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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Structural design of double hull tankers  

SciTech Connect

After a brief introduction of structural design procedure for double hull tankers, their design features are firstly highlighted comparing with conventional single hull tankers. Next discussed are recent topics of double hull VLCC (Very Large Crude oil Carrier) including higher tensile steel and strut arrangement in transverse ring frames. Finally ultimate longitudinal strength of hull girder is analyzed through a simplified method under both sagging and hogging conditions. Making use of this result, some considerations are made on structural reliability of double hull VLCC.

Niho, O.; Yanagibayashi, S.; Akashi, T. [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Terminal Operations for Tube Trailer and Liquid Tanker Filling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Liquid Tanker Filling: Status, Challenges and R&D Needs 1 Linde covers the entire hydrogen value chain LH 2 storage SupplyStorage CompressionTransfer Dispenser Onsite SMR...

3

World tanker industry maintains momentum from Persian Gulf war  

SciTech Connect

The world tanker industry has managed to maintain the momentum generated during the Persian Gulf War. Freight rates for large vessels have regained the high levels seen during the first 2 months of this year, while the expected postwar decline in use of tankers has not materialized. The health of the tanker industry is linked closely with the volume of long haul crude oil from the Middle East, a spot charter from the gulf to Europe, an owner would only break even on the cost of building and operating a new tanker to the highest environmental standards. Owners currently can expect spot rates of about $40,000/day, excellent by the standards of the late 1980s and early 1990s but still below the level needed to justify new buildings. And there are many in the industry who think $40,000/day will be just a happy memory later in the year. Owners are facing pressure for major changes in the industry. Governments and the public want better operating standards and new environmentally sound tankers to reduce the risk of oil spills. At the same time, the industry has to learn to live with repercussion in the 1990 Oil Pollution Act in the U.S., which has opened the way for unlimited liability against tanker owners involved in spills off the U.S. The search also is on for improved profits to make investments required by the changing world of seaborne oil transportation.

Not Available

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Twin-screw tanker designed for high efficiency  

SciTech Connect

In late 1994, the Ching Fu shipyard in Taiwan delivered a chemical tanker to Fram Shipping, for operations around Northern Europe for Norsk Hydro. The 13000 dwt tanker design is optimized to have the lowest possible operational cost for the given dead-weight capacity. Waertsilae Propulsion has from an early stage contributed to the development of the propulsion system. The company proposed the Waertsilae Propac concept, including the hydrodynamic design and the supply of the main components. The propeller was designed using in-house computer programs, and the results confirmed by model tests, both at Danish Maritime Institute (DMI) in Copenhagen, and at SSPA Maritime Consulting in Gothenburg. The hull form for the tanker was optimized by a special bulb design to reduce the wave resistance. The vessel is also designed with a special twin skeg arrangement in the stern. This solution allows for two large and efficient propellers to be installed.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - aframax oil tanker Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aframax oil tanker Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aframax oil tanker Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sirkar, J., Ameer, P., Brown,...

6

Caribbean LNG project marks progress; LNG tanker launched  

SciTech Connect

World LNG trade continues to expand as construction of a major LNG project in the Caribbean hits full stride this fall and another LNG carrier was launched earlier this year. Engineering is nearly complete and construction is nearing midway on Trinidad`s Atlantic LNG. In Japan, NKK Corp. launched another LNG tanker that employs the membrane-storage system. The 50-mile pipeline to move natural gas to the Atlantic LNG facility is also on track for completion by October 1998.

NONE

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

Damage and collapse of double hull tankers in groundings  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss and analyze the mechanics of ships in groundings on rock. A damage estimate model in grounding of ships is proposed. The accuracy and applicability of the model are verified by a comparison of experimental results. The progressive collapse analysis of damaged hull sections, under vertical bending moments by use of the ALPS/ISUM computer code, is described. The procedure is applied to grounding simulation of a double hull tanker with transverseless system.

Paik, J.K.; Lee, T.K. [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative tanker designs Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tech Collection: Engineering 5 OIL TANKER DESIGN METHODOLOGY CONSIDERING PROBABILIS-TIC ACCIDENT DAMAGE Summary: -127. 6 "Interim Guidelines for Approval of Alternative...

9

Operation Planning of Multiparcel Tankers under Fuel Price Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

They may deviate slightly from their normal voyage plans, incur necessary port dues, or even delay the transit through a canal to refuel at a port with attractively priced fuel. ... Most commercial marine vessels use fuels with 180 cst, 380 cst, and 500 cst viscosities with 380 cst being the most common. ... The fuel prices for these options are uncertain except at the end of leg 0. Since the tanker may be at a port, or will reach the next port shortly after time zero, it is reasonable to assume that the fuel price of each refueling option after leg 0 is fixed and known. ...

H. C. Oh; I. A. Karimi

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A laboratory study of the effect of oil-soluble inhibitors on tanker corrosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the internil buikheids of an ocean t . going tacker employed in clean dervice require ma)or repairs to . ! ~ corrosion damage after 8-10 years (&, 4), -' In order to obtain i -i norma3. . life of 20 yeax's (lx5) fur an unprotected olean tanker..., , ' it is necessary tq expend about f1~000, 000 for corrosion' repairs- (&, gj6). Internal coxxosiou rates in vesmels which, carry cx'ude f oil hive been estimated to hs on@' one third to one half as gxeat C . , as in clean taukex'a ($~7) This is true because...

Schneider, Frederick Haden

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

14

A comparative study of simplified methods to analyze the strength of double-hulled tankers in collision  

SciTech Connect

Several empirical or semi-empirical methods and simplified methods which can be easily applied to the estimation of the strength of double-hulled structures like LNG carriers and oil tankers are examined. It became clear that the estimation of the strength character of double-hulled structures in collision depends strongly on the simplified analysis method which is applied.

Ito, Hisashi; Hayashi, Kazuo [NKK Corp., Tsu (Japan); Kitano, Kimio [NKK Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/MiscCases/lef0057.htm[11/29/2012 2:35:38 PM] Case Nos. LEF-0057 and LEF-0073 September 6, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Implementation of Special Refund Procedures Names of Firms:Intercoastal Oil Corporation Gulf States Oil & Refining Dates of Filing: July 20, 1993 July 20, 1993 Case Numbers:LEF-0057 LEF-0073 The Office of General Counsel (OGC) of the Department of Energy (DOE) filed a Petition requesting that the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) formulate and implement Subpart V special refund proceedings. Under the procedural regulations of the DOE, special refund proceedings may be implemented to refund monies to persons injured by violations of the DOE petroleum price regulations,

17

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Emissions from a Suezmax Class Tanker | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-road and On-road Diesel Emissions Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines? The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program -...

19

The development of new evaluation criteria for double hull tankers  

SciTech Connect

ABS SafeHull was issued in October 1993 for trial use by the industry. This paper offers the outline of SafeHull, without going into the details, which have been already presented in the previous publications. With the cooperation from the industry, the authors have applied SafeHull to several new and old designs, and confirmed that increase in steel weight, if any, resulting form the new criteria is within manageable order as predicted by their previous publications and as shown in this paper.

Kaibara, Teruaki; Uemori, Ryoji [American Bureau of Shipping, Yokohama (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crude Oil Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge between PAD...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History From PADD 1 to PADD 2 0 0 274 590 1,646 2,729 1981-2013 PADD 3 14,497 6,416 9,242 13,779 3,624 9,369 1981-2013 From PADD 2 to PADD 1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Risks in DP Shuttle Tanker Offloading Dr Haibo Chen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China Dr. Sverre Haver, Mr. Harald Kleppestø Mr. Kjell Larsen Statoil, Norway Capt. Helge Samuelsen Mr. Arve Lerstad Ship Modelling and Simulation Centre Trondheim, Norway Prof. Torgeir Moan CeSOS, Dept. of Marine Technology NTNU, Trondheim, Norway Dr. Jan Erik Vinnem Preventor AS, Stavanger Mr. Kåre Breivik

Nørvåg, Kjetil

24

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 123 290 257 342 258 287 1986-2013 Crude Oil 0 152 82 204 126 105 1986-2013 Petroleum Products 123 138 175 138 132 182 1986-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1986-2002 Unfinished Oils 20 1986-2013 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 82 119 110 101 112 134 1986-2013 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2013 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 82 119 110 101 112 134 2008-2013 CBOB 28 0 0 13 0 0 2008-2013 Other 54 119 110 88 112 134 2009-2013 Renewable Fuels 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 2009-2012 Other Renewable Fuels 2009-2009 Finished Motor Gasoline 5 0 15 0 0 0 1986-2013

25

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 9,651 10,183 10,476 9,672 9,763 9,182 1986-2013 Crude Oil 129 287 199 342 272 260 1986-2013 Petroleum Products 9,522 9,896 10,277 9,330 9,491 8,922 1986-2013 Pentanes Plus 2 2009-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2013 Unfinished Oils 20 1986-2013 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 6,153 6,358 6,284 5,889 6,175 5,550 1986-2013 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2013 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 6,153 6,358 6,284 5,889 6,175 5,550 2005-2013 CBOB 6,075 6,212 6,174 5,801 6,036 5,416 2008-2013 GTAB 2008-2011 Other 78 146 110 88 139 134 2005-2013

