National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for intercoastal tankers tankers

  1. Tanker spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book evaluates a wide variety of ways to improve tank vessel resistance to penetration during an accident and assesses alternatives for reducing outflow if the ship's hull is breached. In addition to evaluating design options, the book recommends ways to make a tanker more crash-worthy and to allow the crew to respond more effectively to an accident. newly commissioned studies on ship stability, the mechanics of groundings, and the effects of hull designs on oil outflow provide new insight into tank vessel design.

  2. Central ballast tanker design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

  3. Tanker industry progressing in cleaning up operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.

    1993-10-18

    The international tanker industry has made significant strides in improving the safety and environmental awareness of its operations in recent years. With a string of mishaps following the Exxon Valdez spill, public scrutiny focused on the tanker industry and found it lacking. The U.S. government reacted strongly with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. OPA 90 set narrow requirements for tanker construction, forced the creation of a national spill response program, and made tanker operators solely liable for spill damage. The Aegean Sea and Braer accidents around the end of last year forced the pace of European legislation. Since then global initiatives have been announced to improve design and maintenance of tankers and take steps toward eliminating substandard ships and operators. The paper discusses priorities, tanker design, the tanker fleet, OPA status, spill response, the Tampa Bay spill, spill liability, European spills, EC legislation, and the Department of Transportation inquiry.

  4. Tanker spills: Prevention by design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-12

    The study, prompted by the March 1989 grounding of the EXXON VALDEZ in Prince William Sound, Alaska, focused on how alternative tank vessel (tanker and barge) designs might influence the safety of personnel, property, and the environment, and at what cost. In selecting designs to be considered, the committee included certain operational options that might minimize the oil spilled in an accident. The study did not consider means of averting accidents, altering the form of cargo, or responding to oil spills.

  5. Elements of oil-tanker transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, A.

    1982-01-01

    Historical, economic, and statistical aspects of oil tanker transportation are discussed. In addition, oil tanker applied technology using a Hewlett-Packard 67 calculator is detailed. HP-67 programs are given in addition to theoretical formulas, references and examples need to solve the equations using any calculator. The contents include: berthing energy computation; Poisson distribution computation for estimating berth requirements; ship collision probability computation; spill risk analysis; oil spill movement computation; tanker characteristic computations; and ASTM measurement computations. (JMT)

  6. Major tanker spill off Spain under control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that a 23 sq mile oil slick along Spain's northwest coast, spreading form the wreckage of the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea, was for the most part under control as of Dec. 10, Spanish authorities reported. Various press reports put the total spill volume at 490,000 bbl, about double that leaked by the Exxon Valdez supertanker off Alaska in 1989. If initial reports of the spill volume are borne out, the Aegean Sea spill would rank at least as one of the 10 biggest tanker spills.

  7. Alaska panel urges oil tanker changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillingham, S.

    1990-02-05

    A commission assigned by the state of Alaska to investigate the Exxon Valdez oil spill says the Coast Guard's regulation of oil transportation had grown slack over the decade preceding the 11 million-gallon spill. The vigilance over tanker traffic that was established in the early days of pipeline flow had given way to complacency and neglect, says the commission's report, which calls for a revamping of the U.S. oil transportation system. The review places the blame for the spill not only on the Coast Guard but on the oil industry's thirst for profits in the 1980s and blames the state itself for not living up to its obligation to manage and protect its own waters. The report offers 59 recommendations that cover tanker construction and crew training, spill prevention, strategies for responding to spills and cleanup technologies. The panel also wants to see more stringent tanker safety standards, strengthened enforcement of the new regulations and greater penalties levied against violators. The Coast Guard expects that it will be some time before revisions in its tanker monitoring operations are in place.

  8. Saturday effects in tanker oil spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodstein, E. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper documents a [open quotes]Saturday effect[close quotes] in the timing of tanker oil spills -- certain types of spills happen much more frequently on this day than one would expect if the spills were uniformly distributed. The phenomenon is restricted to Europe and North America, and is associated with [open quotes]vessel guidance[close quotes] accidents -- groundings, collisions, and rammings. Eliminating the Saturday effect would reduce tanker oil spills by around 163,000 gallons per year. Several policy responses are considered, including a Saturday harbor tax. A lower bound for an efficient tax is estimated to be $780 for a 20 million gal cargo. 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Tanker spills Norwegian crude oil off Shetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports that crude oil was spilling last week from the U.S. owned Braer tanker after the 89,000 dwt vessel ran aground on the south end of Scotland's Shetland Islands. Workers were trying to assess the extent of damage to the tanker, shoreline, and wildlife after the January 5 accident. Braer's cargo amounted to 607,000 bbl of Norwegian oil bound for Canada. Braer loaded its cargo and sailed January 3 from Den norske stats oljeselskap AS's Mongstad, Norway, terminal with crude from Gullfaks field in the Norwegian North Sea. The $11 million shipment was destined for Ultramar Canada Inc.'s 125,000 b/d refinery at St. Romuald, Que.

  10. Monitoring system tested during LPG tanker unloading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-14

    A specially developed computer-based hazardous-materials monitoring system has been successfully field tested. The test of the portable system occurred during the unloading of 45,000 metric tons of LPG from a 740-ft tanker at the petroleum dock of a plant along the Mississippi River. The function of this system is to detect, report, alarm, and record unacceptable concentrations of hazardous vapors during marine-transfer operations.

  11. China facing revamp of outmoded crude tanker terminal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Expectations of soaring growth in China's crude oil imports has officials taking another look at the country's coastal crude oil tanker terminals. At first glance, plans to add China's coastal tanker terminal capacity would seem to slightly exceed projected needs. However, officials say, existing major terminals are already woefully underutilized. That over capacity will only worsen as plans proceed to construct a number of major new terminals to accommodate the expected surge in calls by large ocean going tankers as exports increase. The paper describes China's existing crude tanker terminals, expansion plans, the reason for terminal underutilization, and the outlook for China becoming a net crude importer by 1995.

  12. Essays on the economic analysis of oil-tanker transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanti-Akom, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three models concerning the economic analysis of the oil tanker market are considered. The first model studies the behavior of a risk-neutral tanker owner under a stochastic framework. A dynamic linear rational expectations model is used to explore the tanker owners decisions regarding his tanker fleet in response to freight rate changes. The model assumes that the tanker owner operates in a competitive tanker market, in the sense that the stochastic freight rates are exogenously given in the model. The second model investigates the economic performance of oil tanker operations. The productivity growth of the tanker industry is explored. A general index of technical change developed by Baltagi and Griffin (1988) is used to examine the rate of technical change of the US flag tankers from 1978 to 1984. The third model compares econometric techniques using panel data to estimate a system of the multivariate translog model. Specification tests are performed, and they favor the random-effect model over the fixed-effect model.

  13. Tanker owners cope with OPA, but

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-27

    This paper reports that the Petroleum Industry Research Foundation Inc. (Pirinc), New York, reports the world tanker industry is learning to live with tough provisions of the US's Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990. But serious problems lie over the horizon. In a report prepared under contract for the Department of Energy, Pirinc noted US waterborne oil imports totaled 6.5 million b/d in 1991, three fourths of which was crude oil, and are expected to rise by almost 3 million b/d by 2000.

  14. Study shows tanker spills about equal from groundings and collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports that figures compiled by International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Ltd., London, dispel the commonly held belief that tanker groundings are more significant than collisions in terms of oil pollution. During the past 21 years, the number of spills and volumes released after collisions and groundings were almost the same, the Catherine Grey, the federation's database manager. The federation the efforts to design environmentally safer tankers, such as those with double hulls, to minimize oil spills following accidents should take full account of the causes of major spills.

  15. Conversion of existing tanker to North Sea FPSO use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voorst, O. van; Baan, J. de; Loenhout, A. van; Krekel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The use of existing tankers as a permanently moored floating storage off loading (FSO) or floating production storage and off loading (FPSO) has been wide spread in the oil industry ever since tankers were used for storage. However, the application of an existing tanker for North Sea FPSO use meeting the stringent demands of the regulatory bodies and the harsh environment of the North Sea has withheld operators from using existing tankers in the North Sea. The acceptance of FPSO technology in the North Sea and the proven ability to moor a tanker with a passive mooring system in a harsh environment has opened the avenue to use existing tankers for use as an FPSO in the North Sea. This is also driven by the search for cost effective solutions for field development plans in order to make marginal fields economically exploitable. The potential reuse of an FPSO on a different location also makes the depreciation period of the FPSO vessel life related instead of field life related. Many issues related to the use of an FPSO in the North Sea are currently subject of papers at various forums. This paper, however, only addresses three crucial areas: (1) the criteria for selection of an existing tanker; (2) the use of a passive mooring system; (3) the fatigue assessment and required modifications. The paper is based on experiences gained during the engineering, design and construction phase of the UISGE GORM, the FPSO, which Bluewater will initially use for Amerada Hess Limited`s Fife Field on the UK continental shelf and confirms that the conversion of a suitable tanker to North Sea FPSO use is a technically flexible and an economically attractive solution.

  16. World tanker industry maintains momentum from Persian Gulf war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-10

    The world tanker industry has managed to maintain the momentum generated during the Persian Gulf War. Freight rates for large vessels have regained the high levels seen during the first 2 months of this year, while the expected postwar decline in use of tankers has not materialized. The health of the tanker industry is linked closely with the volume of long haul crude oil from the Middle East, a spot charter from the gulf to Europe, an owner would only break even on the cost of building and operating a new tanker to the highest environmental standards. Owners currently can expect spot rates of about $40,000/day, excellent by the standards of the late 1980s and early 1990s but still below the level needed to justify new buildings. And there are many in the industry who think $40,000/day will be just a happy memory later in the year. Owners are facing pressure for major changes in the industry. Governments and the public want better operating standards and new environmentally sound tankers to reduce the risk of oil spills. At the same time, the industry has to learn to live with repercussion in the 1990 Oil Pollution Act in the U.S., which has opened the way for unlimited liability against tanker owners involved in spills off the U.S. The search also is on for improved profits to make investments required by the changing world of seaborne oil transportation.

  17. IMO group approves enhanced design rules for tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    This paper reports on a committee of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) which has approved ship design rules aimed at reducing the risk of oil spills from tankers. The approval by IMO's maritime environment protection committee (MEPC) assures that the next generation of tankers will have double hulls or, despite reservations by the U.S., middeck or other designs that offer protection against pollution equal to that provided by double hulls. The requirement for double hull or middeck design will apply to tankers larger than 5,000 dwt. Small tankers, of 600-5,000 dwt, must be fitted with a double bottom. There are no requirements for tankers of less than 600 dwt. The enhanced design criteria will take effect July 6, 1993, for new and existing vessels from 70 nations that have signed the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (Marpol 73/78). Owners in those countries control 90% of the world tanker fleet. MEPC also tackled the problem of existing single hulled vessels. They will be able to trade until they are 25-30 years old before they will be required to meet the enhanced design criteria.

  18. Tanker mooring, storage for sub-Arctic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, K.I.; King, R.D.; Post, G.J.

    1985-11-01

    The expansion of exploration into sub-arctic offshore waters has created a need for tanker mooring facilities for floating storage vessels and tanker loading. In many sub-arctic areas mooring facilities are subject to wind, wave and current conditions which approach conditions in the North Sea during storm seasons. In other seasons, the same facilities will be subject to impact and overturning forces from drifting ice floes and massive ice ridges. A study to develop suitable concepts and preliminary designs for such tanker mooring facilities is discussed. The study was limited to areas where risk of iceberg collision may be ignored, but where ice conditions generally occur 4-6 months during each year with ice coverage ranging up to 100% during this period. The scope of the study required development of suitable concepts and preliminary design studies for three basic SPM tanker loading and storage systems: for direct loading of ice-strengthened shuttle tankers; with a permanently moored icebreaking storage vessel with storage capacity for 1,400,000 bbl of crude oil; and with submerged storage capacity for 1,400,00 bbl of crude oil.

  19. U. S. oil spill law to cause growing tanker problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.B.

    1991-09-30

    This paper reports on tanker owners which face a growing dilemma on the issue of oil spill liability. The U.S. Oil Pollution Act, passed last year in the wake of the March 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, was intended to reduce risk of and damage from such accidents. However, in addition to phasing in double hulls on most tankers operating in U.S. waters, the law substantially increases shipowner's liability for spills. And the federal law does not preempt state liability laws, which in most cases amount to unlimited liability for spill cleanup. Rather than face potentially unlimited liability in the event of a spill, tanker owners worldwide are exercising a number of options to shield themselves. Some of those options could increase the potential for oil spills, industry officials warn. The act also threatens to shatter the international alliance among shippers. A report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London, says the law could have a devastating effect on operating practices. Tanker owners and operators have voiced the most opposition to the new spill law and the shackles it places on them. Now the industry that insures tankers has spoken up about is increased liability, and it too may launch a boycott.

  20. A revolutionary design of double hull oil tanker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akiba, Takehiko; Kitano, Kimio; Sumikama, Yutaka; Tsukuda, Hiroyuki; Toyofuku, Masatsugu; Shibasaki, Kohta; Hah, J.; Furukawa, Koichi

    1995-12-31

    For many years, oil tankers had been designed and constructed based on the single hull concept. However, new regulations which require ``Double Hulls`` in new oil tankers was enacted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1993. Conventional double hull tankers are designed to have the double hull spaces at the sides and bottoms which are normally used as ballast water tanks in order to reduce oil leakage in case of collision or grounding. Some critics, however, have pointed out various problems with the conventional double hull VLCC, such as difficulties in inspection and coating maintenance of the double hull spaces, higher hull girder still water bending moment, etc. In order to eliminate these potential problems, the authors have proposed a new design concept for double hull tankers. In this concept, the double hull spaces are designed as dry void spaces and the ballast water tanks are arranged in the same style as the single hull design. This paper presents a more detailed study and evaluation of this new concept, concerning the hull structural design, oil outflow probability and economic evaluation in comparison with conventional double hull tanker designs. The authors also show the advantages of this new concept which are beneficial to owners and operators.

  1. Tanker-based production eyed for Gulf of Mexico use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, S.

    1986-05-01

    The new oil price environment is sending industry engineers back to the drawing board. The search is on for cost effective and perhaps unconventional deepwater production systems. One candidate for Gulf of Mexico deepwater tracts is a tanker-based floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) system. Substantial experience with tanker-based FPSO systems has proven them to be cost effective when the field is remote from existing production facilities and pipelines. A tanker-based system offers the unique feature of integrating production, storage, and offloading capabilities into a single unit. Such systems can be installed in 12 to 15 months and can even be leased, significantly improving an operator's cash flow.

  2. Tanker under retrofit for arctic service gets new propulsion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-26

    The world's largest azimuthing propulsion drive will be installed on an oil tanker under retrofit for arctic service by a Finnish shipyard. And plans call for the drive's installation on four 135,000 cu m LNG carriers. The 11.4-mw (15,275 hp) Azipod azimuthing electric propulsion drive is being installed on Nemarc's 16,000 dwt arctic tanker M/T Uikku. The major difference between the Azipod system and traditional Z-type thrusters is that the Azipod's propulsion motor is an electric ac synchronous motor located inside the azimuthing unit. The motor drives a fixed-pitch propeller and is speed-controlled (0--100%) by a cycloconverter. The rotatable Azipod drive enables full power thrust in any desired direction.

  3. Design considerations for corrosion control of double-hull tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendexter, L.A. ); Diettrich, D. )

    1993-09-01

    The double-hull design for large vessels engaged in the transportation of oil at sea is not a new concept. The requirement for the future exclusive use of a double-hull configuration for all oil-carrying tank vessels trading in U.S. territorial waters is a result of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. By design, the structural area of the double-hull tanker exposed to ballast water will be considerably increased compared to the single-hull tanker. The choice of protective coatings and their application methods are of vital importance of the integrity of the structure. Of equal importance will be provision for thorough inspection and a well-planned maintenance program throughout the vessel's service life. To assist in meeting these demands, certain physical features can be incorporated during construction to provide access to all parts of the hull structure.

  4. Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-20

    World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

  5. Quantitative risk of oil tanker groundings. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrozowicz, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The culture, design, and operation of the maritime industry all contribute to create an error-inducing system. As oil tankers have become larger, the tolerance for error has decreased as the consequences have increased. Tankers are the largest contributor by vessel type to worldwide oil spill volume. Human error has consistently been attributed to 80 percent of the marine accidents. A closer look reveals that many accidents attributed to human error are system errors. In fact, the term human error is unwarranted in many high-risk accidents and its use is a perforation of the context. The maritime industry has been identified as a high risk operation, requiring an active risk management program. A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) provides a formal process of determining the full range of possible adverse occurrences, probabilities, and expected costs for any undesirable event. A PRA can identify those areas that offer the greatest risk-reducing potential. This thesis focuses on the first level of a proposed three-level risk model to determine the probability of a tanker grounding. The approach utilizes fault trees and event trees and incorporates The Human Error Rate Prediction data to quantify individual errors. The result allows the identification of high-leverage factors in order to determine the most effective and efficient use of resources to reduce the probability of grounding; showing that the development of the Electronic Chart Display and Information System incorporated with the International Safety Management Code can significantly reduce the probability of grounding.

  6. Analysis of single point moored tanker using maneuvering hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimoto, K.; Brinati, H.L.; Fucatu, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Single Point Mooring Systems (SPM) are widely used as a tanker terminal in Brazilian south coast by Petrobras, Brazilian oil company. Although different authors (Wichers, 1987, Obokata, 1987, and Jiang et al., 1988) had analyzed the dynamic stability of SPM system, the down time of these systems due to large oscillatory ship motion in the horizontal plane is significant until now. The main source of the instability of these systems is considered to be the use of inadequate hawser length and bad weather. This paper deals with the dynamic behavior of SPM moored vessels considering the influence of the environmental forces as well as shallow water effects. In a first step, a nonlinear mathematical model developed for the simulation of low speed ship maneuvers (Takashina, 1986) is extended to study the behavior of a tanker moored to a single buoy in comparison with the Obokata`s SPM model, 1987. A large number of tanker motion simulations were carried out both for deep and shallow water and different environmental conditions. The influence of the system parameters shown by the study is, in general, in a good agreement with those obtained by the traditional SPM system analysis.

  7. Probabilistic oil outflow analysis of double hull with mid-deck tanker design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-11-24

    The risk of environmental damage from tankers has been the subject of considerable research and debate. Quantitative methods are important because the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA `90) regulations mandate that a study be carried out to determine whether other structural or operational tank vessel requirements would provide protection to the environment equal to, or greater than, double hull tanker designs. To evaluate alternative designs a rationally developed methodology based on expected oil outflow should be used. Herbert Engineering Corp. (HEC) was tasked to use this methodology to study five design variations of three tanker sizes utilizing damage statistics for tankers. A total of fifteen design configurations were studied.

