Z1-04. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.435, these scope modifications are a 'significant' change to the Zone 1 Interim ROD. In accordance with CERCLA Sect. 117 (c) and 40 CFR 300.435 (c)(2)(i), such a significant change is documented with an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). The purpose of this ESD is to make the changes listed above. This ESD is part of the Administrative Record file, and it, and other information supporting the selected remedy, can be found at the DOE Information Center, 475 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ORR is located in Roane and Anderson counties, within and adjacent to the corporate city limits of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ETTP is located in Roane County near the northwest corner of the ORR. ETTP began operation during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. The original mission of ETTP was to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons. The plant produced enriched uranium from 1945 until 1985. Uranium production was terminated in 1987. ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, so remediation activities are conducted under CERCLA. The primary contaminants of concern at ETTP follow: (1) In groundwater - volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at multiple locations (trichloroethene is generally the most prevalent compound); (2) In sediment - inorganic elements, radionuclides, and polychlorinated biphenyls; (3) In soil - inorganic elements, radionuclides, semivolatile organic compounds (particularly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and VOCs; and (4) In facilities - radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls (abandoned facilities also pose a safety and health hazard to workers.) The purposes of the remedial actions selected in the Zone 1 Interim ROD are to allow unrestricted industrial use down to 10 feet and to remediate potential sources of groundwater contamination. Following is a summary of the major components of the Zone 1 Interim ROD remedy: (1) Excavation of the Blair Quarry burial area and associated contaminated soil; (2) Excavation of miscellaneous contaminated soil in the K-895 Cylinder Destruct Facility area and in the Powerhouse Area; (3) Removal of sludge and demolition of the K-710 sludge beds and Imhoff tanks; (4) Implementation of land use controls (LUCs); and (5) Characterization of soil and remediation of areas that exceed remediation levels.

Bechtel Jacobs

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Final Report to the U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Prepared By: E. Dendy Sloan, Director and Weaver Chair Center for Hydrate Research Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado 80401 esloan@mines.edu For: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Under Contract DE-AF26-067Nt00440 Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Table of Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE DATABASE AND GHML DEVELOPMENT EFFORT

386

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Interim results: development of a head-end process for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Fort St. Vrain fuel  

SciTech Connect

Development of processes and equipment for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Ft. St. Vrain fuel is described. Primary burning, particle classification, particle breaking, secondary burning, and aqueous processing were studied. Interim pilot-plant results show that: (1) graphite can be burned at the plant equivalent rate of 35 kgC/hr-ft$sup 2$ in the primary burner and that fines can be consumed by recycle to the primary burner; (2) separation to greater than 95 percent pure fissile and 85 percent pure fertile particles can be effected by a gas classifier; (3) gas jets are capable of breaking silicon carbide coatings at rates compatible with plant requirements; gas utilization efficiencies are sufficiently great that off-gas generated by the jets is less than 5 percent of the off-gas generated by the process equipment; (4) an artificial inert bed is not required for secondary burning and the carbon content of the bed can easily be reduced to less than 2 percent in the secondary burner; (5) corrosion rates of thorex solution on 304 L stainless steel are sufficiently low to allow the dissolver to be constructed of 304 L stainless steel; and, (6) solids--liquid separation efficiencies using a continuous solid-bowl centrifuge are sufficiently high to process the dissolver product in a pulse-column extractor. Basic data on the process materials and conditions germane to the safety analysis for the process are also given. (JGB)

Hogg, G.W.; Rindfleisch, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Anderson, D.L.; Vavruska, J.S.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Evaluation of tuff as a medium for a nuclear waste repository: interim status report on the properties of tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of summary briefings to the National Academy of Science`s (NAS) Committee on Radioactive Waste Management dealing with feasibility of disposal of heat-producing radioactive waste in silicic tuff. The interim status of studies of tuff properties determined on samples obtained from Yucca Mountain and Rainier Mesa (G-tunnel) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are discussed. In particular, progress is described on resolving issues identified during the first briefing to the NAS which include behavior of water in tuff when heated, the effect of the presence or absence of water and joints on the thermal/physical properties of tuff and the detailed/complex sorptive properties of highly altered and unaltered tuff. Initial correlations of thermal/physical and sorptive properties with the highly variable porosity and mineralogy are described. Three in-situ, at-depth field experiments, one nearly completed and two just getting underway are described. In particular, the current status of mineralogy and petrology, geochemistry, thermal and mechanical, radiation effects and water behavior studies are described. The goals and initial results of a Mine Design Working Group are discussed. Regional factors such as seismicity, volcanism and hydrology are not discussed.

Johnstone, J.K.; Wolfsberg, K. (eds.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks and accomplishments. During the award period, Assistant Director Rudy Marloth became a DOE Qualified Specialist in PHAST, a DOE Qualified Specialist in Compressed Air, and a Certified Energy Manager, and earned a MS degree in Environmental Science.

Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline between successive stepwise infusions.

Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Automated array assembly. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three main sections are included which describe a general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis; a near-term (1982) factory design; and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon solar-cell arrays. The results of an extensive study and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing are presented. From this study, several manufacturing sequences emerge as candidates for satisfying the ERDA/JPL cost goal of $0.50/W selling price in 1986. A minimum manufacturing cost was found in a highly automated line of $0.30/W assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double-glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen-printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated antireflection (AR) layer. The least expensive junction-formation technology appears to be ion implantation;however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. An interim 1982 factory is described for the large-scale production of silicon solar-cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. A 6-month experimental production study of the elements of low-cost solar-cell manufacturing sequences is described as an outgrowth of the cost and manufacturing studies. This program consisted of three parts: an experimental production line study of the major variables associated with the fabrication of 3-in.-diameter silicon solar cells; a study of thick-film screen-printed silver metallization; and panel design and assembly development. (WHK)

D'Aiello, R.V.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint MichaelĂ?Â?s College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint MichaelĂ?Â?s College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A.J. Brizard, J. Decker, Y. Peysson, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2009, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator, Physics of Plasmas 16, 102304:1-9[http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3249627]. A.J. Brizard, 2009, Variational Principles for Reduced Plasma Physics, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 169, 012003 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/169/1/012003]. II. Invited and Contributed Conference Presentations A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, Momentum conservation law for the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations, 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Salt Lake City (Utah), November 14-18, 2011. A.J. Brizard, P.J. Morrison, C. Chandre, and E. Tassi, On the road to the Hamiltonian formulation of gyrokinetic theory, 52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago (Illinois), November 8-12, 2010. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, Lie-transform perturbation analysis of trapped-particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. N. Tronko and A.J. Brizard, Gyrokinetic momentum conservation law, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. C. Chandre and A.J. Brizard, Hamiltonian formulation of reduced Vlasov-Maxwell equations, 50th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Dallas (Texas), November 17-21, 2008. A.J. Brizard, Nonlinear FLR effects in reduced fluid models, Invited Presentation at 11th Easter Plasma Meeting, Torino (Italy), April 15-17, 2009. III. Seminars Reduced Fokker-Planck operators for advanced plasma simulations, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), May 25, 2009. Ray phase-space methods in linear mode conversion, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), April 1, 2009. Old and new methods in gyrokinetic theory, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), March 20, 2009. Hamiltonian theory of adiabatic motion of relativistic charged particles, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), March 11, 2009. Noether method for fluids a

Alain J. Brizard

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.  

SciTech Connect

Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

,

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Microsoft Word - Phase I - Final Report _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low NOx Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine FINAL REPORT Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2003 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Principal Author(s): Raymond...

397

Finding of no significant impact: Interim storage of enriched uranium above the maximum historical level at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Interim Storage of Enriched Uranium Above the Maximum Historical Storage Level at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/EA-0929, September, 1994). The EA evaluates the environmental effects of transportation, prestorage processing, and interim storage of bounding quantities of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant over a ten-year period. The State of Tennessee and the public participated in public meetings and workshops which were held after a predecisional draft EA was released in February 1994, and after the revised pre-approval EA was issued in September 1994. Comments provided by the State and public have been carefully considered by the Department. As a result of this public process, the Department has determined that the Y-12 Plant-would store no more than 500 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and no more than 6 metric tons of low enriched uranium (LEU). The bounding storage quantities analyzed in the pre-approval EA are 500 metric tons of HEU and 7,105.9 metric tons of LEU. Based on-the analyses in the EA, as revised by the attachment to the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), DOE has determined that interim storage of 500 metric tons of HEU and 6 metric tons of LEU at the Y-12 Plant does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Solubility of ferrocyanide compounds. Ferrocyanide Safety Project, Interim report FY1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}(c) [1] as a function of NaOH and temperature was determined to ascertain whether [1] shows retrograde solubility (i.e., decreasing solubility with increasing temperature), which would have bearing on the possible formation of ``hot spots`` in the tanks and thus the safety of the ferrocyanide tanks. The results show that the aqueous concentrations of Cs in equilibrium with [1] at 25, 60, 75 and 90 C are similar (within the limits of experimental error), indicating that [1] does not show retrograde solubility. To understand general solubility relationships of Ni{sub 2}Fe(CN){sub 6}(c) [2] and to determine the influence on solubility of high electrolyte concentrations (e.g., NaNO{sub 3}) that are commonly encountered in the ferrocyanide tanks, the solubility of [2] as a function of CsNO{sub 3}, NiCl{sub 2}, and NaNO{sub 3} was determined. In general, [2] is fairly insoluble and shows slightly increased solubility at high electrolyte concentrations only. For [2] in NiCl{sub 2}, the aqueous Fe concentrations show first a decrease and then an increase with the increase in NiCl{sub 2} concentrations. The increase in Fe concentrations at high Ni concentrations appears to be the result of replacement of Fe by Ni in the [2] structure. For [2] in CsNO{sub 3} and at 0.001 M Na{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}, the Cs is quantitatively removed from solution at low added Cs concentrations and appears to approach the final solid composition of [1]. The solubility of [2] in NaNO{sub 3} and at 0.001 M Na{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} shows an increase in Ni concentrations to about 0.5 mg/l at NaNO{sub 3} concentrations > 1.0 M. These increased Ni concentrations may be the result of substitution of Na for Ni in the solid phase.

