National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for interim corrective measures

  1. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. SWSA 6 interim corrective measures environmental monitoring: FY 1990 results. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a multifaceted monitoring effort associated with the high-density polyethylene caps installed in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as an interim corrective measure (ICM). The caps were installed between November 1988 and June 1989 to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for closure of those areas of SWSA 6 that had received RCRA-regulated wastes after November 1980. Three separate activities were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the caps: (1) wells were installed in trenches to be covered by the caps, and water levels in these intratrench wells were monitored periodically; (2) samples were taken of the leachate in the intratrench wells and were analyzed for a broad range of radiological and chemical contaminants; and (3) water levels in wells outside the trenches were monitored periodically. With the exception of the trench leachate sampling, each of these activities spanned the preconstruction, construction, and postconstruction periods. Findings of this study have important implications for the ongoing remedial investigation in SWSA 6 and for the design of other ICMs. 51 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. ATVM Interim Final Rule Correction | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A few corrections to the final rule regarding fuel economy numbers. ATVM Interim Final Rule Correction More Documents & Publications Updated Guidance For Applicants To Advanced...

  4. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrective Measures Process Corrective Measures Process We follow a stringent corrective measures process for legacy cleanup. August 1, 2013 Corrective measures process Corrective measures process

  5. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corrective Measures Process Corrective Measures Process We follow a stringent corrective measures process for legacy cleanup. August 1, 2013 Corrective measures process Corrective...

  6. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Jonathan L.; Hall, Kevin A.

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  7. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  8. Quality assurance plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase 1 -- Interim corrective measures and Phase 2 -- Purge and trap reactive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project (MSRERP) personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Energy Systems 1995f). This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRERP Phase 1--Interim Corrective Measures and Phase 2--Purge and Trap objectives. This QAP will be reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary for Phase 3 and Phase 4 activities. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan.

  9. DOUBLE TRACKS Test Site interim corrective action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The DOUBLE TRACKS site is located on Range 71 north of the Nellis Air Force Range, northwest of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). DOUBLE TRACKS was the first of four experiments that constituted Operation ROLLER COASTER. On May 15, 1963, weapons-grade plutonium and depleted uranium were dispersed using 54 kilograms of trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosive. The explosion occurred in the open, 0.3 m above the steel plate. No fission yield was detected from the test, and the total amount of plutonium deposited on the ground surface was estimated to be between 980 and 1,600 grams. The test device was composed primarily of uranium-238 and plutonium-239. The mass ratio of uranium to plutonium was 4.35. The objective of the corrective action is to reduce the potential risk to human health and the environment and to demonstrate technically viable and cost-effective excavation, transportation, and disposal. To achieve these objectives, Bechtel Nevada (BN) will remove soil with a total transuranic activity greater then 200 pCI/g, containerize the soil in ``supersacks,`` transport the filled ``supersacks`` to the NTS, and dispose of them in the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site. During this interim corrective action, BN will also conduct a limited demonstration of an alternative method for excavation of radioactive near-surface soil contamination.

  10. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center ...

  11. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April 2003 Grand Junction Office U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the ...

  12. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-Interim reanalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuichard, N.

    2015-07-13

    In this study, exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 registered sites, and up to 250 of them share data (free fair-use data set). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET data set for evaluating ecosystem models' performance, but this requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months) ones, we develop a new and robust method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-Interim) and a high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are, however, not measured at site level, and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-Interim data is needed. We apply this method to the level 4 data (L4) from the La Thuile collection, freely available after registration under a fair-use policy. The performance of the developed method varies across sites and is also function of the meteorological variable. On average over all sites, applying the bias correction method to the ERA-Interim data reduced the mismatch with the in situ data by 10 to 36 %, depending on the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in situ data and the unbiased ERA-I (ERA-Interim) data remains relatively large (on average over all sites, from 27 to 76 % of the standard deviation of in situ data, depending on the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains poor for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations.

  13. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-Interim reanalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vuichard, N.; Papale, D.

    2015-07-13

    In this study, exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 registered sites, and up to 250 of them share data (free fair-use data set). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET data set for evaluating ecosystem models' performance, but this requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months) ones, we develop a new and robustmore » method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-Interim) and a high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are, however, not measured at site level, and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-Interim data is needed. We apply this method to the level 4 data (L4) from the La Thuile collection, freely available after registration under a fair-use policy. The performance of the developed method varies across sites and is also function of the meteorological variable. On average over all sites, applying the bias correction method to the ERA-Interim data reduced the mismatch with the in situ data by 10 to 36 %, depending on the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in situ data and the unbiased ERA-I (ERA-Interim) data remains relatively large (on average over all sites, from 27 to 76 % of the standard deviation of in situ data, depending on the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains poor for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations.« less

  14. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the

  15. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  16. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates an interim measure to control chromium plume migration and maintain the 50 parts-per-billion (ppb) and greater chromium contamination level with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary while long-term corrective action remedies are evaluated and implemented. Concentrations of chromium within the groundwater plume beneath Mortadad Canyon exceed the New Mexico groundwater standard of 50 ppb near the property boundary between LANL and the Pueblo de San Ildefonso and are as high as 1,000 ppb in the plume center.

  17. Correcting radar range measurements for atmospheric propagation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Correcting radar range measurements for atmospheric propagation effects. Abstract not provided. Authors: Doerry, Armin Walter Publication Date: 2013-12-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  18. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April through June 2003

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7-TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress Report April Through June 2003 July 2003 N0063400 GJO- 2003- 467- TAC GJO-PIN 13.5.1-1 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures

  19. 2010-05 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" | Department of Energy 5 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" 2010-05 "Interim Measure for Volatile Organic Constituent Contaminant Source Removal in MAD-L and MDA-G" The intent of this recommendation is to remove large volumes of liquid waste VOCs from the ground and to prevent these contaminants from moving into the groundwater or to the atmosphere. The NNMCAB recognizes

  20. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-10-14

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  1. Comment Period Extended: EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure and Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management has extended the Public Comment Period on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los...

  2. ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and

  3. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  4. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  5. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the...

  6. Spent Fuel Test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Hage, G.L.; Majer, E.L.; Montan, D.N.; Nyholm, R.A.; Rector, N.L.

    1983-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April to May 1980, thus initiating a test with a planned 3- to 5-year fuel storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Three exchanges of spent fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and two previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 2-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Data continue to be acquired from the test. Some data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include analysis of fracture data obtained during site characterization, laboratory studies of radiation effects and drilling damage in Climax granite, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response, a ventilation effects study, and further development of the data acquisition and management systems.

  7. Corrective measures evaluation report for Tijeras Arroyo groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L; Orr, Brennon R.; Dettmers, Dana L.; Hall, Kevin A.; Howard, M. Hope

    2005-08-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation report was prepared as directed by a Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Supporting information includes background concerning the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. The evaluation of remedial alternatives included identifying and describing four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, comparing remedial alternatives to the criteria, and selecting the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, monitored natural attenuation of the contaminants of concern (trichloroethene and nitrate) is the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are also presented.

  8. On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS Tomsk, Russia M. A. Sviridenkov and P. P. Anikin A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Moscow, Russia Introduction The multi-filter rotated shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) provides spectral direct, diffuse, and total horizontal solar irradiance measurements. Because the MFRSR's receiver has a non-Lambertian response, for a correct interpretation of measured radiation an

  9. Corrective measures evaluation report for technical area-v groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L; Orr, Brennon R.; Dettmers, Dana L.; Hall, Kevin A.; Howard, Hope

    2005-07-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation Report was prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V. Supporting information includes background information about the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. Evaluation of remedial alternatives included identification and description of four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of remedial alternatives, and selection of the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, it was determined that monitored natural attenuation of all contaminants of concern (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate) was the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure to remediate contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Finally, design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are presented.

  10. Prediction and measurement of entrained flow coal gasification processes. Interim report, September 8, 1981-September 7, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedman, P.O.; Smoot, L.D.; Fletcher, T.H.; Smith, P.J.; Blackham, A.U.

    1984-01-31

    This volume reports interim experimental and theoretical results of the first two years of a three year study of entrained coal gasification with steam and oxygen. The gasifier facility and testing methods were revised and improved. The gasifier was also modified for high pressure operation. Six successful check-out tests at elevated pressure were performed (55, 75, 100, 130, 170, and 215 psig), and 8 successful mapping tests were performed with the Utah bituminous coal at an elevated pressure of 137.5 psig. Also, mapping tests were performed at atmospheric pressure with a Utah bituminous coal (9 tests) and with a Wyoming subbituminous coal (14 tests). The LDV system was used on the cold-flow facility to make additional nonreactive jets mixing measurements (local mean and turbulent velocity) that could be used to help validate the two-dimensional code. The previously completed two-dimensional entrained coal gasification code, PCGC-2, was evaluated through rigorous comparison with cold-flow, pulverized coal combustion, and entrained coal gasification data. Data from this laboratory were primarily used but data from other laboratories were used when available. A complete set of the data used has been compiled into a Data Book which is included as a supplemental volume of this interim report. A revised user's manual for the two-dimensional code has been prepared and is also included as a part of this interim report. Three technical papers based on the results of this study were published or prepared. 107 references, 57 figures, 35 tables.

  11. 55-Gallon Drum Attenuation Corrections for Waste Assay Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V.R.

