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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Central ballast tanker design  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Letters/Tanker safety  

SciTech Connect

In response to an earlier article by L. J. Carter, T. S. Wyman (Chevron Shipp. Co.) indicated that proper operation of the segregated ballast tank (SBT) system would require heavy reliance on vessel personnel to prevent pollution. Routine washing of cargo tanks on ballast voyages after cargo has been discharged and periodic ballasting of cargo tanks especially during heavy weather would create a potential for marine pollution with SBT's. On the other hand, crude oil washing conducted in port under close supervision avoids this possibility of marine pollution. However, according to A. McKenzie (Tanker Advisory Cent. Inc.), the U.S. tanker industry requires firm government action to establish standards for tanker construction and operation that are considerably more effective than those presently in force. The U.S. should unilaterally pass legislation to, e.g., stop using water in the cargo tanks of tankers for washing and ballasting, retrofit existing tankers with SBT's and require new tankers to have double-hull segregated ballast systems. Other maritime nations will quickly adopt these actions.

Wyman, T.S. (Chevron Shipp. Co.); McKenzie, A.; Carter, L.J.

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

The dynamics of the oil tanker industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tanker industry covers all business related with trading tankers in which there are many participants: vessel owners, charterers, shipbuilders, scrappers, consultants, capitalists, brokers, insurers, surveyors, agents, ...

Lee, TaeSoo, 1960-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tanker safety and pollution prevention  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Coast Guard announces a delay in issuing final regulations for segregated ballast tanks, dedicated clean ballast tanks, crude oil washing systems, inert gas and deck foam systems, and improved steering gear standards on tank vessels. These regulations are expected to be published as final regulations no later than 10/1/79. Although the final regulations will be published and become effective in the fall of 1979, under the provisions of the Port and Tanker Safety Act, those regulations will provide that a tank vessel that is contracted for after 6/1/79, but before issuance of the final regulations must be in compliance with the applicable requirements of the Act and the final regulations in order to be issued a certificate of inspection or a certificate of compliance.

1979-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. The data collected on Form EIA-817, “Monthly Tanker and

6

Alaska panel urges oil tanker changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A commission assigned by the state of Alaska to investigate the Exxon Valdez oil spill says the Coast Guard's regulation of oil transportation had grown slack over the decade preceding the 11 million-gallon spill. The vigilance over tanker traffic that was established in the early days of pipeline flow had given way to complacency and neglect, says the commission's report, which calls for a revamping of the U.S. oil transportation system. The review places the blame for the spill not only on the Coast Guard but on the oil industry's thirst for profits in the 1980s and blames the state itself for not living up to its obligation to manage and protect its own waters. The report offers 59 recommendations that cover tanker construction and crew training, spill prevention, strategies for responding to spills and cleanup technologies. The panel also wants to see more stringent tanker safety standards, strengthened enforcement of the new regulations and greater penalties levied against violators. The Coast Guard expects that it will be some time before revisions in its tanker monitoring operations are in place.

Dillingham, S.

1990-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Monitoring system tested during LPG tanker unloading  

SciTech Connect

A specially developed computer-based hazardous-materials monitoring system has been successfully field tested. The test of the portable system occurred during the unloading of 45,000 metric tons of LPG from a 740-ft tanker at the petroleum dock of a plant along the Mississippi River. The function of this system is to detect, report, alarm, and record unacceptable concentrations of hazardous vapors during marine-transfer operations.

1990-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

8

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge from Other PADDs of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day)

9

Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water  

SciTech Connect

Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

Goldman, M. (Camp Dresser McKee, Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Tanker ballast water treating plant meets tough specs  

SciTech Connect

Sumed, a joint company of Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Dubai, and Kuwait, contracted for a system that would reduce the oil content of discharged ballast water from as much as 2000 ppm to 6 ppm. The oil-water separation plant was installed at Sidi Kerir on the Egyptian coast along the Mediterranean. The plant has five double rows, with each row containing seven concrete tank units (70 units total). Each unit has four plate packs to clean 8000 cu m/hr. The proving trial began on May 3, 1978, and lasted for 32 days. During the period, 14 tankers discharged their ballast water into the plant and the plant removed all but an average of 1.46 ppm of oil, with the highest oil content being 4.0 ppm. (1 diagram, 1 drawing, 1 graph, 3 photos, 4 references, 1 table)

De Kok, a.F.; Marson, H.W.

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

11

Oil-tanker waste-disposal practices: A review  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 (EPA), launched an investigation into tanker waste disposal practices for vessels discharging ballast water at the Alyeska Pipeline Services Company's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility and marine terminal in Valdez, Alaska. It had been alleged that the Exxon Shipping Company was transferring 'toxic wastes originating in California' to Valdez. In response, EPA decided to examine all waste streams generated on board and determine what the fate of these wastes were in addition to investigating the Exxon specific charges. An extensive Information Request was generated and sent to the shipping companies that operate vessels transporting Alaska North Slope Crude. Findings included information on cargo and fuel tank washings, cleaning agents, and engine room waste.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Flare system for safe disposal of LNG from a disabled tanker  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a flare system for the rapid and safe incineration of the cargo of a disabled LNG tanker is evaluated. The project developed design parameters and proof-of-principle investigations of a system for off-loading and flaring LNG from a disabled LNG tanker. The system described offers enough promise to warrant additional investigation, if cargo burning is desired as a way of reducing other possible hazards.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Use of a gravity type oil separator for tanker operations  

SciTech Connect

The need to control the oil content in ballast and tank-cleaning discharges to meet increasingly stringent seawater pollution standards has led to the development of a gravity-type separator capable of handling up to 300 tons/hr of oily ballast water. When properly handled, these separators enable the tanker operator to clean tanks and process oily ballast with an oil content of up to 100% without fear of contamination of the seas. This continuous and automatic operation is unaffected by normal movements. The recovered oil is available for burning as fuel aboard ship, load-on-top or disposal ashore. Separators of this type have been in use on three 70,000 dwt ships, for periods of 1 to 3 yr. On typical voyages, a ship of this size can recover enough slop oil to provide one day or more of bunkers, if the ship is equipped to burn the recovered oil. The ship's crew is trained to carry out analysis of the oil to determine if the oil can be burned onboard immediately following separation or must be treated to drop out salt and/or water prior to burning. Several typical ballast voyages using the separator are discussed. The overboard discharge of water from the separator is analyzed to assure compliance with current pollution regulations.

Lockwood, W.H.; Norris, R.O.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Report of study of tanker safety and pollution prevention requirements for U. S. tankers in domestic trade. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a study to determine if tanker safety and pollution prevention measures in addition to those contained in 1978 Protocols to SOLAS 74 and MARPOL 73 agreements should be applied to U.S. tank vessels in domestic trade. The study examined the risks associated with the marine transportation of oil by U.S. tank vessels in domestic trade, looking at the present and projected U.S. flag tank vessel fleet, oil movements by these vessels, and resulting hazards to people, property, and the marine environment. Possible preventative actions, including extension of ship construction and equipment requirements contained in 1978 Protocols to SOLAS 74 and MARPOL 73 to smaller tankships, were identified and examined. Estimates were made of: (1) the impact of possible preventative actions on accidental and operational oil discharges and damage to the marine environment, (2) tankship fires and explosions, and (3) transportation costs and capital requirements. On the basis of information presented in the study, a key recommendation is the adoption of additional measures to control oil discharges from possible future transportation of OCS oil to shore by U.S. tank vessels. Requirements for segregated ballast tanks or clean ballast tanks should not otherwise be extended to smaller U.S. tankships in domestic trade.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 ( OPA'') and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy's Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry's behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. (Rowland (P.) Associates (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparison of operational energy intensities and consumption of pipelines versus coastal tankers: US Gulf coast to northeast coast routes  

SciTech Connect

This report is a comparative analysis of operational energy intensities and consumption for pipeline shipments versus coastal tanker and tanker-barge movements of light petroleum products from the US Gulf Coast to US East Coast Mid-Atlantic states. It has been prepared for the Office of Transportation Programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a project designed to develop energy conservation strategies in the areas of modal shifts and energy materials transport. It also answers an expressed interest of DOE's Office of Competition as to whether energy penalties are being paid in this region by the shipment of this oil by tanker rather than pipeline. Detailed estimates are made of the 1977 energy intensities (EIs) for tankers and the two major pipelines serving these routes; these are the Colonial pipeline (from Houston) and the Plantation pipeline (from Baton Rouge). Estimates of potential operational energy savings gained from diverting these shipments from tankers to pipelines are figured from these EIs plus 1977 tanker short-ton volumes for these products. Also estimated for these diversions are additional savings of petroleum available through shifts from the fuel oil used to power tankers, to the other energy sources used by pipelines (e.g., coal, which is burned by the utilities serving them). Table 1 indicates that these tanker volumes have been large and steady as a whole; however, individual origin ports have had substantial variations since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Indirect energy requirements of the two modes are not included in this analysis because the methodology for calculating them is still an unresolved research area (e.g., diagreements exist as to how much supporting-infrastructure energy usage should be included for a mode).

Hooker, J.; Rose, A.B.; Bertram, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transporting US oil imports: The impact of oil spill legislation on the tanker market. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA``) and an even more problematic array of State pollution laws have raised the cost, and risk, of carrying oil into and out of the US. This report, prepared under contract to the US Department of energy`s Office of Domestic and International Policy, examines the impact of Federal and State oil spill legislation on the tanker market. It reviews the role of marine transportation in US oil supply, explores the OPA and State oil spill laws, studies reactions to OPA in the tanker and tank barge industries and in related industries such as insurance and ship finance, and finally, discusses the likely developments in the years ahead. US waterborne oil imports amounted to 6.5 million B/D in 1991, three-quarters of which was crude oil. Imports will rise by almost 3 million B/D by 2000 according to US Department of energy forecasts, with most of the crude oil growth after 1995. Tanker demand will grow even faster: most of the US imports and the increased traffic to other world consuming regions will be on long-haul trades. Both the number of US port calls by tankers and the volume of offshore lightering will grow. Every aspect of the tanker industry`s behavior is affected by OPA and a variety of State pollution laws.

Rowland, P.J. [Rowland (P.) Associates (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Prince William Sound disabled tanker towing study. Part 1. Evaluation of existing equipment, personnel and procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study has been undertaken by the Glosten Associates, Inc., to evaluate the existing capability for emergency towing at Prince William Sound and to examine alternatives that could enhance the escort and assist capabilities for disabled tankers within the waterway from the Alyeska Oil Terminal at the Port of Valdez to the Gulf of Alaska outside Hinchinbrook Entrance. Part 1, reported herein, is an objective evaluation by an experienced salvage towing master of the existing tugs, emergency towing equipment, towing practices, and discussion of alternative tug types.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 Intercoastal Oil Case No. LEF-0057 file:///C|/Documents%20and%20Settings/blackard/Desktop/MiscCases/lef0057.htm[11/29/2012 2:35:38 PM] Case Nos. LEF-0057 and LEF-0073 September 6, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Implementation of Special Refund Procedures Names of Firms:Intercoastal Oil Corporation Gulf States Oil & Refining Dates of Filing: July 20, 1993 July 20, 1993 Case Numbers:LEF-0057 LEF-0073 The Office of General Counsel (OGC) of the Department of Energy (DOE) filed a Petition requesting that the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) formulate and implement Subpart V special refund proceedings. Under the procedural regulations of the DOE, special refund proceedings may be implemented to refund monies to persons injured by violations of the DOE petroleum price regulations,

23

Leachate storage transport tanker loadout piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report shows the modifications to the W-025 Trench No. 31 leachate loadout discharge piping, and also the steps involved in installing the discharge piping, including dimensions and welding information. The installation of the discharge pipe should be done in accordance to current pipe installation standards. Trench No. 31 is a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility.

Whitlock, R.W.

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Underwater tanker ballast water/oil separation  

SciTech Connect

The invention contemplates tranferring ballast water contaminated with entrained or emulsified oil to an underwater disengagement zone operating on the water displacement principle, as exemplified by an underwater storage tank having an upwardly convex shell with an opening in its bottom through which water can move into and out of the shell as the volume of oil enclosed within the storage zone fluctuates. The ballast mixture of water and oil is introduced into the disengagement zone, where it separates under the influence of gravity into separate oil and water phases. The oil layer rises to a point from which it can be recovered, while the separated water flows out of the open bottom of the zone into the body of water. (2 claims)

McCabe, J.S.