  8. Method for controlling vapor emissions during loading of tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, T.K.

    1992-06-30

    This patent describes a method for loading crude oil into a tank of a tanker ship having a built-in crude oil loading manifold. It comprises generating and compressing foam at a point remote from the tank; supplying the foam through the crude oil loading manifold onto the bottom of the tank in an amount sufficient to form a layer of the foam having a thickness adequate to provide a barrier which will substantially prevent the passage of hydrocarbon vapors therethrough, the foam expanding while flowing through the manifold and into the tank; and supplying crude oil through the crude oil loading manifold into the tank beneath the layer of foam.

  9. Fuel-cell-propelled submarine-tanker-system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Court, K E; Kumm, W H; O'Callaghan, J E

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a systems analysis of a commercial Arctic Ocean submarine tanker system to carry fossil energy to markets. The submarine is to be propelled by a modular Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell system. The power level is 20 Megawatts. The DOE developed electric utility type fuel cell will be fueled with methanol. Oxidant will be provided from a liquid oxygen tank carried onboard. The twin screw submarine tanker design is sized at 165,000 deadweight tons and the study includes costs and an economic analysis of the transport system of 6 ships. The route will be under the polar icecap from a loading terminal located off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to a transshipment facility postulated to be in a Norwegian fjord. The system throughput of the gas-fed methanol cargo will be 450,000 barrels per day. The total delivered cost of the methanol including well head purchase price of natural gas, methanol production, and shipping would be $25/bbl from Alaska to the US East Coast. Of this, the shipping cost is $6.80/bbl. All costs in 1981 dollars.

  10. Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, M. )

    1992-02-01

    Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

  11. Oil-tanker waste-disposal practices: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 (EPA), launched an investigation into tanker waste disposal practices for vessels discharging ballast water at the Alyeska Pipeline Services Company's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility and marine terminal in Valdez, Alaska. It had been alleged that the Exxon Shipping Company was transferring 'toxic wastes originating in California' to Valdez. In response, EPA decided to examine all waste streams generated on board and determine what the fate of these wastes were in addition to investigating the Exxon specific charges. An extensive Information Request was generated and sent to the shipping companies that operate vessels transporting Alaska North Slope Crude. Findings included information on cargo and fuel tank washings, cleaning agents, and engine room waste.

  12. MMS worldwide tanker spill database: An overview. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The report is an attempt to share the contents of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) Worldwide Tanker Spill Database with other government, public, and private entities. The report includes various spatial and temporal distributions of the more rigorous data from the database. Each section of the report focuses on a particular analysis of the data; because the data needed were sometimes incomplete, the number of spills in each section can vary. Each discussion contains a short description of the data included in the analysis and the overall results. In some cases, suggestions are made regarding possible external factors that may have caused or affected a specific distribution, but no attempts have been made to prove cause and effect.

  13. Puget Sound tanker size optimization. Final report Aug 80-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, R.J.; McKenzie, J.H.; Cebron, E.J.; Hammond, J.G.

    1981-06-01

    Relationships between oil tanker risk and certain quantifiable tanker and port activity characteristics are determined, with a special emphasis on tanker size. A model is developed which optimizes the average tanker size which should be used in a port system to minimize the risk of oil spillage. The study uses statistical techniques to analyze historical worldwide data in order to develop risk relationships. Calculus was used to minimize the risk of spillage based upon different risk indicators. The basic risk indicators developed in the analysis are the number of casualty spills, the total volume of casualty spills, and the total volumes of all spills (including operational). The development of optimal cases is dependent upon the assumption of constant tonnage throughput in a port system.

  14. Microbial influenced corrosion in cargo oil tanks of crude oil tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, R.T.; McFarland, B.L.; Hodgman, R.Z.

    1997-09-01

    Excessive pitting corrosion in the uncoated bottom platings of cargo oil tanks was detected in newbuilt crude oil tankers only 2 to 5 years old, and was diagnosed as microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) concentrations reached as high as 100,000 to 10,000,000 per milliliter in the settled water at the bottom of the cargo oil tanks. Biocide treatment to control MIC was studied in the laboratory using microbial consortia isolated from cargo oil tank bottoms. Biocide treatment to control MIC was attempted experimentally, but was found to be impractical onboard tankers. A MIC mitigation strategy, employing an enhanced pitting inspection and repair program combined with the coating of the bottom platings, was developed and implemented for existing crude oil tankers. Considerations for improvement of future newbuild crude oil tankers are also presented.

  15. Non-nuclear submarine tankers could cost-effectively move Arctic oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumm, W.H.

    1984-03-05

    Before the advent of nuclear propulsion for U.S. Navy submarines, fuel cells were considered to be the next logical step forward from battery powered submarines which required recharging. But with the launching of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954, the development of fuel-cell propulsion was sidelined by the naval community. Nearly 30 years later fuel-cell propulsion on board submarines is actually more cost-effective than the use of nuclear propulsion. In the Artic Ocean, the use of the submarine tanker has long been considered commercially appropriate because of the presence of the polar ice cap, which inhibits surface ship transport. The technical difficulty and high operating cost of Arctic icebreaking tankers are strong arguments in favor of the cheaper, more efficient submarine tanker. Transiting under the polar ice cap, the submarine tanker is not an ''Arctic'' system, but merely a submerged system. It is a system usable in any ocean around the globe where sufficient depth exists (about 65% of the global surface). Ice breakers are another story; their design only makes them useful for transit through heavy sea ice in coastal environments. Used anywhere else, such as in the open ocean or at the Arctic ice cap, they are not a cost-effective means of transport. Arctic sea ice conditions require the Arctic peculiar icebreaking tanker system to do the job the hard way-on the surface. But on the other hand, Arctic sea ice conditions are neatly set aside by the submarine tanker, which does it the energy-efficient, elegant way submerged. The submarine tanker is less expensive to build, far less expensive to operate, and does not need to be nuclear propelled.

  16. Probabilistic oil-outflow analysis of alternative tanker designs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 mandates double hulls for all newly constructed tankers calling in U.S. waters. This study addresses the equivalence of four proposed alternatives to the Double Hull design, based on projected oil outflow resulting from groundings and collisions. The four alternative designs were the Mid-Deck tanker, an underpressure system fitted to a MARPOL tanker, and two proprietary tankage configurations, the Coulombi Egg and POLMIS tankers. Three sizes of vessels, with cargo capacities of 50,000, 150,000, and 272,000 metric tons, were investigated. A probabilistic approach has been adopted for these analyses, utilizing statistical data for tanker casualties developed for the International Maritime Organization. Both side and bottom damage were considered. Loss calculations were based on hydrostatic balance principles. Initial oil loss at impact and dynamic losses due to current and waves were computed based on model tests. Plots illustrating the cumulative oil outflow for each damage condition are presented. Three figures of merit were computed for each damage condition. These are: the probability of zero outflow, the mean outflow, and the extreme (1/10) outflow.

  17. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J. Associates )

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  18. Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, J. Franklin; Wellman, Gerald William; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

  19. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 1. Pacific coast. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the Pacific Coast to determine whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  20. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 2. Atlantic and Florida Gulf coasts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the east coast and Florida Gulf Coast. It discusses whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  1. Need for a probabilistic risk assessment of the oil tanker industry and a qualitative assessment of oil tanker groundings. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrozowiez, M.D.

    1996-06-01

    The culture, design, and operation of the maritime industry all contribute to create an error-inducing system. A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) provides a formal process of determining the full range of possible adverse occurrences, probabilities, and expected costs for any undesirable event. A PRA can identify those areas that offer the greatest risk-reducing potential. Once the components with the greatest risk-reducing potential are identified, appropriate technology and management schemes can properly influence risk reduction. While human error is attributed to 80 percent of the marine accidents, a closer look reveals that many accidents attributed to human error are system errors. An application of a qualitative risk assessment is done for tanker groundings. A fault tree is developed to describe the top event of a tanker grounding. A number of well-known groundings are analyzed to test the utility of the grounding fault tree.

  2. Medium-speed diesel propulsion plant for new shallow-draft LPG tankers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Propulsion equipment from engine builder Krupp MaK and power transmission specialist Lohmann Stolterfoht has been specified for a series of liquefied petroleum gas tankers being built for various customers by Pattje Shipyards, of Waterhuizen, Holland. Pattje reports that the tankers are built using an innovative system of modular construction that has led to the very short building time of only nine months per ship. The tankers have a capacity of 4200 m[sup 3] of gas and a draft of only 5.2 m when fully loaded, to enable the use of shallow water ports. Further particulars of the vessels include an overall length of 100 m, beam dimension of 15.9 m and maximum speed of 14 knots. The tankers' propulsion system is based on a single, in-line, nine-cylinder type 9M453C medium-speed diesel from the [open quotes]C[close quotes] engine series of Krupp MaK, Kiel, Germany. The 33.8 L/cyl engine (bore 320 x stroke 420 mm) develops 3000 kW at 600 r/min. 2 figs.

  3. Tanker navigation safety standards: 20 year tanker size/capacity trend analysis. A study required by section 4111(b)(11) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the size, cargo capacity, and flag nation of tankers transporting oil or hazardous substances on the navigable waters and the waters of the Exclusive Economic Zone by: (1) identifying changes occurring in such size and cargo capacity and in vessel navigation and technology over the 20 year period from 1970 to 1990; and (2) evaluating the extent to which the risks or difficulties associated with tanker navigation, vessel traffic control, accidents, oil spills, and the containment and cleanup of such spills are influenced by or related to an increase in the tanker size and cargo capacity.

  4. Feasibility of methods and systems for reducng LNG tanker fire hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    In this program concepts for reducing fire hazards that may result from LNG tanker collisions are identified and their technical feasibility evaluated. Concepts considered include modifications to the shipborne LNG containers so that in the event of a container rupture less of the contents would spill and/or the contents would spill at a reduced rate. Changes in the cargo itself, including making the LNG into a gel, solidifying it, converting it to methanol, and adding flame suppressants are also evaluated. The relative effectiveness and the costs of implementing these methods in terms of increased cost of gas at the receiving terminal, are explained. The vulnerability of an LNG tanker and its crew to the thermal effects of a large pool fire caused by a collision spill is estimated and methods of protecting the crew are considered. It is shown that the protection of ship and crew so that further deterioration of a damaged ship might be ameliorated, would require the design and installation of extraordinary insulation systems and life support assistance for the crew. Methods of salvaging or disposing of cargo from a damaged and disabled ship are evaluated, and it is concluded that if the cargo cannot be transferred to another (empty) LNG tanker because of lack of availability, then the burning of the cargo at a location somewhat distant from the disabled tanker appears to be a promising approach. Finally, the likelihood of the vapors from a spill being ignited due to the frictional impact of the colliding ships was examined. It is found that the heating of metal sufficient to ignite flammable vapors would occur during a collision, but it is questionable whether flammable vapor and air will, in fact, come in contact with the hot metal surfaces.

  5. Tanker navigation safety standards: Tanker navigation safety research baseline: A study required by section 4111(b)(9) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 directed the Secretary of Transportation to review and incorporate the results of past studies, including studies by the Coast Guard and Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). This literature search and review focuses on materials pertinent to determining or evaluating current and/or `best` practices, and not on the adequacy of current statutes or regulations. In addition, it is not the intention of the report to assess best practices (e.g., suggest the appropriate crew sizes or what navigation equipment should be required on tankers), but to establish the baseline for future study of best practices. The report does not provide answers to new analytical quations, but presents the status of research so that questions addressed previoulsy will not be duplicated by future studies.

  6. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

  7. Prince William Sound disabled tanker towing study. Part 1. Evaluation of existing equipment, personnel and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The study has been undertaken by the Glosten Associates, Inc., to evaluate the existing capability for emergency towing at Prince William Sound and to examine alternatives that could enhance the escort and assist capabilities for disabled tankers within the waterway from the Alyeska Oil Terminal at the Port of Valdez to the Gulf of Alaska outside Hinchinbrook Entrance. Part 1, reported herein, is an objective evaluation by an experienced salvage towing master of the existing tugs, emergency towing equipment, towing practices, and discussion of alternative tug types.

  8. Probabilistic oil outflow analysis of alternative tanker designs. Addendum 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report is an addendum to Probabilistic Oil Outflow Analysis of Alternative Tanker Designs, U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Coast Guard, Report No. CG-D-14-92, July 1992. It covers the effects of design modifications to the Double Hull, Mid-Deck and Underpressure (MARPOL) designs for the 272,000 DWT size, and clarifies the evaluation made of the underpressure concept. The design modifications were made so that these ships would meet the requirements of Regulation 23 of the MARPOL 73/78 Annex for hypothetical outflow of oil. Results for two other designs, the Coulombi Egg and POLMIS, are also presented. A probabilistic approach has been adopted for these analyses, utilizing statistical data for tanker casualties developed for the International Maritime Organization. Both side and bottom damage were considered. Loss calculations were based on hydrostatic balance principles. Initial oil loss at impact and dynamic losses due to current and waves were computed based on model tests. Plots illustrating the cumulative oil outflow for each damage condition are presented. Three figures of merit were computed for each damage condition. These are: the probability of zero outflow, the mean outflow, and the extreme (1/10) outflow.

  9. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  10. Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report looks at the impact of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and the developing State oil spill regulations on the tanker and coastal barge markets, and at the implications for the future of the U.S. seaborne petroleum trades. The analysis relied on a dual approach. Because much of the legislation, both State and Federal, is still evolving--particularly with respect to implementing regulations--as yet there can be no definitive assessment of its impact. Consequently a quantitative analysis of fleets, trades, and vessel movements, was complemented by extensive interviews. Discussions have been held with oil companies large and small, shipowners, charterers, insurance companies, classification societies, and a variety of public and private institutions active in the maritime industry. All interviews were conducted in confidence: no individual views are identified in the report. (AT)

  11. Phillips using automated meter/prover for custody transfer at tanker terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on an automated metering/proving system for custody transfer of crude oil at the Phillips 66 Co. tanker unloading terminal in Freeport, Texas. It is described as one of the most sophisticated systems developed. The menu-driven, one-button automation removes the proving sequence entirely from manual control. The system also is the to be cost-effective and versatile compared to a dedicated flow computer with API calculation capabilities. Developed by Puffer-Sweiven, systems integrators, the new technology additionally is thought to be the first custody transfer system to employ a programmable logic controller (PLC). The PLC provides the automation, gathers and stores all raw data, and prints alarms. Also the system uses a personal computer operator interface (OI) that runs on the Intel iRMX real time operating system. The OI is loaded with Puffer-Sweiven application software that performs API meter factor and volume correction calculations as well as present color graphics and generate reports.

  12. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  13. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release

  14. S. 1461: Oil Tanker Navigation Safety Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill would enhance the navigation safety of oil tankers. Title I, Provisions applicable to nationally licensed personnel, explains provisions relating to motor vehicle driving records of vessel personnel; dangerous drugs and other grounds for suspension or revocation; alcohol testing and alcohol rehabilitation; prohibition on service; vessel traffic services; oil tanker construction and size; oil spill contingency plans and approval; international inventory of equipment and contractors; national council on oil spill technology research and development; oil spill disaster assistance; impact on other laws; penalties; and a report on user fees. Title II, Provisions applicable with respect to Alaska pilotage at Port of Valdez, includes explanations of Bligh reef light; Prince William Sound VTS; oil spill recovery institute; and the Trans-Alaska pipeline liability fund. Title III, Provisions applicable to Mississippi River radio communications on Mississippi River, is also included.

  15. Tanker navigation safety standards: Appropriate crew size. A study required by section 4111(b)(1) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This document presents the results gathered in response to the congressional mandate contained in Section 4111 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-380) to determine appropriate crew sizes on tankers. The definition of `appropriate crew size` is based on the objective of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, to ensure pollution prevention through safe navigation of vessels carrying hazardous substances and/or oil. The report addresses crew size and the impact of laws, implementing regulations, operating practices, ship and automation status, and potential changes thereof, on crew size.

  16. Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  17. EIA-817, Monthly Tanker, Barge, and Rail Movement and Stocks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noticeoog.jsp * Electronic Filing Option: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is a Windows-based application that will enable you to enter data interactively,...

  18. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 126 115 90 125 91 1986-2016 PADD 3 339 562 201 104 0 18 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 9,514 9,513 8,614 6,677 7,556 4,888 1986-2016 ...

  19. Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lincoln Composites (Hexagon) CNG truck - Suitable from space perspective ISO container serves as ground storage - With drop & swap, minimum driver time at site Trailer ...

  20. Mooring system for oil tanker storage vessel or the like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hvide, H.J.

    1993-08-24

    A mooring system for an ocean going vessel, said vessel hull having a thickness, said system comprising: (a) a rigid shaft having an upper end and a lower end, said shaft being immovably fixed at said upper end to said vessel and said lower end of said shaft being disposed beneath and external of said hull; and (b) a chain table rotatably mounted on said lower end of said rigid shaft.

  1. Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-03-02

    Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

  2. System for control of oil leakage from damaged tanker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tornay, E.G.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a fluid control arrangement adapted to be fitted in an opening in a bulkhead common to a liquid cargo tank and a ballast tank. It comprises a section of pipe extending through and sealingly secured in an opening in a bulkhead and defining a passageway for fluid to flow from a cargo tank to a ballast tank; and one-shot valve means in sealing relationship with a first end of the pipe section.