Rai, D.; Felmy, A.R.; Smith, S.C.; Ryan, J.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Silver Bow Creek/Butte Area, MT. (Second remedial action), June 1992. Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Silver Bow Creek/Butte Area site is a mining and processing area located 7 miles east of Anaconda in the Upper Clark Fork River Basin, Deer Lodge County, Montana. Site contamination is the result of over 100 years of mining and process operations in the area. Until the early 1970's, mining, milling, and smelting wastes were dumped directly into Silver Bow Creek and transported downstream. The ROD addresses an interim remedy for all media at OU12. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water in the Inactive area are metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and inorganics.

Not Available

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Phase I Final Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Phase I Final Technical Report 10121.4302.01.Final1 Ultra-High Conductivity Umbilicals: Polymer Nanotube Umbilicals (PNUs) 10121-4302-01 June 24, 2013 Christopher A. Dyke Principal Investigator NanoRidge Materials, Inc. 15850 Vickery Drive Houston, Texas 77032 LEGAL NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC. AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY THE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP TO SECURE ENERGY FOR AMERICA, RPSEA. NEITHER RPSEA MEMBERS OF RPSEA, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THE ENTITIES: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

402

Danish Energy Authority Final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Danish Energy Authority Final report Kaliningrad Regional District Heating Network 2004 - 2006 2006 #12;Kaliningrad District Heating Network Project 2004 - 2006 2 Table of content The report........................................................................................................... 7 1.4.1 District heating in the Region

403

MACCS2 Final Gap Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MACCS2-Gap Analysis MACCS2-Gap Analysis Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.3: Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan: MACCS2 Gap Analysis Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 May 2004 MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the radiological dispersion computer code, MACCS2, relative to established software requirements. This evaluation, a "gap analysis", is performed to meet commitment 4.2.1.3 of the

404

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

405

FinalProgramReportfinal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 8, 2004 November 8, 2004 Paul Wambach EH-53/270 Corporate Square Building U. S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Germantown, MD 20585-0270 CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22750: FY04 FINAL REPORT FOR THE FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS The enclosed subject final report prepared by Joe M. Aldrich is submitted as stated in the Fiscal Year 2004 Field Work Proposal for the Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats. This is the final report for this program. If you have any questions, please contact me at (303) 423-9585, ext. 238 or Joe M. Aldrich at (303) 423- 9585, ext. 227. Sincerely, Duane E. Hilmas, D.V.M., Ph.D. Technical Director Enclosure cc: Donna Cragle Robert Bistline

406

MPO B593110 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) shall provide one (1) Mechanical Engineer to support the Linear Collider Subsystem Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS). The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will include engineering, design, and drawing support for the Vacuum Seal Test. NSTec will also provide a final report of the setup and input to LLNL's project management on project status. The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will also include engineering, design, and drawing support to the conceptual design for manufacturing of the Flux Concentrator Magnet. NSTec will also contribute to LLNS's final report on the Flux Concentrator Magnet. The deliverables are drawings, sketches, engineering documents, and final reports delivered to the LLNS Technical Representative.

Brooksby, C

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of their proposed installation, construction, and operation of a single low-speed wind turbine and its associated facilities. The project is needed to generate electricity for...

408

Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this Research Report has been made by ARI. Please address correspondence concerning distribution of reports to: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and

Carl W. Lickteig; William R. Sanders; Scott B. Shadrick; James W. Lussier; Brian J. Holt; Shawn J. Rainey; Kenneth Copeland; Brooke B. Schaab; Paula Durlach; Zita M. Simutis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for your submittal of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) documents that address biological impairments in Allen, Indian, Sunderland, and Munroe Brooks. These waterbodies are included on Vermont’s 2006 303(d) list and were prioritized for TMDL development. The purpose of these TMDLs is to address aquatic life use impairments caused by stormwater runoff. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hereby approves Vermont’s June, 2008 versions of the four TMDLs (for Allen, Indian, Sunderland, and Munroe Brooks) submitted with a cover letter dated June 19, 2008. EPA has determined that these TMDLs meet the requirements of §303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), and of EPA’s implementing regulations (40 CFR Part 130). A copy of our approval documentation is enclosed. Thank you again for your submittal. My staff and I look forward to continued cooperation with the VT DEC in exercising our shared responsibility of implementing the requirements under Section 303(d) of the CWA. Sincerely, /s/