26

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

27

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 125,514 111,786 113,994 112,461 113,596 110,881 1981-2012 Crude Oil 550 0 0 274 590 1,646 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 124,964 111,786 113,994 112,187 113,006 109,235 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 756 452 113 19 2009-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2012 Unfinished Oils 994 700 425 685 686 571 1981-2012 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 168 606 19,890 33,637 54,909 64,780 1981-2012 Reformulated 168 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2012 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2012 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 168 0 0 2005-2009 Conventional 0 606 19,890 33,637 54,909 64,780 2005-2012 CBOB 606 19,787 33,536 54,393 64,572 2008-2012

28

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 2,539 1,518 1,207 1,602 2,515 1,702 1981-2012 Crude Oil 550 0 0 274 590 294 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 1,989 1,518 1,207 1,328 1,925 1,408 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1981-2002 Unfinished Oils 994 700 425 685 686 571 1981-2012 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 168 0 127 144 710 248 1983-2012 Reformulated 168 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2012 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2012 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 168 0 0 2005-2009 Conventional 0 127 144 710 248 2008-2012 CBOB 0 24 43 194 40 2008-2012 Other 103 101 516 208 2009-2012 Renewable Fuels 0 0 0 0 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 0 0 0 0 2009-2012 Other Renewable Fuels 0 2009-2009

29

A shipping plan for bulk petroleum products by sea-going tankers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(. 01; 1 ?I 0 st '. ii i 0 '. 0 i. gbt 01 uolltc e 0 1!i 1(!i Ly has 1&ci il (' !( !tlst ccl SL sotto po inL in i t s cr&!it 0) I&1 0 I, . P. 'I&(obl &i& iS ii(I jt!' Lcd . . ' 'g t(1011 'Oiuc, thc' pcoilp, 1 ti( Lh so(le 1&(& 1 ! (Pl!it c&i, 'll.... (gy us inc t&&o d I?! ts, ny nc &bcr up Lo &nd 1?eluding 1295 ccn be rcprcuc?Lcd in L&sc 36. ) The. ro&& n; &&c XJPj jpn spccii I&. s I h&t all Lh &uutri &. - in i his ro&& coL'respond co Lhe n r& quir -mont for: product p ?t dc; I inai &ou jj (base...

Boyd, David George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Drilling, Tankers, and Oil Spills on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cargo is to be carried on the opment and return trip, seawater is pumped into carsources. go tanks for ballast. It, too...the oil is discharged coast. Toth together with the seawater. will offset The dangers of transporting oil from petroleum...

William B. Travers; Percy R. Lune

1976-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nested Column Generation applied to the Crude Oil Tanker Routing and Scheduling Problem with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's fuel price of around 650 USD/ton. A port visit avoided through good routing and scheduling could reduce builds on a branch-and-price algorithm in which the column generation subproblems are solved by branch-and-price themselves. We describe our implementa- tion in the branch-cut-and-price framework SCIP and give

Lübbecke, Marco

32

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

33

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offshore Requirements Platform sites Gas treatment plantplants New technologies OTEC Tanker traffic lanes Barge traffic lanes OffshoreOffshore oil/gas production (tanker) Platform site Tanker loading bouy site On-site oil storage Gas treatment plant

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Re-exports of LNG occur when an LNG shipment is offloaded from a tanker into storage tanks at a regasification terminal and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery...

35

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Tanker and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Gasoline Blending Components (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Tanker and...

36

Energy Market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indeed, a large number of oil tankers and LNG carriers passes through the Bosporus and Dardanelles Straits, to transport raw materials to major world markets. The passage of tankers through the Turkish ... , to m...

Angelo Arcuri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from East Coast (PADD 1) of Ethane-Ethylene (Thousand Barrels)","Midwest (PADD 2) Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge...

38

TABLE55.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report." July 2004 Crude Oil ......

39

The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large diameter oil pipeline from Baku to the Turkish port ofoil tanker traffic through the Bosporus (Proposed Turkish Pipeline

Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A, Science Ser.ttice Feature Released upon receipt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t re- Ports that while serving on the Persian Gulf and. Indian Ocean i n British tankers ben tween 1926

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Intermodal Tank Container Management for the Chemical Industry Alan L. Erera, Juan C on asset management problems faced by tank container operators, and formulates an operational tank modes: pipeline, bulk tankers, parcel tankers, tank containers, or drums. Pipeline and bulk tankers

Erera, Alan

42

Study on structural damage of ships due to collision and grounding  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, structural failure of tankers due to collisions and groundings is studied. To investigate failure mechanism and energy absorption capacity of ship structures. Experiments and numerical simulations are carried out. In the numerical simulations, failure of fillet welds and rupture of plates are taken into account. To investigate structural integrity of Mid-Deck Tanker, which was newly developed to reduce accidental oil outflow, numerical simulations of grounding of the tanker are performed.

Kuroiwa, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kawamoto, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan); Kondo, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Kusuba, S. [Pal Corp., Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT . . Appendices . A. District Descriptions and Maps PDF B. Explanatory Notes...

44

Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suezmax class tanker arrived at port of Los Angeles and LongPorts .September http://www.arb.ca.gov/ports/marinevess/vsr/

Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

countries that were previously imported, offloaded into above-ground LNG storage tanks, and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery to other countries. Prices...

46

Microsoft Word - Vol 2 Appendices TOC.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of detectors, sensors, and equipment and methods to control leaking containers (i.e., tanks, truck and railroad tankers, etc.), and provide data for training first responders and...

47

Microsoft Word - Appendix A.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of detectors, sensors, and equipment and methods to control leaking containers (i.e., tanks, truck and railroad tankers, etc.), and provide data for training first responders and...

48

TABLE53.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table 53. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between July 2004 Crude Oil ... 0 383 0...

49

NEWS FOCUS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ROBOT PAINTER . ... Magnets hold the small treaded vehicle to the metal side of a tanker or storage tank, and pressurized roller applies paint. ... Object: to cut painting costs ...

1961-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

51

DOE/EIA-0340(98)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

difference between total movements into and total movements out of each PAD District by pipeline, tanker, and barge. Normal Butane. See Butane. OPEC. The acronym for the...

52

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly, February 2006 Table 58. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2005 (Continued) (Thousand...

53

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly, November 2005 Table 58. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, September 2005 (Continued) (Thousand...

54

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments...

55

TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 0 344 978...

56

Proceedings of the fifth (1995) international offshore and polar engineering conference. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

This represents one of a four volume set of conference proceedings dealing with design and material properties for offshore platforms and tanker ships. Specific papers deal with welded joints, metal properties, corrosion protection and effects, safety, double-hull tankers, and mechanical properties. A total of 62 papers have been individually entered into the database.

Dos Santos, J.F. [ed.] [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Langen, I. [ed.] [Hogskole i Stavanger (Norway); Ellinas, C.P. [ed.] [Advanced Mechanics and Engineering, Croydon (United Kingdom); Ueda, Yukio [ed.] [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Welding Research Inst.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF PURCHASING PROPANE GAS AS "TANKER" LOADS Fuel costs comprise 15 to 20% of the total cost of production gas to the farm and 2) a tanker load can be purchased at 5% above pipeline cost. Summing these two line". One alternative that some growers in Georgia have used to lower their fuel cost is buying

Navara, Kristen

58

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-817, Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D. C. 20585 OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 05/31/2016 (Revised 2013) EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ QUESTIONS If you have any questions about Form EIA-817 after reading the instructions, please contact the Survey Manager at (202) 586-6254. PURPOSE The Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movements Report," is used to

59

Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the security of Chinese oil tankers throughChinas Oil Diplomacy: Is it a Global Security Threat? ?s energy security concerns over rapidly growing oil demand

Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Characterization of FBG sensor interrogation based on a FDML wavelength swept laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Cargo Containment of LNG Tankers, Proc. SPIE 6770, 1-in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier ship [13-17]. Sincedielectric device for massive LNG carrier ships but their

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

tankers waiting to offload their crude oil will eventually make it to their respective ports and we would see high amounts of imports and a build in crude oil inventories after...

62

Topic Significance Ranking of LDA Generative Loulwah AlSumait1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, tanker , water oil/crude oil , price, barrel , crude (0.045), increase, product , petroleum , energy Na, coffee , quota , product , market , price , Brazil ship ship , gulf , attack , Iran , American , oil

Domeniconi, Carlotta

63

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

tankers used high pressure jets of hot sea water to clean oil residue from the storage tanks, which was then dumped into the sea. Over time, environmental regulations were slowly...

64

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for a new LNG liquefaction project to be built in Nikiski, along with storage tanks and a marine tanker terminal. This project would also include the construction of a...

65

Y-12 makes the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ship and burn more than 800 tankers full of oil, or 3.5 million railcar loads of coal. Trains first responders to better protect nuclear materials. Y-12 uses its unique facilities,...