1973-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes  

SciTech Connect

Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

True, W.R.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Movements by Tanker and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

27

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

System for control of oil leakage from damaged tanker  

SciTech Connect

A fluid control arrangement is described adapted to be fitted in an opening in a bulkhead common to a liquid cargo tank and a ballast tank, comprising: a section of pipe extending through and sealingly secured in an opening in a bulkhead and defining a passageway for fluid to flow from a cargo tank to a ballast tank; and one-shot valve means in sealing relationship with a first end of said pipe section, said valve means comprising an annular flange secured to said first end of said pipe section, a thin, cylindrical sealing ring welded at one end to said first end of said pipe section, a blank circular flange welded to a second end of said ring, and a high pressure hydraulic hose arranged substantially in a circle and compressed between said annular flange and said circular blank flange, said hydraulic hose when pressurized being operative to rupture said sealing ring and thereby release said blank circular flange for opening said passageway.

Tornay, E.G.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

System for control of oil leakage from damaged tanker  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a fluid control arrangement adapted to be fitted in an opening in a bulkhead common to a liquid cargo tank and a ballast tank. It comprises a section of pipe extending through and sealingly secured in an opening in a bulkhead and defining a passageway for fluid to flow from a cargo tank to a ballast tank; and one-shot valve means in sealing relationship with a first end of the pipe section.

Tornay, E.G.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 125,514 111,786 113,994 112,461 113,596 110,881 1981-2012 Crude Oil 550 0 0 274 590 1,646 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 124,964 111,786 113,994 112,187 113,006 109,235 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 756 452 113 19 2009-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2012 Unfinished Oils 994 700 425 685 686 571 1981-2012 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 168 606 19,890 33,637 54,909 64,780 1981-2012 Reformulated 168 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2012 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2012 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 168 0 0 2005-2009 Conventional 0 606 19,890 33,637 54,909 64,780 2005-2012 CBOB 606 19,787 33,536 54,393 64,572 2008-2012

33

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 2,539 1,518 1,207 1,602 2,515 1,702 1981-2012 Crude Oil 550 0 0 274 590 294 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 1,989 1,518 1,207 1,328 1,925 1,408 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1981-2002 Unfinished Oils 994 700 425 685 686 571 1981-2012 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 168 0 127 144 710 248 1983-2012 Reformulated 168 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2012 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2012 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 168 0 0 2005-2009 Conventional 0 127 144 710 248 2008-2012 CBOB 0 24 43 194 40 2008-2012 Other 103 101 516 208 2009-2012 Renewable Fuels 0 0 0 0 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 0 0 0 0 2009-2012 Other Renewable Fuels 0 2009-2009

34

From PADD 3 to PADD 1 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download ... 51: 50: 38: 76: 26: 27: 1986-2013: Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use: 51: 50: 38: 76: 26: 27: 2004-2013: Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed ...

35

From PADD 3 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download ... 51: 1993-2013: Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur : 77 : 1993-2013: Residual Fuel Oil: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 16: 1986-2013: Petrochemical Feedstocks ...

36

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 123 290 257 342 258 287 1986-2013 Crude Oil 0 152 82 204 126 105 1986-2013 Petroleum Products 123 138 175 138 132 182 1986-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1986-2002 Unfinished Oils 20 1986-2013 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 82 119 110 101 112 134 1986-2013 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2013 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 82 119 110 101 112 134 2008-2013 CBOB 28 0 0 13 0 0 2008-2013 Other 54 119 110 88 112 134 2009-2013 Renewable Fuels 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 2009-2012 Other Renewable Fuels 2009-2009 Finished Motor Gasoline 5 0 15 0 0 0 1986-2013

37

From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 9,651 10,183 10,476 9,672 9,763 9,182 1986-2013 Crude Oil 129 287 199 342 272 260 1986-2013 Petroleum Products 9,522 9,896 10,277 9,330 9,491 8,922 1986-2013 Pentanes Plus 2 2009-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2013 Unfinished Oils 20 1986-2013 Motor Gasoline Blending Components 6,153 6,358 6,284 5,889 6,175 5,550 1986-2013 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Reformulated - RBOB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2013 RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* 2005-2009 Conventional 6,153 6,358 6,284 5,889 6,175 5,550 2005-2013 CBOB 6,075 6,212 6,174 5,801 6,036 5,416 2008-2013 GTAB 2008-2011 Other 78 146 110 88 139 134 2005-2013

38

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

39

Decision support tool for the tanker second-hand market using data mining techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes an innovative decision support tool intended for market leaders and those anticipating market states of "sale and purchase". This is feasible with the use of powerful data mining techniques and the ...

Karaindros, Athanasios A. (Athanasios Andreas)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

From PADD 2 to PADD 3 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Domestic Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tanker (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 456,925: 490,475: 472,808: 518,990: 525,864: 558,427: 608,923: ...

42

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

43

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

44

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tanker delivery Oil refinery Pipeline Storage TruckTanker delivery Oil refinery Pipeline Terminal storage Truckoil extraction sites and refineries are so far away from

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Regulations to implement 46 USC 3705(C) and 3706(D), formerly sections 5(7) (E) and (H) of the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978  

SciTech Connect

Amendment of certain pollution prevention regulations of the Code of Federal Regulations is proposed to alter Coast Guard requirements concerning ballast tanks in crude oil and product carriers. The amended regulations would be applicable to all US vessels and all foreign vessels that enter navigable waters of the United States or transfer cargo at a port or place subject to US jurisdiction. The new regulations would require that existing crude oil carriers of 20,000 to 40,000 dead-weight tons (DWT) have segregated ballast tanks or a crude oil washing system before January 2, 1986 or when they reach 15 years of age, whichever occurred later, and existing product carriers of 20,000 to 40,000 DWT have segregated ballast tanks or dedicated clean ballast tanks before January 2, 1986, or when they reach 15 years of age, whichever occurred later. An existing vessel is any self-propelled vessel for which the building contract was placed on or before June 1, 1979; for which the keel was laid on or before January 1, 1980; for which delivery was made on or before June 1, 1982; for which major conversion work was performed on or before June 1, 1979; or on which construction work was begun on or before January 1, 1980 or completed on or before June 1, 1982.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipeline) Offshore Requirements Platform sites Gas treatmentand gas) Offshore oil/gas production (tanker) Platform site

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies. The data collected on Form EIA-817, “Monthly Tanker and

48

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES Crude oil pipeline Oil tanker Oiland Demand. Schedule of Crude Oil Supply and Demand Scenariowithin California of both crude oil and natural gas in the

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Myth: The Legacy of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill. Cordova,OpenDocument. Reuters. 2003. Exxon Mobil $3 Billion Angolathe environment. After the Exxon Valdez tanker spilled over

Reed, Kristin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

52

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data"...

53

Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Delivery Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use. How Is Hydrogen Delivered Today? Suppliers currently transport hydrogen by pipeline or over roadways using tube trailers or cryogenic liquid hydrogen tankers. In special...

54

semidefinite programming approaches to distance geometry problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil tankers [51], structural health monitoring [23, 99], military and civilian surveillance ... low bandwidth, in order to minimize the operating costs and maximize ...

55

Guam Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Quick Facts. Guam has no conventional energy resources and relies on petroleum products shipped in by tanker to meet almost all its energy needs.

56

TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 0 344...

57

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use at petroleum refineries is included. • feedstockthe wellhead to a petroleum refinery. A complete country-by-tanker, or the combustion of refinery gas in a petroleum

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use at petroleum refineries is included. • feedstockthe wellhead to a petroleum refinery. A complete country-by-tanker, or the combustion of refinery gas in a petroleum

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mitsui O S K Lines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product A shipping company, with services including containerships, dry bulkers, car carriers, tankers and LNG carriers. References Mitsui O.S.K. Lines Ltd1 LinkedIn...

60

Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction of an offshore tanker platform at Humboldt Bay.offshore presented a particular challenge. A shallow-water work platform,

US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ocean Odysseys: Jack O'Neill, Dan Haifley, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into tankers from offshore platforms, it’s very risky andfacilities to support an offshore platform in the region offonto offshore barges and platforms, a proposition more

O'Neill, Jack; Haifley, Dan; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

63

Deep Sea Hybrid Power Systems for Deep Sea Oil & Gas Recovery ...  

... thereby eliminating the need for pipeline construction and transport altogether. Such tankers could rely on natural-gas powered fuel cells, ...

64

Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts PDF TXT . . Appendices . A. District Descriptions and Maps PDF B. Explanatory Notes...

65

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, ... through the pipeline to the Fujairah oil terminal where it was loaded on a tanker and sent to the Pak-Arab ...

66

Titan Logix Corp: Rugged Level Monitoring  

emergency shut down if the loading capacity is exceeded. The TD80 tracks volume accurately in a mobile tanker to 1/5th of an inch, particularly

67

Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumers LNG Tanker Fleet Regasification Terminals LNGStorage Storage (Long,medium,short-term) Inter. LNG tankers unload the liquid at LNG termi- nals (also called regasification terminals). LNG it to markets or supplied directly to bulk consumers. LNG regasification terminals may also have storage

Barton, Paul I.

68

MICROBIOLOGICAL REVIEWS, June 1991, p. 259-287 Vol. 55, No. 2 0146-0749/91/020259-29$02.00/0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of British Columbia (B.C.) (Enbridge Pipelines Inc. n.d.). In addition, Enbridge is proposing to develop to British Columbia's (B.C.) north coast and a marine terminal to transport crude oil on tankers from ..............................................................................................11 2.2.3.2 Alberta Tank Terminal and British Columbia Marine Terminal ..........12 2.2.3.3 Tanker

Lovley, Derek

69

First year's operation experience of the deepest SPM (Single Point Mooring) in the world  

SciTech Connect

The British National Oil Corp. had a Single Anchor Leg Mooring (SALM) installed at the Thistle Field in Apr. 1977 for export loading of tankers pending completion of the Brent System 36 in. pipeline to Sullom-Voe, which became operational in Dec. 1978; the SALM will continue to be maintained in good condition as a standby alternative export outlet. Modification of the original three 80,000 dwt tankers during 1977 provided the original design capacity of an 80,000 dwt tanker, but with added clean ballast capacity to eliminate tank cleaning and treatment of dirty ballast water. A fully integrated tanker/SALM/platform instrumentation system monitors mooring loads, buoy and riser angles, and tanker status; the latter being radio telemetered to the nearby block platform. Operation of the system and necessary modifications are described.

Millar, J.L.; Hughes, H.; Dyer, R.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-817, Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D. C. 20585 OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 05/31/2016 (Revised 2013) EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ QUESTIONS If you have any questions about Form EIA-817 after reading the instructions, please contact the Survey Manager at (202) 586-6254. PURPOSE The Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movements Report," is used to

71

Optimal commodity distribution for a vehicle with fixed capacity under vendor managed inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under vendor managed inventory (VMI), vendors have the obligation to maintain the retail stores they serve with sufficient inventory levels. In this paper, specifically, we consider an oil tanker which visits and replenishes multiple retail stations ...

Xiaolin Xu; Xiaoqiang Cai; Chunlin Liu; Chikit To

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Multi-Factor Model of Correlated Commodity - Forward Curves for Crude Oil and Shipping Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An arbitrage free multi-factor model is developed of the correlated forward curves of the crude oil, gasoline, heating oil and tanker shipping markets. Futures contracts trading on public exchanges are used as the primary ...

Ellefsen, Per Einar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegas Dodged a Bullet: Chlorine-hauling Tanker Rolls Free. ”March 19, 11. Parsons C. “Chlorine Truck Blast Kills Five inA. “Iraq Insurgents Employ Chlorine in Bomb Attacks. ” New

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Simulation analysis of marine terminal investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common problem in the oil industry is the optimization of terminal facilities to minimize delays in servicing incoming tankers. In Exxon Corporation, simulation has been successfully applied to marine terminal studies since the early nineteen sixties. ...

David W. Graff

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil tankers such as the Exxon Valdez and the Braer. Part ofin response to the Exxon Valdez spill, for example, the UStwice as much oil as the Exxon Valdez, in the waters of the

Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional Total C.Z. Crude Oil; Movement ( 10 BBL/yr) PercentOi 1 ! ~ovemt. C.Z. Total Oil (10 6 BBL/Yr Movemt. ) NATURALterminal and pumping station Oil storage facility Oil tanker

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil...

78

AG IN THE CLASSROOMHELPING THE NEXT GENERATION UNDERSTAND THEIR CONNECTION TO AGRICULTURE R e a d e r  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and The Ugly. Park Rangers work on the ground and in towers spotting fires and hotspots Air tankers drop water and fire retardant Smoke Jumpers Helitack Crews Firefighters creating a fire line Firefighter spraying foam

79

Assessing Reliability In Hydrogen Supply Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas and petroleum exports Other suppliers pose greater threats (Potential) importsImport terminals – Global LNG tanker fleet – Domestic natural gasgas supply LNG dependence on other systems Essentially 100% imports

McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The design of an intelligent decision support tool for submarine commanders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent search of headlines shows a high number of maritime collisions and accidents. The USS Hartford, a nuclear submarine, recently surfaced into an oil tanker just after the running aground of the USS Port Royal in ...