  3. Conventional Gasoline Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PAD Districts 39,540 19,921 9,308 6,440 6,092 6,085 1993-2015 PADD 3 110 0 0 0 0 0 1993-2015 PADD 5 2004-2004 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 1,641 1,596 2,173 2,438 2,673 2,085 1993-2015 PADD 3 10,256 11,814 9,652 6,995 2,538 2,203 1993-2015 PADD 4 11,265 11,992 11,046 9,366 3,304 2,796 1993-2015 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 254,671 171,446 126,922 122,451 128,664 123,168 1993-2015 PADD 2 80,358 57,508 31,876 35,040 10,051 9,941 1993-2015 PADD 4 6,156 1993-2010 PADD 5 3,534 1,131 840 1993-2012 From PADD 4

  4. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  5. Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barge and Rail between PAD Districts 109,830 103,720 105,744 98,960 101,137 100,522 1981-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) -22,180 -21,172 -26,617 -13,481 -7,201 -4,629 1981-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) -82,108 -80,515 -75,498 -77,941 -89,010 -90,690 1981-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) -21,673 -17,622 -20,586 -22,290 -21,564 -20,439 1981-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 16,132 15,589 16,957 14,751 16,639 15,236

  6. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History From PADD 1 to PADD 2 274 590 1,646 2,729 3,915 2,727 1981-2015 PADD 3 9,242 13,779 3,624 9,369 11,607 8,639 1981-2015 PADD 4 0 0 0 2013-2015 PADD 5 20 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 6,186 7,683 24,235 84,910 140,671 141,332 1981-2015 PADD 3 56,820 86,484 176,744 270,731 305,252 372,799 1981-2015 PADD 4 22,494 27,587 33,807 25,727 40,502 75,117 1981-2015 PADD 5 453 1,608 7,948 33,172 52,932 50,063 2010-2015 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 10,096

  7. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,602 2,515 1,702 2,802 2,710 2,572 1981-2015 Crude Oil 274 590 294 1,100 1,492 906 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 1,328 1,925 1,408 1,702 1,218 1,666 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1981-2002 Unfinished Oils 685 686 571 20 184 550 1981-2015 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 144 710 248 1,157 663 275 1983-2015 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2015 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2015 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol*

  8. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 112,531 113,596 110,881 113,612 139,062 150,573 1981-2015 Crude Oil 274 590 1,646 2,729 3,915 2,727 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 112,257 113,006 109,235 110,883 135,147 147,846 1981-2015 Pentanes Plus 452 113 19 2 30 121 2009-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 236 23,034 33,098 1981-2015 Ethane/Ethylene 236 22,845 32,344 2013-2015 Propane/Propylene 0 0 0 0 135 538 2005-2015 Normal Butane/Butylene 0 0 0 0 15 60

  9. From PADD 3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 216,441 213,762 220,029 205,719 215,315 219,022 1981-2015 Crude Oil 3,636 6,372 972 5,049 9,588 13,715 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 212,805 207,390 219,057 200,670 205,727 205,307 1981-2015 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 584 328 146 232 220 144 1981-2015 Propane/Propylene 584 328 146 232 220 144 2005-2015 Unfinished Oils 437 305 0 1,084 1981-2015 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 75,434 75,906 107,437 96,812 106,100 96,777

  10. Small bore, two-stroke diesels after three years of chemical tanker service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Small-bore, two-stroke cross-head engines have been manufactured by MAN B&W Alpha Diesel in Frederikshavn, Denmark, for almost eight years. The 6L35MC engine (bore 350 x stroke 1050 mm) has an output of 3600 kW at 210 r/min, and runs on heavy fuel oil of IF380. The engine is equipped with a power take-off for a 600 kW shaft alternator, which operates almost 70% of the time. Therefore, the engine is normally running at a constant speed of 210 r/min. According to the logbook, the engine has been in operation for 12 290 hours and the shaft alternator for 8480 hours. The chief engineer`s records show a fuel oil consumption of 13610 to 13680 liters per 24 hours, at a power setting of 80% to 85% MCR and 210 r/ min, which is approximately equivalent to 195 g/kWh. Cylinder oil consumption is 76 L/day (about 1.0 g/KWh). These figures confirm that practical measurements comply with the theoretical values. This paper reports in brief, the operating results for the engine.

  11. EIA-817, Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report Page 1 U. S...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Send your surveys using this secure method to: https:... You may access the materials by following the steps: http:... on data from fewer than three respondents, or that are ...

  12. Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 15 90 125 91 76 73 1986-2016 PADD 3 201 104 0 18 21 38 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 2011-2011 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 8,614 6,677 7,556 4,377 6,185 4,536 1986-2016 PADD 3 30,165 26,514 32,150 33,114 29,021 29,329 1986-2016 PADD 4 6,943 7,365 7,150 6,217 6,776 7,264 1986-2016 PADD 5 3,894 3,511 4,977 4,079 3,875 3,824 2010-2016 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 1,388 1,128 509 2,281 1,560 1,318 1986-2016 PADD 2 19,539 17,229 17,509 22,895 27,473 26,217 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

  13. Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts 9,972 7,611 8,237 6,549 7,648 5,743 1981-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) -13,182 -10,465 -17,452 -7,812 -1,468 -3,442 1981-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 11,024 9,848 15,079 9,293 2,343 3,768 1981-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) -11,794 -10,738 -10,920 -12,189 -12,399 -9,893 1986-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 3,980 3,743 5,056 4,159 3,875 3,824

  14. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor

  15. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rail between PAD Districts 3,204 11,523 13,511 13,263 14,289 13,924 1986-2016 PADD 3 201 113 55 68 96 38 1986-2016 PADD 4 0 0 2013-2016 PADD 5 1986-2015 From PADD 2 to PADD 1 21,195 18,009 20,061 13,677 16,610 15,157 1986-2016 PADD 3 55,166 49,725 60,290 60,169 56,396 55,214 1986-2016 PADD 4 12,718 13,443 13,975 13,001 13,863 14,168 1986-2016 PADD 5 7,910 7,743 9,058 7,986 8,631 7,925 1986-2016 From PADD 3 to PADD 1 101,754 97,347 98,952 98,614 98,912 99,327 1986-2016 PADD 2 38,561 33,586

  16. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2016 Petroleum Products 76 53 92 185 71 125 1986-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1986-2002 Unfinished Oils 67 18 27 19 36 29 1986-2016 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 0 0 27 26 0 52 1986-2016 Reformulated 0 0 0 2005-2016 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 2008-2016 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 0 0 27 26 0 52 2008-2016 CBOB 0 0 27 0 0

  17. From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 13,204 11,523 13,511 13,263 14,289 13,924 1986-2016 Crude Oil 115 90 125 91 76 73 1986-2016 Petroleum Products 13,089 11,433 13,386 13,172 14,213 13,851 1986-2016 Pentanes Plus 10 10 10 10 10 11 2009-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 3,947 3,528 3,803 3,541 4,012 3,681 1986-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 3,884 3,465 3,740 3,478 3,949 3,619 2013-2016 Propane/Propylene 45 45 45 45 45 44 2005-2016 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 5

  18. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, January 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 11,209 1,213 9,996 35,554 35,363 190 23,680 28,598 -4,918 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 106,990 8,669 107,347 29,831 18,055 -6,599 16,594 124,991 -103,885 Pentanes Plus

  19. Tanker navigation safety standards: Ability of crewmembers to take emergency actions. A study required by section 4111(b)(3) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of crewmembers to take emergency actions to prevent or remove a discharge of oil or hazardous substance from takers.

  20. Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hearings and Appeals (OHA) formulate and implement Subpart V special refund proceedings. ... set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 205, Subpart V. These procedures apply in situations where ...

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Re-exports of LNG occur when an LNG shipment is offloaded from a tanker into storage tanks at a regasification terminal and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery...

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of ...

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Barge and Rail from East Coast (PADD 1) of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Total ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from Other PADDs of Ethane-Ethylene (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and...

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Ethane-Ethylene (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge...

  6. Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team Woody Biomass Converted to Gasoline by Five-Company Team October 22, 2015 - 10:50am Addthis A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. | Photo courtesy The Gas Technology Institute A tanker picks up gasoline from the biorefinery. |

  7. TABLE55.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report." July 2004 Crude Oil ......

  8. Tanker navigation safety standards: Remote alcohol testing program for masters and pilots. A study required by section 4111(b)(12) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes current federal regulations that cover testing for use of alcohol and dangerous drugs. The report includes a discussion of legal issues concerning drug and alcohol testing, describes several tests used to detect alcohol testing, describes several tests used to detect alcohol or drug use, and discusses some tests capable of detecting impairment resulting from other causes in addition to alcohol or drug use.

  9. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  10. Study on structural damage of ships due to collision and grounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuroiwa, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kawamoto, Y.; Kondo, M.; Kusuba, S.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, structural failure of tankers due to collisions and groundings is studied. To investigate failure mechanism and energy absorption capacity of ship structures. Experiments and numerical simulations are carried out. In the numerical simulations, failure of fillet welds and rupture of plates are taken into account. To investigate structural integrity of Mid-Deck Tanker, which was newly developed to reduce accidental oil outflow, numerical simulations of grounding of the tanker are performed.

  11. TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ...... 0 433 0 344 ...

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    tankers, and barges provides more complete and accurate data on regional supplies of biofuels. In addition, incorporating biodiesel and ethanol movements into regional volumetric ...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 3) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain (PADD 4) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","West Coast (PADD 5) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  17. TABLE53.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 53. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between July 2004 Crude Oil ... 0 383 0...

  18. FE0005958-Impact | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The objective is to advance SPI-CO2Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) gel technology by ... and offloading chemicals from delivery tanker trucks; four UET inline static mixers; ...

  19. table06.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  20. 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Program - The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Douglas ... 409 KB) Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker Harshit Agrawal University of California ...

  1. The Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... cans, plastic bottles, cardboard, waste oil products, paper and napkins from the food ... to area charities. * Y-12 donated two tanker cars to the Southern Appalachia Railway ...

  2. table08.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  3. table07.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  4. The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle ...

  5. table05.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  6. table10.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  7. table09.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," ...

  8. TABLE34.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Total ...... 1,247 24,793 3,065 177 0 0 177 Table 34. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker ...

  9. TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Table 35. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, PAD District I PAD District II Commodity Receipts Shipments Net ...

  10. 2004 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which allowed the conversion of over 60 conventional fuel oil burners to gas burners. ... To avoid this waste, VFA-41 implemented strategies that allowed a tanker jet to ...

  11. ORNL/TM-2015/655

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ...... 5 Fig. 4. Locations of oil and gas wells with higher than 215F ... between the costs of using pipeline and tanker trucks for transporting working fluid ...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Natural Gas Regulation | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Algeria, Trinidad & Tobago, Qatar, Malaysia, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates and exported to Japan aboard ocean going tankers. The Quarterly Report Page can give...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  14. ,"Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

  17. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  18. Wildfre Mitigation at Los Alamos ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine crews, Helo Crews, and light air resources are stationed on site during wildfre season. Large air tankers are stationed within two hours of Laboratory property in Durango, ...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to clean oil residue from the storage tanks, which was then dumped into the sea. Over time, environmental regulations were slowly tightened, and now tankers are not permitted...

  20. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Barge from Midwest (PADD 2) of Conventional Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from Midwest (PADD 2) of...

  1. An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of ...

  2. Accidental oil spill due to grounding: Summary of model test results. Summary report, Jan-Jun 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karafiath, G.

    1992-06-01

    The International Maritime Organization (IMO) sponsored model tests to help in their evaluation of accidental oil spillage from a Mid-Deck Tanker (MDT) and from a Double Hull Tanker (DHT) Design. These tests were conducted at Tsukuba Institute, Japan, and at the Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The test results are explained herein and their significance is summarized.

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 61. Movements of Crude Oil by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 73 0 0 73 3 ............................................................................ 38 0 0 38 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5

  4. Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickey, A.

    1980-06-12

    The Tenvig offshore A/S solution to development of marginal oilfields in the North Sea consists of a tanker about the size of a VLCC, a turret platform moored with anchors and equipped with processing equipment for oil and gas treatment, living quarters, and helicopter landing facilities. The platform is permanently moored at the field during depletion and is connected to a subsea completion. Offloading the oil from the tanker can be done via a subsea pipeline to a nearby loading buoy or directly to shuttle tankers.

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    for a new LNG liquefaction project to be built in Nikiski, along with storage tanks and a marine tanker terminal. This project would also include the construction of a...

  6. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 137 106 0 243 3 ............................................................................ 472 498 0 970 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5 ............................................................................ - - 0 0 From 2 to 1

  7. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain (PADD 4) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  8. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","West Coast (PADD 5) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  9. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 3) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coast (PADD 1) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other ...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Day)","Midwest (PADD 2) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Midwest (PADD 2) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail from Other PADDs ...

  14. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    facility in New Jersey, near the Philadelphia refining center. While EIA does report inter-PADD domestic barge and tanker movements of crude oil, the intra-PADD shipment of...

  15. Offshore oil storage and transfer facility and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M.C.

    1987-04-28

    A method is described for mooring a floating tanker to a submerged fluid supply structure and for operating the structure to deploy to a water surface on which a tanker floats and to retrieve from the water surface to a submerged location a fluid supplying duct. The method includes: engaging at the water surface a buoy line from a surface buoy to the supply structure; engaging with the buoy line a mooring device; directing the mooring device along the buoy line into mating engagement with the supply structure; drawing the buoy line toward the tanker through the engaged mooring device to retrieve the supply duct from the water surface to its latched submerged state in the structure; releasing the mooring device from the supply structure and thereby securing the duct in its latched state in the structure; and recovering the mooring device along the buoy line to the tanker.

  16. UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... above safe operating range. Turn off hot-oil system and start to send feed gas to flare ... be delivered once per run via a cryogenic tanker truck and stored in a cryogenic oxygen ...

  17. Microsoft Word - 2011-YIR-043012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... about 220 miles off the coast of Oman in the Indian Ocean. The tanker was carrying about 2 million barrels of Kuwaiti crude oil destined for refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast. ...

  18. Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into a wellbore ...

  19. U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Historical O

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Loaned 750,000 barrels of crude oil to ConocoPhilips and Citgo following the closure of the Calcasieu Ship Channel that cut off tanker deliveries to refiners near Lake ...

  20. The Future of Home Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as B10 High heating efficiency Costly replacement for oil system Shale gas vs FRAC Act? ... Redistribution Via truck from Canada Via tanker from Canada, Venez., VI, And "Other" ...

  1. Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For more information, visit the Office of Science website. A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. ...

  2. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by Pipeline Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 34 Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 35 Net Movements of Crude Oil ...

  3. Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... May 23, 2016 A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into ...

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    water) at 80-150C are coproduced at oil and gas wells in the US (DOE 2015). * These ... Introduction Components at geothermal site Transported with tanker truck or stored at ...

  5. OHIO E.P.A.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Only 23 Valve House 24 Boiler System 25 Oil Storage Facility 26 Maintenance, Stores, ... X-1305 HF Storage Tank Area 10 X-1305A HF Tanker Car Containment Pit 11 X-1310 Nitrogen ...

  6. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... by Pipeline Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 34 Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT 35 Net Movements of Crude Oil ...

  7. World oil trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A. )

    1991-01-01

    This book provides data on many facets of the world oil industry topics include; oil consumption; oils share of energy consumption; crude oil production; natural gas production; oil reserves; prices of oil; world refining capacity; and oil tankers.

  8. A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT MAGAZINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Clovelly site is a part of the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) system, a deepwater port in the Gulf of Mexico providing tanker offoading for crude oil transported on some of ...

  9. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... when the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in the Prince William Sound (Graham et al., 2012; Peterson et al., 2003; Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, 2006). ...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    to Philadelphia. A 325,000-barrel tanker has economies of scale that make it more economic than the smaller barge movements that typically move on this route. While terms may...

  11. EIA-820, Annual Refinery Report Page 1 U. S. ENERGY INFORMATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crude oil that first traveled 5,000 miles by tanker and then traveled 105 miles by pipeline to the refinery, report pipeline as the method of transportation. * If the refinery...

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For much of 2016, the total cost to ship petroleum products on a Long Range 1 (LR1) tanker from the Arab Gulf to Europe has been the lowest since at least 2007 (Figure 10). The LR1 ...

  13. An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision-Making Procedures | Department of Energy Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures An Update on Proposed Changes to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures August 15, 2014 - 9:00am Addthis A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of

  14. A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procedures | Department of Energy A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures A Proposed Change to the Energy Department's LNG Export Decision-Making Procedures May 29, 2014 - 2:22pm Addthis A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A tanker carries liquified natural gas (LNG) off the coast of Homer, Alaska. | Photo courtesy of the Federal Energy Regulatory

  15. System for collecting products dumped on the surface of a mass of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carro, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    A system for collecting products dumped on the surface of a mass of water includes cages to be arranged at the sides of a tanker. Each cage is preferably prismatic in shape. The height of the cages is such that when the tanker is at ballast, the lower parts of the cages will be submerged while the upper parts will be above the maximum loading line of the tanker. The cages are fastened to the sides of the tanker by freely rotating connection points. In the interiors of the cages is housed a series of floating suction pump inlet members or housings, likewise prismatic in shape, having appropriate dimensions to permit a great sensitivity to the least fluctuating movements of the liquid surface. The complete face of each suction pump inlet member, which is oriented in the direction of travel of the tanker, is provided with an opening which has a height such that the lower edge thereof will be positioned below the floating line of the suction pumps at an approximate depth of 0.01 meter.

  16. Petroleum logistics. Final report and summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The results of this analysis of petroleum logistics are presented in this report. The analysis consists of 3 tasks. Task I, an overview of the petroleum supply and tanker industry, places emphasis on oil company decision-making processes; the organization and decision-making of oil companies as related to crude oil acquisition, supply, distribution and tanker management; the movement of oil to California (including potential constraints); and the evolution of the world crude oil market and oil tankers. Task II is an evaluation of critical elements and constraints affecting the petroleum supply and tanker transportation industry. This report discusses the causes of international petroleum logistical stress including supply reduction, interruption or dislocation, demand increase, and tanker shortage. The report further describes constraining factors affecting the supply of petroleum to California under conditions of international petroleum logistical stress, as well as factors which, themselves, can cause constraint to California oil supply during normal conditions. Task III represents a proposed plan for CEC monitoring of the supply and movement of oil to California. Nine critical areas are discussed, as are the major considerations of standby versus continuous monitoring, present and proposed activities, proposed organization for monitoring, and monitoring of the oil industry.

  17. Double hull grounding experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodd, J.L.; Sikora, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    In the last few years the public and governments of many nations have become increasingly aware of the need for improving oil tanker safety. The requirements for double hull tankers are an attempt to address this need through legislation. Even though a number of investigations on the mechanics of collisions have been done in the past, until recently very little research supported the development of structural improvements to reduce oil tanker damage during grounding and stranding accidents. An aggressive evaluation of double hull tanker crashworthiness in stranding and grounding accidents is underway at CD/NSWC (formerly the David Taylor Research Center). The ability to predict damage from grounding accidents accurately is not currently available. The objective of this paper is to present qualitatively the structural failure mechanisms associated with stranding and grounding events for candidate double hull tanker structures and to present some simple methods for comparing damage scenarios. A comparison of the structural performance of key features in several very different designs will provide useful information toward this understanding.

  18. Marine crude oil terminal measuring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubenas, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    The accurate determination of quantity and quality of crude oil transferred from shore to tanker or tanker to shore, is the function of Marine Crude Oil Terminal Measuring Systems. From the measurement data, a Bill of Lading can be prepared and transport costs, taxes, royalties, and customs fees can be computed Accuracy is essential as each tanker load represents a value of ten to twenty million dollars. Even errors of {+-} 0.1% represent a significant amount of revenue. In addition to accuracy, meter systems offer several other advantages over older more traditional tank gaging methods. Specification guidelines for meter systems and associated equipment are presented in this paper. Since most ports are in environmentally sensitive areas, design for protection from spills is also essential.

  19. Owners fight pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Large-scale movement of oil by sea entails risks that are compounded by variable weather conditions, occasional human fallibility, and mechanical inadequacies. The Int'l Tanker Owners Pollution Federation was established in 1968 to minimize these risks and to help mitigate the impacts of tanker oil spills. The federation recently recommended measures to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of government and industry to respond to tanker oil spills. These include: the establishment of a database on the properties of various oils/ a formal equipment inventory worldwide/ better training facilities for personnel likely to supervise oil recovery operations/ exchange of information between countries on spill experience and research findings/ and international testing and standardization of equipment.