66

ATVM Loans Help Boost Pickup Truck Efficiency | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

electricity for a year 6,685 tanker trucks' worth of gasoline Installing 139 wind turbines These are the kinds of results that the ATVM Loan Program was created to produce....

67

Intrinsic Biodegradation of Heavy Oil from Nakhodka and the Effect of Exogenous Fertilization at a Coastal Area of the Sea of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We performed a field experiment in thebiodegradation of heavy oil spilled from the Russian tankerNakhodka on a beach in the Sea of Japan. We collectedoil-contaminated cobbles and treated half with nitrogen andpho...

Hideaki Maki; Mao Utsumi; Hiroshi Koshikawa

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of Fluctuation of Wind on Ship Motions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the effect of fluctuation of wind on ship motions examined by means of the numerical simulation method. Ship sizes 258,000 dwt and 237,000 dwt oil tankers. Ships are moored to fixed deep wate...

S. Ueda

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Atmospheric emissions of European SECA shipping: long-term projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Speed is the key parameter with respect to fuel consumption of a ship and therefore to its...2009...) for four ship types: tankers, general cargo, container, and bulk vessels (Fig.1). Efficiency rates used in th...

Juha Kalli; Jukka-Pekka Jalkanen; Lasse Johansson

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Padding with Compressed Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We commonly find plants using padding to transport liquids or light solids short distances from tankers into storage tanks. Padding can wreck havoc in compressed air systems with limited storage, undersized cleanup equipment (dryers and filters...

Beals, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

72

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge",3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.htm"

73

Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

Not Available

1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

Three years of operations with the Montrose SBM's  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil from Amoco (U.K.) Exploration Co.'s Montrose field in the North Sea is transported to shore by means of an offshore loading system using two single-buoy moorings (SBM) and two shuttle tankers. The field has no storage facilities, hence a tanker must be moored and loading for the field to produce. The buoys were installed in Summer 1976. This study outlines the 3 years of operating experience with the system, illustrating how weather conditions and repairs have led to an average of 24% downtime for the Montrose field.

Fairbrother, N.J.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fuzzy decision support system for spread mooring system selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spread mooring systems are associated with high level uncertainties and risks during tanker loading/unloading operations. In addition, the design of such complex systems consists of many subjective and imprecise parameters. Therefore, in the present ... Keywords: AHP, Decision making, Fuzzy multiple attribute decision making, Fuzzy set theory, Spread mooring system, TOPSIS

Ayhan Mentes; Ismail Hakki Helvacioglu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Role of dissolution rate and solubility in biodegradation of aromatic compounds.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples from the settling tanks of the Ithaca, N.Y., and Marathon, N.Y., sewage treatment plants were passed through Whatman...301-305. 10. Gutnick, D. L., and E. Rosenberg. 1977. Oil tankers and pollution: a microbiological approach. Annu...

G Stucki; M Alexander

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NEWS FOCUS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The talc, developed by United Sierra division of Cyprus Mines Corp., Trenton, N.J., was used to clean beaches polluted by the oil spillage from the tanker Ocean Eagle ... The hydrantlike parts will be built into giant metering instruments to measure the flow of natural gas and air in industrial combustion systems. ...

1968-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

Conceptual Framework for the Use of Fish Parasites as Bioindicators of Acute and Chronic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Perturbation After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico 1Auburn University: Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico- exploratory oil well Ixtoc explodes, sinks (10.8, 5%) March 24th, 1989: Prince: Gulf of Mexico- oil tanker Megaborg fire (378, 189%) January 21st, 1991: Kuwait- Gulf War I, Iraqi

Kane, Andrew S.

80

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-689 NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oceanography Pilot Study. Part DC: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965 by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S, Government Printing Office. Washington. D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone. By Gunter R. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R C

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-684 l^&'i Age and Size Composition of tlie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study. Part DC; The sea-level wind field and wind stress values, July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office. Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C. Stoner

82

' >'"'! . ilf^i^iev^^: :.;:-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C- Stoner

83

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-685 An Annotated List of Larval and Juvenile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970. iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C Stoner

84

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-691 Seasonal Distributions of Larval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values. July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. D.C. 20402. 620. The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R. C. Stoner

85

Self-traveling robotic system for autonomous abrasive blast cleaning in double-hulled structures of ships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil tankers carrying crude oil, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), lead, vessels such as very large crude oil carriers (VLCCs), bulk carriers (B/C), and liquefied natural gas after midnight on March 24, 1989, the 987-foot tank vessel Exxon Valdez, of the Exxon shipping company

Kim, Jongwon

86

The aerodynamics of a slender body moving very close to a water wave surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......wing-in-ground effect. J. Ship Res., 51, 182186...equation for interaction effects on a moored containership...passing Tanker. J. Ship Res., 50, 278287...three-dimensional wings in ground effect. J. Fluid Mech...and interactions of ships in shallow water......

Q. X. Wang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

U.S. approves second offshore oil port  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

U.S. approves second offshore oil port ... Secretary of Transportation Drew Lewis has approved a license for a second deepwater port for oil super-tankers in the Gulf of Mexico. ... To be constructed and operated by Texas Offshore Port Inc., the port would be located 12 miles south of Freeport, Tex. ...

1981-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Journal of Catalysis 253 (2008) 229238 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastruc- tures, such as gas stations and oil tankers, can be used for their storage and transportation be hydrogenated back to cycloalkanes in spe- cialized gas stations. A number of supported metal catalysts have of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3122, USA b Department of Chemistry

Goodman, Wayne

89

Global Hydrological Cycles and World Water Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metric ton of water per day per person in developing...tanker or other high energyconsuming means...other hand, water demand for food and industrial production...Water demand per person will most...Domestic per capita water use has increased...domestic product (GDP) growth, but...

Taikan Oki; Shinjiro Kanae

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Limits to Power Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isobutane to drive turbines (Hammond, 1972a...effective conservation strategy would be for the...percent), natural gas (now approximately...progress are the development of cryogenic tankers...so that natural gas can be transported...high-temperature gas turbines or magnetohydrodynamic...

91

Abstract B137: Cancer in population exposed to the Persian Gulf War  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer in population exposed to the Persian Gulf War Alireza Mosavi-Jarrahi The...events that occurred during the Persian Gulf War made a severe impact on the...crude oil were released into the Persian Gulf from tankers and oil terminals...

Alireza Mosavi?Jarrahi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CCPPressRelease 13 June 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in prison for the worldwide price fixing of flexible marine hoses, used to transport oil between tankersCCPPressRelease 13 June 2008 Stiff sentences in first criminal price fixing case fail to make a big Stephan ­ t: 07712 343600 or 01603 259560 e: a.stephan@uea.ac.uk Stiff sentences in first criminal price

Feigon, Brooke

93

EIS-0035: Use of VLCCs and VLCCs as Floating Storage Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with the proposed use of tankers as floating storage facilities. This statement is a draft supplement to the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

94

Sabine-Neches Waterway Channel Improvement Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 500 to 800 feet wide, from the Gulf of Mexico; a channel 40 feet deep and 400 feet wide to Beaumont of navigation on the waterway. The current channel was completed in 1960. At that time, crude oil tankers are now used routinely for crude oil imports to both Beaumont and Port Arthur. In addition to larger

US Army Corps of Engineers

95

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep-loaded to traverse the waterway. The current channel depth requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation

US Army Corps of Engineers

96

FREEPORT HARBOR, TEXAS CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Gulf of Mexico; a main channel 45 feet deep and 400 feet wide; a Brazos Harbor channel 36 feet deep requires that large crude carriers remain offshore and transfer their cargo into smaller crude tankers for the remainder of the voyage. This lightering operation takes place in the Gulf of Mexico where the two ships

US Army Corps of Engineers

97

FODDIS et al Identification of the unknown pollution source in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and model design of carbon tetrachloride pollution in the Alsatian aquifer has been the subject of various strategies in polluted aquifers. This work aims at studying the spreading of a dangerous chemical - carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) - that contaminated a part of the Alsatian aquifer (France) because of a tanker accident

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

Profile of George Oster n 1980, when biophysicist George  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. He spent his sophomore year sailing on freighters and tankers to various ports of call, in- cluding dur- ing the first year.'' A Doctorate and then Some Although nuclear energy was a booming field he was relieved to be awarded a graduate fellowship from the Atomic Energy Commission in 1964. He

Oster, George

99

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

100

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

102

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

103

Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast  

SciTech Connect

The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

Childers, M. [Oceaneering Production Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Barnes, J. [Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)]|[UMC Petroleum Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 533 - 294 1,445 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 143 6 0 1,165 3,822 0 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... - - - - - - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 41 0 - 643 183 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 41 0 - 643 183 - CBOB ...........................................................