    2002-04-03

    The present study shows how the percent attenuation for low-level waste (LLW), carbon-steel 55-gallon drums (44 and 46 mil) and for transuranic (TRU) DOT Type 7A 55-gallon drums (approximately 61 mil) changes with gamma energy from 60 keV to 1400 keV. Attenuation for these drums is in the range of 5 to 15 percent at energies from 400 to 1400 keV and from 15 to 35 percent at energies from 120 to 400 keV. At 60 keV, these drums attenuate 70-80 percent of the gamma rays. Correction factors were determined in order to correct for gamma attenuation of a TRU drum if a calibration is performed with a LLW drum. These correction factors increase the activities of the TRU drum by from 10 percent to 2 percent in the energy range of 165 to 1400 keV, with an increase of about 50 percent at 60 keV. Correction factors for TRU drums and for analyses without a drum were used to adjust the percent yield for frequently measured gamma rays, so that the assay libraries could be modified to provide the drum attenuation corrections.

  12. Spatial corrections for pulsed-neutron reactivity measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Y.; Lee, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-07-01

    For pulsed-neutron experiments performed in a subcritical reactor, the reactivity obtained from the area-ratio method is sensitive to detector positions. The spatial effects are induced by the presence of both the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics in the reactor. The traditional kinetics distortion factor is only limited to correcting the spatial effects caused by the fundamental prompt-{alpha} mode. In this paper, we derive spatial correction factors fp and fd to account for spatial effects induced by the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics, respectively. Our numerical simulations with the FX2-TH time-dependent multigroup diffusion code indicate that the high-order prompt neutron harmonics lead to significant spatial effects and cannot be neglected in calculating the spatial correction factors. The prompt spatial correction factor fp can be simply determined by the ratio of the normalized detector responses corresponding to the fundamental k-mode and the prompt neutron flux integrated over the pulse period. Thus, it is convenient to calculate and provides physically intuitive explanations on the spatial dependence of reactivity measured in the MUSE-4 experiments: overestimation of the subcriticality in regions close to the external neutron source and underestimation of the subcriticality away from the source but within the fuel region.

  13. ARM: SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1997-03-21

    SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

  14. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-04-11

    In this study, a time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  15. CMM Interim Check (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montano, Joshua Daniel

    2015-03-23

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length. Unfortunately, several nonconformance reports have been generated to document the discovery of a certified machine found out of tolerance during a calibration closeout. In an effort to reduce risk to product quality two solutions were proposed – shorten the calibration cycle which could be costly, or perform an interim check to monitor the machine’s performance between cycles. The CMM interim check discussed makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge. This off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. Data was gathered, analyzed, and simulated from seven machines in seventeen different configurations to create statistical process control run charts for on-the-floor monitoring.

  16. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  17. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  18. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1982-04-30

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax granite stock on the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized from April to May 1980, initiating the 3- to 5-year-duration test. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this report. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 1-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Much of the acquired data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include completion of site characterization field work, major modifications to the data acquisition and the management systems, and the addition of instrument evaluation as an explicit objective of the test.

  19. Optics measurement and correction during acceleration with beta-squeeze in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2015-05-03

    In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has only taken place at injection and at final energy, with interpolation of corrections partially into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats that, if corrected, could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoiding the high-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. We recently demonstrated successful beam optics corrections during acceleration at RHIC. We verified conclusively the superior control of the beam realized via these corrections

  20. Linear optics measurements and corrections using an AC dipole in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Bai, M.; Yang, L.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent experimental results on linear optics measurements and corrections using ac dipole. In RHIC 2009 run, the concept of the SVD correction algorithm is tested at injection energy for both identifying the artificial gradient errors and correcting it using the trim quadrupoles. The measured phase beatings were reduced by 30% and 40% respectively for two dedicated experiments. In RHIC 2010 run, ac dipole is used to measure {beta}* and chromatic {beta} function. For the 0.65m {beta}* lattice, we observed a factor of 3 discrepancy between model and measured chromatic {beta} function in the yellow ring.

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

  2. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  3. An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Daylight Correction for IR Loss in ARM Diffuse SW Measurements C. N. Long, K. Younkin, and K. L. Gaustad Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington J. A. Augustine National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory Surface Radiation Research Branch Boulder, Colorado Introduction A paper by Cess et al. (2000) notes that some clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements they were using from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern

  4. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  5. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  6. CMM Interim Check Design of Experiments (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montano, Joshua Daniel

    2015-07-29

    Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) are widely used in industry, throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to verify part conformance to design definition. Calibration cycles for CMMs at LANL are predominantly one year in length and include a weekly interim check to reduce risk. The CMM interim check makes use of Renishaw’s Machine Checking Gauge which is an off-the-shelf product simulates a large sphere within a CMM’s measurement volume and allows for error estimation. As verification on the interim check process a design of experiments investigation was proposed to test a couple of key factors (location and inspector). The results from the two-factor factorial experiment proved that location influenced results more than the inspector or interaction.

  7. Development of an EMF Measurements Database, EMF Rapid Program, Project #5, Interim Report: April 1995-December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-04-01

    The EMF measurement data sets in existence today were compiled with varying goals and techniques. Consequently, they have different information content as well as varying logical and physical structure. Future studies will continue to pursue varying goals and utilize techniques that cannot be known in advance. Primary goals for the EMF Measurements Database developed under the Department of Energy EMF RAPID Program are to develop a database structure that can accommodate the diversity of EMF data sets, provide guidance for production of future EMF data sets, and serve as an accessible repository of EMF measurement data. Specific objectives of the EMF Measurements Database are: o to preserve study descriptions, results and data; o to provide readily accessible, well-documented data; and o to facilitate communication among researchers. In addition, the EMF Measurements Database will encourage additional analysis of existing data sets, facilitate analysis of data from multiple projects, support design of new studies, and permit future issues in EMF exposure assessment to be addressed with existing data. Preservation of study descriptions and data is accomplished with a formal, but open, structure. Specifications have been developed for the various elements of the database. Each data set in the database is formally described by a metadata file. The structured metadata file describes the origin, development, logical and physical structure and distribution mechanism for each data set. The metadata for each data set is generated according to a specification developed for the EMF Measurements Database. The actual measurement data is contained in data Products for each data set. The number and type of data product will vary by data set. Most of the data products in the possession of the EMF Measurements Database are available for download from an Internet site. For some data sets, the data products will be maintained by other parties who may have their own access procedures

  8. A Method of Correcting for Tilt From Horizontal in Downwelling Shortwave Irradiance Measurements on Moving Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Jonsson, Haf; Schmid, Beat; Vogelmann, A. M.; Wood, John

    2010-04-14

    Significant errors occur in downwelling shortwave irradiance measurements made on moving platforms due to tilt from horizontal because, when the sun is not completely blocked by overhead cloud, the downwelling shortwave irradiance has a prominent directional component from the direct sun. A-priori knowledge of the partitioning between the direct and diffuse components of the total shortwave irradiance is needed to properly apply a correction for tilt. This partitioning information can be adequately provided using a newly available commercial radiometer that produces reasonable measurements of the total and diffuse shortwave irradiance, and by subtraction the direct shortwave irradiance, with no moving parts and regardless of azimuthal orientation. We have developed methodologies for determining the constant pitch and roll offsets of the radiometers for aircraft applications, and for applying a tilt correction to the total shortwave irradiance data. Results suggest that the methodology is for tilt up to +/-10°, with 90% of the data corrected to within 10 Wm-2 at least for clear-sky data. Without a proper tilt correction, even data limited to 5° of tilt as is typical current practice still exhibits large errors, greater than 100 Wm-2 in some cases. Given the low cost, low weight, and low power consumption of the SPN1 total and diffuse radiometer, opportunities previously excluded for moving platform measurements such as small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and solar powered buoys now become feasible using our methodology. The increase in measurement accuracy is important, given current concerns over long-term climate variability and change especially over the 70% of the Earth’s surface covered by ocean where long-term records of these measurements are sorely needed and must be made on ships and buoys.

  9. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  10. Interim explosives detection alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syler, R.P. )

    1991-01-01

    There is a general concern with insiders smuggling bomb quantities of explosives into sensitive facilities such as nuclear facilities. At this time, there is no single explosives detection device that is suitable for monitoring personnel and their packages for explosives in an operational facility environment. However, there are techniques combining available commercial technologies with procedures and threat analysis that can significantly increase the insiders risk and reduce the population of adversaries. This paper describes the available applicable explosives detection technologies and discusses the techniques that could be implemented on an interim basis. It is important that these techniques be considered, so that some interim level of security against the explosives threat can be established until more sophisticated equipment that is under development becomes available.

  11. Interim Action Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Action Determination Processing of Plutonium Materials from the DOE Standard 3013 Surveillance Program in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS, DOE/EIS-0283-S2). DOE is evaluating alternatives for disposition of non-pit plutonium that is surplus to the national security needs of the United States. Although the Deputy Secretary of Energy approved Critical

  12. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  13. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  14. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  15. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    {sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

  16. The main injector chromaticity correction sextupole magnets: Measurements and operating schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; Bogacz, A.; Brown, B.C.; Harding, D.J.; Fang, S.J.; Martin, P.S.; Glass, H.D.; Sim, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) is a high intensity proton synchrotron which will be used to accelerate protons and antiprotons from 8.9 GeV/c to 150 GeV/c. The natural chromaticities of the machine for the horizontal and the vertical Planes are {minus}33.6 and {minus}33.9 respectively. The {Delta}p/p of the beam at injection is about 0.002. The chromaticity requirements of the FMI, are primarily decided by the {Delta}p/p = 0.002 of the beam at injection. This limits the final chromaticity of the FMI to be {plus_minus}5 units. To correct the chromaticity in the FMI two families of sextupole magnets will be installed in the lattice, one for each plane. A sextupole magnet suitable for the FMI needs has been designed and a number of them are being built. New chromaticity compensation schemes have been worked out in the light of recently proposed faster acceleration ramps. On an R/D sextupole magnet the low current measurements have been carried out to determine the electrical properties. Also, using a Morgan coil, measurements have been performed to determine the higher ordered multipole components up to 18-poles. An overview of these result are presented here.