  20. STL, a new approach to field development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Submerged Turret and Loading (STL) is an efficient and safe system for offshore loading and storage. The loading system can effectively be adapted to specific field requirements and operational conditions. The STL is designed to meet the requirements for versatile and flexible field development, allowing loading operations to take place all year round in the harshest environments. The STL concept has been selected for field development projects with different operational requirements i.e. (1) Direct Shuttle Loading (DSL) which permits loading of processed crude oil directly into shuttle tankers without the requirement for oil storage at the field. A Direct Shuttle Loading system is installed at the Heidrun Field (Conoco). (2) STL as a Floating Storage Unit (FSU) application has been selected for the Fulmar Field (Shell/Esso) and the Yme Field (Statoil). Both FSU`s are converted standard tankers (Aframax and Suezmax) and designed for operation in extreme North Sea environments. (3) An STL buoy can be arranged as an effective offshore loading terminal. BP have selected STL for the Harding Field. The STL loading terminal will be used for export from a subsea field storage. (4) Based on the STL technology Statoil have launched a new design, Multipurpose Shuttle Tanker (MST). This unit will be equipped with the STL ship systems allowing it to operate as an STL tanker for direct shuttle loading, as an STL loading terminal or as a storage unit. In addition the vessel is equipped for operation as a standard North Sea shuttle tanker capable of loading from floating storage units and standard North Sea loading terminals via a loading hose in the conventional manner. (5) The production concept, developed from STL technology can effectively be used for conversion of standard tankers to FPSO or for new-built FPSOs.

  1. Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

  2. Alternatives to Double Hull Tank Vessel Design, Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-24

    The report required by section 4115(e) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. The report concludes that, at present, there are no equivalent designs to the double hull tanker for the prevention of oil outflow due to groundings, which are the most prevalent type of serious vessel accident in U.S. waters. The report does not recommend any changes to the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 to allow alternatives to double hull design, but does recommend that the Coast Guard continue to evaluate novel tanker designs and associated technologies.

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","From PADD 3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge",47,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","9/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  4. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts",5,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","8/31/2016" ,"Next

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail",3,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1981" ,"Release

  6. BooNE: Booster Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scrapbook Page 2 The BooNE collaboration in winter. A tour of the construction site. Working with the BooNE Horn. BooNE in the winter A tour of the construction site. A day with the Horn Janet, Bonnie, and Jen in the Tank. Janet and Bill: the early years. Bill, Richard, Jeff, and Shawn in the midst of discussion. Preparing the tubes Janet and Bill: the early days Discussion in progress The oil tanker arrives. The final stages of oil filling. The BooNE Collaboration in the summer. The oil tanker

  7. Dynamic behavior of articulated single point mooring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of an Articulated Single Point Mooring System subjected to wave loading is presented. The analysis considers non-linearities caused due to Morison Equation`s hydrodynamic drag; variable buoyancy and variable added mass introduced by the variable submergence effect; the effect of instantaneous position of the tower; and the surge motion of the tanker transferred to the tower. The random time history of the oil tanker is derived with the help of it`s Response Amplitude Operator and the specified sea surface elevation spectrum. The analysis is carried out by an iterative frequency domain method which takes care of the above non-linearities. With the proposed method of analysis, a parametric study is conducted, in order to investigate the behavior of the single point mooring system subjected to random waves. The parameters include surge motion o the tanker, current velocity, random waves and point of attachment of the tanker to the tower. From the analysis, the mean peak value of the response and the statistics of the distribution of peak value of heel angle response are also obtained.

  8. Economical development of small isolated fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, W.G.

    1995-11-01

    U.K. offshore oil supplies could be in decline in 10 years unless new methods and technology are developed to open fields that are uncommercial by conventional methods. Such technology is being developed, and much of it is aimed at pressure boosting subsea stepout fields to improve production rate and recovery over increasing distances to a host platform. This paper is concerned with the development of small isolated fields for which a new platform facility is not justified or where no suitable existing host platform is available. The isolated-field production system described here comprises a two-stage subsea separator near the subsea well(s) from which production is tied in by flexible flowlines. Oil/water/gas separation is achieved at near atmosphere pressure, allowing safe loading of the ``dead`` crude into a tanker. The gas is flared at a surface buoy (directly above the separator unit) that also contains power generation and chemical injection facilities. Liquids are pumped to an offshore tanker-loading catenary anchor leg mooring (CALM) buoy, and then to the connected shuttle tanker. Control of the separator system is autonomous based on a programmable logic controller in the subsea control module, with commands and monitoring by an umbilical from a production center on the tanker.

  9. Numerical and experimental analysis of a retrievable offshore loading facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; O`Brien, P.

    1995-12-31

    ROLF (Retrievable Offshore Loading Facility) has been proposed as an alternative offshore oil export tanker loading system for the North Sea. The system consists of a flexible riser ascending from the seabed in a lazy wave configuration to the bow of a dynamically positioned tanker. In order to supplant and support the numerical analyses performed to design the system, an extensive model test program was carried out in a 3D offshore basin at scale 1:50. A model riser with properties equivalent to the properties of the oil filled prototype riser installed in seawater was tested in several combinations of waves and current. During the tests the forces at the bow of the tanker and at the pipeline end manifold were measured together with the motions of the tanker and the riser. The riser motions were measured by means of a video based 3D motion monitoring system. Of special importance was accurate determination of the minimum bending radius for the riser. This was derived based on the measured riser motions. The results of the model tests were compared to numerical analyses by an MCS proprietary riser analysis program.

  10. For oil spills, no slick solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Oil spills from tankers and offshore wells are getting bigger and more numerous. Oil spill cleanup technology is hard-pressed to keep up with the problem. The use of skimming devices, sorbents and chemical agents, and microorganisms to control oil spills is described. The environmental effects of oil spills are briefly discussed.

  11. EIS-0035: Use of VLCCs and VLCCs as Floating Storage Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed use of tankers as floating storage facilities. This statement is a draft supplement to the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

  12. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  13. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 (Thousand Barrels) PADD Pipeline Tanker and Barge Rail Total From 1 to 2 ............................................................................ 2,423 1,492 0 3,915 3 ............................................................................ 3,400 8,207 0 11,607 4 ............................................................................ 0 - 0 0 5 ............................................................................ - - 0 0 From 2 to 1

  14. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8.PDF Table 38. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 106 498 - 223 2,810 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 107 40 0 1,206 2,416 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 0 0 - 357 848 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 125 0 0 723 2,384 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils

  16. The Heidrun Field: Oil offtake system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajabi, F.D.; Breivik, K.; Syvertsen, K.

    1996-12-31

    Offtake of oil from the Heidrun field is achieved through a Direct Shuttle Loading (DSL) system. This approach eliminates the need for an intermediate storage facility, allowing continuous production and transfer of oil directly from the Heidrun TLP to shuttle tankers. Purpose-built or appropriately converted tankers with an integral bow turret locate and connect to a Submerged Turret Loading (STL) buoy which functions both as a tanker mooring point and a termination for the flexible offloading line. The system is designed to permit the tankers to remain connected during loading and to disengage from the STL buoy on completion of loading in all weather conditions up to and including the 100 year storm. This paper describes implementation of the Heidrun DSL system from conception to first oil. It gives the background for choosing the DSL system and information on the data generated to support the selection process. Design, fabrication and installation of various components are explained to give an insight into the challenges that had to be overcome for realization of this first-of-its-kind system in a record time of about one year. Installation of the complete DSL system in the summer of 1994, approximately one year ahead of the original plans, enabled full scale in situ testing of the system with a purpose-modified shuttle tanker. The two-month test program provided the equivalent of one year of operational experience with the system before first oil. The paper addresses data obtained during the full scale testing, and comparison with analytical results. The operation of the Heidrun DSL system is also described. These data together with the experience gained during realization of this bold concept will give key information on how such a concept can be effectively applied to any major or marginal field development scenario either as an offtake system or in conjunction with an FPSO/FSO.

  17. Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childers, M.; Barnes, J. |

    1995-07-17

    The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

  18. Model simulation of the drift and spread of the Aegean Sea oil spill near La Coruna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, P.

    1994-12-31

    On the 3 December 1992 the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea ran aground at Torre de Hercules near the entrance to the Ria de Coruna and La Coruna harbor, Spain. The 291 m tanker of 114,036-dwt carrying 79,096 tons of Brent type crude oil, broke up and exploded. Practically all of the oil was released into the sea. Over 200 km of shore was affected. A two-dimensional depth-integrated model on a .25 ft. x .25 ft. grid was implemented with the capability of predicting wind driven movements in the area of La Coruna. It is driven by meteorological analysis from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMRWF) global numerical weather prediction model.

  19. H. R. 2325: Comprehensive Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, May 11, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 2325 would establish a domestic liability and compensation system for oil pollution from vessels and facilities and would implement the 1984 Protocols to the 1969 Civil Liability and 1971 Fund Conventions concerning seagoing tanker-source oil pollution. The goal of this act is to: (1) strengthen the four existing oil pollution liability and compensation regimes under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, the Deepwater Port Act, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to create a unified program; (2) establish a system financed by vessel and facility owners and the oil industry to compensate the US government, the states, and Indian tribes for removal and restoration costs associated with oil spills; and (3) provide greater protection from foreign tanker oil spills by implementing the existing protocols and conventions.

  20. A design-oriented investigation into the collision strength of double-hulled structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kitano, K.

    1994-12-31

    The installation of a double-hulled structure or equivalent alteration for oil tankers was adopted by IMO (International Maritime Organization) in 1992. There is, however, few practical information on what is the minimum size of a double hull to prevent an oil leak or how the size of a double hull affects the collision strength. To give such information, the effects on the dimensions of the double-hulled structure on the collision strength were investigated quantitatively by means of an analytical method developed by the authors. The effects of the side shell plate thickness, transverse webs thickness, the size of longitudinal stiffeners, the size of transverse web stiffener and the depth of a double-hulled tanker were examined.

  1. The Kirki episode: Detailed biomarker analysis provides some surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, T.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I.

    1996-12-31

    On Sunday 21st July 1991 the oil tanker Kirki caught fire when its bow broke off in heavy seas just 40 km off the Western Australian coastline near Jurien, approximately 200 km north of Perth. The tanker was carrying 80,000 tonnes of Murban light crude oil from the Middle East. Over the next three days approximately 10,000 tonnes of this oil was released into the marine environment, the heavy seas rapidly spreading the oil slick to a thin sheen. There was extensive media coverage of this event and it was widely considered that the spill posed a serious environmental threat to reef systems, recreational beaches and the local rock lobster fishery. This report describes results of analysis performed on several of the samples.

  2. Barracuda field: New records for turret moored FPSO`s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, P.R.B.

    1995-12-01

    An early production system will introduce several innovations and set records when it comes on stream at Barracuda, the third largest of the giant oilfields offshore Brazil. The floating production unit will be a 52,000 dwt FPSO, turret type mooring and a process plant with capacity to process 30,000 bopd. It will remain on location for a minimum of five years. The tanker modifications and overhaul are underway. The FPSO will be prepared to process the oil and offload it to a tandem moored shuttle tanker. The produced gas will be both reinjected and exported to shore through a dedicated riser pipeline. This unit will comprise the world`s largest turret with capacity for 34 risers and the world`s deepest FPSO, moored in 840 meters water depth.

  3. Statoil's offshore submerged turret loading system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevik, K. ); Smedal, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Statoil, the Norwegian state oil company, and Marine Consulting Group (MCG), with support from Norwegian research institutes, are jointly developing a new offshore shuttle tanker loading concept called the Submerged Turret Loading (STL) system. The STL comprises a spread-moored buoy and export line riser configured such that, when not in use, the buoy remains submerged. For shuttle tanker loading, the vessel moves over the buoy and pulls it into a compartment in the bottom of its hull. Mooring loads are then transferred into the vessel's hull; and the export riser is connected to the shuttle's tankage within the chamber, below waterline. Principal features of the innovative new system that allows operations in seastates well beyond present-system limits, increases safety and reduces pollution potential are outlined here.

  4. Hydrocarbons in seawater, sediment, and oyster from the Omani coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Over half of the world crude oil supply is transported from the Arabian Gulf area via tankers through the narrow Strait of Hormuz, which forms the northern boundary of the Sultanate of Oman. Generally, crude oil tanker traffic off the coast of Oman is relatively heavy and all the vessels entering the Gulf to load at various terminals pass by the coastal line of Oman. The present work plays an essential part on the Omani marine monitoring program. The purpose of this program was to establish baseline levels of selected heavy metals, chlorinated and petroleum hydrocarbons in some marine species. This study aims to assess hydrocarbons in seawater, sediment and rocky oysters from the different sites along Omani coastal waters.

  5. Largest Taiwan SPM terminal installed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, A.R. )

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports on the largest Taiwan single-point mooring (SPM) terminal. Chinese Petroleum Corp. (CPC) last year installed and commissioned Taiwan's SPM terminal. This, the third of four planned SPM terminals, is unloading 100,000-300,000 dwt crude-oil tankers 5 miles offshore Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on the southwest coast of the Republic of China. Construction on the fourth SPM terminal, for unloading naphtha and diesel gas oil from 20,000 -100,000 dwt tankers, began late last year. The third terminal consists of a catenary anchor leg mooring (CALM) system, a 56-in, (1,422 mm) OD crude-oil pipeline and a 16-in. (406 mm) OD fuel-oil pipeline. The subsea pipelines extend from the CALM installed in a water depth of 118 ft to an existing shore tank farm tie-in valve station.

  6. LNG Safety Research Report to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety Research Report to Congress LNG Safety Research Report to Congress LNG Safety Research Report to Congress May 2012 The February 2007 Government Accountability Office Report (GAO Report 07-316), Public Safety Consequences of a Terrorist Attack on a Tanker Carrying Liquefied Natural Gas Need Clarification, identified several key Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) research priorities highlighted by a GAO-convened panel of experts on LNG safety in order to provide the most comprehensive and accurate

  7. EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

  8. Mega borg oil spill: Fate and effect studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    The Mega Borg, a Norwegian tanker, released an estimated 5.1 million gallons (gal) of Palanca Angola crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during a lightering accident and subsequent fire. The collection of reports was designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the spill chronology, the fate of the oil released, and subsequent studies that were conducted to assess the impacts of the oil spill on the environment and its biota.

  9. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, December 14,1989-August 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brantley, S.R.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on explosive volcanic activity at Redoubt Volcano, 177 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, which generated numerous tephra plumes that disrupted air traffic above southern Alaska, damaged aircraft, and caused locally heavy tephra fall. Pyroclastic flows triggered debris flows that inundated part of an oil-tanker facility, temporarily suspending oil production in Cook Inlet. The newly established Alaska Volcano Observatory increased its monitoring effort and disseminated volcanic hazard information to government agencies, industry, and the public.

  10. Flexible riser and mooring system develops small oil fields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, A.M.; Holmes, G. ); Benstead, P.J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on the flexible riser and mooring system (FRAMS) which provides a technically straightforward, commercially attractive method of developing small oil fields. A passively moored 60,000-deadweight-ton (60,000-DWT) tanker with deck-mounted equipment provides a swivelless well fluid and injection water path from and to the wellheads. The system can be disconnected rapidly in severe weather.

  11. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,492 8,207 - 3,723 29,770 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 1,218 257 0 11,971 36,169 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils .....................................................

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate

  16. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 62. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 5,854 111 5,743 41,510 44,952 -3,442 31,303 27,535 3,768 Petroleum Products 2

  18. Risk analysis for truck transportation of high consequence cargo.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Robert David

    2010-09-01

    The fixed facilities control everything they can to drive down risk. They control the environment, work processes, work pace and workers. The transportation sector drive the State and US highways with high kinetic energy and less-controllable risks such as: (1) other drivers (beginners, impaired, distracted, etc.); (2) other vehicles (tankers, hazmat, super-heavies); (3) road environments (bridges/tunnels/abutments/construction); and (4) degraded weather.

  19. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery » Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen is most commonly transported and delivered as a liquid when high-volume transport is needed in the absence of pipelines. To liquefy hydrogen it must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures through a liquefaction process. Trucks transporting liquid hydrogen are referred to as liquid tankers. Liquefaction Gaseous hydrogen is liquefied by cooling it to below -253°C (-423°F). Once hydrogen is liquefied it can be stored at

  20. Transport woes threaten California production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-23

    California oil producers face a loss of production this year because of constraints on pipeline and tanker transportation to Los Angeles area refineries. The potential bottleneck is occurring at a time when Outer Continental Shelf production is near capacity from Chevron Corp.'s Point Arguello project at the same time production is increasing from Exxon Corp.'s nearby Santa Ynex Unit (SYU) expansion. Both megaprojects must compete for pipeline space with onshore crude producers, notably in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Recent development limiting transportation options include: An indefinite shutdown of Four Corners Pipe Line Co.'s 50,000 b/d Line No. 1, damaged by the Jan. 17 earthquake; Loss of a tanker permit by Chevron and partners for offshore Point Arguello production; Permanent shutdown of Exxon's offshore storage and treatment (OST) facility, which since 1981 has used tankers to transport about 20,000 b/d of SYU production from the Santa Barbara Channel to Los Angeles. The OST, the first commercial floating production system in the US -- placed in the Santa Barbara Channel in 1981 after a decade of precedent setting legal and political battles -- was shut down Apr. 4. The paper discusses these production concerns, available options, the OST shutdown, and the troubled history of the OST.

  1. Technical and economical aspects of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage in deep oceans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarv, H.; John, J.

    2000-07-01

    The authors examined the technical and economical feasibility of two options for large-scale transportation and ocean sequestration of captured CO{sub 2} at depths of 3000 meters or greater. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through six parallel-laid subsea pipelines. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating platform or a barge for vertical injection through a large-diameter pipe to the ocean floor. Based on the preliminary technical and economic analyses, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a large-diameter, 3,000-meter vertical pipeline from a floating structure appears to be the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions for distances greater than 400 km. Other benefits of offshore injection are high payload capability and ease of relocation. For shorter distances (less than 400 km), CO{sub 2} delivery by subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines or tankers were under 2 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}. Their analyses also indicates that large-scale sequestration of captured CO{sub 2} in oceans is technologically feasible and has many commonalities with other strategies for deepsea natural gas and oil exploration installations.

  2. Deadline near for compliance with U. S. oil spill liability rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The petroleum industry is keeping a close watch on the approaching deadline for compliance with tough new US rules on fiscal liability for oil spills. Interim final rules scheduled to go into effect Dec. 28 stem from the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90). The designation of interim final'' rules leaves room for final adjustments on narrow issues. But in general, the rule swill stand as presently structured. OPA90 imposes liability for oil discharges from US and non-US flagged tankers, as well as ports, terminals, and offshore pipelines and other facilities. Tanker operators have voiced the most vigorous opposition to OPA90 because it could expose them to unlimited liability for damage caused by spills and will impose a phaseout on single hull tankers plying US waters. Scheduled to replace such takers are double hull vessels that carry a much bigger price tag. The paper describes provisions of OPA90, the current situation related to insurance coverage, pro and cons to the new rule, cost issues, oil firms, views, new insurers, and the mandatory excess insurance facility proposal.