Laura Pelosi Commissioner; Munroe Brook Tmdls; Stephen S. Perkins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

D-Area Sulfate Reduction Studty Comprehensive Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. A Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP) (WSRC 2001) was implemented to evaluate the potential for the sulfate reduction remediation of the DCPRB acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume. The following studies, implemented as part of the TSWP, are documented herein: Bacteria Population and Organic Selection Laboratory Testing; DTT-1 Trench Evaluation; DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 1; and DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. Evaluation of sulfate reduction applicability actually began with a literature search and feasibility report in mid 2001, which fed into the TSWP. Physical completion of TSWP work occurred in late 2004 with the completion of the DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. The following are the primary conclusions drawn based upon this 3-year effort: (1) Pure soybean oil provides a long-term, indirect, SRB carbon source that floats on top of the water table (by indirect it means that the soybean oil must be degraded by other microbes prior to utilization by SRB) for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Soybean oil produces no known SRB inhibitory response and therefore large quantities can be injected. (2) Sodium lactate provides a short-term, immediately available, direct, SRB carbon source that is miscible with the groundwater and therefore flows with the groundwater until it has been completely utilized for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Lactate at elevated concentrations (greater than 6 g/L) does produce a SRB inhibitory response and therefore small quantities must be injected frequently. (3) The use of limestone to buffer the contaminated groundwater facilitates sulfate reduction remediation through the injection of organic substrate. Additionally conclusions and recommendations are made in Sections 8 and 9 regarding continuation of this study, the potential for an interim action, and the final remediation once discharge to the DCPRB has been discontinued.

Phifer, M

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix A Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-iii DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Appendix A Site Evaluation Process A-1 A.1 Introduction A-1 A.2 Methodology A-1 A.3 High-Level Waste Treatment and Interim Storage Site Selection A-3 A.3.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-3 A.3.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-3 A.3.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-3 A.3.4 Evaluation Process A-4 A.3.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-6 A.4 Low-Activity Waste Disposal Site Selection A-6 A.4.1 Identification of "Must" Criteria A-7 A.4.2 Identification of "Want" Criteria A-8 A.4.3 Identification of Candidate Sites A-8 A.4.4 Evaluation Process A-8 A.4.5 Results of Evaluation Process A-9 A.4.6 Final Selection of a Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility

412

Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid Passenger-Vehicle Development Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat engine/electric hybrid vehicles offer the potential of greatly reduced petroleum consumption, compared to conventional vehicles, without the disadvantages of limited performance and operating range associated with purely electric vehicles. This report documents a hybrid-vehicle design approach which is aimed at the development of the technology required to achieve this potential - in such a way that it is transferable to the auto industry in the near term. The development of this design approach constituted Phase I of the Near-Term Hybrid-Vehicle Program. The major tasks in this program were: (1) Mission Analysis and Performance Specification Studies; (2) Design Tradeoff Studies; and (3) Preliminary Design. Detailed reports covering each of these tasks are included as appendices to this report and issued under separate cover; a fourth task, Sensitivity Studies, is also included in the report on the Design Tradeoff Studies. Because of the detail with which these appendices cover methodology and both interim and final results, the body of this report was prepared as a brief executive summary of the program activities and results, with appropriate references to the detailed material in the appendices.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): American Thermostat site, South Cairo, Green County, New York (second remedial action). Final report, June 29, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The 8-acre American Thermostat (AT) site is a former thermostat assembly facility in South Cairo, Greene County, New York. From 1954 to 1985, thermostats for small appliances were assembled using machine oils, lubricants, and solvents in the process. Waste chemical sludges were disposed of directly into drains and dumped onsite for dust control. In 1983, an interim consent order was signed requiring AT to clean up the site; however, this was never implemented before plant operations ceased in 1985. A 1988 Record of Decision (ROD) provided for a permanent alternate water supply for approximately 43 affected residents. The final ROD addresses remediation of all remaining contaminated media at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, sludge, debris, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including PCE and TCE; other organics; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

Not Available

1990-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

414

EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain...

415

EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain...

416

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its...

417

Microsoft Word - DOE-GJ-97491-952-FINAL DRAFT_S01406.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Interim Remedial Action Report Interim Remedial Action Report for the Groundwater Operable Unit of the Weldon Spring Site March 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE 952 - /GJ/79491 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy Interim Remedial Action Report for the Groundwater Operable Unit March 2005 DOE/GJ/79491-952 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations ..........................................................................................................v Abstract .........................................................................................................................................