  17. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-20

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  18. SU-E-T-628: Effect of Dose Rate and Leakage Correction for Dosimetric Leaf Gap Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, W; Chu, A; Chi, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the dose rate response of Mapcheck and quantify/correct dose rate/leakage effect on IMRT QA. Evaluate the dose rate/leakage effect on dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) measurement. Methods: Varian Truebeam Linac with HD120 MLC was used for all measurement, it is capable to adjust dose rate from 600MU/min to 5MU/min. Fluke Advanced Therapy Doisemter and PTW 30013 Farmer chamber for chamber measurement; SunNuclear Mapcheck2 with 5cm total buildup for diode measurement. DLG was measured with both chamber and diode.Diode response was measured by varies dose rate, while fixed mapcheck setup and total MU. MLC Leakage was measured with both chamber and diode. Mapcheck measurement was saved as movie file (mcm file), which include measurement updated every 50mSec. The difference between intervals can be converted to dose and dose rate and leakage response correction can be applied to them. Results: DLG measurement results with chamber and diode were showed as follows, the DLG value is 0.36 vs. 0.24mm respectively. Diode dose rate response drops from 100% at 600MU/min to 95.5% at 5MU/min as follows. MLC Leakage measured with diode is 1.021%, which is 9% smaller than 1.112% from chamber measurement. By apply the dose rate and leakage correction, the residue error reduced 2/3. Conclusions: Diode has lower response at lower dose rate, as low as 4.5% for 5MU/min; diode has lower energy response for low energy too, 5% lower for Co-60 than 6MV. It partially explains the leakage difference of 9% between chamber and diode. Lower DLG with diode is because of the lower response at narrower gap, in Eclipse however DLG need to increase to makeup lower response, which is over correction for chamber though. Correction can reduce error by 2/3, the rest 1/3 can be corrected by scatter effect, which is under study.

  19. ROTATIONAL CORRECTIONS TO NEUTRON-STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS FROM THERMAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baubck, Michi; zel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2015-01-20

    We calculate the rotational broadening in the observed thermal spectra of neutron stars spinning at moderate rates in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. These calculations accurately account for the effects of the second-order Doppler boosts as well as for the oblate shapes and the quadrupole moments of the neutron stars. We find that fitting the spectra and inferring the bolometric fluxes under the assumption that a star is not rotating causes an underestimate of the inferred fluxes and, thus, radii. The correction depends on the stellar spin, mass, radius, and the observer's inclination. For a 10km, 1.4 M {sub ?} neutron star spinning at 600Hz, the rotational correction to the flux is ?1%-4%, while for a 15km neutron star with the same spin period, the correction ranges from 2% for pole-on sources to 12% for edge-on sources. We calculate the inclination-averaged corrections to inferred radii as a function of the neutron-star radius and mass and provide an empirical formula for the corrections. For realistic neutron-star parameters (1.4 M {sub ?}, 12km, 600Hz), the stellar radius is on the order of 4% larger than the radius inferred under the assumption that the star is not spinning.

  20. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  1. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  2. Systematic corrections to the measured cosmological constant as a result of local inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderveld, R. Ali; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Wasserman, Ira

    2007-10-15

    We explicitly calculate the lowest order systematic inhomogeneity-induced corrections to the cosmological constant that one would infer from an analysis of the luminosities and redshifts of type Ia supernovae, assuming a homogeneous universe. The calculation entails a post-Newtonian expansion within the framework of second-order perturbation theory, wherein we consider the effects of subhorizon density perturbations in a flat, dust-dominated universe. Within this formalism, we calculate luminosity distances and redshifts along the past light cone of an observer. The luminosity distance-redshift relation is then averaged over viewing angles and ensemble averaged, assuming that density fluctuations at a given cosmic time are a homogeneous random process. The resulting relation is fit to that of a homogeneous model containing dust and a cosmological constant, in order to deduce the best-fit cosmological constant density {omega}{sub {lambda}}. We find that the luminosity distance-redshift relation is indeed modified, even for large sample sizes, but only by a very small fraction, of order 10{sup -5} for z{approx}0.1. This lowest order deviation depends on the peculiar velocities of the source and the observer. However, when fitting this perturbed relation to that of a homogeneous universe, via maximizing a likelihood function, we find that the inferred cosmological constant can be surprisingly large, depending on the range of redshifts sampled. For a sample of supernovae extending from z{sub min}=0.02 out to a limiting redshift z{sub max}=0.15, we find that {omega}{sub {lambda}}{approx_equal}0.004. The value of {omega}{sub {lambda}} has a large variance, and its magnitude tends to get progressively larger as the limiting redshift z{sub max} gets smaller, implying that precision measurements of {omega}{sub {lambda}} from nearby supernova data will require taking this effect into account. This effect has been referred to in the past as the 'fitting problem', and more

  3. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  4. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Favalli, Andrea; Vo, D.; Grogan, Brandon R.; Jansson, Peter; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Mozin, Vladimir; Schwalbach, P.; Sjoland, A.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Trellue, Holly; et al

    2016-02-26

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuelmore » assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. Furthermore, the results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.« less

  5. Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etyemezian, V.; Shafer, D.; Miller, J.; Kavouras, I.; Campbell, S.; DuBois, D.; King, J.; Nikolich, G.; Zitzer, S.

    2010-05-18

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

  6. Memorandum, Interim Procedures During Temporary Suspension of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hiring, credentialing and eligibility determinations during the period of e-QIP suspension. Memorandum, Interim Procedures During Temporary Suspension of Electronic...

  7. Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  8. Interim Guidance Regarding Limitations on CERCLA Liability |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Inner-Office Memorandum: Interim Guidance Regarding Limitations on CERCLA LiabilityPermitting...

  9. Correcting systematic bias and instrument measurement drift with mzRefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Bryson C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tabb, David L.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2015-12-01

    MOTIVATION: Systematic bias in mass measurement adversely affects data quality and negates the advantages of high precision instruments. RESULTS: We introduce the mzRefinery tool into the ProteoWizard package for calibration of mass spectrometry data files. Using confident peptide spectrum matches, three different calibration methods are explored and the optimal transform function is chosen. After calibration, systematic bias is removed and the mass measurement errors are centered at zero ppm. Because it is part of the ProteoWizard package, mzRefinery can read and write a wide variety of file formats. AVAILABILITY: The mzRefinery tool is part of msConvert, available with the ProteoWizard open source package at http://proteowizard.sourceforge.net/

  10. Correcting systematic bias and instrument measurement drift with mzRefinery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gibbons, Bryson C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tabb, David L.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2015-08-04

    Systematic bias in mass measurement adversely affects data quality and negates the advantages of high precision instruments. We introduce the mzRefinery tool into the ProteoWizard package for calibration of mass spectrometry data files. Using confident peptide spectrum matches, three different calibration methods are explored and the optimal transform function is chosen. After calibration, systematic bias is removed and the mass measurement errors are centered at zero ppm. Because it is part of the ProteoWizard package, mzRefinery can read and write a wide variety of file formats. In conclusion, we report on availability; the mzRefinery tool is part of msConvert, availablemore » with the ProteoWizard open source package at http://proteowizard.sourceforge.net/« less

  11. Correcting systematic bias and instrument measurement drift with mzRefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Bryson C.; Chambers, Matthew C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Tabb, David L.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2015-08-04

    Systematic bias in mass measurement adversely affects data quality and negates the advantages of high precision instruments. We introduce the mzRefinery tool into the ProteoWizard package for calibration of mass spectrometry data files. Using confident peptide spectrum matches, three different calibration methods are explored and the optimal transform function is chosen. After calibration, systematic bias is removed and the mass measurement errors are centered at zero ppm. Because it is part of the ProteoWizard package, mzRefinery can read and write a wide variety of file formats. In conclusion, we report on availability; the mzRefinery tool is part of msConvert, available with the ProteoWizard open source package at http://proteowizard.sourceforge.net/

  12. Memorandum on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Memorandum on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness...

  13. VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) Details hydrogen fuel cell buses being ...

  14. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, ...

  15. Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, ...

  16. BLM Interim Competitive Procedures for SEZs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Interim Competitive Procedures for SEZs Citation BLM Interim Competitive...

  17. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: I. Impact of Impurities, Measurement Protocols and Applied Corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Richards, Ryan M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-07-22

    The rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique is being extensively used as a screening tool to estimate the activity of novel PEMFC electrocatalysts synthesized in lab-scale (mg) quantities. Discrepancies in measured activity attributable to glassware and electrolyte impurity levels, as well as conditioning, protocols and corrections are prevalent in the literature. Moreover, the electrochemical response to a broad spectrum of commercially sourced perchloric acid and the effect of acid molarity on impurity levels and solution resistance were also assessed. Our findings reveal that an area specific activity (SA) exceeding 2.0 mA/cm2 (20 mV/s, 25°C, 100 kPa, 0.1 M HClO4) for polished poly-Pt is an indicator of impurity levels that do not impede the accurate measurement of the ORR activity of Pt based catalysts. After exploring various conditioning protocols to approach maximum utilization of the electrochemical area (ECA) and peak ORR activity without introducing catalyst degradation, an investigation of measurement protocols for ECA and ORR activity was conducted. Down-selected protocols were based on the criteria of reproducibility, duration of experiments, impurity effects and magnitude of pseudo-capacitive background correction. In sum, statistical reproducibility of ORR activity for poly-Pt and Pt supported on high surface area carbon was demonstrated.