  3. Gras Dowr joins world`s FPSO fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-05

    The Gras Dowr, a floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSD) for Amerada Hess Ltd.`s North Sea Durward and Dauntless fields, is one of the latest additions to the world`s growing FPSO fleet. The Gras Dowr, anchored in about 90 m of water, lies between the Durward (U.K. Block 21/16) and Dauntless (U.K. Block 21/11) fields, about 3.5 km from the subsea wellhead locations. The Gras Dowr`s main functions, according to Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., are to: receive fluids from well risers; process incoming fluids to separate the fluid into crude, water, and gas; store dry crude oil and maintain the required temperature; treat effluent to allow for water discharge to the sea; compress gas for gas lift as a future option; provide chemical injection skid for process chemical injection; use a part of the produced gas for fuel gas, and flare excess gas; inject treated seawater into the injection wells; house power generation for process and offloading operation and utilities; offload to a tandem moored shuttle tanker including receiving liquid fuel from the same tanker; provide accommodations for operating and maintenance crews; allow helicopters landings and takeoffs; allow handling and storage of goods transported by supply vessels; moor a shuttle tanker; and control the subsea wells.

  4. Economic model for seaborne oil trade. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kian-Wah, H.

    1996-03-01

    This thesis aims to provide some insights as to how oil prices and oil flows might vary with the carrying capacity of the tanker fleet as affected by political events. It provides an econometric analysis of tanker freight rates in the modern era and proposes a mathematical (quadratic) programming economic model that links the crude oil market to the supply elasticity of the world oil tanker fleet based on a competitive economy. The economic model can be considered as a version of the Walras-Cassel general-equilibrium system which possesses an economically meaningful equilibrium solution in terms of oil prices, freight rates and the pattern of oil distribution. The implementation of the model is completed using the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). The study concludes with a scenario study showing how the model could be used to examine the importance of South East Asia`s sealanes in world seaborne oil trade. The model shows the economic vulnerability of oil importing nations, especially Japan, the United States, and Western Europe, to a possible closure of South East Asian sealanes.

  5. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  6. First Stabilization and Disposal of Radioactive Zinc Bromide at the SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denny, J.K.

    2003-02-12

    Facilities Disposition Projects (FDP) personnel at Savannah River Site (SRS) implement the Inactive Facility Risk Management Program to drive down risk and costs in SRS inactive facilities. The program includes cost-effective techniques to identify and dispose of hazardous chemicals and radioactive waste from inactive facilities, thereby ensuring adequate protection of the public, workers and the environment. In June 1998, FDP conducted an assessment of the inactive C-Reactor Facility to assure that chemical and radiological hazards had been identified and were being safely managed. The walkdown identified the need to mitigate a significant hazard associated with storing approximately 13,400 gallons of liquid radioactive Zinc Bromide in three aging railcar tankers outside of the facility. No preventive maintenance was being performed on the rusting tankers and a leak could send radioactive Zinc Bromide into an outfall and offsite to the Savannah River. In 2001, DOE-Savannah River (DOE- SR) funded the FDP to eliminate the identified hazard by disposing of the radioactive Zinc Bromide solution and the three contaminated railcar tankers. This paper describes the innovative, cost-effective approaches and technology used to perform the first stabilization and disposal of radioactive Zinc Bromide at SRS.

  7. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A.

    1997-06-02

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  8. Liuhua 11-1 development -- Design and fabrication considerations for the FPSO Nanhai Sheng Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, J.P.; Koster, T.E.; Yu, L.; Haire, W.M.; Shimamura, Yoshihide

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the development, design, and fabrication of the crude oil process facilities, and the conversion of an existing tanker for use at the Liuhua 11-1 Field. Over a 16-month period spanning 1994 and 1995, Amoco Orient Petroleum Company, and partners, China Offshore Oil Nanhai East Corporation (CONHE), and Kerr-McGee China Petroleum Ltd., converted a crude oil tanker originally built in 1975 to the Nanhai Sheng Li, the floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) facility for the Liuhua 11-1 Field. The FPSO will process up to 65,000 BOPD produced from 20 subsea wells located 1.7 miles away. In addition to the processing facilities for produced oil and water, the FPSO has a processed crude oil storage capacity of 715,000 bbls. The ship`s propulsion system was removed during the conversion, because the FPSO is permanently moored at site by means of a 10-point, ``soft`` mooring. The mooring system was designed to survive the 100-year-return-period typhoon. Several unique aspects of the ship`s conversion, process facility, and mooring system design are discussed. Process design aspects include the flexibility to accommodate wide variations in produced water-oil ratio and total volume, the design considerations of the large water and crude processing equipment, vessel motions during operation, and equipment survival during storms.The FPSO design discussion focuses on global hull strength for surviving a 100-year typhoon. Special design requirements for the mooring turret structural integration to the converted tanker are also discussed.

  9. AEO Early Release 2013 - LNG exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas,

  10. Federal offshore statistics: leasing, exploration, production, revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essertier, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The statistics in this update of the Outer Continental Shelf Statistics publication document what has happened since federal leasing began on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in 1954. Highlights note that of the 29.8 million acres actually leased from 175.6 million acres offered for leasing, 20.1% were in frontier areas. Total revenues for the 1954-1982 period were $58.9 billion with about 13% received in 1982. The book is divided into six parts covering highlights, leasing, exploration and development, production and revenue, reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources, and pollution problems from well and tanker accidents. 5 figures, 59 tables.

  11. Unique Kutubu export system complete; production flowing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGovern, R.; Miller, G. )

    1992-08-03

    First oil from near Lake Kutubu in Papua New Guinea began flowing in June through pipelines and marine facilities recently installed by Chevron Niugini Pty. Ltd. Production facilities were built near Lake Kutubu. The export pipeline was laid form the central production facility to landfall on the Kikori River - approximately 171 km (106 miles) away - and then another 56 miles to a platform in 66 ft of water in the gulf. From the platform, an oilspading line extends about 2.4 miles to the SPM in 83 ft of water where tankers will load oil at an initial design flowrate of 157,000 b/d.

  12. A parable of oil and water: Revisiting Prince William Sound, four years after

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeble, J.

    1993-12-31

    On Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon oil tanker Valdez foundered on Bligh Reef, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska`s Prince William Sound. To Alaskans, especially fishing people, this was a shocking but not entirely unanticipated event, as there had been several near misses in the twelve years since the opening of oil shipping from Valdez, Alaska. This article revisits Prince William sound to evaluate both the lingering environmental effects and the socio-economic effects of the spill and the huge monetary settlement from the spills.

  13. Chedabucto Bay 1992 shoreline oil conditions survey: Long-term fate of bunker C oil from the arrow spill in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, E.H.; McGuire, B.E.; Humphrey, B.

    1994-03-01

    The report presents a description of the activities related to and a summary of the information generated by a field survey carried out in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia, for Environment Canada from June to September 1992. The objective of the survey was to locate and document any residual oil on the shores of Chedabucto Bay. The grounding of the tanker Arrow in February 1970 resulted in the release of more than 11 million liters of Bunker C fuel oil. This oil was stranded over an estimated 305 km of shoreline in the Chedabucto Bay area.

  14. Enhanced removal of Exxon Valdez spilled oil Alaskan gravel by a microbial surfactant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, S.; Elashvili, I.; Valdes, J.J.; Kamely, D.; Chakrabarty, A.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Remediation efforts for the oil spill from the Exxon Valdez tanker in Alaska have focused on the use of pressurized water at high temperature to remove oil from the beaches. We have tested a biological surfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa for its ability to remove oil from contaminated Alaskan gravel samples under various conditions, including concentration of the surfactant, time of contact, temperature of the wash, and presence or absence of xanthan gum. The results demonstrate the ability of the microbial surfactant to release oil to a significantly greater extent (2 to 3 times) than water alone, particularly at temperatures of 30{degree}C and above.

  15. Water pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

  16. Adequacy of the regulatory oversight of the Trans-Alaska pipeline and terminal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Exxon Valdez spill abruptly brought to the nation's attention the risks of transporting crude oil. While oil tanker transportation received many of the headlines, the safety of pipelines carrying oil and the terminals that store it have also been called into question. GAO testified on the adequacy of regulatory oversight of the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline System and the terminal at Valdez, Alaska. This paper reports increased and coordinated regulatory oversight as a major component of an effective operational and emergency response strategy for the pipeline. The current lack of comprehensive and systematic oversight is of particular concern because of recent revelations of significant corrosion problems in the pipeline.

  17. AES Job Opening | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas,

  18. TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................................ 0 433 0 344 978 772 0 0 58,118 Petroleum Products ...................................... 8,045 76 0 3,328 6,928 2,885 0 100,331 23,625 Pentanes Plus ............................................ 0 0 0 0 159 0 0 0 549 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ........................ 0 0 0 1,093 5,010 262 0 3,644 4,920 Unfinished Oils

  19. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0, 2015 EIA rolls out monthly data on crude oil movements by rail For the first time, EIA is providing monthly data on rail movements of crude oil, which have significantly increased over the past five years. The new data on crude-by-rail (CBR) movements are fully integrated with EIA's existing monthly petroleum supply statistics, which already include crude oil movements by pipeline, tanker, and barge. "The new crude-by-rail data provides a clearer picture on a mode of oil transportation

  20. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 3,915 11,607 0 144,029 306,147 40,502 52,647 12,520 327,620 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 135,147 257 0 32,487 154,091 46,624 0 1,186,871 261,553 Pentanes Plus

  1. Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-03-09

    Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

  2. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  3. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage & Liquid Delivery Jacob Leachman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor DOE H 2 Transmission & Delivery Workshop 2/26/2014 H Y P E R H drogen roperties for nergy esearch This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Jacob Leachman * DOE H 2 Transmission & Distribution Workshop * 2/25/2014 H Y P E R Why Cryogenic Hydrogen? * LH 2 tanker trucks delivered 80-90 % of total small merchant H 2 in 2010. 1 * Cryo-H

  4. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  5. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 30, 2015 EIA rolls out monthly data on crude oil movements by rail For the first time, EIA is providing monthly data on rail movements of crude oil, which have significantly increased over the past five years. The new data on crude-by-rail (CBR) movements are fully integrated with EIA's existing monthly petroleum supply statistics, which already include crude oil movements by pipeline, tanker, and barge. "The new crude-by-rail data provides a clearer picture on a mode of oil

  6. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from (Near) Disaster In 1966, a B-52 collided with a tanker over Palomares, Spain, while refueling. Three of its four hydrogen bombs fell on land, and the fourth fell into the sea, where it was recovered after a lengthy search (see photo on page 17). Two bombs were destroyed when their conventional high explosives detonated; the surviving two bomb casings are on display at the National Atomic Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The incident helped prompt the initiative at Los Alamos to

  7. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6.PDF Table 36. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 243 970 0 9,854 19,641 2,664 3,204 775 27,762 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 8,629 40 0 3,003 11,633 3,419 0 103,987 16,778 Pentanes Plus

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 June 2016 Table 57. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, Barge, and Rail Between PAD Districts, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil 1 ................................................................ 73 38 0 4,536 29,329 7,264 3,824 1,318 26,217 Petroleum Products 2 .............................................. 13,851 0 0 10,621 25,885 6,904 4,101 98,009 24,877 Pentanes Plus

  9. Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orphan, Victor J.

    2011-06-01

    SAIC's development of VACIS provides useful 'lessons learned' in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify ''lessons learned'' useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

  10. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was speci#12;cally developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  11. Offshore refrigerated LPG loading/unloading terminal using a CALM buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonjour, E.L.; Simon, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    In existing Liquefied Petroleum Gases terminals, the transfer of liquefied gases to the tanker is performed via articulated loading arms or flexible hoses, working under quasistatic conditions. The tanker has to be firmly moored alongside a jetty or a process barge in a protected area (such as a harbour in most cases). This paper gives the main results of the development of an offshore refrigerated LPG (-48/sup 0/C) loading/unloading system, using a CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses working under dynamic conditions. The aim of this new concept is to replace the standard harbour structure for loading/unloading refrigerated LPG and to provide a considerable reduction in investments and a greater flexibility regarding the terminal location. The main components of that terminal have been designed so as to enable the loading of a 75 000 cubic meter LPG carrier in 15 hours. The results of static and dynamic low temperature tests on a LPG swivel joint for CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses show that such a SPM terminal is now a realistic solution.

  12. Ship-borne oil dispersant procedure and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.A.

    1981-11-17

    A method and system are disclosed for dispersing oil in the event of an oil leak into a body of water from an oil tanker or an oil drilling platform. There is provided structure for detecting the existence of a leak from a container of oil generally surrounded by a body of water into which the oil is leaking; structure for storing an oil dispersant at the site of the leak; and structure responsive to the occurrence of the leak, for automatically causing the dispersant to be released from the containment structure into the leaking oil. In an oil tanker, the system and method may be implemented by providing structure for detecting a leak in the oil tank wall, suspending a container of dispersant inside the oil tank, and providing structure for rupturing the dispersant container in response to the detection of a leak so that dispersant is caused to mix with the oil in the tank before the oil leaks therefrom. In the case of an offshore oil drilling platform, the system and method may be implemented by leak detection devices mounted to the drill casings or on buoys in the water body, one or more dispersant containers with release chutes directed toward the water body mounted to the side of the platform, and structure responsive to the detection devices for opening the dispersant containers in response to the detection of an oil leak.

  13. Final report on development and testing of the microwave oil-water monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, C.

    1991-06-15

    The oil-water monitor is a device invented by Dr. Claude Swanson of Applied Physics Technology to respond to the petroleum-loss problem in crude oil transfers. It is a device which measures water content in crude oil and other petroleum products, in a flowing pipe such as a pipeline or tanker manifold. It is capable of accurately measuring the water contamination levels in crude oil shipments, in real time as the crude oil flows through the loading manifold into the tanker, or at the receiving point as the oil is off-loaded. The oil-water monitor has application in the verification of oil volumes and concentration of contaminants at petroleum transfer points. The industry-estimated level of water loss at transfer points due to inadequate monitoring technology amounts to several billion dollars per year, so there is a definite perceived need within the petroleum community for this type of accurate water monitoring technology. News articles indicating the importance of this problem are shown. The microwave oil-water monitor measures the water content in the oil, whether in the form of small droplets or large globules. Therefore it can be applied to the crude oil as it flows through crude oil pipes into the ship, or at transfer points in a crude oil distribution system. 4 refs., 18 figs.

  14. Exxon Valdez controversy revived

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-26

    Four years after its occurrence rocked the petroleum industry and revitalized the US environmental movement, the Exxon Valdez tanker oil spill off Alaska continues to stir controversy. Conflicting reports abound over whether there is long term damage to the Prince William Sound ecosystem resulting from the March 24, 1989, spill. Government scientists at recent conferences disclosed studies they contend show long term, significant damage to the sound. Exxon this month launched a counteroffensive, disclosing results of studies it funded that it claims show no credible scientific evidence of long term damage. At the same time, the company blasted as flawed the government's data on assessing environmental damage to the sound and charged that test samples from the sound were mishandled. Meantime, Prince William Sound still shows lingering effects from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. But recovery has been so rapid that there is more controversy over how to use $900 million in natural resource recovery funds that Exxon paid than over how badly species are suffering. The paper describes Exxon's studies; faulty data; lingering damage; and an update on tanker safety.

  15. Development of the oil-water monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, C.

    1990-04-02

    The oil-water monitor is a device invented by Dr. Claude Swanson of Applied Physics Technology to respond to the petroleum-loss problem in crude oil transfers. It is a device which measures water content in crude oil and other petroleum products, in a flowing pipe such as a pipeline or tanker manifold. It is capable of accurately measuring the water contamination levels in crude oil shipments, in real time as the crude oil flows through the loading manifold into the tanker, or at the receiving point as the oil is off-loaded It has application in the verification of oil volumes and concentration of contaminants at petroleum transfer points. The industry-estimated level of water loss at transfer points due to inadequate monitoring technology amounts to several billion dollars per year, so there is a definite perceived need within the petroleum community for this type of accurate water monitoring technology. The device has been patented, and initial feasibility experiments have been conducted. The present research is directed toward developing and demonstrating a bench model prototype of the oil-water monitor, complete with the computer software and automated microwave equipment and electronics which will demonstrate the performance of the invention, for implementation in full-scale fielded systems. 3 figs.

  16. Experience with offloading in the North Sea: Development of new cost efficient technology for marine storage and production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breivik, K.G.

    1995-12-01

    Statoil has 15 years of experience with offshore loading -- or ``off loading`` -- in the North Sea. Initially, this operation was based on a rather complex articulated loading platform (ALP) and a few modified conventional tankers. The technique has developed into today`s simple but efficient submerged turret loading (STL) system and a significant fleet of highly specialized vessels. These include the multipurpose shuttle tanker (MST), the first of which was recently ordered. The efficiency and regularity of off loading operations match that of pipeline transport. Experience gained during 15 years of off loading has yielded a constant series of improvements in operational safety and developments in standardized operating procedures. Statoil ranks today as one of the world`s largest exporters of crude oil, and offshore loading plays a key role in the group`s operations. The recent development of integrated off loading and vessel technologies opens the way to an interesting and promising future for off loading as well as marine storage production.

  17. Floating oil production unit slated in small field off Gabon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-14

    This paper reports on the first U.S. tanker converted to a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) unit which takes up station in Gombe-Beta field off Gabon by Dec. 1. FPSO Ocean Producer will work under a 3 year, day rate contract let late in 1990 by Amoco-Gabon Bombe Marin co., a unit of Amoco Production Co. (OGJ, Dec. 24, 1990, p. 27). Gombe-Beta field is in the Atlantic Ocean about 70 miles south of Port Gentil, Gabon. Ocean Producer will be moored in 50 ft of water 3.7 miles off Gabon, with Bombe-Beta's unmanned production platform about 820 ft astern. The vessel will be held in position by a disconnectable, asymmetric, six point, spread mooring system, It is owned and operated by Oceaneering International Services Ltd. (OISL). Affiliate Oceaneering Production Systems (OPS) converted the 78,061 dwt oil tanker MT Baltimore Sea at a capital cost of $25 million at Gulf Copper Manufacturing Corp.'s Port Arthur, Tex., shipyard. Both companies are units of Oceaneering International Inc., Houston. OPS the Ocean Producer's use in Gombe-Beta field is the shallowest water FPSO application in the world. Amoco-Gabon chose an FPSO production system for Gombe-Beta because it expects the remote field to have a short economic life, and the oil requires extensive processing.