105

EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes  

SciTech Connect

A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

Not Available

1994-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A. [Mobil Shipping and Transportation, Fairfax, VA (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

107

The proceedings of the fourth (1994) international offshore and polar engineering conference. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

This conference proceedings is one volume of a four volume set dealing with oil and gas industry operations in polar and offshore environments. This particular conference deals primarily with materials and designs for offshore platforms and tanker ships. It provides papers dealing with concretes, steels, and composite materials and the IR mechanical properties. Many papers review testing and processes for welded joints. It also provides papers which deal with fracture mechanics and corrosion protection. Approximately 74 papers have been individually abstracted and entered into the data base.

Ueda, Yukio; Tomita, Yasumitsu [eds.] [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Dos Santos, J.F. [ed.] [GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht (Germany); Langen, I. [ed.] [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway); Waagaard, K. [ed.] [Veritec, Hovik (Norway)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

S.1930: Royalty Enhancement Act of 1998, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this bill is to provide certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. Sections of the Bill describe: definitions; rights, obligations and responsibilities; costs responsibility; transporter charges; imbalances; royalty-in-kind for trucked, tankered, or barged oil or gas; limitations on application; reporting; audit; lease terms not affected; eligible and small refiners; applicable laws; indian lands; effective; and regulations.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chemical fate of Bunker C fuel oil in a subtropical marine environment  

SciTech Connect

On August 10, 1993, a major oil spill occurred when approximately 1.2 million liters of Bunker C (No. 6) fuel oil spilled from the fuel tanker Bouchard 155 after it collided with the phosphate freighter Balsa 37 in a shipping channel at the entrance to Tampa Bay, Florida. Although early hydrodynamic conditions with ebbing tides caused most of the oil to be carried several kilometers out of Tampa Bay and into the Gulf of Mexico, subsequent onshore winds and spring tides caused significant quantities of the oil to be deposited on nearby beaches and in mangrove, seagrass and estuarine habitats north of the mouth of Tampa Bay.

Wetzel, D.L.; Van Vleet, E.S. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chedabucto Bay 1992 shoreline oil conditions survey: Long-term fate of bunker C oil from the arrow spill in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a description of the activities related to and a summary of the information generated by a field survey carried out in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia, for Environment Canada from June to September 1992. The objective of the survey was to locate and document any residual oil on the shores of Chedabucto Bay. The grounding of the tanker Arrow in February 1970 resulted in the release of more than 11 million liters of Bunker C fuel oil. This oil was stranded over an estimated 305 km of shoreline in the Chedabucto Bay area.

Owens, E.H.; McGuire, B.E.; Humphrey, B.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Oil recovery; Technology that tames large spills  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the threat of oil spills is growing with the increasing use of larger tankers, the expansion of offshore oil exploration, and-as was demonstrated recently in the Persian Gulf-the dangers of war and terrorism. Aware of the environmental havoc that massive spills can cause, engineers are working hard to devise effective methods of scooping oil from the water's surface and cleaning contaminated shorelines. Techniques are being developed, which combine mechanical, chemical, and biological processes to contain spills.

Valenti, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 38. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 18 141 - 303 1,948 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 137 44 0 855 3,010 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 83 0 - 396 158 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 83 0 - 396 158 - CBOB ........................................................... 0 0 - 396 0 -

113

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

114

Gasoline vapor recovery  

SciTech Connect

In a gasoline distribution network wherein gasoline is drawn from a gasoline storage tank and pumped into individual vehicles and wherein the gasoline storage tank is refilled periodically from a gasoline tanker truck, a method of recovering liquid gasoline from gasoline vapor that collects in the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom, said method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a source of inert gas; (b) introducing inert gas into the gasoline storage tank as liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom so that liquid gasoline drawn from the tank is displaced by inert gas and gasoline vapor mixes with the inert gas in the headspace of the tank; (c) collecting the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture from the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the tank is refilled from a gasoline tanker truck; (d) cooling the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture to a temperature sufficient to condense the gasoline vapor in the mixture to liquid gasoline but not sufficient to liquify the inert gas in the mixture; (e) separating the condensed liquid gasoline from the inert gas; and delivering the condensed liquid gasoline to a remote location for subsequent use.

Lievens, G.; Tiberi, T.P.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Floating oil production unit slated in small field off Gabon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the first U.S. tanker converted to a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) unit which takes up station in Gombe-Beta field off Gabon by Dec. 1. FPSO Ocean Producer will work under a 3 year, day rate contract let late in 1990 by Amoco-Gabon Bombe Marin co., a unit of Amoco Production Co. (OGJ, Dec. 24, 1990, p. 27). Gombe-Beta field is in the Atlantic Ocean about 70 miles south of Port Gentil, Gabon. Ocean Producer will be moored in 50 ft of water 3.7 miles off Gabon, with Bombe-Beta's unmanned production platform about 820 ft astern. The vessel will be held in position by a disconnectable, asymmetric, six point, spread mooring system, It is owned and operated by Oceaneering International Services Ltd. (OISL). Affiliate Oceaneering Production Systems (OPS) converted the 78,061 dwt oil tanker MT Baltimore Sea at a capital cost of $25 million at Gulf Copper Manufacturing Corp.'s Port Arthur, Tex., shipyard. Both companies are units of Oceaneering International Inc., Houston. OPS the Ocean Producer's use in Gombe-Beta field is the shallowest water FPSO application in the world. Amoco-Gabon chose an FPSO production system for Gombe-Beta because it expects the remote field to have a short economic life, and the oil requires extensive processing.

Not Available

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

valdez  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Energy Information Administration March 1989 A Review of Valdez Oil Spill Market Impacts by John S. Cook and Charles P. Shirkey On March 24, 1989, the tanker, Exxon Valdez, ran aground, spilling 240,000 barrels of crude oil into Alaska 's Prince William Sound and sending waves of concern across the country. This concern, focused initially on the environment, quickly spread to economic anxieties over possible supply disruptions and rising prices. Based on data available through May 19, 1989, it now appears that these fears were largely unfounded. Events since the spill demonstrate that most of the impact on petroleum markets was psychological rather than physical. As far as oil supply disruptions go, the Valdez incident should have been a minor annoyance that should have gone largely unnoticed in the market

117

EIA-817  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Email: Email: Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Questions? Call: 202-586-6254 FORM EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or

118

Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Addthis Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More (Text Version) Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More video. The words "Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More" appear onscreen, followed by video of oil wells and oil tankers. Shots of various modes of transportation, including cars and planes. Nearly a billion dollars a day. That's how much we spend on oil imports in the U.S. - oil that powers our nation's transportation systems and industries. Shots of crops being harvested and processed. The words "Biofuels - Made from biomass" appear onscreen along with several vials of different biomass feedstocks, including corn fibers, peanut shells, and switchgrass.

119

NDP-30/R6 (Table 2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprises the sum of Africa, North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Comprises the sum of Africa, North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Oceania, the former U.S.S.R., and the Antarctic Fisheries. 2 Includes Christmas Island. 3 Identifies bunkers delivered by tankers to vessels on the Antarctic fishing grounds; fuels delivered to Antarctic research stations are not included. 4 Refers to former Burma. 5 Refers to the former Democratic Kampuchea. 6 Excludes Taiwan province. 7 Includes Taiwan Province. 8 Prior to 1 January 1993, refers to the former Czechoslovakia composed of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. 9 Code used for population data only. Energy statistics for France and Monaco are combined (251). 10 From 1950 to 1958, data includes the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, and Gabon. 11 From 1950 to 1954, data includes Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

120

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,646 3,624 0 5,350 102,565 33,807 0 4,046 351,020 Petroleum Products ............................................... 109,235 465 0 32,407 177,805 31,369 0 1,159,745 245,412 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 19 0 - 0 5,780 0 - 0 30,395 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 10,283 127,973 288 - 16,440 50,605 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 571 10 0 0 6,901 - 0 305 1,643 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 64,780 102 0 9,507 4,411 4,155 0 538,610 69,841

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ESH100.2.ENV.5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Procedure Title Provide and Protect Potable Water Procedure Manager COOPER, TERRY W. Status Active Subject Matter Expert Michael L. Du Mond (Mike) Robert Ziock Applicability, Exceptions, and Consequences This corporate procedure applies to all Members of the Workforce whose activities include: Drawing potable water from the potable water system on Sandia-controlled premises. Using permanent and nonpermanent potable water dispensers (e.g., Rubbermaid© brand containers, tanker trucks and trailers, and water tanks) at remote sites, which are not connected to a potable water system (e.g., field-location testing facilities, firing and rocket ranges, and waste sites). Exceptions to, or deviations from this procedure must be approved through the Executive Policy Sponsor or Policy Area Manager, if delegated. Click

122

CX-003364: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

364: Categorical Exclusion Determination 364: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mobile Hydrogen-Fueling Station and Use of Hydrogen Buses at LLNL CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Livermore, California Office(s): Lawrence Livermore Site Office Two hydrogen buses would be delivered and operated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to provide regular taxi service for LLNL employees and special events. A mobile hydrogen-fueling station would be located in the tanker storage yard (southeast side of LLNL) and would be the primary fueling source for the hydrogen buses. The fueling station would be comprised of a trailer with compressed hydrogen tanks, and equipped with solar panels for the communication system and pump,