  18. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: I. Impact of Impurities, Measurement Protocols and Applied Corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Richards, Ryan M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-07-22

    The rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique is being extensively used as a screening tool to estimate the activity of novel PEMFC electrocatalysts synthesized in lab-scale (mg) quantities. Discrepancies in measured activity attributable to glassware and electrolyte impurity levels, as well as conditioning, protocols and corrections are prevalent in the literature. Moreover, the electrochemical response to a broad spectrum of commercially sourced perchloric acid and the effect of acid molarity on impurity levels and solution resistance were also assessed. Our findings reveal that an area specific activity (SA) exceeding 2.0 mA/cm2 (20 mV/s, 25°C, 100 kPa, 0.1 M HClO4) for polishedmore » poly-Pt is an indicator of impurity levels that do not impede the accurate measurement of the ORR activity of Pt based catalysts. After exploring various conditioning protocols to approach maximum utilization of the electrochemical area (ECA) and peak ORR activity without introducing catalyst degradation, an investigation of measurement protocols for ECA and ORR activity was conducted. Down-selected protocols were based on the criteria of reproducibility, duration of experiments, impurity effects and magnitude of pseudo-capacitive background correction. In sum, statistical reproducibility of ORR activity for poly-Pt and Pt supported on high surface area carbon was demonstrated.« less

  19. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  20. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination (781.29 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination

  1. Interim Approach to the MRS facility design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The purpose is to present the proposed Interim Approach to the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility design development. This Interim Approach document fulfills the function allocated to the OCRWM-SEMP (DOE/RW-0051REVlP, March 1990, Section 5.2 Approach to the MRS Design) until the MRS section of the OCRWM-SEMP is approved. Until completion of the OCRWM-SEMP, this Interim Approach document will be approved and controlled according to the Program Change Control Procedure (DOE/RW-0223REV3P). This document discusses the general approach to Conceptual Design (CD), Title I Design, and Title II Design activities.

  2. Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule Extracted Pages from the Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule, September 19, 2008 Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule (111.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Comments of the Staff of the public utilities commission of the state of California on the interim final rule Comments on Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities Changes recommended by OIRA

  3. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  4. In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements L. M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado H. Vömel and S. J. Oltmans National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado A. Paukkunen Vaisala Oy Helsinki, Finland Introduction Radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements are fundamentally important to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program goals because they are used in a

  5. Methods Data Qualification Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sam Alessi; Tami Grimmett; Leng Vang; Dave McGrath

    2010-09-01

    The overall goal of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) is to maintain data provenance for all NGNP data including the Methods component of NGNP data. Multiple means are available to access data stored in NDMAS. A web portal environment allows users to access data, view the results of qualification tests and view graphs and charts of various attributes of the data. NDMAS also has methods for the management of the data output from VHTR simulation models and data generated from experiments designed to verify and validate the simulation codes. These simulation models represent the outcome of mathematical representation of VHTR components and systems. The methods data management approaches described herein will handle data that arise from experiment, simulation, and external sources for the main purpose of facilitating parameter estimation and model verification and validation (V&V). A model integration environment entitled ModelCenter is used to automate the storing of data from simulation model runs to the NDMAS repository. This approach does not adversely change the why computational scientists conduct their work. The method is to be used mainly to store the results of model runs that need to be preserved for auditing purposes or for display to the NDMAS web portal. This interim report demonstrates the currently development of NDMAS for Methods data and discusses data and its qualification that is currently part of NDMAS.

  6. Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and 2020 Cost Targets Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and ...

  7. Design review report FFTF interim storage cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, P.L.

    1995-01-03

    Final Design Review Report for the FFTF Interim Storage Cask. The Interim Storage Cask (ISC) will be used for long term above ground dry storage of FFTF irradiated fuel in Core Component Containers (CCC)s. The CCC has been designed and will house assemblies that have been sodium washed in the IEM Cell. The Solid Waste Cask (SWC) will transfer a full CCC from the IEM Cell to the RSB Cask Loading Station where the ISC will be located to receive it. Once the loaded ISC has been sealed at the RSB Cask Loading Station, it will be transferred by facility crane to the DSWC Transporter. After the ISC has been transferred to the Interim Storage Area (ISA), which is yet to be designed, a mobile crane will be used to place the ISC in its final storage location.

  8. Guidance For Preparatioon of Basis For Interim Operation (BIO) Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3011-2002 December 2002 Superceding DOE-STD-3011-94 November 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF BASIS FOR INTERIM OPERATION (BIO) DOCUMENTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3011-2002 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S.

  9. Interim Ventilation System Tie-in Completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2016 Interim Ventilation System Tie-in Completed Early this week sub-contractors at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) completed the "tie in" of the new interim ventilation system (IVS) to the ductwork for the existing underground ventilation system. Following a series of operational tests, the IVS is expected to increase airflow in the WIPP underground by approximately 54,000 cubic feet per minute. The tie-in operation consisted of removal of sections of the existing ductwork

  10. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  11. Effectiveness of interim remedial actions at a radioactive waste facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Seay, W.M.; McNamee, E.; USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN; Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Over the past eight years, several interim remedial actions have been taken at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), primarily to reduce radon and gamma radiation exposures and to consolidate radioactive waste into a waste containment facility. Interim remedial actions have included capping of vents, sealing of pipes, relocation of the perimeter fence (to limit radon risk), transfer and consolidation of waste, upgrading of storage buildings, construction of a clay cutoff wall (to limit the potential groundwater transport of contaminants), treatment and release of contaminated water, interim use of a synthetic liner, and emplacement of an interim clay cap. An interim waste containment facility was completed in 1986. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  12. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  13. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  14. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  15. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  17. Expedited approach to a carbon tetrachloride spill interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowdery, C.; Primrose, A.; Uhland, J.; Castaneda, N.

    1998-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation was selected as an interim measure for a carbon tetrachloride spill site where source removal or in situ treatment cannot currently be implemented due to the surrounding infrastructure. Rather than delay action until the site is more accessible to an interim action, this more expedited approach would support a final action. Individual Hazard Substance Site (IHSS) 118.1 is a former underground storage tank at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) that stored carbon tetrachloride for process use. Inadvertent releases associated with filling and failure of the tank system resulted in an accumulation of carbon tetrachloride in a bedrock depression around a group of former process waste tanks. Access to the source of contamination is obstructed by numerous utilities, the process waste tanks, and other components of the site infrastructure that limit the ability to conduct an effective remedial action. A preremedial field investigation was conducted in September 1997 to identify and delineate the extent of the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. Data collected from the investigation revealed that natural processes might be limiting the migration of contaminants from the source area.

  18. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Corrective Action Complete is demonstrated by one of the following: Eliminate Exposure (11 SMAs, 16 Sites) SMA SITE Submittal Date Document 2M-SMA-2.2 03-003(k) September...

  19. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition of Certain Plutonium Materials Stored at the Savannah River Site For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination (880.28 KB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination EIS-0283-S2: Second Amended Notice of Intent

  20. Now Available: Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Report (February 2015) | Department of Energy Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim Evaluation Report (February 2015) Now Available: Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim Evaluation Report (February 2015) March 20, 2015 - 2:17pm Addthis An interim evaluation report summarizing results from the first year of Lakeland Electric's two-year 3-Period Time of Use (TOU) program called "Shift-to-Save" (STS) is now available. The study is part of

  1. Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim (Year 1) Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report (February 2015) | Department of Energy Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim (Year 1) Evaluation Report (February 2015) Lakeland Electric SGIG Consumer Behavior Study Interim (Year 1) Evaluation Report (February 2015) This interim evaluation report summarizes results from the first year of Lakeland Electric's two-year 3-Period Time of Use (TOU) program called "Shift-to-Save" (STS). Lakeland Electric has undertaken this study as part of a full system-wide

  2. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). One of the radionuclides emitted that would affect the radiation dose was iodine-131. This report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  3. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NRDC's comments on Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential ...

  4. Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document displays the interim final rule and request for comments for Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and ...

  5. EIS-0283-S2: Amended Interim Action Determination | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plutonium Materials from the Department of Energy Standard 3013 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (Amending Interim Action Determination of 12082008) DOE is ...

  6. T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers.

  7. Letter on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Letter on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the ...

  8. Soil remediation interim measures/interim remedial action (IM/IRA) for Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulgar, L.; Law, J.; Buddy, M.

    1994-12-31

    The accelerated Cleanup Program for Rocky Flats Plant includes a number of subprograms which are being implemented to expedite remediation at the facility. One of these is the Soil Remediation IM/IRA. This paper discusses the objectives, scope, and approach for the Soil Remediation IM/IRA program. The major features of this program are addressed, along with a discussion of its potential benefits relative to the conventional RCRA/CERCLA remediation process. The paper also provides information on the problems encountered and decisions made during the planning and development of this program, its current status, and future plans.

  9. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAY TH

    2008-08-12

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

  10. Technical bases for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    The experience base for water storage of spent nuclear fuel has evolved since 1943. The technology base includes licensing documentation, standards, technology studies, pool operator experience, and documentation from public hearings. That base reflects a technology which is largely successful and mundane. It projects probable satisfactory water storage of spent water reactor fuel for several decades. Interim dry storage of spent water reactor fuel is not yet licensed in the US, but a data base and documentation have developed. There do not appear to be technological barriers to interim dry storage, based on demonstrations with irradiated fuel. Water storage will continue to be a part of spent fuel management at reactors. Whether dry storage becomes a prominent interim fuel management option depends on licensing and economic considerations. National policies will strongly influence how long the spent fuel remains in interim storage and what its final disposition will be.

  11. Probabilistic Performance Assessment: SCC of SNF Interim Storage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Probabilistic Performance Assessment: SCC of SNF Interim Storage Canisters C. Bryan1, C. ... Effect of Initial Heat Load Two alternative cases run, with 4 kW and 10 kW heat ...

  12. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  13. Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R. L.; Alleman, T. L.; Waynick, J. A.; Westbrook, S. R.; Porter, S.

    2006-04-01

    This is an interim report for a study of biodiesel oxidative stability. It describes characterization and accelerated stability test results for 19 B100 samples and six diesel fuels.