Carrigan, Geoffrey P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rail deliveries of oil and petroleum products up 38% in first ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... Rail deliveries of crude oil and petroleum products in June alone jumped 51% to 42,000 tanker cars from a year earlier to an ...

82

Water by truck in Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decisionmetrices : dynamic structural estimation of shipping investment decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation develops structural models for analyzing shipping investment decisions, namely ordering, scrapping and lay-up decisions in the tanker industry. We develop models, based on a microeconomic specification, ...

Dikos, George

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- EOR >90% CO 2 Wells Tanker - EOR Flue Gas Fires Ammonia Ethanol Off-gas Natural Gas Landfill Gas EGR Coalbed Methane Merchant Gas <10% Hydrogen Mfg. Syngas Coal Gasification...

85

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

86

SNG seen bolstering LP-gas traffic  

SciTech Connect

A surge in SNG production from LPG, which could stem in part from government policies, may raise the declining profits of marine transporters and U.S. importers of LPG; such SNG would have a distinct cost advantage over Alaskan gas and coal-derived gas and could compete with LNG; if LNG costs $5/million Btu in 1984, it would equal the cost of SNG made from butane at $0.30/gal (butane will probably be the favored SNG feed); an industrial market for LPG would develop immediately if there were a 10% cut in the price spread between LPG and No. 2 fuel oil, which were priced at $3.50 and $2.47/million Btu, respectively, in the summer 1977. At the seminar, H. Nygaard (Norw. Guarantee Inst. Ships and Drilling Vessels A/S) proposed a plan calling for independent tanker-owners to charter-in their tankers, probably for a two-year period; inefficient tankers would be laid up, and over-all profits from working tankers would be redistributed between their owners and owners of laid-up tankers. U.S. Government crude-import policies and tanker safety standards are discussed.

Becraft, J.; Nygaard, H.

1978-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge",3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_c_r10-z0p_ep00_mbbl_m.htm"

88

A Primer on the Fifth Power Plan: A Guide for Our Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas (LNG), loaded onto specially designed LNG tankers, and shipped to LNG receiv- ing terminals where, their efforts are in response to FERC's proposed solution for the nation, which happens to be a bad fit for the Northwest's system. The regional group's current proposal out- lines a staged process in which the inde

89

THE OUTLOOK FOR GLOBAL TRADE IN LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG Terminal proposed for offshore California is based on this design. For nearly thirty years, world gas, LNG, liquefaction, LNG tankers, regasification, LNG receipt terminals, natural gas geopolitics liquid LNG and to regasify it for pipeline delivery onshore. The proposed Cabrillo Port and Crystal

90

National Security Consequences of U.S. Oil Dependency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the technologies of liquefied natural gas (LNG), through which gas is cooled and compressed to a liquid, shipped on tankers, and then warmed and re-gasified to its original form. Realizing the potential for LNG will require additional facilities to receive and re-gasify imported LNG in the United States. At the same time

Deutch, John

91

ResGrid: A Grid-Aware Toolkit for Reservoir Uncertainty Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or measurement. Reservoir studies concerned with responses affecting value, e.g. ­ Peak oil rate ­ Cumulative oil ­ Drilling performance analysis with high-rate data "UCOMS" #12;Oil Industry in Louisiana · Major oil ­ 17 petroleum refineries (capacity 2.8M barrels/day) ­ Ports receive ultra large oil tankers ­ 20

Allen, Gabrielle

92

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the re- gion of Baltimore Canyon. Between April 1968 and May 1971 we cap- tured, tagged , and released), and Exxon Corpora- tion measured the amounts of hydro- carbons currently present in ocean waters the open ocean off major routes. For the study, water samples were collected from Exxon tankers travelling

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

93

Rensselaer Catalog Undergraduate, Graduate, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS RESPONSE TO THE EXXON VALDEZ OIL SPILL Janet A. Mc response to the Exxon Valdez oil spill/Janet A. McDonnell. p. cm. Cover title. Includes bibliographical . United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. 3. Exxon Valdez (Ship) 4. Tankers - Accidents - Environmental

Varela, Carlos

94

Open Source Vision Library (OpenVL) Based Local Positioning System Changsong Shen, Steve Oldridge and Sidney Fels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the diminishing indigenous pipeline- delivered oil (California and north- western British Columbia) supple- mented in small coastal tankers. In the mid-1950's new refineries were built in Washington and British Columbia. or British Columbia do not appear to be economically or environmentally at- tractive. Due to the increasing

British Columbia, University of

95

ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature09708 Mapping copy number variation by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be moving the oil from Alberta to British Columbia and then shipping it by tankers via the Panama Canal another bold decision by refusing to consider the fate of the Keystone XL pipeline until after the 2012 of the White House--with the placards about the Earth in peril and with pipeline-like black plastic tubes

Batzer, Mark A.

96

MANAGING IMPACTS OF MAJOR PROJECTS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENBRIDGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be moving the oil from Alberta to British Columbia and then shipping it by tankers via the Panama Canal another bold decision by refusing to consider the fate of the Keystone XL pipeline until after the 2012 of the White House--with the placards about the Earth in peril and with pipeline-like black plastic tubes

97

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

98

Sabine-Neches Waterway Channel Improvement Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vessels, the amount of vessel traffic on the SNWW has also increased. Both the SNWW and U.S. crude oil of navigation on the waterway. The current channel was completed in 1960. At that time, crude oil tankers are now used routinely for crude oil imports to both Beaumont and Port Arthur. In addition to larger

US Army Corps of Engineers

99

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/EL TN-11-4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the well was successfully capped (OSAT 2010). This is comparable in magnitude to previous oil spills in U.S due to releases of crude oil from tankers, offshore platforms, drilling rigs and wells. Spills was one of four large oil spills occurring along U.S. coastlines from 1976 to 2010. Depending

US Army Corps of Engineers

100

The Neutrino Eye: A Megaton Low Energy Neutrino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, despite the evident truth of that statement, the history of the water Cherenkov detectors demonstrates requirements. After all, there are million ton oil tankers, and there are oil platforms of much larger.4.4 Supernovae Out to 2Mpc The entire history of extra­solar neutrino astronomy consists of the the few second

Learned, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Common Errors in Leak Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Leak tightness requirements for various products...1 � 10 -4 Small Pipeline (gas) 1 � 10 -5 Tanker (liquified natural gas) 1 � 10 -6 Fine Storage tank (NH 3 ) 1 � 10 -8 Heart pacemaker (gas) 1 � 10 -11...

102

Fuzzy decision support system for spread mooring system selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spread mooring systems are associated with high level uncertainties and risks during tanker loading/unloading operations. In addition, the design of such complex systems consists of many subjective and imprecise parameters. Therefore, in the present ... Keywords: AHP, Decision making, Fuzzy multiple attribute decision making, Fuzzy set theory, Spread mooring system, TOPSIS

Ayhan Mentes; Ismail Hakki Helvacioglu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

CCPPressRelease 13 June 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in prison for the worldwide price fixing of flexible marine hoses, used to transport oil between tankers by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) or Serious Fraud Office (SFO), they were induced by a US plea bargain Notes to Editors 1. 1 `Oil industry executives jailed f

Feigon, Brooke

104

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Tanker and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

105

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

106

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PADDs Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline.

107

Innovative production system goes in off Ivory Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phased field development of the Lion and Panthere fields, offshore the Ivory Coast, includes a small floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) tanker with minimal processing capability as an early oil production system (EPS). For the long-term production scheme, the FPSO will be replaced by a converted jack up mobile offshore production system (MOPS) with full process equipment. The development also includes guyed-caisson well platforms, pipeline export for natural gas to fuel an onshore power plant, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) tanker for oil export. Pipeline export for oil is a future possibility. This array of innovative strategies and techniques seldom has been brought together in a single project. The paper describes the development plan, early oil, jack up MOPS, and transport and installation.

Childers, M. [Oceaneering Production Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Barnes, J. [Paragon Engineering Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)]|[UMC Petroleum Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Kirki episode: Detailed biomarker analysis provides some surprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On Sunday 21st July 1991 the oil tanker Kirki caught fire when its bow broke off in heavy seas just 40 km off the Western Australian coastline near Jurien, approximately 200 km north of Perth. The tanker was carrying 80,000 tonnes of Murban light crude oil from the Middle East. Over the next three days approximately 10,000 tonnes of this oil was released into the marine environment, the heavy seas rapidly spreading the oil slick to a thin sheen. There was extensive media coverage of this event and it was widely considered that the spill posed a serious environmental threat to reef systems, recreational beaches and the local rock lobster fishery. This report describes results of analysis performed on several of the samples.

Currie, T.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth (Australia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Risk analysis for truck transportation of high consequence cargo.  

SciTech Connect

The fixed facilities control everything they can to drive down risk. They control the environment, work processes, work pace and workers. The transportation sector drive the State and US highways with high kinetic energy and less-controllable risks such as: (1) other drivers (beginners, impaired, distracted, etc.); (2) other vehicles (tankers, hazmat, super-heavies); (3) road environments (bridges/tunnels/abutments/construction); and (4) degraded weather.

Waters, Robert David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Table 59. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 533 - 294 1,445 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 143 6 0 1,165 3,822 0 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... - - - - - - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 41 0 - 643 183 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 41 0 - 643 183 - CBOB ...........................................................

111

Recovering associated gas from marginal fields  

SciTech Connect

To enable production from offshore gasfields too small to justify a pipeline, LGA Gastechnik G.m.b.H. has designed for a capacity of 30-90 million cu ft/day a system comprising a floating production unit on a catamaran barge complete with its own powerplant and personnel quarters plus a 15,000 cu m LNG/LPG/NGL tanker in the form of a catamaran holding two long cylindrical tanks. The catamaran barge production unit has a standard breadth of 27.5 m and depth of 6.5 m, with the length varying from 90 m to 120 m according to production and storage needs. There are ten cargo tanks located below decks in the two hulls. The tanker draft is either 7.7 m with LNG or 9.0 m with LPG. Tankers can be designed to match the actual production slate of a field. A possible third component of the system is a floating or a shore-based storage installation with capacity for 27,000 cu m LNG, 15,000 cu m LPG, and 7000 cu m natural gas liquids. At the beginning of 1978, Liquid Gas International G.m.b.H. was given an order for the preconstruction planning of a gas production and transport system such as described above.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Risk assessment of storage and transport of liquefied natural gas and LP-gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A method for assessing the societal risk of transporting liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) is described, and is illustrated by application to the transport of LPG by tank truck and LNG by tanker ship in the U.S. Data on past experience and projected future handling of these liquefied gases are used with analysis of flammable plume formation and ignition, and population distributions, to estimate the risks of fatalities from tank truck and tanker ship accidents. From an estimated 52 significant accidents per year with LPG tank trucks at the present truck-associated transportation rate of 20 billion gallons of LPG per year, a fatality rate of 1.2 per year is calculated. For the projected 1980 importation of 33 billion gallons by tanker ship, a fatality rate of 0.4 per year is calculated, using a conservatively high one chance in 20,000 of a significant accident per trip. Comparison with fires and explosions from all causes in the U.S. and Canada leading to 10 or more fatalities shows that these are 100 times more frequent than the predicted frequency of comparable LPG and LNG accidents. Tabulations of experience with spills of flammable volatile liquids are included. (GRA)

Simmons, J.A.

1974-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

Accord near for offshore California oil shipments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are faint glimmers of hope again for offshore California operators. After more than a decade of often bitter strife over offshore oil and gas development and transportation issues, state officials and oil producers may be moving toward compromise solutions. One such solution may be forthcoming on offshore development. But the real change came with the turnabout of the California Coastal Commission (CCC), which last month approved a permit for interim tankering of crude from Point Arguello oil field in the Santa Barbara Channel to Los Angeles. The dispute over how to ship offshore California crude to market has dragged on since before Point Arguelo development plans were unveiled. The project's status has become a flashpoint in the U.S. debate over resource use and environmental concerns. The controversy flared anew in the wake of the 1989 Exxon Valdez tanker spill off Alaska, when CCC voided a Santa Barbara County permit for interim tankering, a move project operator Chevron Corp. linked to the Exxon Valdez accident. Faced with litigation, the state's economic devastation, and acrimonious debate over transporting California crude, Gov. Pete Wilson and other agencies approved the CCC permit. But there's a catch: A permanent pipeline must be built to handle full production within 3 years. The paper discusses permit concerns, the turnaround decision, the anger of environmental groups, and pipeline proposals.