123

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about

124

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 December 2011 Table 60. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,141 1,441 -300 34,752 8,711 26,041 6,469 28,784 -22,315 Petroleum Products ............................................... 100,976 9,207 101,951 35,804 23,219 -6,304 23,593 122,848 -94,762 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - 3,260 417 2,843 1,046 2,853 -1,807 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... 3,702 0 3,702 10,375 13,641 -3,266 17,197 8,355 8,842 Ethane/Ethylene

125

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 23, 22, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 23, 2012 | Next Release: Mar. 1, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Re-Exports of LNG Grew in 2011 Re-exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) occur when foreign LNG shipments are offloaded into above-ground U.S. storage tanks located on-site at regasification terminals and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery to other countries. A total of 53.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) were re-exported in 2011, compared to 32.9 Bcf in 2010. Re-exports of foreign-sourced LNG from U.S. LNG terminals exceeded 12 Bcf in January 2011, equivalent to about 30 percent of U.S. LNG import volumes during that month. There are currently three U.S. LNG terminals that have been granted

126

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include:

127

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 December 2011 Table 57. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 1,067 - 459 5,402 2,850 - 682 28,102 Petroleum Products ............................................... 9,201 6 0 3,132 17,764 2,323 0 97,844 20,880 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 417 0 - - 2,853 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... 0 0 - 1,539 12,003 99 - 2,163 6,192 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - - 0 347 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,931 0 0 698 616 346 0 40,455 4,008 Reformulated - RBOB

128

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.PDF 9.PDF Table 39. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 740 321 419 34,006 10,274 23,732 7,482 27,754 -20,272 Petroleum Products ............................................... 101,184 8,513 103,178 33,918 22,673 -8,062 23,754 122,191 -93,986 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - 4,568 406 4,162 1,111 4,121 -3,010 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 2,621 0 2,621 10,547 13,760 -3,213 17,861 7,305 10,556 Ethane/Ethylene ...............................................

129

Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL) Place Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia Zip 2067 Sector Solar Product Solar Sailor 'hybrid marine power' (HMP) and 'solar wing' technology is suitable for a wide range of applications from small-unmanned vessels to large tankers, including ferries, tourist cruisers and private yachts. References Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL) is a company located in Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia . References ↑ "Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Sailor_Holdings_Ltd_SSHL&oldid=35132

130

Shielding requirements for K Basin waste transfer line  

SciTech Connect

K-East Basin sludge, mixed with water, is to be transported to the tank farms using a high integrity container mounted on a trailer. Load considerations preclude driving the truck directly to the tank opening. Thus, it is envisioned that a transfer line will run from a tanker unloading point to a point where the waste can be injected into a waste tank. It is presently envisioned that the waste will be pumped from the truck to the tank in a three inch pipe which is encased inside a six inch pipe. The transfer line will be shielded by either berming earth with a density of approximately 2.00 g/cm{sup 3} (125 lb/ft{sup 3}) around the line, or constructing a concrete raceway.

Goldberg, H.J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 consists of 19 reports describing technical effort performed by Government Contractors in the area of LNG Safety and Environmental Control. Report topics are: simulation of LNG vapor spread and dispersion by finite element methods; modeling of negatively buoyant vapor cloud dispersion; effect of humidity on the energy budget of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vapor cloud; LNG fire and explosion phenomena research evaluation; modeling of laminar flames in mixtures of vaporized liquefied natural gas (LNG) and air; chemical kinetics in LNG detonations; effects of cellular structure on the behavior of gaseous detonation waves under transient conditions; computer simulation of combustion and fluid dynamics in two and three dimensions; LNG release prevention and control; the feasibility of methods and systems for reducing LNG tanker fire hazards; safety assessment of gelled LNG; and a four band differential radiometer for monitoring LNG vapors.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

AEO Early Release 2013 - LNG exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas, or LNG. U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas are expected to reach 1.6 trillion cubic feet in 2027, double the export levels projected for that time in last year's outlook . And, according to EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski: "Increasing domestic natural gas production, especially from tight shale formations, and lower

134

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.PDF 6.PDF Table 36. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 146 175 - 475 6,913 2,886 - 265 27,489 Petroleum Products ............................................... 8,469 44 0 2,765 17,339 2,569 0 98,419 19,332 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 406 0 - - 4,121 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 1,378 12,271 111 - 1,243 6,062 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - - 0 47 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,378 0 0 536 527 307 0 41,206 3,077 Reformulated - RBOB .......................................

135

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 9,396 5,270 4,126 434,346 141,722 292,624 111,580 355,664 -244,084 Petroleum Products ............................................... 1,192,152 109,700 1,187,640 421,032 241,581 -23,755 244,122 1,458,755 -1,170,927 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 19 -19 35,669 5,780 29,889 13,880 30,395 -16,515 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 26,723 0 26,723 99,367 138,544 -39,177 185,252 67,045 118,207

136

Pipeliners beat designers across Panama's jungle  

SciTech Connect

Hard-driving pipeline crews are slashing a path down the steep slopes of the Andes range on Panama's Caribbean coast for the final leg of an 80-mile Pacific-Atlantic oil link that will reduce shipping times for North Slope crude to Gulf Coast refineries. When completed in late August, the trans-isthmus tube will be able to drain the Panama Canal of Alaskan oil, which currently must be pumped from large tankers to 65,000 ton ships before passage through the 50-mile cut. The 36 and 40-in.-dia pipe will connect an existing Northville oil transshipment terminal at Puerto Armuelles, near Costa Rica on the Pacific Coast, with a new 2.5-million-bbl storage area at Chiriqui Grande on the Caribbean coast. Two pumping stations, one at Puerto Armuelles and another at the base of the Serrania de Tabasara mountains, will lift the oil 4,000 ft over the Continental Divide. Gravity flows of 7 1/2 ft per second down the steep drop to the swamps along the Caribbean will feed three 833,000-bbl tanks being built on a hillside overlooking Chiriqui Bay. From there, two 36-in. lines will feed concrete-coated pipe sections trenched into the surf zone and placed on the muddy bottom for the remaining distance to two marine loading buoys over a mile offshore. The catenary anchor-leg mooring buoys are designed to handle tankers of up to 160,000 tons in 65 ft of water at maximum fill rates of 120,000 bbl per hour.

Not Available

1982-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

An economic and environmental assessment of transporting bulk energy from a grazing ocean thermal energy conversion facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) facility produces electrical power without generating carbon dioxide (CO2) by using the temperature differential between the reservoir of cold water at greater depths and the shallow mixed layer on the ocean surface. As some of the best sites are located far from shore, one option is to ship a high-energy carrier by tanker from these open-ocean or grazing OTEC platforms. We evaluate the economics and environmental attributes of producing and transporting energy using ammonia (NH3), liquid hydrogen (LH2) and methanol (CH3OH). For each carrier, we develop transportation pathways that include onboard production, transport via tanker, onshore conversion and delivery to market. We then calculate the difference between the market price and the variable cost for generating the product using the OTEC platform without and with a price on CO2 emissions. Finally, we compare the difference in prices to the capital cost of the OTEC platform and onboard synthesis equipment. For all pathways, the variable cost is lower than the market price, although this difference is insufficient to recover the entire capital costs for a first of a kind OTEC platform. With an onboard synthesis efficiency of 75%, we recover 5%, 25% and 45% of the capital and fixed costs for LH2, CH3OH and NH3, respectively. Improving the capital costs of the OTEC platform by up to 25% and adding present estimates for the damages from CO2 do not alter these conclusions. The near-term potential for the grazing OTEC platform is limited in existing markets. In the longer term, lower capital costs combined with improvements in onboard synthesis costs and efficiency as well as increases in CO2 damages may allow the products from OTEC platforms to enter into markets.

Elisabeth A. Gilmore; Andrew Blohm; Steven Sinsabaugh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

S-K Final Report Project Title: Examination of Coastal Aquaculture Effluent and Receiving Water Quality throughout the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bratvold Savannah River Ecology Laboratory University of Georgia Date: October 31, 2005 Abstract. The receiving water for this facility is an intercoastal water way. The second facility is a small operation

139

Hydrostatic Mooring System. Final Technical Report: Main Report plus Appendices A, B, and C - Volume 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The main conclusions from the work carried out under this contract are: An ordinary seafarer can learn by training on a simulator, to moor large tanker vessels to the Hydrostatic Mooring, safely and quickly, in all weather conditions up to storms generating waves with a significant wave height of 8 m. Complete conceptual design of the Hydrostatic Mooring buoy was carried out which proved that the buoy could be constructed entirely from commercially available standard components and materials. The design is robust, and damage resistant. The mooring tests had a 100% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being securely attached and moored to the vessel following every mooring attempt. The tests had an 80% success rate from the point of view of the buoy being adequately centered such that petroleum transfer equipment on the vessel could be attached to the corresponding equipment on the buoy. The results given in Table 3-2 of the mooring tests show a consistently improving performance from test to test by the Captain that performed the mooring operations. This is not surprising, in view of the fact that the Captain had only three days of training on the simulator prior to conducting the tests, that the maneuvering required is non-standard, and the test program itself lasted four days. One conclusion of the test performance is that the Captain was not fully trained at the initiation of the test. It may therefore be concluded that a thoroughly trained navigator would probably be able to make the mooring such that the fluid transfer equipment can be connected with reliability in excess of 90%. Considering that the typical standard buoy has enough power aboard to make eight mooring attempts, this implies that the probability that the mooring attempt should fail because of the inability to connect the fluid transfer equipment is of the order of 10{sup {minus}8}. It may therefore be concluded that the mooring operation between a Hydrostatic Mooring and a large tanker vessel can be carried out with near absolute reliability in all sea states up to a sea state where the significant wave height is 8 m.