  14. Interim report on long range plan for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The interim report on the updated NSAC Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics will be presented to the community for discussion and comment before submission to the funding agencies. The presentation will be coordinated by E. Moniz chair of NSAC.

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... SIS Safe Interim Storage SO2 Sulfur dioxide SR State ... East Area using the same methods described for the ... the 200 East Area thereby reducing the likelihood of waste ...

  16. VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) Details hydrogen fuel cell buses being evaluated in service at AC Transit. Presented at the APTA Bus and Paratransit Conference in Anaheim, California, April 30 through May 3, 2006. 40012.pdf (412.92 KB) More Documents & Publications Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell

  17. Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2000-09-07

    This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

  18. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  19. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado

  20. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) | Department of Energy Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy, using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the electric power industry have jointly

  1. DOE Interim Guidance on Mercury Management Procedures and Standards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Services » Waste Management » Waste Disposition » Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury is in the Planning Stages » DOE Interim Guidance on Mercury Management Procedures and Standards DOE Interim Guidance on Mercury Management Procedures and Standards DOE, in consultation with the USEPA and State agencies, prepared this guidance on packaging, transportation, receipt, management, and long-term storage of elemental mercury at a DOE facility or

  2. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  3. Interim Basis for PCB Sampling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    2001-03-20

    This document was developed as an interim basis for sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and will be used until a formal data quality objective (DQO) document is prepared and approved. On August 31, 2000, the Framework Agreement for Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Hanford Tank Waste was signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) (Ecology et al. 2000). This agreement outlines the management of double shell tank (DST) waste as Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) PCB remediation waste based on a risk-based disposal approval option per Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations 761.61 (c). The agreement calls for ''Quantification of PCBs in DSTs, single shell tanks (SSTs), and incoming waste to ensure that the vitrification plant and other ancillary facilities PCB waste acceptance limits and the requirements of the anticipated risk-based disposal approval are met.'' Waste samples will be analyzed for PCBs to satisfy this requirement. This document describes the DQO process undertaken to assure appropriate data will be collected to support management of PCBs and is presented in a DQO format. The DQO process was implemented in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA QA/G4, Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994) and the Data Quality Objectives for Sampling and Analyses, HNF-IP-0842, Rev. 1A, Vol. IV, Section 4.16 (Banning 1999).

  4. Interim Basis for PCB Sampling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    2001-01-18

    This document was developed as an interim basis for sampling and analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and will be used until a formal data quality objective (DQO) document is prepared and approved. On August 31, 2000, the Framework Agreement for Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Hanford Tank Waste was signed by the US. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) (Ecology et al. 2000). This agreement outlines the management of double shell tank (DST) waste as Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) PCB remediation waste based on a risk-based disposal approval option per Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations 761.61 (c). The agreement calls for ''Quantification of PCBs in DSTs, single shell tanks (SSTs), and incoming waste to ensure that the vitrification plant and other ancillary facilities PCB waste acceptance limits and the requirements of the anticipated risk-based disposal approval are met.'' Waste samples will be analyzed for PCBs to satisfy this requirement. This document describes the DQO process undertaken to assure appropriate data will be collected to support management of PCBs and is presented in a DQO format. The DQO process was implemented in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA QAlG4, Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994) and the Data Quality Objectives for Sampling and Analyses, HNF-IP-0842, Rev. 1 A, Vol. IV, Section 4.16 (Banning 1999).

  5. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  6. CERCLA interim action at the Par Pond unit: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, H.M.; Matthews, S.S.; Neal, L.W.; Weiss, W.R.

    1993-11-01

    The Par Pond unit designated under CERCLA consists of sediments within a Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling water reservoir. The sediments are contaminated with radionuclides and nonradioactive constituents from nuclear production reactor operations. The mercury in Par Pond is believed to have originated from the Savannah River. Because of Par Pond Dam safety Issues, the water level of the reservoir was drawn down, exposing more than 1300 acres of contaminated sediments and triggering the need for CERCLA interim remedial action. This paper presents the interim action approach taken with Par Pond as a case study. The approach considered the complexity of the Par Pond ecosystem, the large size of Par Pond, the volume of contaminated sediments, and the institutional controls existing at SRS. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers units with large volumes of low-concentration wastes, as is the case with Par Pond, to be {open_quotes}special sites.{close_quotes} Accordingly, EPA guidance establishes that the range of alternatives developed focus primarily on containment options and other remedial approaches that mitigate potential risks associated with the {open_quotes}special site.{close_quotes} The remedial alternatives, according to EPA, are not to be prohibitively expensive or difficult to implement. This case study also is representative of the types of issues that will need to be addressed within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex as nuclear facilities are transitioned to inactive status and corrective/remedial actions are warranted.

  7. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  8. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Topic: Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test. Chromium Update - March...

  9. Northeast Site Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Interim Measures Progress...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 Figure 3. Energy Balance......7 Figure 7. Treatment System Process Flow Diagram ... sent from there to the LNAPL and DNAPL waste storage tanks. ...

  10. Chromium Interim Measures Project and Ongoing Plume Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the March 12, 2015 Committee meeting Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Ongoing Characterization of the Chromium Plume in Mortandad Canyon and the Pump and Treat Pilot Test.

  11. Wayne Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Wayne, New Jersey. [Wayne Interim Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the envirormental monitoring program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of WISS and surrounding area began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. WISS is a National Priorities List site. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  12. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Hazelwood, Missouri. [Hazelwood Interim Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at HISS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment.

  13. Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-04-23

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

  14. NEXT GENERATION MELTER OPTIONEERING STUDY - INTERIM REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; RAMSEY G; LOMAX J; ALLEN H

    2010-10-19

    The next generation melter (NOM) development program includes a down selection process to aid in determining the recommended vitrification technology to implement into the WTP at the first melter change-out which is scheduled for 2025. This optioneering study presents a structured value engineering process to establish and assess evaluation criteria that will be incorporated into the down selection process. This process establishes an evaluation framework that will be used progressively throughout the NGM program, and as such this interim report will be updated on a regular basis. The workshop objectives were achieved. In particular: (1) Consensus was reached with stakeholders and technology providers represented at the workshop regarding the need for a decision making process and the application of the D{sub 2}0 process to NGM option evaluation. (2) A framework was established for applying the decision making process to technology development and evaluation between 2010 and 2013. (3) The criteria for the initial evaluation in 2011 were refined and agreed with stakeholders and technology providers. (4) The technology providers have the guidance required to produce data/information to support the next phase of the evaluation process. In some cases it may be necessary to reflect the data/information requirements and overall approach to the evaluation of technology options against specific criteria within updated Statements of Work for 2010-2011. Access to the WTP engineering data has been identified as being very important for option development and evaluation due to the interface issues for the NGM and surrounding plant. WRPS efforts are ongoing to establish precisely data that is required and how to resolve this Issue. It is intended to apply a similarly structured decision making process to the development and evaluation of LAW NGM options.

  15. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RW-0596 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear ... D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent ...

  16. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar

  17. ATVM Loan Program Interim Final Rule (November 12, 2008) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Loan Program Interim Final Rule (November 12, 2008) ATVM Loan Program Interim Final Rule (November 12, 2008) Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program ATVM Loan Program Interim Final Rule (130.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Automotive Trade Policy Council: Proposed Interim Final Rule Updated Guidance For Applicants To Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program ATVM Guidance for Applicants 11.4.14

  18. ANALYSIS OF DOSE RATES DURING REPLACEMENT OF MANIPULATORS IN THE FFTF INTERIM EXAMINATION & MAINTENANCE (IEM) CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSON, J.V.

    2002-01-23

    Replacement of a master-slave manipulator in the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility was carried out in August 2001. This operation created a 178-mm opening in the thick concrete wall of the hot cell. To aid in radiological work planning, dose rates outside the penetration in the wall were predicted using MCNP{trademark} photon transport calculations. The predicted dose rate was 7.7 mrem/h, which was reasonably close to the value of 10.4 mrem/h inferred from measurements.

  19. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-03-27

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities

  20. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  1. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under

  2. Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies | Department of Energy Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies June 26, 2015 - 5:30pm Addthis Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy, using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the electric power

  3. RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task No. FC05.9400 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

  4. Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental

  5. Status of Corrective Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP AIB Report Status of Corrective Actions Status of Corrective Actions at LANL Department of Energy Issues Accident Investigation Board (AIB) Report on February 14 Incident ...

  6. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2011-08-01

    Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim fiscal year (FY) 2011 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under the Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA)-1 guidelines and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from seven test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault, including tensile tests, creep tests, and cyclic tests. Of the 5,603,682 records currently in the vault, 4,480,444 have been capture passed, and capture testing is in process for the remaining 1,123,238.

  7. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits:Interim CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Delphi Groupe, Inc., and J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2011-06-20

    This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. Construction was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) under the Approval of Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, on January 6, 2011, pursuant to Subpart XII.8a of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The project is located in Area 5 of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, located in southern Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. The project site, in Area 5, is located in a topographically closed basin approximately 14 additional miles north of Mercury Nevada, in the north-central part of Frenchman Flat. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location

  8. Single Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VLADIMIROFF, D.T.; BOYLES, V.C.

    2000-05-22

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  9. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  10. System Specification for Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-12-27

    This specification establishes the system-level functional, performance, design, interface, and test requirements for Phase 1 of the IHLW Interim Storage System, located at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The IHLW canisters will be produced at the Hanford Site by a Selected DOE contractor. Subsequent to storage the canisters will be shipped to a federal geologic repository.