  18. The Canadian experience in frontier environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.H. )

    1991-03-01

    Early Canadian frontier exploration (from 1955 onshore and from 1966 for offshore drilling) caused insignificant public concern. The 1967-1968 Torrey Canyon Tanker and Santa Barbara disasters roused public opinion and governments. In Canada, 1969-1970 Arctic gas blowouts, a tanker disaster, and damage to the 'Manhattan' exacerbated concerns and resulted in new environmental regulatory constraints. From 1970, the Arctic Petroleum Operations Association learned to operate safely with environmental responsibility. It studied physical environment for design criteria, and the biological and human environment to ameliorate impact. APOA's research projects covered sea-ice, permafrost, sea-bottom, oil-spills, bird and mammal migration, fish habitat, food chains, oceanography, meteorology, hunters'/trappers' harvests, etc. In 1971 Eastcoast Petroleum Operators' Association and Alaska Oil and Gas Association followed APOA's cooperative research model. EPOA stressed icebergs and fisheries. Certain research was handled by the Canadian Offshore Oil Spill Research Association. By the mid-1980s these associations had undertaken $70,000,000 of environmental oriented research, with equivalent additional work by member companies on specific needs and similar sums by Federal agencies often working with industry on complementary research. The frontier associations then merged with the Canadian Petroleum Association, already active environmentally in western Canada. Working with government and informing environmental interest groups, the public, natives, and local groups, most Canadian frontier petroleum operations proceeded with minimal delay and environmental disturbance.

  19. Prepermit work starts on California crude line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-08

    This paper reports on preliminary work leading to permitting efforts for a 171 mile pipeline to move low gravity crude from giant fields of California to the Los Angeles area. The 20 in., unheated pipeline would cost $180-190 million and could go on stream in 3-3 1/2 years. The project has the backing of partners in development of giant Point Arguello field in the Santa Maria basin off Santa Barbara County, a project blocked from start-up for more than 3 years by permitting wrangles. Pipeline sponsors also have proposed moving oil production from development of Santa Ynez Unit in the Santa Barbara Channel. Point Arguello production is expected to start this year with flow limited to 20,000 b/d, moving moved by pipeline to refineries outside Los Angeles. Point Arguello partners want to ship full Arguello production of 80,000-100,00 b/d by tanker until the PPC project is complete, which the county opposes. The group has appealed the county's denial of an interim tankering permit to the California Coastal Commission, which is expected to hold a hearing on the matter this month. The controversy has been further complicated by other, competing projects designed to move Point Arguello crude to market.

  20. The Esso-Bernicia oil spill, Shetland, 1978-79: Experiences and lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, W. ); Kingham, L.V. )

    1991-03-01

    About 200 tons of Bunker C fuel oil escaped from a ruptured tank in a berthing incident in the winter of 1978-79. The worst weather conditions in a decade and failure of equipment led to widespread environmental damage. Local crofters also suffered some loss of sheep through oiling and subsequent drowning (sheep graze backshore beach areas of Shetland). The environmental response to the experiences of this accident produced reinforcement of baseline and operational monitoring of the physical and biological environments. SOTEAG (the Shetland Oil Terminal Environmental Group - a committee set up and funded jointly by industry (the terminal and pipeline operators) and Shetland Island Council and including the Port of Sullom Voe Harbour Authority) also commissioned special surveys to investigate other claims of environmental damage. At a managerial level, links between the Sullom Voe Oil Spills Advisory Committee (SVOSAC) and SOTEAG were reinforced. To prevent any recurrence of the widespread damage caused by 'Bernicia' a multimillion dollar engineering project was completed to build permanent spill booms to intercept oil moving along the coast at strategic points and to boom-off environmentally sensitive areas. Oil spill response equipment and deployment capacity were also increased substantially. Although not related directly to 'Bernicia,' other improvements over the last decade have included an 'area of avoidance' for the prescribed westerly, Atlantic, tanker approach to the terminal (effectively at least 10 mi away from land), aerial and video inspection of all inbound tankers, and the introduction of legislation relating to the amount and quality of ballast water.

  1. OCT (Offshore Technology Conference) accents deepwater action around the globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, P.; Scarborough, R.H.

    1980-05-12

    According to P. Yost (US Coast Guard) at the 12th Offshore Technology Conference (Houston 1980), the US Coast Guard's high-seas boom and skimmer equipment worked well with the strong constant currents and heavy crude involved in the Ixtoc blowout but due to a lighter crude and more variable currents, was not as successful in containing spills from the Burmah Agate tanker in the fall of 1989. Texas beaches will not remove any more oil from the Ixtoc blowout, but the long term effects of the spill remain unknown. Federal and state officials are examining options concerning the 17-19 tar mats deposited by the spill on the beaches; the only way to remove the tar mats might be by bulldozer at low tide. A Coast Guard study of tanker and freighter traffic off Galveston, Texas has been completed and recommendations, possibly involving earlier boarding by pilots of incoming vessels, will be made soon. Other papers presented at the OTC are discussed.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 120: Areas 5 and 6 Aboveground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison Urban

    1999-06-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 120. CAU 120 consists of two Corrective Action Sites located in Areas 5 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site. CAS 05-01-01 is located in Area 5 and consists of three 45,800-liter aboveground storage tanks, piping, and debris associated with Well RNM-1. CAS 06-01-01 in Area 6 consists of two aboveground storage tanks and two tanker trailers All the CAU 120 items have been used to convey or contain radiologically contaminated fluid from post-nuclear event activities at the NTS> Closure of this CAU was completed by collecting samples to identify the appropriate method of disposal for tanks, piping, debris, and tankers in each CAS. Placing low-level radioactive waste into the appropriate containers and disposing of waste in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, the Area 9 10C Landfill, and the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site.

  3. Exceptions to the rules of oil-spill behavior: Case studies of major oil spills of the past twenty years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, M.O.

    1994-11-01

    Studies of major oil spills over the past 20 yr have allowed an evolution of our understanding of how to respond to and remediate the environmental impacts from such spills. There have been a number of spills for which follow-up research has provided major turning points that allowed the development of certain rules of oil-spill behavior. For example, the spill of over 100,000 tons of crude oil by the tanker Urquiola on the coast of Spain in May 1976 demonstrated the importance of hydrodynamic energy level in natural cleanup processes. Research on the spill of over 200,000 tons of crude oil along the coast of France by the tanker Amoco Cadiz in March 1978 allowed a better understanding of the long-term effects of spilled oil on exposed tidal flats and salt marshes. The oil spilled by the tanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound, Alaska, in March 1989 impacted many miles of gravel beaches, which were treated by a number of methods, including some innovative berm-relocation techniques. A thorough understanding of the coastal geomorphology and processes of the spill site was essential for the development of meaningful contingency and response plans. Research on the impacts of intertidal habitats of the coast of Saudi Arabia during the Gulf War spill of 1991 indicates that some previously held concepts on oil behavior and fate on shorelines must be revised. One of the best established rules of oil-spill behavior was that the depth of oil penetration on sand beaches and tidal flats increases with increasing sediment grain size. However, no such correlation was found on the Saudi Arabian coast, primarily due to the presence of secondary porosity (e.g., bubble sand, extensive burrows, and gypsum crystals). The oil penetrated to depths of tens of centimeters, even in fine sand, which has significantly slowed natural removal processes and weathering rates. These sediments remained heavily oiled with incipient asphalt pavements forming two years after the spill.

  4. East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,121,490 1,155,814 1,202,911 1,269,854 1,329,650 1,341,370 1981-2015 Crude Oil 6,766 7,153 23,011 81,350 147,071 153,586 1981-2015 Petroleum Products 1,114,724 1,148,661 1,179,900 1,188,504

  5. March 2009 Y-12 Times

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track

  6. China has 6,000-mile pipeline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming, S.

    1983-08-01

    A dramatic change has taken place in China's oil transport system, with pipelines replacing tank-cars as the most important means of transport for crude oil and petroleum products. According to Petroleum Ministry officials, the volume of crude oil carried by China's pipeline system increased from 23.2 percent in 1971 to 65.6 percent in 1981, while the volume delivered by tank-cars declined from 61.11 percent to 8.4 percent. The remainder was transported by tankers. China's 9,700 km (6,000-mile) pipeline network includes 5,600 km (3,500 miles) designed to carry crude oil and more than 600 km (375 miles) for petroleum products, plus 3,400 km (2,100 miles), mostly in Sichuan province, for natural gas.

  7. Potential seen for doubling U. S. LNG imports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-21

    According to a U.S. Office of Technology Assessment report, Nigeria, Indonesia, Australia, Malaysia, Trinidad, Colombia, and Chile are the most likely sources of U.S. imports of LNG, although the areas with the greatest amounts of exportable surplus LNG are the Persian Gulf, with > 231 trillion cu ft/yr, and the U.S.S.R., with 439 trillion cu ft/yr. The import of LNG would increase the U.S. balance of payments deficit, but LNG imports seem preferable to oil imports. LNG producers have a tendency to sell to Europe or Japan, since these areas are closer to the LNG sources. Maritime Administration and Export-Import Bank programs favor the use of domestic rather than foreign LNG tankers, which tends to reduce the financial stake of foreign suppliers in uninterrupted deliveries. Exportable LNG surpluses (in trillions of cu ft/yr) include: Algeria, 8; Nigeria, 33; Southeast Asia, 41; and Western Hemisphere, 19.

  8. Transmission, storage and export of product from the Arun field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soeryanto, J.

    1982-01-01

    Arun liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant is the second Indonesian LNG plant. It began production in August 1978. Plant feed is supplied from the Arun gas condensate field located ca. 30 km from the plant. The overall complex is designed to produced LNG equivalent to 18 million cu m/day of gas, and 12,000 cu m/day of stabilized condensate. Field facilities produce and separate gas and condensate for delivery through separate pipelines to the LNG plant. At the plant, condensate is stabilized and stored in four 78,705-cu m floating roof tanks and shipped in conventional tankers, moored off shore. The gas is treated, dehydrated, and liquefied. Gas treating is accomplished by the Benfield Hi-pure Process. Liquefaction is accomplished using the propane pre-cooled multi-component refrigerant process. Refrigerant components required for the liquefaction process are produced from 2 fractionation trains.

  9. Histopathologic lesions in sea otters exposed to crude oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, R.K.; Moeller, R.B.; Pletcher, J.M.; Haebler, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    On 24 March 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska. In the months following the spill, over 1,000 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from oil spill-affected areas are known to have died. The purpose of the study is to identify and describe histopathologic lesions associated with crude oil exposure in sea otters and to discuss possible pathogeneses of the lesions. Materials available included tissues from oil-contaminated and uncontaminated otters that died in rehabilitation centers following the oil spill and tissues from otters that were found dead in the oil spill-affected area with external oil present. Tissues from apparently normal sea otters from an area not contaminated by crude oil, were also examined.

  10. Hydrocarbons in intertidal sediments and mussels from Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1977-1980: Characterization and probable sources. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karinen, J.F.; Babcock, M.M.; Brown, D.W.; MacLeod, W.D.; Ramos, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    The oil spill that resulted from the March 1989 grounding of the oil tanker vessel Exxon Valdez provides a unique opportunity for the study of marine oil pollution effects because the spilled crude oil polluted a large geographic area that was previously considered pristine. The only sources of confounding hydrocarbons in the areas of Prince William Sound, Alaska, impacted by the spill are naturally occurring hydrocarbons and anthropogenic hydrocarbons from occasional boating activity in the Sound or due to long-range atmospheric transport. The authors' objectives were to determine the levels, intra-annual variability, and interannual variability of selected alkane hydrocarbons and PAHs in intertidal sediments and in M. trossulus tissues at a network of sampling stations over the 4-year sampling period, and if possible to identify the likely sources of hydrocarbons found.

  11. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Paschkewitz, J; Pointer, W D; DeChant, L J; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Radovich, C; Merzel, T; Plocher, D; Ross, J; Storms, B; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Roy, C J

    2005-11-14

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At high way speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices.

  12. Oil spill response engineering and planning. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, M.R.; Celikkol, B.; Goodwin, C.E.; Carrier, R.; McDonald, S.P.

    1991-12-01

    Tanker and barge traffic associated with the five petroleum product terminals along the NH side of the Piscataqua River represents a constant oil spill threat to the contiguous Great Bay System, NH, an estuarine reserve. Several serious accidents have in fact taken place in the 1970's and two small spills in 1990. A major factor is that the Piscataqua channel is subject to high velocity tidal currents. Should a spill occur, problems arise in knowing where the slick will move and how to control it using booms. In the project, these problems were addressed by developing procedures for using diversion booms in high speed current environments and in revising and implementing a previously developed Oil Spill Trajectory Model.

  13. Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-08-25

    The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO's is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today's cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

  14. In the wake of the Exxon Valdez

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.

    1990-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez went aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, releasing more than ten million gallons of oil. This book begins with a dramatic, minute-by-minute account of the wreck itself and the woefully ineffective oil spill response plans. It explores the reactions and interactions of the oil industry and government officials. It includes interviews of Exxon executives, state and federal decision-makers, environmental scientists, and Native villagers. Drawing on these exclusive accounts plus the myriad public documents generated by the disaster, a compelling account of an environmental crisis beyond control and its devastating toll on Alaska's people, wildlife, and landscape is presented.

  15. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. )

    1991-11-01

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

  16. Commingled crude from Brent and Ninian streams assayed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-08

    Crudes from the Brent and Ninian pipeline systems have been commingled into a single stream known as Brent blend. The commingling began Aug. 2, 1990. Reasons for commingling the blends include declining throughput of both systems and the need to maintain Brent blend as a crude of consistent quality and volume. Brent blend's good refining properties and production rate have given it benchmark status. The price of Brent blend is used to calculate many other crude prices. Some Middle Eastern crudes sold in Europe are based on a fixed discount to the price of Brent blend. Another reason for the commingling is cost savings. Because the two streams had been stabilized and stored at separate facilities at the Sullom Voe terminal on the Shetland Islands, there is now more flexibility in the system. The commingled crude is shipped by tankers from the Sullom Voe terminal.

  17. Hopper dredges applied to the Alaska oil spill, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, K.H.; Redlinger, J.F.

    1992-03-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground in Prince William Sound, Alaska. This accident resulted in the largest American oil spill ever and spoiled one of the most pristine areas in North America. In April 1989, the US Army Corps of Engineers was requested to assist in the cleanup of this disastrous oil spill. Two of the Corps' minimum fleet hopper dredges, the Yaquina and the Essayons, were dispatched to assist in collecting oil. Although unmodified hopper dredges had never been used in this capacity, the Yaquina and the Essayons proved to be the most effective tools in the recovery of oil. Given proper air support, adequate containment boom, and commitment at the earliest possible time, hopper dredges can make a significant contribution to the cleanup of large oil spills.

  18. Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-08-25

    The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO`s is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today`s cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

  19. No frills loading terminal in operation off Equatorial Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, B. )

    1992-02-24

    A multipoint conventional buoy mooring, often called a Mediterranean moor, provides a low-cost solution for loading tankers from the new onshore Isla de Bioko terminal in Equatorial Guinea, West Africa. This paper reports on this mooring method which is a basic no frills terminal system, suitable for protected areas with moderate sea conditions. The system will be used for transporting condensate produced in the offshore Alba field. Walter International, a Houston-based independent producer, together with its partners, is developing this gas condensate field in about 250 ft of water, some 18 miles off the coast. The high gravity, 47-48{degrees} API, Alba field gas condensate is piped to a shore-based tank farm for processing and storage.

  20. Pollution by petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments from continental shelf of Tabasco State, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botello, A.V.; Gonzalez, C.; Diaz, G. )

    1991-10-01

    The Wider Caribbean is potentially one of the largest oil producing areas in the world. Major petroleum production areas include Louisiana and Texas, USA; the Bay of Campeche, Mexico; Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela; and Gulf of Paria, Trinidad; all of which are classified as production accident high-risk zones. About 5 million of barrels are transported every day in the Caribbean, thus generating an intense tanker traffic. It has been estimated that oil discharges from tank washings within the Wider Caribbean could be as high as 7 million barrels/year. For all those reasons petroleum pollution is considered as the major environmental problem in the Wider Caribbean area and increasing day to day due to the use of petroleum as the main energy source. On the other hand, the continental shelf of Tabasco state actually represents one of the most productive areas for crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico. Sediments were collected from this area and analyzed for hydrocarbons.

  1. Evolutionary developments advancing the floating production, storage, and offloading concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.H.T.; Foolen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Tanker-based floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) systems have been in operation since Aug. 1977, when a single-well FPSO was put into production by Shell Espana in the Mediterranean. The overall operational experience with this system at this field is reviewed. Special attention is directed to the wireline workover facilities which have proven to be satisfactory. A subsequent evolutionary step, a FPSO accommodating multiple wells, necessitated development of a multiple-bore product swivel. A design program for this swivel was initiated in 1978, a prototype was built and fullscale testing finalized in 1980. A summary of the test results is presented. Simultaneous with the multiple-bore swivel development, detailed engineering for an 8-well FPSO was begun. This sytem includes gas lift a

  2. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker, Pipeline, Barge and Rail between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","From PADD 1 to",4,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1986" ,"Data 2","From PADD 2 to",4,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1986" ,"Data 3","From

  3. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","From PADD 1 to",3,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1986" ,"Data 2","From PADD 2 to",3,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1986" ,"Data 3","From PADD 3

  4. East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline, Tanker, Barge and Rail Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 109,830 103,720 105,744 98,960 101,137 100,522 1981-2016 Crude Oil 9,972 7,611 8,237 6,549 7,648 5,743 1981-2016 Petroleum Products 100,144 95,869 96,421 92,656 93,488 94,779 1986-2016

  5. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2015 (Thousand Barrels) a Pipeline 25,319 1,270,581 1,894,658 178,448 290,577 3,659,583 Domestic 2,766 679,552 1,624,647 86,978 222,419 2,616,362 Foreign 22,553 591,029 270,011 91,470 68,158 1,043,221 Tanker 305,663 0 941,152 0 513,584 1,760,399 Domestic 119,833 0 28,324 0 180,353 328,510 Foreign 185,830 0 912,828 0 333,231 1,431,889 Barge 22,367 4,569 227,383 0

  6. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration closure report for Corrective Action Unit 120: Areas 5 and 6 aboveground storage tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 120 of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). CAU 120 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which are approximately 130 kilometers (80 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAS 05-01-01 is located in Area 5 and consists of three 45,800-liter (12,100-gallon) aboveground storage tanks (ASTs), piping, and debris associated with Well RNM-1. CAS 06-01-01 consists of two ASTs and two tanker trailers (all portable) that were originally located at the Area 6 Cp-50 Hot Park and which had been moved to the Area 6 Waste Handling Facility. All of the items in CAU 120 have been used to contain or convey radiologically contaminated fluid that was generated during post-nuclear event activities at the NTS.

  7. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: A "Worst Case Scenario" for Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2012-07-06

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, at the interchange known as the "MacArthur Maze." The accident involved a double tanker truck of gasoline overturning and bursting into flames. The subsequent fire reduced the strength of the supporting steel structure of an overhead interstate roadway causing the collapse of portions of that overpass onto the lower roadway in less than 20 minutes. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has analyzed what might have happened had a spent nuclear fuel transportation package been involved in this accident, to determine if there are any potential regulatory implications of this accident to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper provides a summary of this effort, presents preliminary results and conclusions, and discusses future work related to the NRC's analysis of the consequences of this type of severe accident.