Jens Korsgaard

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about winter supply in New England. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell by 10 percent on Tuesday, October 16, dropping to $20.05 per barrel. By Friday, WTI had recovered two thirds of the decrease, ending the week at $21.85 per barrel, or $3.77 per MMBtu.

142

March 2009 Y-12 Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track Page 5 Page 5 Third-generation employee follows his father's sage advice Page 7 Page 7 Car enthusiasts go into overdrive Brett Pate Ray Smith Donna Watson Mona Wright Lisa Xiques B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the

143

Basic research opportunities to support LNG technology. Topical report, July 1989-December 1990  

SciTech Connect

As additional gas reserves come on production during the next decade in areas with limited local markets, worldwide LNG trade is expected to expand. The availability of dedicated LNG tankers may well determine the rate at which this growth occurs. Plans are being made now to bring the four U.S. import terminals up to capacity during this period. As LNG becomes a more significant factor in the domestic natural gas market, consideration should be given to applications other than simply regassifying and comingling it with other supplies entering the pipeline grid. The higher energy density and the low temperature of LNG offer opportunities for expanding the use of natural gas into the industrial and transportation sectors. Greater use of LNG in peak shaving and intermediate storage may also provide benefits in increased reliability and performance of the gas transmission and distribution grid. In order to provide new and more cost-effective technologies to respond to these opportunities, it is recommended that GRI broaden the range of research it is currently performing on LNG.

Groten, B.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Asia Pacific LNG trade: Status and technology development  

SciTech Connect

The Asia Pacific Region is experiencing a period of sustained economic expansion. Economic growth has led to an increasing demand for energy that has spurred a rapid expansion of baseload liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in this region. This is illustrated by the fact that seven of the ten baseload facilities in existence provide LNG for markets in the Asia Pacific region. With the three exceptions having been initially commissioned in 1972 and earlier, it is fair to observed that most advances in LNG technology have been developed and applied for this market. The paper presents the current status and identified future trends for the Asia Pacific LNG trade. Technology development in terms of application to onstream production, processing and transportation facilities, including LNG tankers, is presented. The potential of future advances to applied technology and operational practices to improve the cost-effectiveness of new and existing facilities is discussed. Current design data and methods as actually used are examined in terms of identifying where fundamental research and basic physical data are insufficient for optimization purposes. These findings are then summarized and presented in terms of the likely evolution of future and existing LNG projects in the Asia Pacific region.

Hovdestad, W.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development of mid-scale and floating LNG facilities  

SciTech Connect

The development of large-scale base load LNG facilities has dominated the process industry for decades. However, in many areas of the world, base load facilities are not feasible due to inadequate reserves. Mid-scale facilities can be economically attractive in certain locations and, in fact, have several advantages which aid in their development. The PRICO II LNG liquefaction process offers a process configuration which fits well with these developments. The process has been used in a range of facility sizes from base load to peak shaving applications. In addition to onshore facilities, floating liquefaction facilities can be developed on barges or tankers to handle mid-scale to large scale LNG production. Concepts for several sizes and configurations of floating facilities have been developed using the PRICO II process integrated into a total production, liquefaction, and load-out system. This paper covers the PRICO process concept, application areas and facility configurations which are currently being developed for mid-scale and floating LNG facilities.

Price, B.C.; Mortko, R.A. [Black and Veatch Pritchard, Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety  

SciTech Connect

Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California Past, Present and Future  

SciTech Connect

I'm pleased to be here as your keynote speaker from the utility industry. Today is fitting to discuss the role of an alternative/renewable energy resource such as geothermal. Three years ago today, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. This ecological catastrophe was another of those periodic jolts that underscores the importance of lessening our nation's dependence on oil and increasing the use of cost-effective, environmentally benign alternative/renewable energy sources. Alternative/renewables have come a long way since the first oil crisis in 1973. Today, they provide 9 percent of electric power used in the United States. That's nearly double the figure of just two years ago. And since 1985, one-third of a new capacity has come from geothermal, solar, wind and biomass facilities. Nevertheless, geothermal supplies only about three-tenths of a percent of the country's electric power, or roughly 2,800 megawatts (MW). And most of that is in California. In fact, geothermal is California's second-largest source of renewable energy, supplying more than 5 percent of the power generated in the state. Today, I'd like to discuss the outlook for the geothermal industry, framing it within Southern California Edison's experience with geothermal and other alternative/renewable energy sources.

Budhraja, Vikram S.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Man B W brings two-stroke slow-speed engines back to Europe  

SciTech Connect

In a move started almost ten years ago, MAN B W Diesel A/S has now centralized the company's Copenhagen activities into one place. With these moves, it seems that the restructuring of the Danish engine builder, Burmeister Wain, into a member of the worldwide diesel engine group, MAN B W, has been completed. Just as interesting, however, are recent moves to expand the company's capabilities for producing two-stroke engines in Europe. MAN in Augsburg, Germany, acquired B W in 1980. This was the time when MAN decided to terminate its own two-stroke engine developments in favor of the B W design. The two-stroke engines designed in Copenhagen are more than 90% directed to the marine market and less than 10% for land-based power plants. Whereas, in Augsburg, the four-stroke engine market activities are some 65% directed to the power generation market, leaving 35% to marine. The big medium-speed marine engines built in Augsburg are mostly used for passenger ships, cruise ships and ferries, just to name the major applications. The two-stroke engines from Copenhagen are used for container ships, tankers or bulk carriers. 2 figs.

Kunberger, K.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Prediction of wax buildup in 24 inch cold, deep sea oil loading line  

SciTech Connect

When designing pipelines for cold environments, it is important to know how to predict potential problems due to wax deposition on the pipeline's inner surface. The goal of this work was to determine the rate of wax buildup and the maximum, equlibrium wax thickness for a North Sea field loading line. The experimental techniques and results used to evaluate the waxing potential of the crude oil (B) are described. Also, the theoretic model which was used for predicting the maximum wax deposit thickness in the crude oil (B) loading pipeline at controlled temperatures of 40 F (4.4 C) and 100 F (38 C), is illustrated. Included is a recommendation of a procedure for using hot oil at the end of a tanker loading period in order to dewax the crude oil (B) line. This technique would give maximum heating of the pipeline and should be followed by shutting the hot oil into the pipeline at the end of the loading cycle which will provide a hot oil soaking to help soften existing wax. 14 references.

Asperger, R.G.; Sattler, R.E.; Tolonen, W.J.; Pitchford, A.C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermally insulated pipelines successfully move high-wax-content crude offshore Gabon  

SciTech Connect

Three thermally insulated pipelines have been installed at a water depth of 35 m (115 ft) in Shell Gabon's Lucina Marine field. The three lines consist of two 2-km (1.24-mile) long flowlines connecting drilling and production platforms and a 3.2 km (2 mile) long loading line connecting a production platform to a storage tanker permanently moored in the field. All three pipelines are of 10.75-in. OD with rigid polyurethane-foam insulation contained in a high-density polyethylene sleeve. The pipelines have been designed with an operating temperature of 90/degree/C. (194/degree/F.). Thermal insulation was chosen because of the Lucina crude's high wax cloud point of 55/degree/C. (131/degree/F.). Without insulation, cooling of the crude in subsea pipelines would have lead to rapid wax deposition. Details of the coating and insulation of the line and riser pipe are given. For the line pipe, a thermal-insulation system consisting of polyurethane foam (PUF) within a polyethylene (PE) sleeve pipe was chosen.