  11. Corrective Actions Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Cleanup » Corrective Actions Corrective Actions Process The general process for evaluating and remediating potential release sites is called the corrective action process. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Corrective actions The Laboratory's corrective actions process refers to the way in which the Laboratory investigates, stabilizes,

  12. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford

  13. Maywood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Maywood, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1984, was continued in 1989 at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the Borough of Maywood and the Township of Rochelle Park, New Jersey. MISS is currently used for storage of soils contaminated with low-level radioactivity. MISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials are present. The monitoring program at MISS measures thoron and radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and thorium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. The radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual to verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effects on public health. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) during calendar year 1989. Environmental monitoring began at MISS in 1984. 19 refs., 23 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. First interim examination of defected BWR and PWR rods tested in unlimited air at 229/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Cook, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year whole rod test was initiated to investigate the long-term stability of spent fuel rods under a variety of possible dry storage conditions. Both PWR and BWR rods were included in the test. The first interim examination was conducted after three months of testing to determine if there was any degradation in those defected rods stored in an unlimited air atmosphere. Visual observations, diametral measurements and radiographic smears were used to assess the degree of cladding deformation and particulate dispersal. The PWR rod showed no measurable change from the pre-test condition. The two original artificial defects had not changed in appearance and there was no diametral growth of the cladding. One of the defects in BWR rod showed significant deformation. There was approximately 10% cladding strain at the defect site and a small axial crack had formed. The fuel in the defect did not appear to be friable. The second defect showed no visible change and no cladding strain. Following examination, the test was continued at 230/sup 0/C. Another interim examination is planned during the summer of 1983. This paper discusses the details and meaning of the data from the first interim examination.

  15. Small fields output factors measurements and correction factors determination for several detectors for a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} and linear accelerators equipped with microMLC and circular cones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Baumann, M.; Trompier, F.; Roch, P.; Clairand, I.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire-Josset, S.; Chea, M.; Boisserie, G.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The use of small photon fields is now an established practice in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. However, due to a lack of lateral electron equilibrium and high dose gradients, it is difficult to accurately measure the dosimetric quantities required for the commissioning of such systems. Moreover, there is still no metrological dosimetric reference for this kind of beam today. In this context, the first objective of this work was to determine and to compare small fields output factors (OF) measured with different types of active detectors and passive dosimeters for three types of facilities: a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} system, a dedicated medical linear accelerator (Novalis) equipped with m3 microMLC and circular cones, and an adaptive medical linear accelerator (Clinac 2100) equipped with an additional m3 microMLC. The second one was to determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors introduced in a recently proposed small field dosimetry formalism for different active detectors.Methods: Small field sizes were defined either by microMLC down to 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 mm{sup 2} or by circular cones down to 4 mm in diameter. OF measurements were performed with several commercially available active detectors dedicated to measurements in small fields (high resolution diodes: IBA SFD, Sun Nuclear EDGE, PTW 60016, PTW 60017; ionizing chambers: PTW 31014 PinPoint chamber, PTW 31018 microLion liquid chamber, and PTW 60003 natural diamond). Two types of passive dosimeters were used: LiF microcubes and EBT2 radiochromic films.Results: Significant differences between the results obtained by several dosimetric systems were observed, particularly for the smallest field size for which the difference in the measured OF reaches more than 20%. For passive dosimeters, an excellent agreement was observed (better than 2%) between EBT2 and LiF microcubes

  16. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration--Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Strickland, Christopher E.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim barrier on the surface. Such a barrier is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. A plan has been prepared to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barrier. Soil water content and water pressure will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests were installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, four heat-dissipation units, and a drain gauge to measure soil water flux. A meteorological station has been installed outside of the fence. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests are planned to be installed beneath the proposed barrier.

  17. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY08 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2009-02-01

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The surface barrier is designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the contaminated soil zone created by the Tank T-106 leak and minimize movement of the contamination. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier.

  18. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  19. Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-10-22

    The purpose of this document is to list the Interim Stabilization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential or Support drawings. Essential Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment. Support Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems or components shown on essential drawings.

  20. Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam (Naperville, IL); Galvin, Thomas M. (Darien, IL)

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

  1. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-17

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste.

  2. DOE Names Interim Manager for Idaho Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy NNSA Site Facility Management Contracts - June 2016 DOE NNSA Site Facility Management Contracts - June 2016 DOE NNSA Site Facility Management Contracts - June 2016.pdf (58.05 KB) More Documents & Publications DOEfacilitymgt_contractsownership_01052011.pdf Chapter 1 - Acquisition Regulations System Class Patent Waiver W(C)2008-001

    DOE Names Interim Manager for Idaho Operations Office Dennis Miotla, the Office of Nuclear Energy's Deputy Assistant Secretary Dennis Miotla for

  3. Report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The report on interim storage of spent nuclear fuel discusses the technical, regulatory, and economic aspects of spent-fuel storage at nuclear reactors. The report is intended to provide legislators state officials and citizens in the Midwest with information on spent-fuel inventories, current and projected additional storage requirements, licensing, storage technologies, and actions taken by various utilities in the Midwest to augment their capacity to store spent nuclear fuel on site.

  4. 105-H Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.G. Ison

    2008-11-08

    The following information documents the decontamination and decommissioning of the 105-H Reactor facility, and placement of the reactor core into interim safe storage. The D&D of the facility included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and restoration of the site. The ISS work also included construction of the safe storage enclosure, which required the installation of a new roofing system, power and lighting, a remote monitoring system, and ventilation components.

  5. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decommissioned Reactors | Department of Energy Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors (229.88 KB) More Documents & Publications Information Request, "THE REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT AND THE CONGRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY ON THE

  6. Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Energy Laboratories | Department of Energy Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories This Interim Report presents the preliminary observations and recommendations gleaned from Phase I of the study by the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories (Commission). Key issues of the report focus on the

  7. Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation Interim Report of the Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation The SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation (TFNN) was established by the Secretary of Energy on December 20, 2014 to advise the Department of Energy (DOE) on future areas of emphasis for its nuclear nonproliferation activities. This interim report of the Task Force sets forth its findings and recommendations to date in five timely and important areas: (I)

  8. Definition of the base analysis case of the interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, F.M.

    1995-12-01

    The base analysis case for the ``Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment`` is defined. Also given are brief description of the sensitivity cases.

  9. Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors PDF icon Report to Congress on Plan ...

  10. Fuel cell flooding detection and correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiPierno Bosco, Andrew; Fronk, Matthew Howard

    2000-08-15

    Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

  11. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electric Drive System Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.

    2004-11-23

    Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  12. Dispersion corrections to parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorchtein, M.; Horowitz, C. J. [Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, M. J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    We consider the dispersion correction to elastic parity violating electron-proton scattering due to {gamma}Z exchange. In a recent publication, this correction was reported to be substantially larger than the previous estimates. In this paper, we study the dispersion correction in greater detail. We confirm the size of the disperion correction to be {approx}6% for the QWEAK experiment designed to measure the proton weak charge. We enumerate parameters that have to be constrained to better than relative 30% in order to keep the theoretical uncertainty for QWEAK under control.

  13. EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use of H-Canyon/HB-Line to Prepare Feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication at the Savannah River Site) During Fiscal Year 2012, DOE will initiate activities in the H-Canyon and HB-Line to support plutonium oxide production. The purpose and need for this action is to ensure sufficient early feedstock will be readily available when the MFFF begin operations. For more information on this project, see the project webpage: http://energy.gov/node/299815. Download Document EIS-0283-S2: Interim Action

  14. Interim Guidance on DOE Personal Property Foreign Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The attached Acquisition Letter provides interim direction and procedural guidance to DOE and NNSA on proper protocol for personal property transactions executed with foreign entities, to include property title transfers, loans and abandonments and pertains to personal property in the hand of the Federal government, contractor or a third party. Direction and guidance is specific to accountable personal property, as defined in DOE Order 580.1. Guidance in this Acquisition Letter shall be followed until DOE Order 580.1 is updated to include foreign transactions.

  15. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2015 Interim Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Interim Work Plan Adopted by consensus September 5, 2014; comments from October committee discussions 1 Proposed additions from October TWC and RAP committee discussions in RED Topic Quarter 1 10/ 2014 - 12/2014 Quarter 2 01/2015- 03/2015 Quarter 3 04/2015 - 06/2015 Quarter 4 07/2015 - 09 2015 Committee Assignment (lead in Bold) Deferred Maintenance Plan Agency Lead: Kyle Rankin, DOE-RL Chief Engineer Action: Policy discussion Potential HAB Action: _____ Context: The status of structures on

  16. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  17. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  18. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.

  19. Guidance Regarding Actions That May Proceed During the NEPA Process: Interim Actions (DOE, 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE guidance to provide assistance in determining whether an action within the scope of an EIS may be taken before a record of decision is issued. The guidance reviews applicable requirements, gives examples of the types of actions that may proceed as interim actions, describes case studies, and outlines the steps in the EIS process for interim actions.

  20. Machine plumbness criteria: Interim technology release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The objective of this technology release is to define the maximum allowable deviation from plumb of the centrifuge machine and to recommend machine installation techniques to achieve the specified criteria. The centrifuge feature used as a reference for plumbness is the casing centerline as defined by a line drawn between the theoretical centers of the top and bottom flange faces. In practice, this measurement is accomplished by using specified casing flange diameters or bolt patterns as the reference points. The criterion adopted for GCEP is that each machine shall be plumb within 0.5 in. over the length of the casing as initially installed. Over a long period of time the plumbness is allowed to degrade to 1.0 in. This standard should be achievable using the currently planned installation techniques and within a time limit consistent with GCEP operational objectives. For development testing, centrifuge machines are meticulously adjusted using a plumb bob to achieve a plumbness with 1/8 in. About one to two days are required to complete the installation. This level of effort is justified for a development machine especially where baseline data is being gathered. A more reasonable standard with a corresponding reduction in installation time is required for GCEP. The specified criteria of 0.5 in. maximum out-of-plumb at time of installation and 1.0 in., ultimate, are believed to be a reasonable compromise. Machine design features or operating modes that are dependent on vertical alignment were examined to assess the impact of the selected plumbness criteria. Machine performance and design requirements are defined in the applicable technology release documents.