Not Available

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

Mercado, M.S.

1996-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

Investigation of the geokinetics horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. Quarterly report, January, February, March 1981  

SciTech Connect

Retort No. 23 has been heavily instrumented and was ignited on March 16, 1981. A total of 6588 barrels of shale oil have been recovered from Retort No. 24 to date; 6057 barrels of oil were recovered during the quarter, an average of 65 barrels per day. Approximately 4909 barrels of shale oil were shipped by tanker truck to the WESRECO refinery in Salt Lake City, Utah, during the quarter. Drilling of re-entry process and instrumentation wells on Retort No. 25 was completed. A post-burn core sampling program for Retort No. 18 was developed and implemented.

Hutchinson, D.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Shipping LNG: new regulations and the 1964-77 record  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 which was signed into U.S. law 10/17/78, and its various special requirements for LPG or LNG shipments entering U.S. ports: a major report from Poten and Partners Inc. on the safety record of liquefied gas ships, which shows that the cargoes remained unaffected despite incidents common to all shipping; the potential effects of U.S. requirements for segregated ballast and for fixed inert gas systems, especially for U.S. fleets of ships largely more than 15 years old; and the media furor over the docking of the LPG carrier Cavendis.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 38. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to 2 3 5 1 3 5 Crude Oil ................................................................. 18 141 - 303 1,948 - Petroleum Products ............................................... 137 44 0 855 3,010 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. - 0 - 0 0 - Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 83 0 - 396 158 - Reformulated - RBOB ....................................... - - - - - - Conventional ..................................................... 83 0 - 396 158 - CBOB ........................................................... 0 0 - 396 0 -

118

Tank vessels transferring Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil proposed design and equipment standards  

SciTech Connect

The US Coast Guard proposes to require US and foreign flag tank vessels engaged in the transfer of OCS oil in bulk as cargo from an offshore oil exploitation or production facility to shore to have segregated ballast tanks, dedicated clean ballast tanks, or special ballast arrangements by 6/1/80. This proposal would implement the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 and would eliminate the mixing of ballast water and oil, thus reducing operational pollution that could occur if there was a substantial increase in vessel traffic. Comments must be received by 6/16/80.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

120

ADANS database specification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) Database Specification (DS) is to describe the database organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the database (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other database objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The database is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.

1997-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Offshore refrigerated LPG loading/unloading terminal using a CALM buoy  

SciTech Connect

In existing Liquefied Petroleum Gases terminals, the transfer of liquefied gases to the tanker is performed via articulated loading arms or flexible hoses, working under quasistatic conditions. The tanker has to be firmly moored alongside a jetty or a process barge in a protected area (such as a harbour in most cases). This paper gives the main results of the development of an offshore refrigerated LPG (-48/sup 0/C) loading/unloading system, using a CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses working under dynamic conditions. The aim of this new concept is to replace the standard harbour structure for loading/unloading refrigerated LPG and to provide a considerable reduction in investments and a greater flexibility regarding the terminal location. The main components of that terminal have been designed so as to enable the loading of a 75 000 cubic meter LPG carrier in 15 hours. The results of static and dynamic low temperature tests on a LPG swivel joint for CALM buoy and LPG floating hoses show that such a SPM terminal is now a realistic solution.

Bonjour, E.L.; Simon, J.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

What's ahead for LNG/LPG  

SciTech Connect

The growth of the LNG, LPG, and pipeline bulk distribution gas markets depends on the availability of capital, including an estimated $60 billion by the end of the 1980's for LNG alone to support a network of projects moving approx. 15 billion cu ft/day throughout the world, which will require long-term (averaging over 20 yr) index-linked contracts for the gas. According to the American Gas Association, import of LNG as opposed to an equivalent amount of energy from crude oil would offer the U.S. several advantages, including significant capital investment for LNG facilities in the U.S. and a larger proportion of imports moving in U.S. owned and constructed tankers. The growth of international LNG trade will also depend on the extent to which gas processing and transportation costs can be decreased by increasing LNG tanker size, on the demand for natural gas, and on U.S. gas pricing policy. Plausible trends in LNG/LPG trade through the 1980's, and the requirement for high gas prices as an incentive for gas resource development in several countries, including the U.S., are discussed.

Remington, P.; Fraser, M.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fueling area site assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of a Site Assessment performed at the Fuel Storage Area at Buckley ANG Base in Aurora, Colorado. Buckley ANG Base occupies 3,328 acres of land within the City of Aurora in Arapahoe County, Colorado. The Fuel Storage Area (also known as the Fueling Area) is located on the west side of the Base at the intersection of South Powderhorn Street and East Breckenridge Avenue. The Fueling Area consists of above ground storage tanks in a bermed area, pumps, piping, valves, an unloading stand and a fill stand. Jet fuel from the Fueling Area is used to support aircraft operations at the Base. Jet fuel is stored in two 200,000 gallon above ground storage tanks. Fuel is received in tanker trucks at the unloading stand located south and east of the storage tanks. Fuel required for aircraft fueling and other use is transferred into tanker trucks at the fill stand and transported to various points on the Base. The Fuel Storage Area has been in operation for over 20 years and handles approximately 7 million gallons of jet fuel annually.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Offshore loading-system design is aimed at higher efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Mobil Shipping and Transporation Co. has completed the design of an offshore loading system aimed at overcoming the limitations of existing terminals. The loading/mooring/storage system (LMS) is a semisubmersible vessel with ship mooring and loading facilities atop a box-shaped crude storage structure, which is well below the water line away from the effect of waves and clear of loading tankers' bows. The storage volume equals or exceeds that of a VLCC. There are 15 dual-purpose cargo/ballast tanks in the lower section with a control tower over the center tank. The loading system is designed to load 800,000 bbl of crude in about 12 hr. Each tank contains a diagonally suspended synthetic rubber diaphragm that will isolate crude from water ballast. Computer simulations based on North Sea weather data indicate that the LMS will allow marine loading efficiencies of at least 95Vertical Bar3< with total storage of a week's production or more. Other advantages of the LMS include the ability to moor shuttle tankers up to 200,000 dwt; self-contained repair and maintenance capabilities; and mobility. Variations of anchoring and riser systems for the LMS are discussed.

1978-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Dissolved Hydrocarbons and related microflora in a fjordal seaport: sources, sinks, concentrations, and kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The continuous addition of toluene as a solute of treated ballast water from oil tankers into a well-defined estuary facilitated the study of the dynamics of dissolved hydrocarbon metabolism in seawater. Near the ballast water injection point, a layer of warm ballast water, rich in bacteria, that was trapped below the less-dense fresh surface water was located. Toluene residence times were approximately 2 weeks in this layer, 2 years elsewhere in Port Valdez, and 2 decades in the surface water of a more oceanic receiving estuary adjacent. The origin of bacteria in this layer was traced to growth in oil tanker ballast during shipments. The biomass of toluene oxidizers in water samples was estimated from the average affinity of pure-culture isolates for toluene (28 liters per g of cells per h) and observed toluene oxidation kinetics. Values ranged from nearly all of the total bacterial biomass within the bacteria-rich layer down to 0.2% at points far removed. Because the population of toluene oxidizers was large with respect to the amount of toluene consumed and because water from a nearby nonpolluted estuary was equally active in facilitating toluene metabolism, we searched for an additional hydrocarbon source. It was found that terpenes could be washed from spruce trees by simulated rainfall, which suggested that riparian conifers provide an additional and significant hydrocarbon source to seawater. (JMT)

Button, D.K.; Robertson, B.R.; Craig, K.S.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 December 2011 Table 57. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 374 1,067 - 459 5,402 2,850 - 682 28,102 Petroleum Products ............................................... 9,201 6 0 3,132 17,764 2,323 0 97,844 20,880 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 417 0 - - 2,853 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... 0 0 - 1,539 12,003 99 - 2,163 6,192 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 65 0 - 0 317 - - 0 347 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,931 0 0 698 616 346 0 40,455 4,008 Reformulated - RBOB

128

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9.PDF 9.PDF Table 39. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 740 321 419 34,006 10,274 23,732 7,482 27,754 -20,272 Petroleum Products ............................................... 101,184 8,513 103,178 33,918 22,673 -8,062 23,754 122,191 -93,986 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - 4,568 406 4,162 1,111 4,121 -3,010 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 2,621 0 2,621 10,547 13,760 -3,213 17,861 7,305 10,556 Ethane/Ethylene ...............................................

129

Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL Sailor Holdings Ltd SSHL Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL) Place Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia Zip 2067 Sector Solar Product Solar Sailor 'hybrid marine power' (HMP) and 'solar wing' technology is suitable for a wide range of applications from small-unmanned vessels to large tankers, including ferries, tourist cruisers and private yachts. References Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL) is a company located in Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia . References ↑ "Solar Sailor Holdings Ltd (SSHL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Sailor_Holdings_Ltd_SSHL&oldid=35132

130

valdez  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Energy Information Administration March 1989 A Review of Valdez Oil Spill Market Impacts by John S. Cook and Charles P. Shirkey On March 24, 1989, the tanker, Exxon Valdez, ran aground, spilling 240,000 barrels of crude oil into Alaska 's Prince William Sound and sending waves of concern across the country. This concern, focused initially on the environment, quickly spread to economic anxieties over possible supply disruptions and rising prices. Based on data available through May 19, 1989, it now appears that these fears were largely unfounded. Events since the spill demonstrate that most of the impact on petroleum markets was psychological rather than physical. As far as oil supply disruptions go, the Valdez incident should have been a minor annoyance that should have gone largely unnoticed in the market

131

EIA-817  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Email: Email: Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Questions? Call: 202-586-6254 FORM EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or

132

Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More Addthis Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More (Text Version) Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More video. The words "Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More" appear onscreen, followed by video of oil wells and oil tankers. Shots of various modes of transportation, including cars and planes. Nearly a billion dollars a day. That's how much we spend on oil imports in the U.S. - oil that powers our nation's transportation systems and industries. Shots of crops being harvested and processed. The words "Biofuels - Made from biomass" appear onscreen along with several vials of different biomass feedstocks, including corn fibers, peanut shells, and switchgrass.

133

NDP-30/R6 (Table 2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprises the sum of Africa, North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Comprises the sum of Africa, North America, South America, Asia, Europe, Oceania, the former U.S.S.R., and the Antarctic Fisheries. 2 Includes Christmas Island. 3 Identifies bunkers delivered by tankers to vessels on the Antarctic fishing grounds; fuels delivered to Antarctic research stations are not included. 4 Refers to former Burma. 5 Refers to the former Democratic Kampuchea. 6 Excludes Taiwan province. 7 Includes Taiwan Province. 8 Prior to 1 January 1993, refers to the former Czechoslovakia composed of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. 9 Code used for population data only. Energy statistics for France and Monaco are combined (251). 10 From 1950 to 1958, data includes the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, and Gabon. 11 From 1950 to 1954, data includes Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam.