418

Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was the subject of the issued Campaign I interim report (Duignan et al., 2004a or Appendix I-1). The streams created in Campaign I were used for Campaign II, and during Campaign II more of the same recycle streams were produced, with the addition of recycle streams created during the pilot-scale ion exchange unit operation (Duignan et al., 2004b or Appendix I-2). Campaign III used the recycles from Campaign II and was the first campaign to use all the recycle streams (Duignan et al., 2004c or Appendix I-3). The operation of each of the subsequent campaigns, i.e., II, III, and IV, while different from Campaign I, are very similar to each other, and can be best understood as the process of operating a series of Pretreatment Unit Operations in a somewhat prototypic manner. That is, while Campaign I studied the operation of a single, albeit important, Pretreatment Unit Operation, i.e., Ultrafiltration, subsequent campaigns were to study the four major unit operations that make-up the RPP-WTP Pretreatment Facility. They are: Waste Feed Evaporation Process (FEP), Ultrafiltration Process (UFP), Cesium Ion Exchange Process (CIX), and the Treated LAW Evaporation Process (TLP). Each of the campaigns operated basically as a separate subtask, but as with Campaign I, the recycle streams produced in one campaign were fed into the subsequent campaign. Therefore, all four campaigns were chemically connected through these recycle streams, which carry over effects of the preceding campaign. The results of Campaign IV operations are the subject of this fourth and final report. Separate reports were issued after each of the previous campaigns, but they were treated as interim because of being limited to the results obtained from a single campaign (or past campaigns) and further limited to only highlights of that single campaign. This final report not only discusses the Campaign IV results but compares those with the previous campaigns. Also included is a more comprehensive discussion of the overall task activities, as well as abridged versions of the full databases of the accumulated

Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final Report: RPP-WTP Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In August 2004 the last of the SIPP task testing ended--a task that formally began with the issuance of the RPP-WTP Test Specification in June 2003. The planning for the task was a major effort in itself and culminated with the input of all stakeholders, DOE, Bechtel National, Inc., Washington Group International, in October 2003 at Hanford, WA (Appendix A). This report documents the activities carried out as a result of that planning. Campaign IV, the fourth and final step towards the Semi-Integrated Pilot Plant (SIPP) task, conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the Savannah River Site, was to take the several recycle streams produced in Campaign III, the third step of the task, and combine them with other simulated recycle and chosen waste streams. (Campaign III was fed recycles from Campaign II, as Campaign II was fed by Campaign I.) The combined stream was processed in a fashion that mimicked the pretreatment operations of the DOE River Protection Project--Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) with the exception of the Ion Exchange Process. The SIPP task is considered semi-integrated because it only deals with the pretreatment operations of the RPP-WTP. That is, the pilot plant starts by receiving waste from the tank farm and ends when waste is processed to the point of being sent for vitrification. The resulting pretreated LAW and HLW simulants produced by the SIPP were shipped to VSL (Vitreous State Laboratory) and successfully vitrified in pilot WTP melters. Within the SIPP task these steps are referred to as Campaigns and there were four Campaigns in all. Campaign I, which is completely different than other campaigns, subjected a simulant of Hanford Tank 241-AY-102/C-106 (AY102) waste to cross-flow ultrafiltration only and in that process several important recycle streams were produced as a result of washing the simulant and cleaning the cross-flow filter. These streams were fed to subsequent campaigns and that work was the subject of the issued Campaign I interim report (Duignan et al., 2004a or Appendix I-1). The streams created in Campaign I were used for Campaign II, and during Campaign II more of the same recycle streams were produced, with the addition of recycle streams created during the pilot-scale ion exchange unit operation (Duignan et al., 2004b or Appendix I-2). Campaign III used the recycles from Campaign II and was the first campaign to use all the recycle streams (Duignan et al., 2004c or Appendix I-3). The operation of each of the subsequent campaigns, i.e., II, III, and IV, while different from Campaign I, are very similar to each other, and can be best understood as the process of operating a series of Pretreatment Unit Operations in a somewhat prototypic manner. That is, while Campaign I studied the operation of a single, albeit important, Pretreatment Unit Operation, i.e., Ultrafiltration, subsequent campaigns were to study the four major unit operations that make-up the RPP-WTP Pretreatment Facility. They are: Waste Feed Evaporation Process (FEP), Ultrafiltration Process (UFP), Cesium Ion Exchange Process (CIX), and the Treated LAW Evaporation Process (TLP). Each of the campaigns operated basically as a separate subtask, but as with Campaign I, the recycle streams produced in one campaign were fed into the subsequent campaign. Therefore, all four campaigns were chemically connected through these recycle streams, which carry over effects of the preceding campaign. The results of Campaign IV operations are the subject of this fourth and final report. Separate reports were issued after each of the previous campaigns, but they were treated as interim because of being limited to the results obtained from a single campaign (or past campaigns) and further limited to only highlights of that single campaign. This final report not only discusses the Campaign IV results but compares those with the previous campaigns. Also included is a more comprehensive discussion of the overall task activities, as well as abridged versions of the full databases of the accumulated