  1. Interim Storage of Plutonium in Existing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmall, T.D.

    1999-05-10

    'In this era of nuclear weapons disarmament and nonproliferation treaties, among many problems being faced by the Department of Energy is the safe disposal of plutonium. There is a large stockpile of plutonium at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Center and it remains politically and environmentally strategic to relocate the inventory closer to a processing facility. Savannah River Site has been chosen as the final storage location, and the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF) is currently under construction for this purpose. With the ability of APSF to receive Rocky Flats material an estimated ten years away, DOE has decided to use the existing reactor building in K-Area of SRS as temporary storage to accelerate the removal of plutonium from Rocky Flats. There are enormous cost savings to the government that serve as incentive to start this removal as soon as possible, and the KAMS project is scheduled to receive the first shipment of plutonium in January 2000. The reactor building in K-Area was chosen for its hardened structure and upgraded seismic qualification, both resulting from an effort to restart the reactor in 1991. The KAMS project has faced unique challenges from Authorization Basis and Safety Analysis perspectives. Although modifying a reactor building from a production facility to a storage shelter is not technically difficult, the nature of plutonium has caused design and safety analysis engineers to make certain that the design of systems, structures and components included will protect the public, SRS workers, and the environment. A basic overview of the KAMS project follows. Plutonium will be measured and loaded into DOT Type-B shipping packages at Rocky Flats. The packages are 35-gallon stainless steel drums with multiple internal containment boundaries. DOE transportation vehicles will be used to ship the drums to the KAMS facility at SRS. They will then be unloaded, stacked and stored in specific locations throughout the

  2. Status of Corrective Actions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report on February 14 Incident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project in Carlsbad, New Mexico April 12, 2012 x x Contact Communication Office (505) 667-7000 Corrective Actions...

  3. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable ClassroomField Study Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Hotchi,Toshifumi; Spears,Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2005-09-01

    The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This report presents an interim status update and preliminary findings from energy and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) measurements in sixteen relocatable classrooms in California. The field study includes measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions. Ten of the classrooms were equipped with a new HVAC technology and six control classrooms were equipped with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters have been monitored continuously, while unoccupied acoustic measurements were measured in one of four planned seasonal measurement campaigns. Continuously monitored data are remotely accessed via a LonWorks{reg_sign} network and stored in a relational database at LBNL. Preliminary results are presented here.

  4. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Environmental Assessment and Corrective Measures Study Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2.1 PHYSIOGRAPHY AND SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY ......20 2.2 GEOLOGY AND ... Facility Investigation RWQCB Regional Water Quality Control Board SVE Soil Vapor ...

  6. Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomauske, B. R.

    2003-02-25

    The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005.

  7. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  8. Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 70275,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 CFR Part 433, 434, and 435, December 4, 2006 | Department of Energy Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 70275, 10 CFR Part 433, 434, and 435, December 4, 2006 Interim Final Rule and Request for Comments, Federal Register, 71 FR 70275, 10 CFR Part 433, 434, and 435, December 4, 2006 Document displays the interim final rule and request for comments for Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings

  9. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  10. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David G.

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  11. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  12. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  13. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-04-01

    Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

  14. Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, W.W.

    1998-03-02

    This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

  15. Sample results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 9 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H.

  16. N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has completed placing N Reactor in interim safe storage, a process also known as “cocooning.”

  17. DQO Summary Report for 105-N/109-N Interim Safe Storage Project Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Lee

    2005-09-15

    The DQO summary report provides the results of the DQO process completed for waste characterization activities for the 105-N/109-N Reactor Interim Safe Storage Project including decommission, deactivate, decontaminate, and demolish activities for six associated buildings.

  18. Request for Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality | Department of Energy Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Request for Rehearing and Request for Interim Clarification by David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Federal Power Act § 313, David K. Paylor, Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary-1995.html[6/27/2011 12:58:00 PM] FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES SUMMARY The Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared according to requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act. In accordance with these Acts, a Draft Environmental Impact Statement was issued on August 5, 1994, (DOE 1994) and it was revised in response to public,

  20. New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole

  1. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings | Department of Energy NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise

  2. Interim Report of the Task Force on DOE National Laboratories | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Interim Report of the Task Force on DOE National Laboratories Interim Report of the Task Force on DOE National Laboratories The SEAB Task Force on DOE National Laboratories was established by the Secretary of Energy on June 16, 2014, to provide advice, guidance, and recommendations on important issues related to improving the health and management of the labs. The Task Force has been charged to review past studies, Congressional reports and direction, and Departmental deliberations

  3. Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 15 3.0 Underground Test Area............ 13 3-1 Underground Test Area Corrective Action ...

  4. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Hazelwood, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, begun in 1984, was continued during 1989 at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the City of Hazelwood, Missouri. HISS is currently used for storage of soils contaminated with residual radioactive material. HISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive material remains from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The monitoring program at HISS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring conducted at HISS during calendar year 1989. 19 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  5. Environmental surveillance results for 1995 for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCague, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    This memorandum presents and interprets analytical results and measurements obtained as part of the 1995 environmental surveillance program for the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The discussion provides a comparative analysis of average historical background conditions and applicable regulatory criteria to the 1995 results reported for external gamma radiation and for samples from the media investigated (air, surface water, sediment, groundwater, and stormwater). Results from the 1995 environmental surveillance program at HISS indicate that, with the exception of thorium-230 in streambed sediment, applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines were not exceeded for any measured parameter or for any dose calculated for potentially exposed members of the general public. In the absence of sediment guidelines, DOE soil guidelines serve as a standard of comparison for data obtained from stream bed sediment; two samples from downstream locations contained concentrations of thorium-230 that exceeded DOE soil guidelines. All stormwater sample results were in compliance with permit-specified limits. Other radioactive materials include radium 226 and natural uranium.

  6. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J.

    1997-10-01

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  7. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  8. Finding of no significant impact. Consolidation and interim storage of special nuclear material at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA -- 1060, for the consolidation, processing, and interim storage of Category I and II special nuclear material (SNM) in Building 371 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (hereinafter referred to as Rocky Flats or Site), Golden, Colorado. The scope of the EA included alternatives for interim storage including the no action alternative, the construction of a new facility for interim storage at Rocky Flats, and shipment to other DOE facilities for interim storage.

  9. Safe Advantage on Dry Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanato, L.S.

    2008-07-01

    This paper aims to present the advantages of dry cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (cooling water pools) for SNF. When the nuclear fuel is removed from the core reactor, it is moved to a storage unit and it wait for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside water pools within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. After some period of time in pools, SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing facilities, or still, wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet facilities, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. Interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively wet and if the nuclear facility had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry facilities. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer then wet one. Casks, either concrete or metallic, are safer, especially on occurrence of earthquakes, like that occurred at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, in Japan on July 16, 2007. (authors)

  10. Process safety management and interim or remedial action plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, M.J.; Henney, D.A.; Heitzman, V.K. [HWS Consulting Group, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Day, D.W. [Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Remedial Actions, including Interim Remedial Activities, often require the use of treatment facilities or stabilization techniques using on-site chemical processes. As such, the 29 CFR 1910.119 Process Safety Management (PSM) of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (PSM Standard) and the USEPA regulations for Risk Management Planning require that these chemicals and their attendant potential hazards be identified. A Hazard and Operation (HAZOP) study, Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis, or equivalent graphic presentation of processes must be completed. These studies form a segment of the Process Hazard Analysis (PHA). HAZOP addresses each system and each element of a system that could deviate from normal operations and thus cause a hazard. A full assessment of each process is produced by looking at the hazards, consequences, causes and personnel protection needed. Many variables must be considered when choosing the appropriate PHA technique including the size of the plant, the number of processes, the types of processes, and the types of chemicals used. A mixture of these techniques may be required to adequately transmit information about the process being evaluated.

  11. Uranium exploration of the Colorado Plateau: interim staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This report is an issue of the original draft copy of the Interim Staff Report on Uranium Exploration on the Colorado Plateau, dated June 1951. The original draft copy was only recently located and is being published at this time because of the interest in the contained historical content. The table of contents of this report lists: history of uranium mining; geology; proposed program for the geologic investigations section; general activities of industry and government; and future exploration of sedimentary uranium deposits and anticipated results. Under the proposed program section are: future of the copper-uranium deposits as a source of uranium; uraniferous asphaltite deposits; and commission exploration and future possibilities. The section on general activities of industry and government includes: exploratory and development drilling; field investigations and mapping; early geologic investigations and investigations by the US geological survey; and geophysical exploration. Tables are also presented on: uranium production by districts; US Geological survey drilling statistics; Colorado Exploration Branch drilling statistics; summary of drilling projects; and comparative yearly core-drill statistics on the Colorado Plateau.

  12. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Hazelwood, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation`s atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at HISS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment.

  13. Hazelwood interim storage site: Annual site environmental report, Hazelwood, Missouri, Calendar Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The monitoring program at Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium, concentrations in surface water, groundwater and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect or public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual at HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. This exposure is less than the exposure a person receives during a flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of HISS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. The results of 1988 monitoring show that HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 15 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  15. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux "invited... a... W. X. Ding, D. L. Brower, and T. Y. Yates Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA ͑Presented 13 May 2008; received 12 May 2008; accepted 16 May 2008; published online 31 October 2008͒ Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial

  16. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  17. Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

    1989-07-01

    Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  19. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production by Michael Joseph Wilking B.Ch.E., University of Minnesota, 2001 M.S., University of Colorado, 2007 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Colorado in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Physics 2009 This thesis entitled: Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production written by Michael Joseph Wilking has been

  20. Immobilized High Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report 2nd Generation Implementing Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-09-14

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document.