Hales, M.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of 1 MW-class HTS motor for podded ship propulsion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To reduce fuel consumption and lead to a major reduction of pollution from NOx, SOx and CO2, the electric ship propulsion system is one of the most prospective substitutes for conventional ship propulsion systems. In order to spread it, innovative technologies for the improvement of the power transmission are required. The high temperature superconducting technology has the possibility for a drastic reduction of power transmission loss. Recently, electric podded propulsions have become popular for large cruise vessels, icebreakers and chemical tankers because of the flexibility of the equipment arrangement and the stern hull design, and better maneuverability in harbour, etc. In this paper, a 1 MW-class High temperature superconducting (HTS) motor with high efficiency, smaller size and simple structure, which is designed and manufactured for podded propulsion, is reported. For the case of a coastal ship driven by the optimized podded propulsion in which the 1MW HTS motor is equipped, the reductions of fluid dynamic resistance and power transmission losses are demonstrated. The present research & development has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

K Umemoto; K Aizawa; M Yokoyama; K Yoshikawa; Y Kimura; M Izumi; K Ohashi; M Numano; K Okumura; M Yamaguchi; Y Gocho; E Kosuge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect

This quarter`s feature report focuses on natural gas exports to Mexico. OFP invites ideas from the public on future topics dealing with North American natural gas import/export trade. Such suggestions should be left on OFP`s electronic bulletin board. Natural Gas exports to Mexico continued to grow and reached an historic high for the month of June (7.8 Bcf). Two new long-term contracts were activated; Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company began importing 14.7 MMcf per day from TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Renaissance Energy (U.S.) Inc. began importing 2.8 MMcf per day from Renaissance Energy Ltd. for resale to Delmarva Power & Light Company. Algerian LNG imports remained stagnant with only one tanker being imported by Pan National Gas Sales, Inc. (Pan National). During the first six months of 1995, data indicates gas imports increased by about 10 percent over the 1994 level (1,418 vs. 1,285 Bcf), with Canadian imports increasing by 14 percent and Algerian imports decreasing by 81 percent. During the same time period, exports increased by 18 percent (83 vs. 70.1 Bcf).

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ecosystem under pressure: Ballast water discharge into Galveston Bay, Texas (USA) from 2005 to 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ballast water exchange processes facilitate the dispersal and unnatural geographic expansion of phytoplankton, including harmful algal bloom species. From 2005 to 2010, over 45,000 vessels (?8000 annually) travelled across Galveston Bay (Texas, USA) to the deep-water ports of Houston (10th largest in the world), Texas City and Galveston. These vessels (primarily tankers and bulkers) discharged ?1.2נ108metrictons of ballast water; equivalent to ?3.4% of the total volume of the Bay. Over half of the ballast water discharged had a coastwise origin, 96% being from US waters. Galveston Bay has fewer non-indigenous species but receives a higher volume of ballast water discharge, relative to the highly invaded Chesapeake and San Francisco Bays. Given the magnitude of shipping traffic, the role of Galveston Bay, both as a recipient and donor region of non-indigenous phytoplankton species is discussed here in terms of the invasibility risk to this system by way of ballast water.

Jamie L. Steichen; Rachel Windham; Robin Brinkmeyer; Antonietta Quigg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Detection of waterborne mutagens and characterization of chemicals in selected Galveston sites after an oil spill  

SciTech Connect

In our previous study, we proposed a unique sampling technique for mutagens in marine environment by suspending an absorbent, blue rayon, selective to polycyclic mutagens with three or more fused rings. By using this technique, we were able to bring back a small amount of adsorbent, weighing less than 10 g, from remote sampling sites, rather than large volumes of water. In the summer of 1990, a collision of barge tankers occurred in Galveston Bay and approximately 500,000 gal of oil were spilled into the Bay. Several sites in Galveston Bay were sampled 5-7 d after the oil sill. We characterized the pollutants chemically and detected the mutagenicity. We designed the present study to examine the applicability of our technique from two points of view. One was to determine if there was a correlation between mutagenicity of blue rayon-adsorbed compounds and the level of known mutagens detected in water samples from the same site. The other was to certify if the sampling technique provided a convenient method for handling water samples collected at remote sites. The chemical analysis was carried out in Texas (U.S.A.) an the mutagenicity testing was done in Okayama (Japan). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Kira, S.; Taketa, K.; Itoh, T.; Hayatsu, H. (Okayama Univ. Medical School, Shikata-cho (Japan)); Zheng, Y.; Li, R.; Holliday, T.L.; Giam, C.S. (Texas A M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market  

SciTech Connect

Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

Not Available

1991-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

1991 international petroleum encyclopedia  

SciTech Connect

There is no other petroleum industry publication quite like the International Petroleum Encyclopedia. With a timely, accurate combination of global industry coverage and analysis, detailed statistical surveys, cutting-edge reports on technological advancements and the ever-popular atlas maps, the 1991 International Petroleum Encyclopedia is a smart buy for professionals whose business is oil and gas, as well as for those whose business is affected by the industry's trends and developments. Written by a professional staff of Oil and Gas Journal petroleum experts, the 1991 IPE gives you the all important global perspective for constructing sound business strategies for the 90's. The petroleum industry is scrambling for information that will help it survive this volitile period. This book reports on the topics in the petroleum industry the latest developments in horizontal drilling, world refining (the latest information on reformulated fuels), and predictions about the post-war Persian Gulf industry. PULS, discussions on changes in the Gulf of Mexico, developments in the LNG trade, and crude oil tanker supply/.demand curves.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab  

SciTech Connect

The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab  

SciTech Connect

The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Wright, Mathew C. [JLAB; Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Investigation of Pool Spreading and Vaporization Behavior in Medium-Scale LNG Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A failure of a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker can occur due to collision or loading/unloading operation resulting in spillage of LNG on water. Upon release, a spreading liquid can form a pool with rapid vaporization leading to the formation of a flammable vapor cloud. Safety analysis for the protection of public and property involves the determination of consequences of such accidental releases. To address this complex pool spreading and vaporization phenomenon of LNG, an investigation is performed based on the experimental tests that were conducted by the Mary Kay OConnor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC) in 2007. The 2007 tests are a part of medium-scale experiments carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF), College Station. The dataset represents a semi-continuous spill on water, where LNG is released on a confined area of water for a specified duration of time. The pool spreading and vaporization behavior are validated using empirical models, which involved determination of pool spreading parameters and vaporization rates with respect to time. Knowledge of the pool diameter, pool height and spreading rate are found to be important in calculating the vaporization rates of the liquid pool. The paper also presents a method to determine the vaporization mass flux of LNG using water temperature data that is recorded in the experiment. The vaporization rates are observed to be high initially and tend to decrease once the pool stopped spreading. The results of the analysis indicated that a vaporization mass flux that is varying with time is required for accurate determination of the vaporization rate. Based on the data analysis, sources of uncertainties in the experimental data were identified to arise from ice formation and vapor blocking.

Nirupama Gopalaswami; R. Mentzer; M. Sam Mannan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An exergy based approach to determine production cost and CO2 allocation for petroleum derived fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable and non-renewable exergy and CO2 costs of petroleum derived fuels produced in Brazil are evaluated using exergoeconomy to rationally distribute the exergy costs and the CO2 emitted in processes with more than one product. An iterative procedure is used to take into account the cyclic interactions of the processed fuels. The renewable and non-renewable exergy costs together with the CO2 cost provide a reasonable way to compare different fuels and can be used to assess an enormous quantity of processes that make use of petroleum derived products. The system considers Brazilian typical processes and distances: offshore oil and gas production, transportation by shuttle tankers and pipelines, and refining. It was observed that the renewable exergy cost contribution in the total exergy cost of petroleum derived fuels is negligible. On average, the refining process is responsible, for 85% of the total unit exergy cost. Total unit exergy costs of gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas and fuel oil were found to be: 1.081MJ/MJ, 1.074MJ/MJ, 1.064MJ/MJ, 1.05MJ/MJ, respectively. The hydrotreatment process increases diesel cost from 1.038MJ/MJ to 1.11MJ/MJ in order to decrease its sulphur content. The CO2 cost reflects the extent of processing as well as the C/H ratio of the used fuel. Hence, coke followed by hydrotreated diesel have the largest CO2 cost among the fuels, 91gCO2/MJ and 79gCO2/MJ, respectively.

J.A.M. Silva; D. Flrez-Orrego; S. Oliveira Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Liquefaction of natural gas to methanol for shipping and storage  

SciTech Connect

The penetration of natural gas into distant markets can be substantially increased by a new methanol synthesis process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new methanol process is made possible by the discovery of a catalyst that drops synthesis temperatures from about 275/sup 0/C to about 100/sup 0/C. The new low temperature liquid catalyst can convert synthesis gas completely to methanol in a single pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This characteristic leads to a further major improvement in the methanol plant. As a result of process design factors made possible by the BNL catalyst, the plant required to convert natural gas to methanol is very simple. Conversion of natural gas to methanol requires two chemical reactions, both of which are exothermic, and thus represent a loss of heating value in the feed natural gas. This loss is about 20% of the feed gas energy, and is, therefore, higher than the 10% loss in energy in natural gas liquefaction, which is a simpler physical - not a chemical - change. The energy disadvantage of the methanol option must be balanced against the advantage of a much lower capital investment requirement made possible by the new BNL synthesis. Preliminary estimates show that methanol conversion and shipping require an investment for liquefaction to methanol, and shipping liquefied methanol that can range from 35 to 50% of the capital needed for the LNG plant and LNG tanker fleet. This large reduction in capital requirements is expected to make liquefaction to methanol attractive in many cases where the LNG capital needs are prohibitive. 3 tabs.