134

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,646 3,624 0 5,350 102,565 33,807 0 4,046 351,020 Petroleum Products ............................................... 109,235 465 0 32,407 177,805 31,369 0 1,159,745 245,412 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 19 0 - 0 5,780 0 - 0 30,395 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 10,283 127,973 288 - 16,440 50,605 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 571 10 0 0 6,901 - 0 305 1,643 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 64,780 102 0 9,507 4,411 4,155 0 538,610 69,841

135

ESH100.2.ENV.5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Procedure Title Provide and Protect Potable Water Procedure Manager COOPER, TERRY W. Status Active Subject Matter Expert Michael L. Du Mond (Mike) Robert Ziock Applicability, Exceptions, and Consequences This corporate procedure applies to all Members of the Workforce whose activities include: Drawing potable water from the potable water system on Sandia-controlled premises. Using permanent and nonpermanent potable water dispensers (e.g., Rubbermaid© brand containers, tanker trucks and trailers, and water tanks) at remote sites, which are not connected to a potable water system (e.g., field-location testing facilities, firing and rocket ranges, and waste sites). Exceptions to, or deviations from this procedure must be approved through the Executive Policy Sponsor or Policy Area Manager, if delegated. Click

136

CX-003364: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

364: Categorical Exclusion Determination 364: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mobile Hydrogen-Fueling Station and Use of Hydrogen Buses at LLNL CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Livermore, California Office(s): Lawrence Livermore Site Office Two hydrogen buses would be delivered and operated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to provide regular taxi service for LLNL employees and special events. A mobile hydrogen-fueling station would be located in the tanker storage yard (southeast side of LLNL) and would be the primary fueling source for the hydrogen buses. The fueling station would be comprised of a trailer with compressed hydrogen tanks, and equipped with solar panels for the communication system and pump,

137

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about

138

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 December 2011 Table 60. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 1,141 1,441 -300 34,752 8,711 26,041 6,469 28,784 -22,315 Petroleum Products ............................................... 100,976 9,207 101,951 35,804 23,219 -6,304 23,593 122,848 -94,762 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - 3,260 417 2,843 1,046 2,853 -1,807 Liquified Petroleum Gases ................................... 3,702 0 3,702 10,375 13,641 -3,266 17,197 8,355 8,842 Ethane/Ethylene

139

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 23, 22, 2012 | Release Date: Feb. 23, 2012 | Next Release: Mar. 1, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Re-Exports of LNG Grew in 2011 Re-exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) occur when foreign LNG shipments are offloaded into above-ground U.S. storage tanks located on-site at regasification terminals and then subsequently reloaded onto tankers for delivery to other countries. A total of 53.4 billion cubic feet (Bcf) were re-exported in 2011, compared to 32.9 Bcf in 2010. Re-exports of foreign-sourced LNG from U.S. LNG terminals exceeded 12 Bcf in January 2011, equivalent to about 30 percent of U.S. LNG import volumes during that month. There are currently three U.S. LNG terminals that have been granted

140

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Terminal A facility used primarily for the storage and/or marketing of petroleum products which has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Effect of oil-contaminated sediment on the longhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus) following chronic exposure  

SciTech Connect

One of the most common pollutants in coastal marine areas is petroleum that is discharged continually from bilges and tankers. Fish which inhabit the littoral zone are usually exposed to a variety of pollutants, including petroleum, that originate from urban and industrial waste. The longhorn sculpin, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus, is one of the fish species that inhabits littoral areas adjacent to wharves and fish-processing plants were it feeds on discarded offal. Discharged crude oil has been reported to contaminate and persist in sediment for long periods and is known to affect fish in a variety of ways. The present study was conducted to ascertain the effect of oil-contaminated sediment, following long-term exposure, on body weight, organs, tissues and parasitofauna of the sculpin and the potential use of its parasites as indicators of pollution.

Khan, R.A. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John's (Canada))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Short cut for Japan's oil. [Canal across Thailand's Kra Isthmus  

SciTech Connect

Dependence of Japan, Thailand, and other countries in the area on oil and LNG imports from the Middle East has led to a reexamination of a long-standing idea to build a canal across Thailand's Kra Isthmus. Besides relieving congestion in shipping lanes around Singapore, it would contribute significantly to the economic development of southern Thailand and reduce transport costs of vital fuel supplies. Such a canal project could result in further economies from greater ship use and would entirely change the maritime map of Southeast Asia, as a number of important ports of call for world shipping which lie between Arabian and Northeast Pacific waters are too small for the giant tankers. In spite of the fact that various surveys were conducted jointly by Japanese and Thai authorities to choose the optimum location for the canal, the project appears to be shelved for the time being, owing to very heavy investments and various other factors involved. (MCW)

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO`s is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today`s cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO's is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today's cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

Design features and availability of liquefied gas carriers  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers the growth of seaborne LPG trade, various designs of liquefied gas carriers (independent tank, of semimembrane, and integral tank) for the transportation of LPG within the framework of the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) code as well as U.S. Coast Guard regulations including insulation systems, ballast storage between the cargo tank and the hull, and methods by which the cargo tank either supports the weight of the cargo or transfers it to the hull; the development of the world liquefied gas carrier fleet including pressurized ships, combination ships (which can carry cargo either partially or fully pressurized and/or fully refrigerated) and the fully refrigerated ships; new design developments; tanker availability; and their economic impact on the transportation costs of seaborne LPG.

Rasch, J.M.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Safety audit of refrigerated liquefied gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

An Exxon Research and Engineering Co. comprehensive review of engineering practices and application of safety requirements at Exxon's world-wide refrigerated liquefied hydrocarbon gas storage and handling installations, which included a field audit of about 90 tanks at 30 locations, showed that catastrophic tank failure was not a credible event with properly operated and maintained tanks designed, constructed, and tested in accordance with API Standard 620, Design and Construction of Large Welded Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, although supplemental requirements were suggested to further enhance safety. The review also showed that any meaningful safety audit should be comprehensive and must include all facilities with careful attention to detail. The review embraces products of -1 to -167C and included LNG, ethylene, LPG, and LPG olefins. Recent and proposed LNG safety legislation; some field audit results; and recommendations as to design, construction, and operation of LNG and LPG storage facilities, marine terminals, and tankers, are also discussed.

Feely, F.J.; Sommer, E.C.; Marshall, B.T.; Palmer, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

AEO Early Release 2013 - LNG exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of U.S. expected to become net exporter of natural gas by end of decade The United States is on track to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2020 as domestic gas production continues to increase faster than consumption through this decade. Growing production and low prices will help spur exports, according to the new long-term outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Some of that gas will be sent overseas in huge ocean-going tankers carrying super-cooled liquefied natural gas, or LNG. U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas are expected to reach 1.6 trillion cubic feet in 2027, double the export levels projected for that time in last year's outlook . And, according to EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski: "Increasing domestic natural gas production, especially from tight shale formations, and lower

149

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.PDF 6.PDF Table 36. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity From 1 to From 2 to From 3 to 2 3 5 1 3 4 5 1 2 Crude Oil ................................................................. 146 175 - 475 6,913 2,886 - 265 27,489 Petroleum Products ............................................... 8,469 44 0 2,765 17,339 2,569 0 98,419 19,332 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 0 - - 406 0 - - 4,121 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 0 0 - 1,378 12,271 111 - 1,243 6,062 Unfinished Oils ..................................................... 36 0 - 0 871 - - 0 47 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ................. 4,378 0 0 536 527 307 0 41,206 3,077 Reformulated - RBOB .......................................

150

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 PAD District 2 PAD District 3 Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Net Receipts Crude Oil ................................................................. 9,396 5,270 4,126 434,346 141,722 292,624 111,580 355,664 -244,084 Petroleum Products ............................................... 1,192,152 109,700 1,187,640 421,032 241,581 -23,755 244,122 1,458,755 -1,170,927 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 0 19 -19 35,669 5,780 29,889 13,880 30,395 -16,515 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 26,723 0 26,723 99,367 138,544 -39,177 185,252 67,045 118,207

151

Spills worsen problems in global oil movements  

SciTech Connect

Since early 1978 there have been several serious accidents involving oil tankers and terminals. The wreck of the Amoco Cadiz off the northwestern coast of France on March 16, 1978, resulted in the largest oil spill in history; about 230,000 tons were spilled over 60 mi of the French coastline. Other less spectacular spills have had similar damaging effects. International spill liability agreements are discussed. The bulk of coastal pollution throughout the world is caused by ballast tank discharges that are in excess of limits set by international convention. Minimizing or eliminating ballast discharges is a primary goal of individual oil companies and international groups. Theoretically, the load on top method of ballast tank cleaning should largely eliminate pollution from ships with facilities to use this technique. Examined are methods of enforcing international regulation of ballast tank cleaning operations and implementing widespread use of the load on top cleaning technique. (1 map, 5 photos, 1 table)

Vielvoye, R.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels  

SciTech Connect

A proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels of 40,000 dwt and over, in domestic trade has been issued by the US Coast Guard under the Port and Tanker Safety Act. Exemption would be allowed if shore-based reception facilities are a preferred method of handling dirty ballast and if such facilities are adequate and readily available. Adoption of the proposal would recognize that in certain trades where existing tank vessels have set loading locations, it is as effective to use shore-based reception facilities for the treatment of oil residues as it is to use SBT, CBT, or COW. The proposal requires, among others, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits for the reception facilities, and contains a provision for revocation of exemptions upon noncompliance with regulations. Comments must be received by 7/7/80.

1980-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Conversion of associated natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons. Final report, June 1, 1995--January 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original concept envisioned for the use of Fischer-Tropsch processing (FTP) of United States associated natural gas in this study was to provide a way of utilizing gas which could not be brought to market because a pipeline was not available or for which there was no local use. Conversion of gas by FTP could provide a means of utilizing offshore associated gas which would not require installation of a pipeline or re-injection. The premium quality F-T hydrocarbons produced by conversion of the gas can be transported in the same way as the crude oil or in combination (blended) with it, eliminating the need for a separate gas transport system. FTP will produce a synthetic crude oil, thus increasing the effective size of the resource. The two conventional approaches currently used in US territory for handling of natural gas associated with crude petroleum production are re-injection and pipelining. Conversion of natural gas to a liquid product which can be transported to shore by tanker can be accomplished by FTP to produce hydrocarbons, or by conversion to chemical products such as methanol or ammonia, or by cryogenic liquefaction (LNG). This study considers FTP and briefly compares it to methanol and LNG. The Energy International Corporation cobalt catalyst, ratio adjusted, slurry bubble column F-T process was used as the basis for the study and the comparisons. An offshore F-T plant can best be accommodated by an FPSO (Floating Production, Storage, Offloading vessel) based on a converted surplus tanker, such as have been frequently used around the world recently. Other structure types used in deep water (platforms) are more expensive and cannot handle the required load.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

March 2009 Y-12 Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track Page 5 Page 5 Third-generation employee follows his father's sage advice Page 7 Page 7 Car enthusiasts go into overdrive Brett Pate Ray Smith Donna Watson Mona Wright Lisa Xiques B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the

157

Control instrumentation for wellheads and mud-kill systems. [Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the instrumentation and control systems used on the wellheads and mud-kill systems at the Mobil Oil Arun natural gas field, situated onshore in the province of Aceh, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The reservoir is a carbonate reef containing an estimated 15 Tcf (0.42 X 10/sup 12/ m/sup 3/) gas at approximately 7,000 psig (48 263 kPa) and 360/sup 0/F (182/sup 0/C). The wellstream from the field is separated into natural gas, condensate liquid, and water. The gas and condensate are then shipped through separate pipelines to the Arun liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility at Lho' Seumawe, about 40 mi (25 km) away on the northeastern coast of Sumatra. After liquefaction the LNG is shipped by tanker to Japan. The field was discovered in 1971 and became operational in 1977. The LNG delivery contract complied with the Japanese calls for regular delivery; thus continuity of supply to the LNG plant was of paramount importance for meeting transportation and supply schedules. Two actual blowouts in the Arun field have provided valuable experience in evaluating both equipment and systems in terms of design, reliability, and application for this type of field service. This paper concentrates on the design and installation of the control systems associated with the wellhead and mud-kill systems and highlights the problems encountered during the past five years.

Giles, A.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

159

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about winter supply in New England. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell by 10 percent on Tuesday, October 16, dropping to $20.05 per barrel. By Friday, WTI had recovered two thirds of the decrease, ending the week at $21.85 per barrel, or $3.77 per MMBtu.

160

Review and validation of exposure assessment methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is twofold, to standardize and to validate exposure assessment methods. First, the attempt is made to standardize the manner in which exposure assessment methods are developed. Literature on the subject is reviewed and seven common elements discovered to be common are discussed. The seven elements are causative agents, exposure groups, exposure-modifying parameters, industrial hygiene measurement data, misclassification issues, validation issues, and reliability issues. It is believed that thinking in terms of these elements will yield more consistent and complete exposure assessment models. Three types of exposure estimation methods are reviewed in this form. These methods are selected because they are the most thorough and represent the most frequently used and referenced types of estimation strategies: the statistical model, the deterministic model, and the multiplicative model. Second, the paper reports on an attempt to validate a semiquantitative exposure assessment model against industrial hygiene data collected from employees of one firm in the maritime industry. The set of data contains 440 samples with 75 percent of them censored by the method limit of detection. Methods to calculate an average concentration with nondetectable data are discussed. It is concluded that (1) the model does not predict the data well, (2) the industrial hygiene data does not properly fit the tails of a lognormal distribution, and (3) that average exposure to benzene in the (un)loading of petrochemicals from tankers is decidedly below exposure limits.

Shaw, Eduardo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intercoastal tankers tankers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California Past, Present and Future  

SciTech Connect

I'm pleased to be here as your keynote speaker from the utility industry. Today is fitting to discuss the role of an alternative/renewable energy resource such as geothermal. Three years ago today, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. This ecological catastrophe was another of those periodic jolts that underscores the importance of lessening our nation's dependence on oil and increasing the use of cost-effective, environmentally benign alternative/renewable energy sources. Alternative/renewables have come a long way since the first oil crisis in 1973. Today, they provide 9 percent of electric power used in the United States. That's nearly double the figure of just two years ago. And since 1985, one-third of a new capacity has come from geothermal, solar, wind and biomass facilities. Nevertheless, geothermal supplies only about three-tenths of a percent of the country's electric power, or roughly 2,800 megawatts (MW). And most of that is in California. In fact, geothermal is California's second-largest source of renewable energy, supplying more than 5 percent of the power generated in the state. Today, I'd like to discuss the outlook for the geothermal industry, framing it within Southern California Edison's experience with geothermal and other alternative/renewable energy sources.