  1. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site: Annual site environment report, Calendar year 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) is presently used for the storage of low-level radioactively contaminated soils. Monitoring results show that the HISS is in compliance with DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) and radiation protection standards. During 1985, annual average radon concentrations ranged from 10 to 23% of the DCG. The highest external dose rate at the HISS was 287 mrem/yr. The measured background dose rate for the HISS area is 99 mrem/yr. The highest average annual concentration of uranium in surface water monitored in the vicinity of the HISS was 0.7% of the DOE DCG; for /sup 226/Ra it was 0.3% of the applicable DCG, and for /sup 230/Th it was 1.7%. In groundwater, the highest annual average concentration of uranium was 12% of the DCG; for /sup 226/Ra it was 3.6% of the applicable DCG, and for /sup 230/Th it was 1.8%. While there are no concentration guides for stream sediments, the highest concentration of total uranium was 19 pCi/g, the highest concentration of /sup 226/Ra was 4 pCi/g, and the highest concentration of /sup 230/Th was 300 pCi/g. Radon concentrations, external gamma dose rates, and radionuclide concentrations in groundwater at the site were lower than those measured in 1984; radionuclide concentrations in surface water were roughly equivalent to 1984 levels. For sediments, a meaningful comparison with 1984 concentrations cannot be made since samples were obtained at only two locations and were only analyzed for /sup 230/Th. The calculated radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual at the HISS, considering several exposure pathways, was 5.4 mrem, which is 5% of the radiation protection standard.

  2. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    core velocity fluctuations and the dynamo in a reversed-field pinch * D. J. Den Hartog, †,a) J. T. Chapman, b) D. Craig, G. Fiksel, P. W. Fontana, S. C. Prager, and J. S. Sarff Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 16 November 1998; accepted 20 January 1999͒ Plasma flow velocity fluctuations have been directly measured in the high-temperature magnetically confined plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus ͑MST͒

  3. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ cross section by Ryan P. Fitzgerald A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2005 Approved: A. E. Champagne, Advisor J. C. Blackmon, Reader C. Iliadis, Reader ABSTRACT Ryan P. Fitzgerald: Measurement of the 1 H( 7 Be, 8 B)γ cross section (Under the Direction of A. E. Champagne) The fusion

  4. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interpretation of micro benchmark and application energy use on the Cray XC30 Brian Austin, and Nicholas J. Wright ⇤ August 29, 2014 Abstract Understanding patterns of application energy use is key to reaching future HPC e ciency goals. We have measured the sensitivity of en- ergy use to CPU frequency for several microbenchmarks and applications on a Cray XC30. First order fits to the performance and power data are su cient to describe the energy used by these applications. Exam- ination of

  5. Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronegative Contaminants and Drift Electron Lifetime in the MicroBooNE Experiment The MicroBooNE Collaboration May 19, 2016 Abstract High-purity liquid argon is critical for the operation of a liquid argon time projec- tion chamber (LArTPC). At MicroBooNE, we have achieved an electron drift lifetime of at least 6 ms without evacuation of the detector vessel. Measurements of the elec- tronegative contaminants oxygen and water are described and shown as the gas and liquid argon stages of

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Number Title Page 1-1 Process Flow Diagram for Underground Test Area Corrective Action ... NPDES National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System NTS Nevada Test Site pdf Probability ...

  7. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report: Calendar year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the City of Hazelwood, Missouri. Originally known as the Cotter Corporation site on Latty Avenue in Hazelwood, the HISS is presently used for the storage of soils contaminated with residual radioactive material. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action and environmental monitoring program are being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National, Inc., Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The monitoring program at the HISS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual at the HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 2% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the HISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 11 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electic Drive System Interim Report - Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.; Hsu, J.S.; Marlino, L.D.; Miller, C.W.; Ott, G.W., Jr.; Oland, C.B.; Burress, T.A.

    2007-07-31

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Both of these motive power sources are capable of providing mechanical drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak power output of 50 kW at 1300 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department

  10. Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-11

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  11. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

  12. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-08-24

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life.

  13. Barometric and Earth Tide Correction

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-10

    BETCO corrects for barometric and earth tide effects in long-term water level records. A regression deconvolution method is used ot solve a series of linear equations to determine an impulse response function for the well pressure head. Using the response function, a pressure head correction is calculated and applied.

  14. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  15. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2010-01-01

    DOEs Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i

  16. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  17. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Weed, John W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  18. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of 11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  19. Entropic corrections to Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendi, S. H. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, A. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175-132, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Considering the general quantum corrections to the area law of black hole entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity interprets as an entropic force, we derive the modified forms of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory of gravitation and Einstein field equations. As two special cases we study the logarithmic and power-law corrections to entropy and find the explicit form of the obtained modified equations.

  20. Letter on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SEAB's comments on the findings and recommendations in the interim report of the Congressionally mandated Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, chaired by T.J. Glauthier and Jared Cohon.

  1. Memorandum on the Interim Report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SEAB's comments on the findings and recommendations in the interim report of the Congressionally mandated Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories, chaired by T.J. Glauthier and Jared Cohon.

  2. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  3. Spectral and temperature correction of silicon photovoltaic solar radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalsky, J.J.; Perez, R.; Harrison, L. ); LeBaron, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Silicon photovoltaic sensors are an inexpensive alternative to standard thermopile sensors for the measurement of solar radiation. However, their temperature and spectral response render them less accurate for global horizontal irradiance and unsuitable for direct beam and diffuse horizontal irradiance unless they can be reliably corrected. A correction procedure for the rotating shadowband radiometer, which measures all three components, based on a three-way parameterization of the solar position and sky conditions is proposed. After correction, root-mean-square errors for the global and diffuse horizontal irradiance and the direct normal irradiance are about 10, 12, and 13 W/m{sup 2} in comparison with coincident, 5-minute thermopile measurements. While the numerical results are specific to the rotating shadowband instrument, the correction algorithm should apply universally.

  4. Report on the performance monitoring system for the interim waste containment at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, Lewiston, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) is an interim storage site for low-level radioactive waste, established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Lewiston, New York. The waste containment structure for encapsulating low-level radioactive waste at the NFSS has been designed to minimize infiltration of rainfall, prevent pollution of groundwater, preclude formation of leachate, and prevent radon emanation. Accurately determining the performance of the main engineered elements of the containment structure will be important in establishing confidence in the ability of the structure to retain the wastes. For this purpose, a waste containment performance monitoring system has been developed to verify that these elements are functioning as intended. The key objective of the performance monitoring system is the early detection of trends that could be indicative of weaknesses developing in the containment structure so that corrective action can be taken before the integrity of the structure is compromised. Consequently, subsurface as well as surface monitoring techniques will be used. After evaluating several types of subsurface instrumentation, it was determined that vibrating wire pressure transducers, in combination with surface monitoring techniques, would satisfactorily monitor the parameters of concern, such as water accumulation inside the containment facility, waste settlement, and shrinkage of the clay cover. Surface monitoring will consist of topographic surveys based on predetermined gridlines, walkover surveys, and aerial photography to detect vegetative stress or other changes not evident at ground level. This report details the objectives of the performance monitoring system, identifies the elements of the containment design whose performance will be monitored, describes the monitoring system recommended, and outlines the costs associated with the monitoring system. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  6. Criticality safety evaluation for long term storage of FFTF fuel in interim storage casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, R.F.

    1995-05-11

    It has been postulated that a degradation phenomenon, referred to as ``hot cell rot``, may affect irradiated FFTF mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel during dry interim storage. ``Hot cell rot`` refers to a variety of phenomena that degrade fuel pin cladding during exposure to air and inert gas environments. It is thought to be a form of caustic stress corrosion cracking or environmentally assisted cracking. Here, a criticality safety analysis was performed to address the effect of the ``hot cell rot`` phenomenon on the long term storage of irradiated FFTF fuel in core component containers. The results show that seven FFTF fuel assemblies or six Ident-69 pin containers stored in core component containers within interim storage casks will remain safely subcritical.

  7. Proposed decision document, other contamination sources, interim response action, South Tank Farm Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-23

    The South Tank Farm Plume (STFP) is listed under the 'Remediation of Other Contamination Sources' Interim Response Action (IRA) sites under the Final Technical Program Plan FY88-FY92 and the Federal Facility Agreement. The process and guidelines used to assess alternatives, produce this Proposed Decision Document, and implement this IRA are specified in and conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement. The purposes of the Proposed Decision Document for Other Contamination Sources IRAs are to: (a) state the objective of the IRA; (b) discuss Interim Response Action alternatives, if any, that were considered; (c) provide the rationale for the alternative selected; (d) present the final ARAR decision; (e) summarize the significant comments received regarding the IRA and responses to those comments; and (f) establish an IRA Deadline for completion of the IRA, if appropriate. Each of the above mentioned issues is addressed in this document.

  8. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voegele, Michael D.; Vieth, Donald

    2013-07-01

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste

  9. Microsoft Word - Interim Work Authorization Form rev 2-9.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rev. 2/9/05 * Submit original form to M. Montalvo, MS 69, promptly on completion of work. INTERIM Work Authorization Process for Activities by Non-SSRL Workers at SSRL This Work Authorization Process applies to all maintenance, repair, and installation work performed at SSRL by non-SSRL workers. All work must be initiated by a technically qualified SSRL staff person (e.g. accelerator system manager, shop manager, facilities staff member, beam line engineer, etc.) who will serve as the

  10. Microsoft Word - SEAB Lab Task Force Interim Report Final.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Secretary of Energy Task Force on DOE National Laboratories June 17, 2015 This page intentionally left blank 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This interim report of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) National Laboratory Task Force (TF) identifies the constraints on and evaluates the effectiveness of laboratory operations that impact the performance and efficiency of the DOE national laboratories. The TF stresses the overriding importance of two actions: clarifying the authorities and