  8. Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

    1980-12-01

    A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

  9. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

  10. Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

  11. Dimethyl ether fuel proposed as an alternative to LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikkawa, Yoshitsugi; Aoki, Ichizo

    1998-04-06

    To cope with the emerging energy demand in Asia, alternative fuels to LNG must be considered. Alternative measures, which convert the natural gas to liquid fuel, include the Fischer-Tropsch conversion, methanol synthesis, and dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis. Comparisons are evaluated based on both transportation cost and feed-gas cost. The analysis will show that DME, one alternative to LNG as transportation fuel, will be more economical for longer distances between the natural-gas source and the consumer. LNG requires a costly tanker and receiving terminal. The break-even distance will be around 5,000--7,000 km and vary depending on the transported volume. There will be risk, however, since there has never been a DME plant the size of an LNG-equivalent plant [6 million metric tons/year (mty)].

  12. Foinaven development - breaking the mould

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maclean, C.H.J.; Boyd, J.D.; Smith, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Foinaven Phase 1, the first oil field development West of Shetland (UK), has produced a new standard in the time between discovery and first oil. This performance improvement stems from the clarity of hydrocarbon imaging available with new technology based on 3D seismic data. Oil in the Foinaven field (discovered in late 1992) lies within Palaeocene reservoir sands. Reservoir quality is excellent, although the sands are relatively thin, distributed over a large area and are overlain by a gas cap. Prior to appraisal drilling, 3D seismic data were acquired as part of an extensive 2000 sq. km. survey shot in the summer of 1993. The conventional 3D seismic data were inverted to produce an acoustic impedance (Al) dataset. Comparisons of Al-predicted vs. actual hydrocarbon pore thickness during appraisal drilling have shown a typical variance of less than +/- 10%. A horizontal appraisal well was spudded in mid-1994. Once the target reservoir was entered, directional information from MWD was used to steer the well along a desired path in real time to intersect specific targets. The hole was completed using a pre-packed production liner. An extended well test using a semi-submersible linked to a shuttle tanker was undertaken, and over 400,000 bbi of oil were produced. This extended test yielded significant long-term development information. This combination of technologies - seismic, drilling and extended well test - has proved invaluable in advancing the appraisal of Foinaven. Foinaven Phase I is being developed by Petrojarl IV, a ship shaped FPSO facility. Horizontal production wells will be used with subsea completion, and following processing the crude oil will be exported by shuttle tanker. Development drilling started in November 1994. First oil is programmed for early 1996 at a plateau rate around 85 mbd.

  13. Foinaven development - breaking the mould

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maclean, C.H.J.; Boyd, J.D.; Smith, P.J. )

    1996-01-01

    Foinaven Phase 1, the first oil field development West of Shetland (UK), has produced a new standard in the time between discovery and first oil. This performance improvement stems from the clarity of hydrocarbon imaging available with new technology based on 3D seismic data. Oil in the Foinaven field (discovered in late 1992) lies within Palaeocene reservoir sands. Reservoir quality is excellent, although the sands are relatively thin, distributed over a large area and are overlain by a gas cap. Prior to appraisal drilling, 3D seismic data were acquired as part of an extensive 2000 sq. km. survey shot in the summer of 1993. The conventional 3D seismic data were inverted to produce an acoustic impedance (Al) dataset. Comparisons of Al-predicted vs. actual hydrocarbon pore thickness during appraisal drilling have shown a typical variance of less than +/- 10%. A horizontal appraisal well was spudded in mid-1994. Once the target reservoir was entered, directional information from MWD was used to steer the well along a desired path in real time to intersect specific targets. The hole was completed using a pre-packed production liner. An extended well test using a semi-submersible linked to a shuttle tanker was undertaken, and over 400,000 bbi of oil were produced. This extended test yielded significant long-term development information. This combination of technologies - seismic, drilling and extended well test - has proved invaluable in advancing the appraisal of Foinaven. Foinaven Phase I is being developed by Petrojarl IV, a ship shaped FPSO facility. Horizontal production wells will be used with subsea completion, and following processing the crude oil will be exported by shuttle tanker. Development drilling started in November 1994. First oil is programmed for early 1996 at a plateau rate around 85 mbd.

  14. Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

  15. Chemical comparison of weathered spilled oil and Exxon/Valdez hold oil from an occupational health standpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Ho, Chen-h.; Guerin, M.R.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon/Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef located off the coast of Alaska, and 11 million gallons of Northslope Alaska crude oil were spilled into Prince William Sound. More than 11,000 workers and uncounted volunteers participated in the clean up operation. The exposure of cleanup workers to spilled oil over several months of cleanup operations suggests the need for an assessment of any unusual occupational health hazards. To address this issue, weathered spilled oil and hold oil were subjected to biodirected chemical fractionation and target chemical analyses. Potential inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact hazards were investigated. The characterization methods of the DOE/Office of Health and Environmental Research Synthetic Fuels Program were applied to samples related to the spill to permit inter-comparability with that data base. Two oil spills were obtained for characterization. Exxon/Valdez hold oil collected directly from the hold of the tanker was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Also provided was a 75-days old weathered spilled oil sampled on June 6, 1989, from a skimmer collecting oil washed off of Knight Island. Because 40 wt % of the weathered oil consisted of non-oil materials such as sand, entrapped water, and leaves, an oil fraction was prepared by suspending the oil benzene/chloroform drying with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, filtering, and removing the solvent by rotary evaporation. The tests conducted here suggest that there is no unusual human health hazard associated with the weathered Exxon/Valdez spilled oil in the context of other petroleum crude oils. Clearly, the volatile organics in the freshly spilled oil present a potential inhalation hazard, but such a threat is considerably mitigated by weathering. The polar neutral chemical class fraction increases notably during weathering, but does not appear to represent an increased genotoxic hazard. 20 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  17. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  18. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  19. LPG emergency response training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dix, R.B.; Newton, B.

    1995-12-31

    ROVER (Roll Over Vehicle for Emergency Response) is a specially designed and constructed unit built to allow emergency response personnel and LPG industry employees to get ``up close and personal`` with the type of equipment used for the highway transportation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This trailer was constructed to simulate an MC 331 LPG trailer. It has all the valves, piping and emergency fittings found on highway tankers. What makes this unit different is that it rolls over and opens up to allow program attendees to climb inside the trailer and see it in a way they have never seen one before. The half-day training session is composed of a classroom portion during which attendees will participate in a discussion of hazardous material safety, cargo tank identification and construction. The specific properties of LPG, and the correct procedures for dealing with an LPG emergency. Attendees will then move outside to ROVER, where they will participate in a walkaround inspection of the rolled over unit. All fittings and piping will be representative of both modern and older equipment. Participants will also be able to climb inside the unit through a specially constructed hatch to view cutaway valves and interior construction. While the possibility of an LPG emergency remains remote, ROVER represents Amoco`s continuing commitment to community, education, and safety.

  20. Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This quarter`s feature report focuses on natural gas exports to Mexico. OFP invites ideas from the public on future topics dealing with North American natural gas import/export trade. Such suggestions should be left on OFP`s electronic bulletin board. Natural Gas exports to Mexico continued to grow and reached an historic high for the month of June (7.8 Bcf). Two new long-term contracts were activated; Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company began importing 14.7 MMcf per day from TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Renaissance Energy (U.S.) Inc. began importing 2.8 MMcf per day from Renaissance Energy Ltd. for resale to Delmarva Power & Light Company. Algerian LNG imports remained stagnant with only one tanker being imported by Pan National Gas Sales, Inc. (Pan National). During the first six months of 1995, data indicates gas imports increased by about 10 percent over the 1994 level (1,418 vs. 1,285 Bcf), with Canadian imports increasing by 14 percent and Algerian imports decreasing by 81 percent. During the same time period, exports increased by 18 percent (83 vs. 70.1 Bcf).

  1. Offshore LNG (liquefied natural gas) production and storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barden, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A barge, outfitted with gas liquefaction processing equipment and liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tanks, is suggested as a possible way to exploit remote offshore gas production. A similar study with a barge-mounted methanol plant was conducted several years ago, also using remote offshore feed gas. This barge-mounted, LNG system is bow-moored to a single point mooring through which feed gas is piped via seafloor pipeline from a nearby gas production facility. The barge is arranged with personnel accommodation forward, LNG storage midships, and gas liquefaction processing equipment aft. A flare boom is cantilevered off the barge's stern. The basis of design stipulates feed gas properties, area environmental data, gas liquefaction process, LNG storage tank type plus other parameters desirable in a floating process plant. The latter were concerned with safety, low maintenance characteristics, and the fact that the process barge also would serve as an offshore port where LNG export tankers would moor periodically. A brief summary of results for a barge-mounted methanol plant from an earlier study is followed then by a comparison of LNG and methanol alternatives.

  2. Use of risk-analysis methods in the LNG industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelto, P.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper examines the use of probabilistic risk analysis methods in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry and summarizes some ongoing work being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) using risk analysis techniques to assess LNG facility release prevention systems. The basic facilities for LNG processing, transportation, and storage include export terminals, marine vessels, import terminals, peakshaving/satellite facilities, and truck tankers. Risk analysis results can be used to characterize the safety of the current systems, to identify areas for improvement, to determine regulatory compliance, to guide research and development, and to evaluate system changes. Previous risk analysis studies on LNG facilities are reviewed in terms of successes and problems in meeting the above objectives. PNL is performing a study of the effectiveness of LNG release prevention and control systems. The overall objectives of this PNL research project are to develop an adequate understanding of LNG release prevention and control systems and to identify factors which may alter or nullify their usefulness. Analyses of LNG import terminal release prevention systems are summarized. Representative release scenarios are developed for reference import terminal. The analysis of these release scenarios consists of four main parts: (1) predicting the expected number of occurrences for each scenario, (2) determining the reliability and effectiveness of the emergency sensors and shutdown systems, and (3) estimating the size of the potential releases, and (4) evaluating design alternatives.

  3. Recommended research on LNG safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, H.J.; Gilmore, F.R.

    1981-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the safety and other environmental aspects of liquefied energy gases including liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effort reported here was conducted as part of the planning for further research into the safety aspects of transporting and storing LNG, with primary emphasis on public safety. Although the modern LNG industry has enjoyed excellent success in providing for safe operations, significant questions remain on the part of many, the expressions of which were intensified with the addition of marine-based LNG import terminals. Public safety with regard to large-scale importation of this fuel has received widespread attention in the US Congress, state legislatures, county and city governments, and from various individuals and public groups, with coverage in all the news media, including books published on the subject. The safety concerns have centered around the consequences to the public of a large spill of the cryogenic liquid from an ocean tanker or a larger storage tank, either of which might hold as much as 125,000 m/sup 3/ of LNG.

  4. Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M.

    1996-10-01

    In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

  5. Pollution risk from marine casualties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurz, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    In the oil tanker, oil shipping industry, there is no single fail-safe design that can ensure spill-free protection under all possible circumstances. Regulatory efforts have focused on design improvements that can be incorporated with out destroying the basic mission. Good examples are the IMO requirements for segregated ballast tanks, crude oil washing, and inert gas systems which have become mandatory over the last 15 years. They have contributed much to reduce pollution and enhance safety of life at sea. In contrast, the double-hull design, which has been mandated for new vessels operating in US waters, adds 15% to 20% more to a vessel's construction cost with no offsetting income. Most ship owners are not enamored with the double hull requirement, which will not necessarily save them from ruinous financial exposure to unlimited liability if involved in a major oil spill in the US, even if all reasonable safety precautions have been followed. There are no physical features in a ship that offset operational shortcomings such as an incompentent crew, poor operating procedures, or a lack of navigational aids. The problem in the industry is not vessel age or deficiencies in design, nor lack of safety rules and regulations. The problem is one of poor enforcement, which accounts for most of the operational inadequacies evidenced in vessels. But above all, safe marine operations depend on people. The human element remains the most important part of the safety equation.

  6. Liuhua 11-1 development -- New pipeline technologies for diverless connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bludworth, C.K.; Ming, C.; Paull, B.M.; Gates, S.; Manuel, W.S.; Hervey, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of the Liuhua infield production and test pipelines, focuses on new technologies used to tie the pipelines into a subsea manifold, and reviews the basis for selection of flexible pipe in reference to steel pipelines. The infield pipelines consist of two 13.5-in.-ID flexible pipes for production and one 6.0-in.-ID flexible pipe for well test. Each pipeline/riser is approximately 10,300 ft long and runs from the subsea manifold below the FPS, Nanhai Tiao Zhan, to the FPSO tanker, Nanhai Sheng Li. The technologies used to tie the pipelines into the subsea manifold involved: a transition tie-in base into which the flexible pipe was pulled using ROV-assisted tooling to make up the first-end connector; a rigid pipe long jumper from the manifold to the tie-in base; and the surveying and measurement tools to set up the jumper welding jigs. Each new pipeline tie-in technology was proven through field tests of actual components before completion of manufacturing and installation.

  7. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2005-05-03

    We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

  8. A knowledge based system for economic analysis and risk assessment of subsea development scenarios for small oilfields in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, N.J.; Ford, J.T.; Tweedie, A.

    1996-12-31

    The decision to develop a small (<100 mmbbls) oilfield in the UK sector of the Central/Northern North Sea requires a careful assessment of all aspects of the field development plan: the reservoir model (reserves and production profile); capital and operating costs; and the current economic climate (oil price, interest rates, tax regime etc). This paper describes the development of a knowledge based software package that allows a quick look assessment of the overall economics and risk profile associated with the development of small oilfields in this region. It is a modular system that uses a cost database, cost adjustment algorithms, cash flow analysis engine and simulation procedures to integrate and analyze the impact of reservoir and production characteristics costs (capex and opex) and economic factors on the decision to develop such a field. The production system configurations considered by the system are: (1) an unmanned wellhead platform tied back to a third party platform for fluid processing/export, (2) an FPSO with oil export via a shuttle tanker and gas export via a tie-in to the existing North Sea gas pipeline infrastructure, and (3) a straight tie-back from a group of subsea wells to a third party platform for fluid processing/export.

  9. Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budhraja, Vikram S.

    1992-03-24

    I'm pleased to be here as your keynote speaker from the utility industry. Today is fitting to discuss the role of an alternative/renewable energy resource such as geothermal. Three years ago today, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. This ecological catastrophe was another of those periodic jolts that underscores the importance of lessening our nation's dependence on oil and increasing the use of cost-effective, environmentally benign alternative/renewable energy sources. Alternative/renewables have come a long way since the first oil crisis in 1973. Today, they provide 9 percent of electric power used in the United States. That's nearly double the figure of just two years ago. And since 1985, one-third of a new capacity has come from geothermal, solar, wind and biomass facilities. Nevertheless, geothermal supplies only about three-tenths of a percent of the country's electric power, or roughly 2,800 megawatts (MW). And most of that is in California. In fact, geothermal is California's second-largest source of renewable energy, supplying more than 5 percent of the power generated in the state. Today, I'd like to discuss the outlook for the geothermal industry, framing it within Southern California Edison's experience with geothermal and other alternative/renewable energy sources.

  10. Assessment of tar pollution on the United Arab emirates beaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Hilal, A.H.; Khordagui, H.K. )

    1993-01-01

    In light of the inadequate information concerning stranded tar on the southwest beaches of the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, particularly following the massive oil releases during the Gulf War, the present investigation was designed to provide reference-integrated information on the nature, location, and levels of stranded tar balls on the beaches of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The recorded levels appeared to be higher than expected or previously reported. The tar distribution pattern, in addition to the degree of weathering, indicates that the massive oil release during the Gulf War did not reach the UAE shorelines. The highest reported levels of stranded tar ever recorded in the Arabian Gulf at Jabal Dhannah apparently originated from oil spills and tankers' ballast water at the main oil terminal at the Al-Ruwaiss oil refinery some 10 km to the east. The surprising, relatively high levels of stranded tar on the beaches of the Gulf of Oman were solely attributed to the heavy navigation traffic close to the shorelines. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. In situ bioremediation. When does it work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The study narrows the focus to two critical facets of bioremediation. First, it addresses the use of microorganisms to remove contamination from ground water and soils that remain in place (i.e., in situ) during the cleanup. This focus distinguishes in situ bioremediation of the sub-surface from significantly different applications of bioremediation, such as to treat oil tanker spills, wastewaters, or sludges. Second, the primary object of the study is to provide guidance on how to evaluate when an in situ bioremediation process is working or has worked. This focus is most important because the in situ environment is highly complex and very difficult to observe. Therefore, tools from several scientific and engineering disciplines must be used in a sophisticated manner if the success of a bioremediation effort is to be evaluated. Guidance is acutely needed today because most people faced with making decisions about bioremediation projects do not have the interdisciplinary knowledge to integrate all of the necessary tools. (Copyright (c) 1993 by the National Academy of Sciences.)

  12. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

  13. CAMEO-Valdez: A user's perspective. [Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, T.J.

    1990-01-11

    On the morning of March 24, 1989, the tanker EXXON VALDEZ ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound. The vessel was carrying over 53 million gallons of North Slope crude oil of which almost 11 million gallons were spilled in the water. The immediately impacted area included most of the western part of the Sound, but eventually, the area expanded to include parts of Seward, Homer, and Kodiak. This event constituted the worst oil spill in the history of this country, and was identified as a 'spill of national significance.' A major response to clean up the oil by EXXON, which was closely monitored by Federal and State agencies and various interest groups, was necessary. Early in the response it was obvious to the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC) that a computer-aided management system was necessary to monitor the progress of the spill clean-up operations. This paper will describe CAMEO (Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations) - Valdez, developed for the FOSC by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration acting in its role as the Scientific Support Coordinator (SSC). A discussion of how CAMEO was used and an evaluation of its effectiveness will also be presented.

  14. Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-04

    Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

  15. World electricity and gas industries; Pressures for structural change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahane, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Electric and gas utilities are central middlemen in the energy business. Worldwide, more than 50% of all primary energy is transformed by utilities and delivered to final consumers through utility wires and pipes. The structure and behavior of the electricity and gas industries and the role and behavior of utilities are therefore important to all other energy industry players. The electricity and gas industries are special. Unlike oil, coal, or wood, electricity and gas are transported from producers to consumers mostly via fixed grids. This means that supplies are generally tied to specific markets and, unlike an oil tanker on the high seas, cannot be easily diverted elsewhere. These grids are natural monopolies inasmuch as having more than one wire or pipe along a given route is generally unnecessary duplicative. In addition, both supply and grid investments are generally large and lumpy. Industrial organization theory suggests that the coordination of industries can be achieved either through hierarchies or through markets. Hierarchies are generally preferred when the transaction costs of coordinating through markets is too high. These two elements of electricity and gas industry structure are the means of hierarchical coordination. This paper discusses the possibilities for changing the structure of utilities to one which has greater reliance on markets.