Budhraja, Vikram S.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Geothermal Energy Market in Southern California Past, Present and Future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

I'm pleased to be here as your keynote speaker from the utility industry. Today is fitting to discuss the role of an alternative/renewable energy resource such as geothermal. Three years ago today, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska. This ecological catastrophe was another of those periodic jolts that underscores the importance of lessening our nation's dependence on oil and increasing the use of cost-effective, environmentally benign alternative/renewable energy sources. Alternative/renewables have come a long way since the first oil crisis in 1973. Today, they provide 9 percent of electric power used in the United States. That's nearly double the figure of just two years ago. And since 1985, one-third of a new capacity has come from geothermal, solar, wind and biomass facilities. Nevertheless, geothermal supplies only about three-tenths of a percent of the country's electric power, or roughly 2,800 megawatts (MW). And most of that is in California. In fact, geothermal is California's second-largest source of renewable energy, supplying more than 5 percent of the power generated in the state. Today, I'd like to discuss the outlook for the geothermal industry, framing it within Southern California Edison's experience with geothermal and other alternative/renewable energy sources.

Budhraja, Vikram S.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

163

Recommended research on LNG safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the safety and other environmental aspects of liquefied energy gases including liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effort reported here was conducted as part of the planning for further research into the safety aspects of transporting and storing LNG, with primary emphasis on public safety. Although the modern LNG industry has enjoyed excellent success in providing for safe operations, significant questions remain on the part of many, the expressions of which were intensified with the addition of marine-based LNG import terminals. Public safety with regard to large-scale importation of this fuel has received widespread attention in the US Congress, state legislatures, county and city governments, and from various individuals and public groups, with coverage in all the news media, including books published on the subject. The safety concerns have centered around the consequences to the public of a large spill of the cryogenic liquid from an ocean tanker or a larger storage tank, either of which might hold as much as 125,000 m/sup 3/ of LNG.

Carpenter, H.J.; Gilmore, F.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ideas for future liquid Argon detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline a strategy for future experiments on neutrino and astroparticle physics based on the use, at different detector mass scales (100 ton and 100 kton), of the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique. The LAr TPC technology has great potentials for both cases with large degree of interplay between the two applications and a strong synergy. The ICARUS R&D programme has demonstrated that the technology is mature and that one can built a large ($\\sim$ 1 kton) LAr TPC. We believe that one can conceive and design a very large mass LAr TPC with a mass of 100 kton by employing a monolithic technology based on the use of industrial, large volume cryogenic tankers developed by the petro-chemical industry. We show a potential implementation of a large LAr TPC detector. Such a detector would be an ideal match for a Superbeam, Betabeam or Neutrino Factory, covering a broad physics program that could include the detection of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos, and search for proton decays, in addition to the rich accelerator neutrino physics program. In parallel, physics is calling for another application of the LAr TPC technique at the level of 100 ton mass, for low energy neutrino physics and for use as a near station setup in future long baseline neutrino facilities. We present here the main physics objectives and outline the conceptual design of such a detector.

A. Ereditato; A. Rubbia

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fast okay urged for Alaska line prebuild funding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foothills Pipelines (Yukon) Ltd. has asked the Canada National Energy Board (NEB) to approve its financing plans for the prebuilt sections of the Alaska Highway gas pipeline along with a number of other conditions, which include approval of additional gas exports for its affiliate company, Pan-Alberta Gas Ltd.; accelerated depreciation rates for prebuilt facilities in Alberta and British Columbia; a minimum 17.5% flat rate of return on equity; and diversion of gas exports approved for two other companies to the prebuilt facilities when completed. NEB's decision is expected March 11, 1980. Trans Mountain Pipe Line Co. Ltd. has informed NEB that it will proceed with its application to build a pipeline from Low Point, Wash., to Edmonton, Alberta, to transport Alaska crude oil, and also to build a tanker port in Washington State. Gas deliveries from Alberta to eastern Canada and the US have returned to normal seasonal volume following the explosion February 26, 1980 in Trans-Canada Pipeline Ltd.'s 85,000 hp compressor station. Repair costs, cause of the explosion, and modifications of the safety procedures remain to be determined.

Not Available

1980-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production: Evaluation of H2 Mini-Grids  

SciTech Connect

We have assessed the transportation of hydrogen as a metal hydride slurry through pipelines over a short distance from a neighborhood hydrogen production facility to local points of use. The assessment was conducted in the context of a hydrogen "mini-grid" serving both vehicle fueling and stationary fuel cell power systems for local building heat and power. The concept was compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen mini-grid option and to a stand-alone hydrogen fueling station. Based on our analysis results we have concluded that the metal hydride slurry concept has potential to provide significant reductions in overall energy use compared to liquid or chemical hydride delivery, but only modest reductions in overall energy use, hydrogen cost, and GHG emissions compared to a compressed gaseous hydrogen delivery. However, given the inherent (and perceived) safety and reasonable cost/efficiency of the metal hydride slurry systems, additional research and analysis is warranted. The concept could potentially overcome the public acceptance barrier associated with the perceptions about hydrogen delivery (including liquid hydrogen tanker trucks and high-pressure gaseous hydrogen pipelines or tube trailers) and facilitate the development of a near-term hydrogen infrastructure.

Lasher, Stephen; Sinha, Jayanti

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Dome takes a 20% interest in the Arctic pilot project to move LNG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to B. Richards of Dome Petroleum Ltd., Dome's interest will be shared with its partially owned subsidiary, Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Ltd. According to J. Bell of Petro-Canada, the operator for the Arctic project, negotiations are under way with Tenneco Inc. for gas sales of up to 225 million cu ft/day to begin in 1985-86. At first, two tankers would ship LNG to a delivery terminal at an as yet unselected site on Canada's east coast, but by 1992, nine ships capable of delivering 1.23 billion cu ft/day of LNG, could be in service. The U.S. and European potential LNG markets amounts to 3-4 trillion cu ft/yr and 3.5-4 trillion cu ft/yr, respectively. Petro-Canada also supports the Polar Gas Ltd. project to lay a gas pipeline from the Arctic Islands and Mackenzie Delta to the south; the projects are not considered to be in competition.

Richards, B.; Bell, J.

1980-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Basic research opportunities to support LNG technology. Topical report, July 1989-December 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As additional gas reserves come on production during the next decade in areas with limited local markets, worldwide LNG trade is expected to expand. The availability of dedicated LNG tankers may well determine the rate at which this growth occurs. Plans are being made now to bring the four U.S. import terminals up to capacity during this period. As LNG becomes a more significant factor in the domestic natural gas market, consideration should be given to applications other than simply regassifying and comingling it with other supplies entering the pipeline grid. The higher energy density and the low temperature of LNG offer opportunities for expanding the use of natural gas into the industrial and transportation sectors. Greater use of LNG in peak shaving and intermediate storage may also provide benefits in increased reliability and performance of the gas transmission and distribution grid. In order to provide new and more cost-effective technologies to respond to these opportunities, it is recommended that GRI broaden the range of research it is currently performing on LNG.

Groten, B.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Natural gas imports and exports. Second quarter report 1995  

SciTech Connect

This quarter`s feature report focuses on natural gas exports to Mexico. OFP invites ideas from the public on future topics dealing with North American natural gas import/export trade. Such suggestions should be left on OFP`s electronic bulletin board. Natural Gas exports to Mexico continued to grow and reached an historic high for the month of June (7.8 Bcf). Two new long-term contracts were activated; Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company began importing 14.7 MMcf per day from TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Renaissance Energy (U.S.) Inc. began importing 2.8 MMcf per day from Renaissance Energy Ltd. for resale to Delmarva Power & Light Company. Algerian LNG imports remained stagnant with only one tanker being imported by Pan National Gas Sales, Inc. (Pan National). During the first six months of 1995, data indicates gas imports increased by about 10 percent over the 1994 level (1,418 vs. 1,285 Bcf), with Canadian imports increasing by 14 percent and Algerian imports decreasing by 81 percent. During the same time period, exports increased by 18 percent (83 vs. 70.1 Bcf).

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Overview study of LNG release prevention and control systems  

SciTech Connect

The liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry employs a variety of release prevention and control techniques to reduce the likelihood and the consequences of accidental LNG releases. A study of the effectiveness of these release prevention and control systems is being performed. Reference descriptions for the basic types of LNG facilities were developed. Then an overview study was performed to identify areas that merit subsequent and more detailed analyses. The specific objectives were to characterize the LNG facilities of interest and their release prevention and control systems, identify possible weak links and research needs, and provide an analytical framework for subsequent detailed analyses. The LNG facilities analyzed include a reference export terminal, marine vessel, import terminal, peakshaving facility, truck tanker, and satellite facility. A reference description for these facilities, a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA), and a list of representative release scenarios are included. The reference facility descriptions outline basic process flows, plant layouts, and safety features. The PHA identifies the important release prevention operations. Representative release scenarios provide a format for discussing potential initiating events, effects of the release prevention and control systems, information needs, and potential design changes. These scenarios range from relatively frequent but low consequence releases to unlikely but large releases and are the principal basis for the next stage of analysis.

Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Holter, G.M.; Powers, T.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NRC ISSUES REPORT FOR COMMENT ON SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION CASK RESPONSE TO CALDECOTT TUNNEL FIRE SCENARIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a study of how a truck cask for transporting spent nuclear fuel might perform in a severe tunnel fire. The report models the performance of the NAC International Model LWT (NAC) spent fuel cask under the conditions of the April 1982 fire in the Caldecott highway tunnel near Oakland, Calif., when a gasoline tanker carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline overturned and caught fire. Severe, intense fires such as the Caldecott fire are extremely rare. However, they provide an opportunity to study how transportation packages might perform under very severe accident conditions. The results of this study strongly indicate that any radioactive release from the NAC model or a similar spent fuel shipping cask involved in a severe tunnel fire such as that of the Caldecott highway tunnel accident would be within regulatory limits. The peak internal temperatures predicted for the NAC cask in the analysis of the Caldecott fire scenario were not high enough to result in rupture of the fuel cladding (protective metal tubing around the fuel). Therefore, it would not be expected that any radioactive material (including spent nuclear fuel particles or fission products) would be released from the fuel rods. The maximum cask temperatures experienced around the lid, vent and drain ports exceeded the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Drewry: Mideast in firm control of world oil supplies for 1990s  

SciTech Connect

Surging economic growth in the Far East will push up world crude oil demand steadily in the 1990s despite the current economic downturn. It will fall to members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to meet that increased demand, given the expected decline in non-OPEC production. And because OPEC members in the Persian Gulf region are best positioned to meet the increase, the balance of power in oil markets will shift even more in favor of the Middle East. Seaborne oil exports from the Middle East will jump almost 30% by 1997 from 1991 levels. There will be a worldwide rise of 16% in the volume of seaborne crude oil trade, with a 29% hike in movements of refined products by tanker. Those are among the findings of a report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London. Drewry said, It is expected that 1992 will be a low point in non-OPEC output and that production levels will recover steadily from 1993 onward, although not rapidly enough to match the anticipated rise in demand. Drewry estimates non-OPEC production in 1997 at 37.1 million b/d vs. 38.1 million b/d in 1991. With non-OPEC production falling by 2.6% between 1991 and 1997, OPEC producers will have the scope to increase their output by almost 32% over the same period.

Not Available

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Numerical simulation of sloshing in LNG tanks with a compressible two-phase model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of liquid dynamics in LNG tanks is getting more and more important with the actual trend of LNG tankers sailing with partially filled tanks. The effect of sloshing liquid in the tanks on pressure levels at the tank walls and on the overall ship motion indicates the relevance of an accurate simulation of the fluid behaviour. This paper presents the simulation of sloshing LNG by a compressible two-phase model and the validation of the numerical model on model-scale sloshing experiments. The details of the numerical model, an improved Volume Of Fluid (iVOF) method, are presented in the paper. The program has been developed initially to study the sloshing of liquid fuel in spacecraft. The micro-gravity environment requires a very accurate and robust description of the free surface. Later, the numerical model has been used for calculations for different offshore applications, including green water loading. The model has been extended to take two-phase flow effects into account. These effects are particularly important for sloshing in tanks. The complex mixture of the liquid and gas phase around

Rik Wemmenhove; Arthur E. P. Veldman; Tim Bunnik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Some problems of dynamic distributional planning for petroleum distillates in Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the development of mathematical models that may aid in the strategic planning of distributional operations of petroleum distillates in countries such as Mexico, where these operations are very complex involving multiple time periods, multiple commodities, several means of transportation, and uncertain demands. A new mathematical instrument for policy analysis of the west coast tanker distributional operations of Pemex regarding gasoline and diesel fuels is developed in terms of goal-interval programming formulations. Taking advantage of the special structure of these multiperiod-multicommodity formulations that would otherwise be mixed-integer programming problems, new special linear programming structures are devised which achieve integrality at extreme point solutions. This permits assessment of incremental policy changes in terms of the usual dual variables, a significant advantage. The extension of policy planning to other regions of the country, a secondary problem, is begun with a framework of modeling which comprehends inter-regional transfers. Future research will develop the corresponding intra-regional policy tools.