Duignan, M. R.; Adamson, D. J.; Calloway, T. B.; Fowley, M. D.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steimke, J. L.; Williams, M. R.; Zamecnik, J. R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microsoft Word - Abengoa Final EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO ABENGOA SOLAR INC. FOR THE SOLANA THERMAL ELECTRIC POWER PROJECT NEAR GILA BEND, ARIZONA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 May 2010 DOE/EA-1683 i CONTENTS Acronynms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................. viii SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................x 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action .......................................................................... 1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "interim final oswer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FINAL Announcement International Brainstorming Work-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, though in an energy in-efficient way. Organic MSW is identified as one of the potential sources of biomass energy. Biomass is a renewable resource that has a steady and abundant supply, especially thoseFINAL Announcement 1st International Brainstorming Work- shop on Waste to Energy in India Organized

Hone, James

422

Module Utilization Committee. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the US Department of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules. The final report of that committee accounts for that disposition. The membership and activities of the committee are set forth and the results of its activities are reported.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

Lee, J.D. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Microsoft Word - Phase I - Final Report _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT FINAL REPORT Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2003 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Principal Author(s): Raymond Drnevich (Praxair) James Meagher (Praxair) Vasilis Papavassiliou (Praxair) Troy Raybold (Praxair) Peter Stuttaford (Power Systems Mfg.) Leonard Switzer (Praxair) Lee Rosen (Program Manager, Praxair) Issued August 2004 DOE Award No: DE-FC26-03NT41892 Submitted by: Praxair, Inc. 175 East Park Dr. Tonawanda, NY 14150 Subcontractor: Power Systems Mfg 1440 W. Indiantown Rd., Suite 200 Jupiter, FL 33458 ii DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Gov- ernment. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employ- ees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

425

Interim Action Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national security needs of the United States. Although the Deputy Secretary of Energy approved

426

Interim Action Determination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in K-Area. Conclusion DOE has reviewed the environmental analysis relevant to processing Pu-239 materials in H-Canyon for vitrification in DWPF. DOE believes the analyses in the...

427

METAALICUS Project Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A whole ecosystem study has been undertaken to examine the relationship between atmospheric mercury deposition and fish mercury concentrations. The project is known as the Mercury Experiment to Assess Atmospheric Loading in Canada and the United States (METAALICUS). METAALICUS is a multiyear study funded by the public and private sectors in the United States and Canada. Three stable isotopes of mercury are being added to a lake and its surrounding watershed (upland and wetland). The study site is the Lak...

2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

DOE_FINAL_REPORT_newest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1 2008 to June 30 2011 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 Principal Investigator: Anne Trehu Graduate Research Assistant: Peter Kannberg Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory November 15, 2012 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 2 Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or

429

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Foreword COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

430

Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality...

431

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of the passage of decontaminated salt solution from the ITP filters into tank 50H for interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the nuclear criticality safety associated with the decontaminated salt solution after passing through the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) filters, through the stripper columns and into Tank 50H for interim storage until transfer to the Saltstone facility. The criticality safety basis for the ITP process is documented. Criticality safety in the ITP filtrate has been analyzed under normal and process upset conditions. This report evaluates the potential for criticality due to the precipitation or crystallization of fissionable material from solution and an ITP process filter failure in which insoluble material carryover from salt dissolution is present. It is concluded that no single inadvertent error will cause criticality and that the process will remain subcritical under normal and credible abnormal conditions.

Hobbs, D.T.; Davis, J.R.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

FY 93 Thermal Loading Systems Study Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Thermal Loading Systems Study being conducted by the is to identify a thermal strategy that will meet the performance requirements for waste isolation and will be safe and licensable. Specifically, both postclosure and preclosure performance standards must be met by the thermal loading strategy ultimately selected. In addition cost and schedule constraints must be considered. The Systems Engineering approach requires structured, detailed analyses that will ultimately provide the technical basis for the development, integration, and evaluation of the overall system, not just a subelement of that system. It is also necessary that the systems study construct options from within the range that are allowed within the current legislative and programmatic framework. For example the total amount of fuel that can legally be emplaced is no more than 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) which is composed of 63,000 MTU spent fuel and 7,000 MTU of defense high level waste. It is the intent of this study to begin the structured development of the basis for a thermal loading decision. However, it is recognized that to be able to make a final decision on thermal loading will require underground data on the effects of heating as well as a suite of ''validated'' models. It will be some time before these data and models are available to the program. Developing a final, thermal loading decision will, therefore, be an iterative process. In the interim, the objective of the thermal loading systems study has been to utilize the information available to assess the impact of thermal loading. Where technical justification exists, recommendations to narrow the range of thermal loading options can be made. Additionally, recommendations as to the type of testing and accuracy of the testing needed to establish the requisite information will be made. A constraint on the ability of the study to select an option stems from the lack of primary hard data, uncertainties in derived data, unsubstantiated models, and the inability to fully consider simultaneously coupled processes. As such, the study must rely on idealized models and available data to compare the thermal loading options. This report presents the findings of the FY 1993 MGDS Thermal Loading Systems Study. The objectives of the study were to: (1) if justified, place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading that is ''too hot''; (2) ''grade'' or evaluate the performance as a function of thermal loading of the potential repository to contain high level spent nuclear fuel against performance criteria; (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability; and (4) recommend the additional types of tests and/or analyses to be conducted to provide the necessary information for a thermal loading selection.