  16. Kepiting field production/storage barge; Design, installation, and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl, A.C.; Satar, S. ); Liles, S.P. )

    1990-04-01

    The Kepiting field is located in 295 ft (90 m) of water in the Natuna Sea, Indonesia. Development of this two-well field required innovative planning and involved unique designs of producing systems. The plan includes seafloor wells tied back to a spread-anchored, purpose-built, oil-process and -storage barge. The barge is designed to handle four producing wells and to process 10,000 B/D (1590 m{sup 3}/d) well fluid and 10 million scf/D (283 {times} 10{sup 3} std m{sup 3}/d) gas. Excess gas beyond barge-fuel needs and artificial-lift requirements is flared on the barge. Heated oil storage for 53,000 bbl (8430 m{sup 3}) is available. Processed crude is transported from the barge to a floating export terminal by a shuttle tanker. Kepiting field was operated profitably from Oct. 27, 1986, to Aug. 8, 1989, at which time the wells were plugged and the tieback risers disconnected. This paper discusses the design and construction of the barge and the operating philosophy and experience.

  17. 1991 international petroleum encyclopedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    There is no other petroleum industry publication quite like the International Petroleum Encyclopedia. With a timely, accurate combination of global industry coverage and analysis, detailed statistical surveys, cutting-edge reports on technological advancements and the ever-popular atlas maps, the 1991 International Petroleum Encyclopedia is a smart buy for professionals whose business is oil and gas, as well as for those whose business is affected by the industry's trends and developments. Written by a professional staff of Oil and Gas Journal petroleum experts, the 1991 IPE gives you the all important global perspective for constructing sound business strategies for the 90's. The petroleum industry is scrambling for information that will help it survive this volitile period. This book reports on the topics in the petroleum industry the latest developments in horizontal drilling, world refining (the latest information on reformulated fuels), and predictions about the post-war Persian Gulf industry. PULS, discussions on changes in the Gulf of Mexico, developments in the LNG trade, and crude oil tanker supply/.demand curves.

  18. Oil pollution in Shijiu Harbor studied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Lutian

    1983-11-09

    This article describes an experimental model designed to forecast oil pollution in the newly constructed Shijiu Harbor, using a mixture of 30% used machine oil and 70% light diesel, in amounts of 200 kg per test. Plastic bags filled with the mixture are slit open and cast into the water generally along the axis of the major ocean current. Small boats are used to collect water specimens to trace the experimental pollutant. The density distribution and the horizontal diffusion coefficient are calculated to produce equations to study effects of the surface wind speed, the depth of the water, and the tidal waves on the oil drift. Each test is completed in about 2 hours. On the basis of statistical data of large Chinese harbors published by the ministry and related reports of foreign countries, the mean annual oil pollution load of Shijiu Harbor is computed in terms of the total estimated tonnage of cargo ships, tugboats, oil tankers, and fishing boats. The forecast model, the equations, and the computation processes are described in some detail.

  19. STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

    2008-12-31

    Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

  20. Brazil advances subsea technology in Marlim pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-29

    Petroleum Brasileiro SA has extended several water depth records for subsea technology during a pilot project in giant Marlim oil field in the Campos basin off Brazil. Petrobras finished the 10 well Marlim pilot last December. The field's pilot phase was intended to begin early production and enable Petrobras to gather more reservoir data. Ten satellite wells, including two prepilot wells, were completed during the Marlim pilot phase with guidelineless (GLL) wet christmas trees designed and fabricated by FMC Corp., Houston, and CBV Industrial Mechanic SA, Rio de Janeiro. The subsea wells are producing 52,000 b/d of oil and 21.19 MMCfd of gas in water depths of 1,847-2,562 ft. Marlim pilot well flow is routed to a permanent semisubmersible floating production system (FPS). Oil moves from the FPS to a monobuoy that offloads to a shuttle tanker. In addition to marking the first successful uses of purpose-built GLL wet trees, FMC said the Marlim pilot project allowed GLL subsea technology to evolve from conceptual status into a proven deepwater completion method. The paper describes the project.

  1. Low level benzene exposure in Sweden: effect on blood elements and body burden of benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berlin, M.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements for benzene exposure were performed for different work places. In addition, breath benzene concentrations were measured in different occupations in order to establish toxico-kinetics of benzene in man; chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of exposed workers were also examined. Smoking appears to result in a large increase in benzene concentration in exhaled breath. The smoke from one cigarette contains 60-80 micrograms of benzene. It was found that exposure levels of 10 ppm are rather uncommon among workers handling gasoline or gasoline equipment. It was concluded that the gasoline load of road tankers cannot be responsible for chromosome changes of the driver, as milk truck drivers showed the same changes. These results did not prove that benzene was the cause of the observed changes. Smoking is the confounding factor, with a potency of at least the same order of magnitude as benzene. In addition, our present knowledge about mechanisms of benzene is not sufficiently developed to permit quantitative conclusions as to the human health risks.

  2. A framework for assessing relative risks associated with multiple stressors in Port Valdez, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegers, J.K.; Landis, W.G.; Mortensen, L.S.; Wilson, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment is to develop a versatile process that will provide a mechanism for evaluating both present and future risks to this environment. Much of the regulatory and environmental interest in the port has centered around a Ballast Water Treatment facility that treats and discharges up to 30 mgd of oily ballast water brought in by crude oil tankers. However, six point discharges and other potential sources of pollution exist in the area. The authors have delineated eleven subareas in the port in order to identify the potential anthropogenic stressors, as well as the receptors that could be exposed to these stressors. Potential effects were then characterized for each exposure. Each component is ranked and integrated, resulting in a relative risk estimate in each subarea. Both the discernible risks, based on available data, and the data gaps are presented. Uncertainty is expressed as a range of high and low risk associated with each component. Results of the ranking indicate that hydrocarbons released through discharges, contaminated runoff and spills pose the most discernible risk to sediment quality and wildlife in the port. Undetermined, but potentially severe, risks to all ecological components include possible future oil spills, shoreline development, and the introduction of nonindigenous species. The final assessment provides a tool for current and future ecological monitoring efforts in the Port Valdez area.

  3. Vulnerability to closing of Hormuz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-07

    Tankers carrying roughly 8-million barrels per day (mmb/d) of crude oil, or some 16% of the non-communist world's oil supply, pass through the Strait of Hormuz. Experts agree that just 3-mmb/d of that could be exported through alternate routes. If the war between Iran and Iraq should result in their completely halting each other's production, this relatively limited supply curtailment would reduce world oil production by over 3.4-mmb/d. Since the two have not caused such mutual disaster during four years of war, many observers believe there has been a deliberate avoidance of the jugular squeeze. Nevertheless, the two combatants appear capable not only of cutting off their oil production, but escalating fighting to the point where Gulf traffic would be impeded. Potential results from a prolonged Iran-Iraq crisis are viewed in three scenarios. Also included in this issue are brief summaries of: (1) Mexico's new energy plan, internationalism, and OPEC; (2) update on Argentina's energy resource developments; (3) Venezuela: belt tightening; (4) Western Hemisphere oil production declines; (5) (6) days of oil supply for Canada, USA, Japan, France, Italy, and UK; and (6) US Department of Defense fuel consumption. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and principal industrial fuel prices are included for March for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  4. LNG shipments in 1994 set records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-15

    Worldwide LNG shipments by ocean-going vessels in 1994 increased to 1,619 voyages, according to an LNG shipping industry statistical annual. LNG Log 20 published the recently compiled 1994 data in the last quarter of 1995. The publication is from the Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators Ltd., London. The year`s total was 8.8% more than for 1993 and the most in 35 years of records. The trips were made and the vessels loaded and discharged without report of serious safety or environmental incident, says the publication. Of the voyages completed during the year, 596 were to European receiving terminals (up 2.8% over 1993), and 1,003 went to the Far East (an increase of 10.7%); shipments to the US, however, dropped to 20, from 32 in 1993. This paper shows that the 1,619 voyages represent 3.6 million nautical miles logged by 78 vessels active during the year. These ships pumped ashore record annual volumes of approximately 144.3 million cu m of LNG, 110.1 million cu m (76.3%) of which went to Far Eastern customers. The paper also summarizes containment systems in use in 1994 and since LNG began to be shipped in 1959.

  5. The Asia Pacific LNG trade: Status and technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovdestad, W.R.

    1995-10-01

    The Asia Pacific Region is experiencing a period of sustained economic expansion. Economic growth has led to an increasing demand for energy that has spurred a rapid expansion of baseload liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in this region. This is illustrated by the fact that seven of the ten baseload facilities in existence provide LNG for markets in the Asia Pacific region. With the three exceptions having been initially commissioned in 1972 and earlier, it is fair to observed that most advances in LNG technology have been developed and applied for this market. The paper presents the current status and identified future trends for the Asia Pacific LNG trade. Technology development in terms of application to onstream production, processing and transportation facilities, including LNG tankers, is presented. The potential of future advances to applied technology and operational practices to improve the cost-effectiveness of new and existing facilities is discussed. Current design data and methods as actually used are examined in terms of identifying where fundamental research and basic physical data are insufficient for optimization purposes. These findings are then summarized and presented in terms of the likely evolution of future and existing LNG projects in the Asia Pacific region.

  6. Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

    1997-07-01

    Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

  7. Development of mid-scale and floating LNG facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, B.C.; Mortko, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The development of large-scale base load LNG facilities has dominated the process industry for decades. However, in many areas of the world, base load facilities are not feasible due to inadequate reserves. Mid-scale facilities can be economically attractive in certain locations and, in fact, have several advantages which aid in their development. The PRICO II LNG liquefaction process offers a process configuration which fits well with these developments. The process has been used in a range of facility sizes from base load to peak shaving applications. In addition to onshore facilities, floating liquefaction facilities can be developed on barges or tankers to handle mid-scale to large scale LNG production. Concepts for several sizes and configurations of floating facilities have been developed using the PRICO II process integrated into a total production, liquefaction, and load-out system. This paper covers the PRICO process concept, application areas and facility configurations which are currently being developed for mid-scale and floating LNG facilities.

  8. Cost savings from nuclear regulatory reform: An econometric model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canterbery, E.R. |; Johnson, B.; Reading, D.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear-generated power touted in the 1950s as someday being {open_quotes}too cheap to meter{close_quotes} got dismissed in the 1980s as incapable of being both safe and cost effective. Today, less than 20 percent of American`s electricity is nuclear-generated, no new plants are planned or on order, and some of the earliest units are scheduled for decommissioning within the next decade. Even so, interest in nuclear power has been revived by increasing energy demands, concerns about global warming, and the uncertainty surrounding oil resources in the Persian Gulf. As a long-term alternative to fossil fuels, atomic energy offers the important advantages of clean air and domestic availability of fuel. But these advantages will count for little unless and until the costs of nuclear power can be seen as reasonable. The authors premise is that the relevant costs are those of providing safe and environmentally clean electric energy. To the extent that increased costs have resulted from increasingly stringent regulations, they reflect the internalization of external costs. Indeed, the external costs of nuclear power (particularly safety and environmental protection) have been internalized to a greater degree than with most alternative fuel sources used by electric utilities. Nuclear construction costs are properly compared with those of alternative sources only after the latter are adjusted for environmental damage and endangerment, including, as examples, the costs of oil spills, of building double-hulled tankers, and of building off-shore offloading facilities. A shift to nuclear sources could reduce these costs whereas it would increase disposal costs for radioactive materials. The authors contend that a better understanding of nuclear plant construction costs is pivotal to a balanced evaluation of the merits of uranium relative to other fuel choices. 12 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

  10. Thermal-Structural Analysis of the MacArthur Maze Freeway Collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C R; Wemhoff, A P; McMichael, L D

    2008-02-26

    At approximately 3:41 AM on the morning of April 29, 2007, a tractor-trailer rig carrying 8,600 gallons (32.6 m{sup 3}) of fuel overturned on Interstate 880 in Oakland, CA. The resultant fire weakened the surrounding steel superstructure and caused a 50-yard (45.7 m) long section of the above connecting ramp from Interstate 80 to Interstate 580 to fail in approximately 18 minutes. In this study, we performed a loosely-coupled thermal-structural finite element analysis of the freeway using the LLNL Engineering codes NIKE3D, DYNA3D and TOPAZ3D. First, we applied an implicit structural code to statically initialize the stresses and displacements in the roadway at ambient conditions due to gravity loading. Next, we performed a thermal analysis by approximating the tanker fire as a moving box region of uniform temperature. This approach allowed for feasible calculation of the fire-to-structure radiative view factors and convective heat transport. We used a mass scaling methodology in the thermal analysis to reduce the overall simulation time so an explicit structural analysis could be used, which provided a more computationally efficient simulation of structural failure. Our approach showed structural failure of both spans due to thermal softening under gravity loading at approximately 20 minutes for a fixed fire temperature of 1200 C and fixed thermal properties. When temperature-dependent thermal properties were applied, the south and north spans collapsed at approximately 10 minutes and 16 minutes, respectively. Finally, we performed a preliminary fully-coupled analysis of the system using the new LLNL implicit multi-mechanics code Diablo. Our investigation shows that our approach provides a reasonable first-order analysis of the system, but improved modeling of the transport properties and the girder-box beam connections is required for more accurate predictions.

  11. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  12. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  13. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  14. Forties oil line replacement overcomes sandwave challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steel, W.J.M.; Imglis, R. )

    1991-03-06

    A major new 36-in., oil-export pipeline has been installed in the North Sea between the Forties field and Cruden Bay on the U.K. mainland. Designing and installing the line involved solving problems caused by sandwaves in the nearshore segment of the route. The Forties pipeline system covers offshore and land pipelines between the Forties field and the Firth of Forth tanker loading terminal and incorporates oil transportation, stabilization-gas separation, processing, and storage. The pipeline is used as part of an integrated oil and gas liquid gathering system from the central North Sea. Oil and gas liquids from other offshore fields are connected by subsea pipelines and riser to the Forties Charlie platform. Inspection of the existing 32-in. offshore pipeline had indicated signs of corrosion which would prevent the system from operating economically as future demands increased. In addition, when the line was commissioned in 1975, it was not envisioned that it would eventually carry crude from several other fields, which will come onstream this decade. The decision to lay a new 36-in. sealine reflects this need for increased capacity to ensure that the Forties pipeline system continues as a major carrier of oil and gas liquids well into the next century. Corrosion monitoring and inspection of the 32-in. line led to sections of the topside pipework being replaced in 1985 and the top section of the rise in 1987. The corrosion also resulted in the pipeline maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) being limited to 115 barg (1,668 psig) from 129 barg (1,871 psig).

  15. Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2014-07-01

    This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

  16. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  18. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  19. Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution

  20. Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown

  1. A radionuclide tracer is used to identify potential contamination zones on the Alaskan shelf in response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M. ); Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L. )

    1990-01-09

    On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground and spilled over 10 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound (PWS). Alaska, a deep fjord supporting large populations of birds, fish, marine mammals, and benthic organisms. We participated in 2 cruises in May and October to identify specific sedimentary areas and benthic habitats on the Alaskan shelf that may be potentially contaminated by crude oil. To identify benthic areas of potential oil impact, we measured the distribution of Beryllium-7 ([sup 7]Be 53.3-d half-life), an atmospherically deposited radioisotope, in 24 sediment cores collected in PWS and along the Kenai Peninsula at water depths ranging from 80-775 m. Like petroleum hydrocarbons, [sup 7]Be rapidly sorbs to suspended matter in coastal waters and tends to accumulate in sedimentary areas where suspended matter accumulates. The sedimentary distribution of [sup 7]Be was used to identify benthic areas that may be subject to oil contamination and for tracing dispersal and fate of this energy-related contaminant. [sup 210]Pb and [sub 137]Cs were also measured to determine an associated sediment accumulation rate at selected sites. No detectable levels of [sup 7]Be were found in surface sediments at about half of the stations. This suggests that little or no material from the water column has accumulated here in the last 3 months. Sites on the eastern side of Knight Island and along the Kenai Peninsula, downstream of the spill, had [sup 7]Be accumulation inventories ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 pCi/cm[sup 2] occurred at a site on the western side of Montague Island (246 m depth) within the the tidal mixing zone of PWS and the Gulf of Alaska. The high value suggests that water-column materials are focusing and depositing at this site so this benthic habitat may likely be affected by the oil spill. Data from new and reoccupied stations during the October cruise will be presented and areas of potential impact from oil contamination discussed.

  2. Cayuga County Regional Digester: Vision Becomes Reality. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamyar V. Zadeh; Jim Young

    2013-03-12

    With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: (a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. (b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. ( c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at

  3. FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER MS

    2008-04-21

    Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield

  4. Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D.; Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T.; Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R.

    2012-07-01

    Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to

  5. QER- Comment of Jennifer Markens 8

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    I am writing to express profound concern about the proposed pipeline that will bring shale gas directly from the Marcellus shale beds all along the top of Northern Massachusetts. After careful examination over the past three months, since this was announced, I strongly feel that this scheme has very little to do with the needs of Massachusetts residents for "more gas" and much more to do with the needs of a private, obscenely wealthy corporation to profit from the Marcellus shale by bringing this gas to port and its waiting tankers, for sale abroad. This pipeline is many times larger than any current demand by a mind-boggling factor: there are other pipeline expansion/development efforts underway, also running through Massachusetts. It is very clear that we are being set up as the shipping and storage grid for the Marcellus shale. Marcellus gas is well known to be high in radioactivity. A report by Marvin Resnikoff, Phd. details reasons why bringing this gas to New York will be deadly to citizens. Given Massachusetts proximity to the Marcellus shale, everything in that report would be equally true for Massachusetts. Fugitive emissions will ruin land all across Norther Mass, and permanently destroy water and land. This level of radioactivity: the benzene, neurotoxins, VOC's and carcinogens will be pumped all over Massachusetts under high pressure to meet shipping deadlines: so that an obscenely wealthy company can make profits for a handful of individuals while all of the expense, risk, and destruction, now and in the future will be put on Massachusetts citizens: now and for many years in the future. Due to the endless advertising budgets of the gas industry, the public has no idea how much their safety and well being are at risk, when radioactive gas, and the chemicals used to produce and extract shale gas, are shipped through neighborhoods and yards for sale abroad. This pipeline is being planned as a feeder line all around the Marcellus shale. This has the

  6. Silicone injection restores failing submarine cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilstra, M.

    1995-12-01

    Faced with the prospect of replacing nearly 10 miles of aging undersea cables, Orcas Power & Light Co (Opalco) elected instead to inject silicone into as many of the cables as possible. Silicone injection has been used extensively on underground residential distribution (URD) and feeder cables, but only two underwater cables had previously been injected: a feeder cable for Florida Power Corp under an intercoastal waterway and a cable for Washington Water Power Co under a lake in western Idaho. The compound restores power cables damaged by water treeing and prevents further water damage. Selection criteria included age, type, and whether the cables had ever been spliced. Older, soldered, hand-wrapped splices were avoided as they block the CableCure fluid from flowing through. This makes the cable uninjectable unless the splices are replaced with the molded type. The first cables chosen for injection were between 15 and 30 years old and clear of soldered splices. They also were free from faults. 4 figs.