Gomez Lopez, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Floating LNG plant will stress reliability and safety  

SciTech Connect

Mobil has developed a unique floating LNG plant design after extensive studies that set safety as the highest priority. The result is a production, storage and offloading platform designed to produce 6 million tons per year of LNG and up to 55,000 bpd of condensate from 1 Bcfd of feed gas. All production and off-loading equipment is supported by a square donut-shaped concrete hull, which is spread-moored. The hull contains storage tanks for 250,000 m{sup 3} of LNG, 6540,000 bbl of condensate and ballast water. Both LNG and condensate can be directly offloaded to shuttle tankers. Since the plant may be moved to produce from several different gas fields during its life, the plant and barge were designed to be generic. It can be used at any location in the Pacific Rim, with up to 15% CO{sub 2}, 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, 55 bbl/MMcf condensate and 650 ft water depth. It can be modified to handle other water depths, depending upon the environment. In addition, it is much more economical than an onshore grassroots LNG plant, with potential capital savings of 25% or more. The paper describes the machinery, meteorology and oceanography, and safety engineering.

Kinney, C.D.; Schulz, H.R.; Spring, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114  

SciTech Connect

Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Water pollution: EPA controls over ballast water at Trans-Alaska Pipeline Marine Terminal  

SciTech Connect

The Alyeska Pipeline Service Company at Valdez, Alaska, operates a water treatment plant at the terminal to treat ballast water, oily sea water that is carried in tankers to provide stability, before it is discharged into the bay. The Environmental Protection Agency is nearly 4 years late in issuing a new permit to Alyeska which regulates the types and amounts of pollution that can be discharged. Alyeska has been operating under an extension of its old permit whose conditions may be less stringent than the new permit will require. Prior to 1984, EPA monitored Alyeska's permit and identified instances of noncompliance with permit conditions, but its enforcement actions were limited to discussions and correspondence with Alyeska. In contrast, since 1984, EPA has begun taking enforcement actions as well as investigating allegations of other environmental problems. EPA should have acted sooner and until the new permit is issued, questions about the protection of marine life and water quality in Valdez Bay will remain unanswered.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Clean, economical, underwater (hydrocarbon) storage  

SciTech Connect

A consortium consisting of Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft A.G., Phoenix Gummiwerke A.G., Strabag Bau-A.G., and Bugsier Reederei und Bergungs-A.G. offers a plausible solution to the large-scale underwater storage of hydrocarbons. Up to 20 storage compartments of 8000 cu m capacity can be assembled for a capacity of 160,000 cu m. Each compartment is divided in half by a nylon-reinforced polyurethane diaphragm which isolates oil or other products on one side from sea-water ballast on the other side. As oil is pumped into storage on one side of the diaphragm, the diaphragm moves and ballast on the other side is displaced to the sea. Ballast re-enters the compartment during unloading. The system can enable small offshore platforms to produce more economically. Cargo tankers load at 8000 cu m/hr. The tanks will be used in 200 m or greater water depths. The loading station is installed in a buoy 30 m below the water surface.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

New generation loading/mooring/storage (LMS) production platform  

SciTech Connect

A new generation loading/mooring/storage (LMS) production platform designed by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd. and the Aker Group has been patented in the U.S. and several other countries by Mobil Oil Corp. The LMS vessel is a semisubmersible with ship mooring and loading facilities atop a box-shaped crude oil storage structure which floats well below the waterline. A capability is provided for loading tankers with 800,000 bbl of crude oil in only 12 hr. There are 15 dual-purpose cargo/ballast tanks in the lower section, with a control tower over the center tank. Upper and lower cargo tanks in the tower are each divided into three sections to provide additional crude handling flexibility. The LMS operates at a constant draft. Crude pumped into the LMS from the producing platform enters the tower tanks and is then transferred to a lower tank in which a diagonal suspended synthetic rubber diaphragm separates the oil from clean water ballast. During ship loading, the pressure of seawater reentering the dual tanks pushes the crude to the tower, where cargo pumps deliver it to the loading vessel.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Keeping oil out of the marine environment  

SciTech Connect

Although the load-on-top procedure is capable of recovering 99% of the oil in tank washings and dirty ballast, the industry has continued to look for ways to reduce the contact between oil and water on board ship. With crude oil washing, as the tanker discharges its cargo, part of the crude oil is redirected through the ship pipes into washing machines located in the cargo tanks. The crude oil is applied under pressure to the tank walls, structure and tank bottom to remove oil residues. The resulting tank washings (all crude oil) are pumped onshore along with the rest of the cargo. Currently, clean ballast tanks and some of the remaining cargo tanks are, on a rotational basis, crude-oil washed with each discharge. Exxon Corp. VLCC's will be equipped to crude-oil wash all tanks, every discharge, by 1978. Oil residues retained on board ship following water washing average about to 1200 tons. The actual range experienced by Exxon's vessels during 1975-76 was 980-1460 tons. Studies of similar vessels following a crude-oil wash, with water rinse, showed significantly less oil remaining on board ship, 300-450 tons.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of Sirikit oil field, Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The Sirikit oil field, Thailand's first significant oil find, was discovered in late 1981 by Thai Shell Exploration and Production Company, Ltd., with its second exploration well. After deciding to develop the field (named after Thailand's queen), Thai Shell took only 1 year to design and install the production station, and organize an unconventional evacuation system (road tanker and railway) before oil came on stream in January 1983. A series of facility upgradings kept pace with the production buildup, to a plateau of about 21,000 b/d. The crude oil is waxy (pour point = about 35/sup 0/C), but it is light (40/sup 0/ API) and has an attractive refinery yield. Associated gas is sold to the nearby (specially installed) electricity generating station. Gas compression was commissioned in 1985 to increase utilization of gas, which previously was flared. The agricultural environment dictated the need for cluster drilling of deviated wells, as well as highlighting the importance of good relationships with the local population and authorities. Safety and security are of particular interest. The field is geologically complex, being very faulted in a lacustrine environment and extremely stratified and heterogeneous in reservoir quality. One of two major reservoirs has a gas cap. After some early surprises in delineating the field, a three-dimensional seismic survey was conducted, which better defined the structure and the reserve potential. Nevertheless, parallel appraisal and development continues on a careful step-by-step approach, using the latest production and pressure data to refine the reservoir geologic model. In November 1985, the Petroleum Authority of Thailand became a minority partner, with Shell remaining as operator.

Brooks, J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Dynamic analysis of multiple-body floating platforms coupled with mooring lines and risers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computer program, WINPOST-MULT, is developed for the dynamic analysis of a multiple-body floating system coupled with mooring lines and risers in the presence of waves, winds and currents. The coupled dynamics program for a single platform is extended for analyzing multiple-body systems by including all the platforms, mooring lines and risers in a combined matrix equation in the time domain. Compared to the iteration method between multiple bodies, the combined matrix method can include the full hydrodynamic interactions among bodies. The floating platform is modeled as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom. The first- and second-order wave forces, added mass coefficients, and radiation damping coefficients are calculated from the hydrodynamics program WAMIT for multiple bodies. Then, the time series of wave forces are generated in the time domain based on the two-term Volterra model. The wind forces are separately generated from the input wind spectrum and wind force formula. The current is included in Morison's drag force formula. In case of FPSO, the wind and current forces are generated using the respective coefficients given in the OCIMF data sheet. A finite element method is derived for the long elastic element of an arbitrary shape and material. This newly developed computer program is first applied to the system of a turret-moored FPSO and a shuttle tanker in tandem mooring. The dynamics of the turret-moored FPSO in waves, winds and currents are verified against independent computation and OTRC experiment. Then, the simulations for the FPSO-shuttle system with a hawser connection are carried out and the results are compared with the simplified methods without considering or partially including hydrodynamic interactions.

Kim, Young-Bok

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The liquid Argon TPC: a powerful detector for future neutrino experiments and proton decay searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of new generation neutrino and astroparticle physics experiments exploiting the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technique, following a graded strategy that envisions applications with increasing detector masses (from 100 ton to 100 kton). The ICARUS R&D program has already demonstrated that the technology is mature with the test of the T600 detector at surface. Since 2003 we have been working with the conceptual design of a very large LAr TPC with a mass of 50-100 kton to be built by employing a monolithic technology based on the use of industrial, large volume, cryogenic tankers developed by the petro-chemical industry. Such a detector, if realized, would be an ideal match for a Super Beam, Beta Beam or Neutrino Factory, covering a broad physics program that includes the detection of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos, and searches for proton decay, in addition to the rich accelerator neutrino physics program. A "test module" with a mass of the order of 10 kton operated underground or at shallow depth would represent a necessary milestone towards the realization of the 100 kton detector, with an interesting physics program on its own. In parallel, physics is calling for a shorter scale application of the LAr TPC technique at the level of 100 ton mass, for low energy neutrino physics and for use as a near station setup in future long baseline neutrino facilities. We outline here the main physics objectives and the design of such a detector for operation in the upcoming T2K neutrino beam. We finally present the result of a series of R&D studies conducted with the aim of validating the design of the proposed detectors.

A. Ereditato; A. Rubbia

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Oil prices in a new light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

Fesharaki, F. (East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Confined boiling rates of liquefied petroleum gas on water  

SciTech Connect

Results of a program to measure the rate of boiling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water surface and to develop an analytical model to describe the phenomena involved are reported. Primary emphasis was placed on liquid propane or LPG mixtures containing small quantities of ethane or butane or both. A few exploratory tests were, however, made with pure liquid ethane, ethylene, and n-butane. The investigation was conducted to provide quantitative data and analytical models to delineate the rate of vaporization, the spread rate and the degree of fractionation, should an LPG tanker suffer an accident leading to a major spill on water. For propane or LPG spills on water, immediately following the contact, violent boiling commenced. Ice quickly formed; in most cases, ice was even thrown onto the sidewalls of the vessel. In some instances sprays of water/ice and propane were ejected from the calorimeter. Within a few seconds, however, the interaction quieted and the surface was covered by a rough ice sheet. The LPG boiled on the surface of this ice, but large gas bubbles occasionally appeared under the ice shield and were trapped. The boiling rate decreased with time with a concomitant increase in the thickness of the ice shield. In the first second or two, very high boiling heat fluxes were experienced. The mass of LPG lost was approximately half that spilled originally. It is estimated that only 5 to 15% could have been ejected as liquid if the water loss is used as a reference. However, since the water surface is very agitated during this period, it is not possible to obtain reliable quantitative values of the boiling flux. Also, as noted, the mass lost in the very early time period was approximately proportional to the original mass of LPG used. It may be inferred that larger spills lead to more mixing and boiling before the ice shield prevents a direct contact between the LPG and the water.

Reid, R.C.; Smith, K.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Estimates of fire environments in ship holds containing radioactive material packages  

SciTech Connect

Fire environments that occur on cargo ships differ significantly from the fire environments found in land transport. Cargo ships typically carry a large amount of flammable fuel for propulsion and shipboard power, and may transport large quantities of flammable cargo. As a result, sea mode transport accident records contain instances of long lasting and intense fires. Since Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) casks are not carried on tankers with large flammable cargoes, most of these dramatic, long burning fires are not relevant threats, and transport studies must concentrate on those fires that are most likely to occur. By regulation, INF casks must be separated from flammable cargoes by a fire-resistant, liquid-tight partition. This makes a fire in an adjacent ship hold the most likely fire threat. The large size of a cargo ship relative to any spent nuclear fuel casks on board, however, may permit a severe, long lasting fire to occur with little or no thermal impact on the casks. Although some flammable materials such as shipping boxes or container floors may exist in the same hold with the cask, the amount of fuel available may not provide a significant threat to the massive transport casks used for radioactive materials. This shipboard fire situation differs significantly from the regulatory conditions specified in 10 CFR 71 for a fully engulfing pool fire. To learn more about the differences, a series of simple thermal analyses has been completed to estimate cask behavior in likely marine and land thermal accident situations. While the calculations are based on several conservative assumptions, and are only preliminary, they illustrate that casks are likely to heat much more slowly in shipboard hold fires than in an open pool fire. The calculations also reinforce the basic regulatory concept that for radioactive materials, the shipping cask, not the ship, is the primary protection barrier to consider.