S.F. Saterlie

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

Congressional Final House Final Senate Current Request Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2010 ($ in thousands) Congressional Final House Final Senate Current Request Mark Mark Appropriation FOSSIL ENERGY R&D Coal 368,865 394,315 428,200 393,485 Natural Gas Technologies 25,000 25,000 25,000 17,364 Unconventional Fossil Energy Technologies 0 0 25,000 19,474 Program Direction 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 Plant & Capital Equipment 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 Environmental Restoration 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Cooperative Res. & Development 0 0 5,000 4,868 Congressional Directed Projects 0 9,550 27,300 35,879 Special Recruitment Program 700 700 700 700 Subtotal 582,565 617,565 699,200 659,770 Transfer from Biomass (non-add) TOTAL FOSSIL ENERGY R&D 582,565 617,565 699,200 659,770 STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Facilities Expansion

435

Microsoft Word - N01221_NE Site IRAP final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Northeast Site August 2008 Office of Legacy Management LMS/PIN/N01221 Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AM01-07LM00060 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank LMS/PIN/N01221 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Interim Remedial Action Plan for Source Removal at the Northeast Site August 2008 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Interim Remedial Action Plan for Source Removal at the Northeast Site August 2008 Doc. No. N0122100 Page iii Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations .........................................................................................................

436

Field practice internship final report  

SciTech Connect

This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

Foster, T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR Report More Documents & Publications Final ECR 2008 Report...

438

SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SPECIAL REREVIEW SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED , ?4~0180N SctuAnr P. 0. 00x *a STATION F New YORK, N. Y. IN RLPLY RCFSRTO EID?f A- 43 MS ~-7405 eng-8 ". Subject: Contract No.H-7405 eng-8 with Metal Hydrides Incorporated. MEMORAhDUM to the Files. 1. Reference is made to basi.c communication dated 27 September 1945, Symbol No. EIDM 1%-30-b, requesting certain information with respect to the subject contract. 2. Reference pars,?-raph a. The Government committed to restore Contractor's plant 70 its original conditfon because of the fact that In furtherance of the Government work great expansion of facility ?.natallation in the Con- tractor's plant was required and the Contractor was un- W illing, in the event of termination or early cessation of

439

Microsoft Word - NT06555-Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-NT0006555 Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2011 USE OF POLYMERS TO RECOVER VISCOUS OIL FROM UNCONVENTIONAL RESERVOIRS Submitted by: New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy, Socorro, NM 87801 Authored By: Randall Scott Seright (Principal Investigator) Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 12, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

440

Attributes Paper-Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October, 2000 Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Attributes Paper-Final (9/19/00) 1 Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Preface The NERAC 1 Task Force on Technology Opportunities for Increasing the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) determined at its first meeting in November 1999 that a set of metrics was needed to judge proliferation resistance and to identify areas in which technical contributions could be useful. However, because of the time constraints imposed on the Task Force and the difficulty of developing quantifiable metrics, it was decided that a set of qualitative attributes could

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441

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Combustion turbine repowering: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation into the feasibility of repowering an existing reheat fossil unit utilizing combustion turbines. It identifies a potentially attractive repowering project, through the evaluation and selective elimination of a large number of alternatives. A conceptual design is performed on the selected alternative. Capital costs are developed for this alternative including new equipment and modifications to existing equipment. The results of an economic evaluation and sensitivity analysis are presented, to serve as a basis for a decision on whether or not to proceed with final design, procurement, and construction of the system. The steps presented in the report are intended to provide for the utility industry a detailed methodology for investigating repowering at a specific utility site. 4 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Final_Testimony(20).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 1 Chairman Bingaman, Ranking Member Murkowski, Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Implementation of National Consensus Appliance Agreements Act of 2011 (S.398) and the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act (S.395). In June 2009, President Obama said, "One of the fastest, easiest, and cheapest ways to make our economy stronger and cleaner is to make our economy more energy efficient." 1 Energy-conserving appliance standards are one of the significant steps the Administration has taken to save energy in homes and businesses nationwide, and pave the way toward a clean energy future for our country. 2 Since January 2009, the Department of Energy has finalized new efficiency standards for more than twenty household and commercial

444

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 3, October 1978-June 1979  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe collector system design was re-evaluated as a new system, as compared to previous evaluation where the heat pipe was an interchangeable component in the standard TC-101 system. Collector hardware components were finalized, including production costs. Heat pipe fluid-vessel testing continued indoors and outdoors in the solar panel. A prototpe production processing station has been designed which shows that the labor content of processing individual heat pipes can be reduced to 15 seconds with a total cost of $1.50.