O'Hare, T.E.; Sapienza, R.S.; Mahajan, D.; Skaperdas, G.T.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

169

Transportation and Power Requirements for He 3 Mining of the Jovian Planets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bi?modal fusion propulsion system that can be used for transportation to and the mining of He 3 from the Jovian planets is proposed. It consists of the Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion reactor which is analyzed for utilization as a propulsion device as well as for use as a surface power system. The fusion reactions in the device are initiated by the heating provided by the fission fragments and the annihilation products produced by the at rest annihilation of antiprotons in uranium U 238 target nuclei. The energetic pions and muons of the antiproton?proton (or neutron) annihilation in the U 238 nucleus can heat a suitable fusion fuel to several keV temperature during their short lifetime while the remaining heating to ignition is provided by the fission fragments. We examine the use of such a system to travel to Jupiter for instance to mine the He 3 which is known to exist to the tune of 350 trillion tons in its atmosphere. Such a rich source of this isotope can readily meet the needs of a fusion?powered global industrial energy consumption estimated at 5400 tons annually for an indefinite length of time. Although He 3 exists to a much lesser degree in the lunar regolith the power requirements for its extraction estimated at 270 GJ per kg may render its economic viability very much in question. It is suggested that mining the planets at a power requirement 30 times less than its lunar counterpart may be more desirable in spite of the distances involved if a reasonably rapid transportation system can be devised. In its propulsive mode the GDM device is shown to be capable of traveling to Jupiter and bringing back the annual world need of He 3 in about six months. Based on such performance it is quite reasonable to envision a space tanker employing the proposed propulsion system to fly from Earth to the outer planet of choice spend a period of time in the planet's atmosphere extracting He 3 or loading it from an extractor plant already in place and then return to Earth with its cargo. It will also be shown that in its power mode the GDM system is capable of producing enough electric power to support colonization and the amount of antiprotons needed will be well within the projected production rate of the next two decades.

Terry Kammash; Ricky Tang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.  

SciTech Connect

Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution from varying kWh storage capability of battery packs in HEVs and PHEVs from {approx}16 to 64 km of charge depleting distance. Sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the effect of replacing the battery once during the vehicle's life. The paper includes one appendix that examines several recent studies of interactions of PHEVs with patterns of electric generation and one that provides definitions, acronyms, and fuel consumption estimation steps.

Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

173

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site - Part 2  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromate was used throughout the 100 Areas (100-B, 100-C, 100-D/DR, 100-F, 100-H, and 100 K) as a corrosion inhibitor in reactor cooling water. Chromate was delivered in rail cars, tanker trucks, barrels, and local pipelines as dichromate granular solid or stock solution. In many occasions, chromate was inevitably discharged to surface or near-surface ground through spills during handling, pipeline leaks, or during disposal to cribs. The composition of the liquids that were discharged is not known and it is quite possible that Cr(VI) fate and transport in the contaminated sediments would be a function of the chemical composition of the waste fluids. The major objectives of this investigation which was limited in scope by the financial resources available, were to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100-D Area spill sites; 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of macroscopic leaching studies, and microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone that can be used for developing options for environmental remediation. The information gathered from this research effort will help to further improve our understanding of Cr(VI) behavior in the vadose zone and will also help in accelerating the 100 Area Columbia River Corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of column experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns. Column experiments used the field size fraction of the sediment samples and a simulated Hanford Site groundwater solution. Periodic stop flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using some microscale techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mssbauer spectroscopy.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; McKinley, James P.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Um, Wooyong; Resch, Charles T.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Petersen, Scott W.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309  

SciTech Connect

Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

Grant, K E

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Locating new coal-fired power plants with Carbon Capture Ready designA GIS case study of Guangdong province in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Making new coal-fired power plants carbon capture ready (Carbon Capture Ready) in China has been recognised as a crucial by a number of stakeholders academics, energy companies and regional government, based on a study in EU-UK-China NZEC project. A number of publications have investigated the definition, engineering requirements, economic and finance of CCR for China. However there remain a number of questions regarding the extent to which a plants physical location might constrain the feasibility of CCS retrofit. To address this issue, a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been used as a tool for mapping current and planned large carbon dioxide sources in Guangdong, also illustrating potential storage sites and calculating possible carbon dioxide transportation route. This paper investigates the location factors that should be considered when locating new build CCR power plants and demonstrates the methodology of using GIS software with spatial analysis in planning new build power plant in Guangdong. A preliminary study has identified over 30 large power plants within the region, with plant locations and historical emission data collected and presented in ArcGIS. Factors such as distance to potential storage site, route of CO2 pipeline, extra space on site and potential development plan etc. were investigated in the modelling and calculated the potential source and sink solution. The study then moves on to suggest possible new build plant locations which can be easily fitted in to the current network, based on economic optimisation. The scope for future coal plant development combined with a possible nuclear plant siting plan is discussed towards the end of the paper. Guangdong province, which owns the third largest coal-fired power installed capacity out of 31 provinces, generated over 8% of Chinas total electricity every year for the past 15 years. CO2 storage opportunities could be found in the surrounding South China Sea, where Guangdong has a total of 4,300km of coastline and some small scale oil fields on shore within the region. It is also among the first places to start the national open and reform policy in China. The province is one of the richest in China, with the highest GDP among all other provinces since 1989, and the foreign trade accounts for more than a quarter of Chinas total amount. It also contributes around 12of the total national economic output. Currently, the provincial government is proposing a low carbon roadmap, which is the first of its kind in China. The work has created a totally new thinking on capture ready power plant planning. This differs from existing studies (e.g., which aim to investigate the existing carbon dioxide emission sources at specified location and provide source and sink matching analysis. Instead the study focuses on policy implementation for new build capture ready power plants. Three clusters within Guangdong province are identified as potential temporary CO2 storage hubs before transporting the gas to a long term storage site. When officials are planning new power plant locations from a capture ready perspective, the plants should not necessarily be close to storage sites in straight line, but rather should be within a reasonable distance of a cluster. Transport of the captured CO2 will not be limited to pipelines, but could be extended to road and rail tankers. Power plant parameters and storage site data were collected for this research. Public transportation, utilities, landscapes, river, land used and population data were referenced from various sources; therefore, some of the data could be out of date. Nevertheless, it should still provide enough information when deciding the location of the transport cluster. Any future work could build on the existing model with updated data. Moreover, it could fit in with the national natural gas transportation network and utility planning network to provide long term integrated energy system analysis. The paper could provide policy makers, investors and urban planning officials with a view on how conventi

Jia Li; Tim Cockerill; Xi Liang; Jon Gibbins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.  

SciTech Connect

FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie, Simon and Vernon assisted with sorting and spawning Summer Chinook at the Wells hatchery for the Summer Chinook reintroduction program on the lower Yakima River. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 12,909 gallons/min. Four river pumps (12,400gpm) and one well pump No.2 (509gpm) are supplying water to the facility main head box and the egg incubation building. ACCLIMATION SITES: Easton had much activity in October, the electrical power panel that's switches commercial power operation to generator power (transfer switch) malfunctioned. Charlie called Wallace Electric as well as ASCO Services to trouble shoot the problem which has yet to be determined. Heaters have been turned on in all service buildings at the acclimation sites. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission traveled to Easton to install a pole to mount a satellite and a new ups backup system with new monitors and computers for pit tag data recording and transmitting. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tanks at Easton and Clark Flat. AMB Tools performed maintenance on the compressors at the acclimation sites as well as Cle Elum (5 total). VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Day Wireless performed maintenance on all handheld and vehicle radios. Day Wireless repaired radio communications (static noise) on the 6th also. All vehicles mileages and conditions are reported monthly to Toppenish. Cle Elum staff continues to clean and maintain all facility vehicles weekly. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Kevin of Raincountry was called in response to repairs needed to the water chiller system. Cle Elum staff winterized all irrigation as well as shop grounds. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the hatchery on the 22nd. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation room has been set up for transfer of eggs from isolation buckets to vertical stacks, temperature units are recorded daily. RESENTDENTIAL HOUSING: Residents irrigation has been winterized and fall fertilizer was applied to all grass on facility. Four Seasons performed maintenance on all heating sy

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Last of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 13. Refineries Permanently Shutdown By PAD District Between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2013 PAD District I 542,450 GNC Energy Corp Greensboro, NC 3,000 0 a Primary Energy Corp Richmond, VA 6,100 0 a Saint Mary's Refining Co Saint Mary's, WV 4,000 4,480 02/93 03/93 Cibro Refining Albany, NY 41,850 27,000 07/93 09/93 Calumet Lubricants Co LP Rouseville, PA 12,800 26,820 03/00 06/00 Young Refining Corp. Douglasville, GA 5,400 0 07/04 07/04 Sunoco Inc Westville, NJ 145,000 263,000 11/09 02/10 Western Refining Yorktown Inc Yorktown, VA 66,300 182,600 09/10 12/11 Sunoco Inc Marcus Hook, PA 178,000 278,000 12/11 12/11 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District II 460,315 Coastal Refining & Mktg El Dorado, KS 0 20,000 b Intercoastal Energy Svcs

180

Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California  

SciTech Connect

Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix ``E``), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

Not Available

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California. [Curly Top Virus  

SciTech Connect

Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix E''), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

Not Available

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z