Koski, J.A.; Cole, J.K.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sorting through the many total-energy-cycle pathways possible with early plug-in hybrids.  

SciTech Connect

Using the 'total energy cycle' methodology, we compare U.S. near term (to {approx}2015) alternative pathways for converting energy to light-duty vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT) in plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), hybrids (HEVs), and conventional vehicles (CVs). For PHEVs, we present total energy-per-unit-of-VKT information two ways (1) energy from the grid during charge depletion (CD); (2) energy from stored on-board fossil fuel when charge sustaining (CS). We examine 'incremental sources of supply of liquid fuel such as (a) oil sands from Canada, (b) Fischer-Tropsch diesel via natural gas imported by LNG tanker, and (c) ethanol from cellulosic biomass. We compare such fuel pathways to various possible power converters producing electricity, including (i) new coal boilers, (ii) new integrated, gasified coal combined cycle (IGCC), (iii) existing natural gas fueled combined cycle (NGCC), (iv) existing natural gas combustion turbines, (v) wood-to-electricity, and (vi) wind/solar. We simulate a fuel cell HEV and also consider the possibility of a plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicle (FCV). For the simulated FCV our results address the merits of converting some fuels to hydrogen to power the fuel cell vs. conversion of those same fuels to electricity to charge the PHEV battery. The investigation is confined to a U.S. compact sized car (i.e. a world passenger car). Where most other studies have focused on emissions (greenhouse gases and conventional air pollutants), this study focuses on identification of the pathway providing the most vehicle kilometers from each of five feedstocks examined. The GREET 1.7 fuel cycle model and the new GREET 2.7 vehicle cycle model were used as the foundation for this study. Total energy, energy by fuel type, total greenhouse gases (GHGs), volatile organic compounds (VOC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate (PM2.5) and sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}) values are presented. We also isolate the PHEV emissions contribution from varying kWh storage capability of battery packs in HEVs and PHEVs from {approx}16 to 64 km of charge depleting distance. Sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the effect of replacing the battery once during the vehicle's life. The paper includes one appendix that examines several recent studies of interactions of PHEVs with patterns of electric generation and one that provides definitions, acronyms, and fuel consumption estimation steps.

Gaines, L.; Burnham, A.; Rousseau, A.; Santini, D.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

195

DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag  

SciTech Connect

Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of the vehicle. Furthermore, the evaluation of the impact of small changes in radiator or grille dimensions has revealed that the total drag is not particularly sensitive to those changes. This observation leads to two significant conclusions. First, a small increase in radiator size to accommodate heat rejection needs related to new emissions restrictions may be tolerated without significant increases in drag losses. Second, efforts to reduce drag on the tractor requires that the design of the entire tractor be treated in an integrated fashion. Simply reducing the size of the grille will not provide the desired result, but the additional contouring of the vehicle as a whole which may be enabled by the smaller radiator could have a more significant effect.

McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

196

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site - Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site, chromate was used throughout the 100 Areas (100-B, 100-C, 100-D/DR, 100-F, 100-H, and 100 K) as a corrosion inhibitor in reactor cooling water. Chromate was delivered in rail cars, tanker trucks, barrels, and local pipelines as dichromate granular solid or stock solution. In many occasions, chromate was inevitably discharged to surface or near-surface ground through spills during handling, pipeline leaks, or during disposal to cribs. The composition of the liquids that were discharged is not known and it is quite possible that Cr(VI) fate and transport in the contaminated sediments would be a function of the chemical composition of the waste fluids. The major objectives of this investigation which was limited in scope by the financial resources available, were to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100-D Area spill sites; 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of macroscopic leaching studies, and microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone that can be used for developing options for environmental remediation. The information gathered from this research effort will help to further improve our understanding of Cr(VI) behavior in the vadose zone and will also help in accelerating the 100 Area Columbia River Corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of column experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns. Column experiments used the field size fraction of the sediment samples and a simulated Hanford Site groundwater solution. Periodic stop flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using some microscale techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; McKinley, James P.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Um, Wooyong; Resch, Charles T.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Petersen, Scott W.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

Impacts of Vessel Noise Perturbations on the Resident Sperm Whale Population in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico is home to two of the world?s ten busiest ports by cargo volume, the Port of New Orleans and the Port of Houston; and in 2008, these ports hosted a combined 14,000 ships, a number which is likely only to increase. Past research shows that this increase in shipping worldwide has historically lead to an increase in ambient noise level of 3-5dB per decade. Sperm whales in the Gulf of Mexico are considered a genetically distinct, resident population. They have a preference for the Louisiana-Mississippi Shelf region which directly overlaps with the entrance to the Mississippi and the Port of New Orleans. Disruptions from vessel noise could influence feeding and breeding patterns essential to the health of the stock. Data used in this analysis were collected continuously over 36 days in the summer of 2001 from bottom moored Navy Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys. Results showed a significant difference (P<0.05) in noise level between hours with ships passing and hours without. Metrics for 56 ship passages were analyzed to compare duration of ship passage with duration of maximum received level (MRL) during ship passage. Results of that analysis showed an average ship passage of 29 minutes with average MRL lasting 23% of the ship passage and an average increase of 40dB. Lastly, click counts were made with the Pamguard. Click counts for ship passages were completed for 35 min and 17.5 min before and after the estimated closest point of approach (CPA) for each ship. Results showed a 36% decrease in the number of detectable clicks as a ship approaches when comparing clicks detected at intervals of both 35 minutes before and 17 minutes before the CPA; additionally, 22% fewer clicks were counted 30 min after the ship than 30 min before (results significant at the P=0.01 level). These results indicate a potential change in sperm whale behavior when exposed to large class size vessel traffic (e.g. tankers and container ships) from major shipping lanes. Recommendations for addressing this issue are discussed.

Azzara, Alyson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_netr_d_r10-z0p_vnr_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:09:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge" "Sourcekey","MTTNRP11","MCRNRP11","MPEMNP11","MPPNRP11","MLPNRP11","METNRP11","MPRNRP11","MBNNRP11","MBINRP11","MUONRP11","MBCNRP11","MO1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOBGRR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MO3NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO2NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO5NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO7NR_R10-Z0P_1","MO9NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPOOR_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOOXE_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORD_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","M_EPOORO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MGFNRP11","MGRNRP11","MG1NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0RO_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG4NR_R10-Z0P_1","MG5NR_R10-Z0P_1","M_EPM0CAL55_VNR_R10-Z0P_MBBL","MG6NR_R10-Z0P_1","MGANRP11","MKJNRP11","MKENRP11","MDINRP11","MD0NR_R10-Z0P_1","MD1NR_R10-Z0P_1","MDGNRP11","MRENRP11","MPFNRP11","MPNNR_R10-Z0P_1","MPONR_R10-Z0P_1","MNSNRP11","MLUNRP11","MWXNRP11","MAPNRP11","MMSNRP11"

200

Cayuga County Regional Digester - Vision Becomes Reality - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at mesophilic temperatures, is designed to process the daily feedstock and produce 220,000 SCF2 of biogas per day. The digester also produces 44,000 gallons of digested slurry per day. 3. Biogas Conditioning System: The plant employs a biological biogas conditioning system to remove the H2S and moisture contents of the biogas and prepare it to be used by the plant generation system. 4. Combined Heat and Power System (CHP): This is a 633kW high efficiency biogas-fired GE-Jenbacher model JMS-312 GS-NL reciprocating engine cogeneration system. The heat recovery system incorporated into the package is designed to capture the waste heat from the engine exhaust, the jacket cooling water and the engine oil circuit. 5. Electrical Substation and Power Distribution Systems: An electrical distribution system has been constructed on-site that aggregates the electrical service of the different county buildings on the District campus into a county owned electric distribution system that is interconnected with the CHP and the local electric grid. The electrical system is designed, in accordance with the utility guidelines, to allow grid-parallel operation of CHP and provide for import and export of electric power. 6. Thermal Energy Distribution System: The heat recovery system has been integrated into a high temperature water distribution system that distributes the heat to the thermal circuits for the anaerobic digester facility. Additional piping has also been installed to transfer the remaining thermal energy to other county buildings on the campus. On a daily basis, the plant will co-process 35,000 gallons of manure from local dairy farms, 8,500 gallons of food-processor waste and 1,200 gallons of brown grease to produce 200,000 ft3/d of biogas and 44,000 gallons of pathogen-free nutrient-rich digested slurry for agricultural use by farms and in the local area. The biogas fueled CHP produces 5,157,000 kWh of electricity and 19,506 dekatherms of thermal energy per year. Electrical power generated by the cogeneration system powers all the buildings on the Cayuga County campus an

Kamyar V. Zadeh, Ph.D.; Blue Electron Technology Solutions International LLC

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

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201

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

ORNL RAIL BARGE DB  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database. The database consists of 96 subnetworks. Each of the subnetworks represent an individual railroad, a waterway system, or a composite group of small railroads. Two subnetworks represent waterways; one being barge/intercoastal, and the other coastal merchant marine with access through the Great Lakes/Saint Lawrence Seaway, Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, the Panama Canal, and Pacific Coast. Two other subnetworks represent small shortline railroads and terminal railroad operations. One subnetwork is maintained for the representation of Amtrak operations. The remaining 91 subnetworks represent individual or corporate groups of railroads. Coordinate locations are included as part of the database. The rail portion of the database is similar to the original FRA rail network. The waterway coordinates are greatly enhanced in the current release. Inland waterway representation was extracted from the 1:2,000,000 United States Geological Survey data. An important aspect of the database is the transfer file. This file identifies where two railroads interline traffic between their systems. Also included are locations where rail/waterway intermodal transfers could occur. Other files in the database include a translation table between Association of American Railroad (AAR) codes to the 96 subnetworks in the database, a list of names of the 96 subnetworks, and a file of names for a large proportion of the nodes in the network.

Johnson, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Last of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 13. Refineries Permanently Shutdown By PAD District Between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2013 PAD District I 542,450 GNC Energy Corp Greensboro, NC 3,000 0 a Primary Energy Corp Richmond, VA 6,100 0 a Saint Mary's Refining Co Saint Mary's, WV 4,000 4,480 02/93 03/93 Cibro Refining Albany, NY 41,850 27,000 07/93 09/93 Calumet Lubricants Co LP Rouseville, PA 12,800 26,820 03/00 06/00 Young Refining Corp. Douglasville, GA 5,400 0 07/04 07/04 Sunoco Inc Westville, NJ 145,000 263,000 11/09 02/10 Western Refining Yorktown Inc Yorktown, VA 66,300 182,600 09/10 12/11 Sunoco Inc Marcus Hook, PA 178,000 278,000 12/11 12/11 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District II 460,315 Coastal Refining & Mktg El Dorado, KS 0 20,000 b Intercoastal Energy Svcs

204

Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie, Simon and Vernon assisted with sorting and spawning Summer Chinook at the Wells hatchery for the Summer Chinook reintroduction program on the lower Yakima River. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 12,909 gallons/min. Four river pumps (12,400gpm) and one well pump No.2 (509gpm) are supplying water to the facility main head box and the egg incubation building. ACCLIMATION SITES: Easton had much activity in October, the electrical power panel that's switches commercial power operation to generator power (transfer switch) malfunctioned. Charlie called Wallace Electric as well as ASCO Services to trouble shoot the problem which has yet to be determined. Heaters have been turned on in all service buildings at the acclimation sites. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission traveled to Easton to install a pole to mount a satellite and a new ups backup system with new monitors and computers for pit tag data recording and transmitting. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tanks at Easton and Clark Flat. AMB Tools performed maintenance on the compressors at the acclimation sites as well as Cle Elum (5 total). VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Day Wireless performed maintenance on all handheld and vehicle radios. Day Wireless repaired radio communications (static noise) on the 6th also. All vehicles mileages and conditions are reported monthly to Toppenish. Cle Elum staff continues to clean and maintain all facility vehicles weekly. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Kevin of Raincountry was called in response to repairs needed to the water chiller system. Cle Elum staff winterized all irrigation as well as shop grounds. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the hatchery on the 22nd. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation room has been set up for transfer of eggs from isolation buckets to vertical stacks, temperature units are recorded daily. RESENTDENTIAL HOUSING: Residents irrigation has been winterized and fall fertilizer was applied to all grass on facility. Four Seasons performed maintenance on all heating sy

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z