Ernst, D.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DOE Technology TF Final-Jun  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Interim r eport o f T echnology T ransition T ask F orce to the S ecretary o f E nergy A dvisory B oard ( July 2 0, 2 011) DOE i s t he a gency r esponsible f or c reating, d emonstrating, a nd e ncouraging d eployment of e nergy t echnology t hat p rovides r eliable a nd a ffordable e nergy necessary f or a growing e conomy a nd p ersonal u se w ithout a dverse e nvironmental e ffects. E nergy security a nd i mproving e conomic c ompetitiveness a re i mportant a dditional g oals. T he basic p rinciple t hat s hould g overn D OE's i nvolvement i s t hat D OE e ngages w hen t he private s ector i s u nable o r u nwilling t o m ake i nvestments t hat a re i n t he p ublic's interest. There a re f our s tages a t w hich g overnment s upport c an o ccur: ( 1) creation o f n ew i deas (basic r esearch a nd e xploratory d evelopment), ( 2)

446

Co-combustion feasibility study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigates the technical and economic feasibility of co-combusting municipal sewage sludge produced by the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1 with paper mill sludge produced by the Cottrell Paper Company, Encore Paper Company, International Paper Company, Mohawk Paper Mills, and TAGSONS Papers at the Saratoga County Sewer District No. 1`s secondary wastewater treatment plant and recovering any available energy products. The co-combustion facility would consist of sludge and wood chip storage and conveying systems, belt filter presses, screw presses, fluidized-bed incinerators, venturi scrubbers and tray cooling systems, ash dewatering facilities, heat recovery steam generators, gas-fired steam superheaters, and a back-pressure steam turbine system. Clean waste wood chips would be used as an auxiliary fuel in the fluidized-bed incinerators. It is recommended that the ash produced by the proposed facility be beneficially used, potentially as a raw material in the manufacture of cement and/or as an interim barrier layer in landfills.

Handcock, D.J. [Clough, Harbour and Associates, Albany, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evaluation of Shear Strength Threshold of Concern for Retrieval of Interim-Stored K-Basin Sludge in the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

K-Basin sludge will be recovered into the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) and will be stored in the T Plant for interim storage (at least 10 years). Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show that high uranium content K Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has "paste" and "chunks" with shear strengths of approximately 3~5 kPa and 380 ~ 770 kPa, respectively. High uranium content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185°C, 10 h) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. After interim storage at T Plant, the sludge in the STSCs will be mobilized by water jets impinging the sludge. The objective of the evaluation was to determine the range of sludge shear strength for which there is high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from STSCs. The shear strength at which the sludge can be retrieved is defined as the "shear strength threshold of concern." If the sludge shear strength is greater than the value of the shear strength threshold of concern, a water-jet retrieval system will be unlikely to mobilize the sludge up to the container’s walls. The shear strength threshold of concern can be compared with the range of possible shear strengths of K-Basin stored sludge to determine if the current post interim-storage, water-jet retrieval method is adequate. Fourteen effective cleaning radius (ECR) models were reviewed, and their validity was examined by applying them to Hanford 241-SY-101 and 241-AZ-101 Tanks to reproduce the measured ECR produced by the mixer pumps. The validation test identified that the Powell-3 and Crowe-2 ECR models are more accurate than other ECR models reviewed. These ECR models were used to address a question as to whether the effective cleaning radius of a water jet is sufficient or if it can be readily expanded to cover the range of possible shear strengths. These results will assist CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to establish the technical basis of the feasibility of the sludge retrieval and storage plan and to develop an adequate water jet system to retrieve the stored K-Basin sludge in the STSCs. The STSCs are 2:1 elliptical-head vessels, 58 inches in diameter and 105 inches tall. Each STSC will contain 0.5 to 2.1 m3 of settled sludge with the specific loading dependent upon sludge type.

Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

IRIS Final Technical Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four years of IRIS, from October 1999 to October 2003. It provides a panoramic of the project status and design effort, with emphasis on the current status, since two previous reports have very extensively documented the work performed, from inception to early 2002.

M. D. Carelli

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

FINAL SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynalene Inc has developed and patented a fuel cell coolant with the help of DOE SBIR Phase I and Phase II funding (Project DE-FG02-04ER83884). However, this coolant could only be produced in lab scale (500 ml to 2 L) due to problems in the optimization and scale-up of a nanoparticle ingredient. This project optimized the nanoparticle production process in 10 L and 100 L reactors (which translates to about 5000 gallons of coolant), optimized the filtration process for the nanoparticles, and develop a high throughput production as well as quality control method for the final coolant formulation. Scale-up of nanoparticle synthesis (using emulsion polymerization) is an extremely challenging task. Dynalene researchers, in collaboration with a university partner, identified all the parameters affecting the size, charge density and coagulation characteristics of the nanoparticles and then optimized these parameters to achieve the goals and the objectives of this project. Nanoparticle synthesis was demonstrated to be reproducible in the 10 L and 100 L scales.

Satish Mohapatra

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z