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Sample records for interchange distribution calculator

  1. Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ibutedenergycalculator.com OpenEI Keyword(s): Challenge Generated, Green Button Apps Language: English References: Apps for Energy1 The Distributed Energy Calculator allows you...

  2. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets This document presents guidelines related to ...

  3. Fuel Interchangeability Considerations for Gas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, D.H.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years domestic natural gas has experienced a considerable growth in demand particularly in the power generation industry. However, the desire for energy security, lower fuel costs and a reduction in carbon emissions has produced an increase in demand for alternative fuel sources. Current strategies for reducing the environmental impact of natural gas combustion in gas turbine engines used for power generation experience such hurdles as flashback, lean blow-off and combustion dynamics. These issues will continue as turbines are presented with coal syngas, gasified coal, biomass, LNG and high hydrogen content fuels. As it may be impractical to physically test a given turbine on all of the possible fuel blends it may experience over its life cycle, the need to predict fuel interchangeability becomes imperative. This study considers a number of historical parameters typically used to determine fuel interchangeability. Also addressed is the need for improved reaction mechanisms capable of accurately modeling the combustion of natural gas alternatives.

  4. Quantum mechanical method of fragment's angular and energy distribution calculation for binary and ternary fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V.; Pen'kov, N. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    In the framework of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the method of calculation for partial fission width amplitudes and asymptotic behavior of the fissile nucleus wave function with strong channel coupling taken into account has been suggested. The method allows one to solve the calculation problem of angular and energy distribution countation for binary and ternary fission.

  5. Interchangeable breech lock for glove boxes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemonds, David Preston

    2015-11-24

    A breech lock for a glove box is provided that may be used to transfer one or more items into the glove box. The breech lock can be interchangeably installed in place of a plug, glove, or other device in a port or opening of a glove box. Features are provided to aid the removal of items from the breech lock by a gloved operator. The breech lock can be reused or, if needed, can be replaced with a plug, glove, or other device at the port or opening of the glove box.

  6. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-07-03

    The US Department of Energy Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) is funding and overseeing the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed information system providing access to integrated data in support of, and generated in, all phases of geothermal development. NGDS is being built in an open paradigm and will employ state-of-the-art informatics approaches and capabilities to advance the state of geothermal knowledge in the US. This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System. It identifies general specifications for NGDS catalog metadata and data content, and provides specific instructions for preparation and submission of data assets by OGT-funded projects.

  7. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System.

  8. Local regulation of interchange turbulence in a dipole-confined plasma torus using current-collection feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, T. M. Mauel, M. E. Worstell, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    Turbulence in plasma confined by a magnetic dipole is dominated by interchange fluctuations with complex dynamics and short spatial coherence. We report the first use of local current-collection feedback to modify, amplify, and suppress these fluctuations. The spatial extent of turbulence regulation is limited to a correlation length near the collector. Changing the gain and phase of collection results in power either extracted from or injected into the turbulence. The measured plasma response shows some agreement with calculations of the linear response of global interchange-like MHD and entropy modes to current-collection feedback.

  9. Ion finite Larmor radius effects on the interchange instability in an open system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katanuma, I.; Sato, S.; Okuyama, Y.; Kato, S.; Kubota, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)] [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A particle simulation of an interchange instability was performed by taking into account the ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. It is found that the interchange instability with large FLR grows in two phases, that is, linearly growing phase and the nonlinear phase subsequent to the linear phase, where the instability grows exponentially in both phases. The linear growth rates observed in the simulation agree well with the theoretical calculation. The effects of FLR are usually taken in the fluid simulation through the gyroviscosity, the effects of which are verified in the particle simulation with large FLR regime. The gyroviscous cancellation phenomenon observed in the particle simulation causes the drifts in the direction of ion diamagnetic drifts.

  10. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, Victor; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas; Margolis, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Using production-cost model (PLEXOS), we simulate the Western Interchange (WECC) at several levels of the yearly renewable energy (RE) generation, between 13% and 40% of the total load for the year. We look at the overall energy exchange between a region and the rest of the system (net interchange, NI), and find it useful to examine separately (i) (time-)variable and (ii) year-average components of the NI. Both contribute to inter-regional energy exchange, and are affected by wind and PV generation in the system. We find that net load variability (in relatively large portions of WECC) is the leading factor affecting the variable component of inter-regional energy exchange, and the effect is quantifiable: higher regional net load correlation with the rest of the WECC lowers net interchange variability. Further, as the power mix significantly varies between WECC regions, effects of ‘flexibility import’ (regions ‘borrow’ ramping capability) are also observed.

  11. Numerical Calculation of Neoclassical Distribution Functions and Current Profiles in Low Collisionality, Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Lyons, S.C. Jardin, and J.J. Ramos

    2012-06-28

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f ) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and elec trons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h ). We work in a 4D phase space in which ? defines a flux surface, ? is the poloidal angle, v is the total velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and ? is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and ?#21; . The Rosenbluth potentials, ?#8; and ?, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos ? , where #31;? is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos #18;? , and finite elements in v . At each ? , we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe ), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi ). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37 , pp 183-204 (1980).] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C1 [S.C. Jardin, et al ., Computational Science & Discovery, 4 (2012).]).

  12. Numerical calculation of neoclassical distribution functions and current profiles in low collisionality, axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, B. C. [Program in Plasma Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Ramos, J. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and electrons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h). We work in a 4D phase space in which {psi} defines a flux surface, {theta} is the poloidal angle, v is the magnitude of the velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and {lambda} is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and {lambda}. The Rosenbluth potentials, {Phi} and {Psi}, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos{chi}, where {chi} is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos{theta}, and finite elements in v. At each {psi}, we solve a block tridiagonal system for h{sub i} (independent of f{sub e}), then solve another block tridiagonal system for h{sub e} (dependent on f{sub i}). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37, 183-204 (1980)] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C{sup 1}[S. C. Jardin et al., Comput. Sci. Discovery 5, 014002 (2012)]).

  13. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; Gupta, R.; Hagler, P.; Negele, J.; Pochinsky, A.; Schafer, A.; Syritsyn, S.; Yoon, B.

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  14. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Birn, Joachim; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Hesse, Michael; Schindler, Karl

    2015-07-16

    This paper provides insights into the possible coupling between reconnection and interchange/ballooning in the magnetotail related to substorms and flow bursts. The results presented are largely based on recent simulations of magnetotail dynamics, exploring onset and progression of reconnection. 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with different tail deformation demonstrate a clear boundary between stable and unstable cases depending on the amount of deformation, explored up to the real proton/electron mass ratio. The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintainingmore » a monotonic increase with distance downtail. This suggests that ballooning instability in the tail should not be expected prior to the onset of tearing and reconnection. 3-D MHD simulations confirm this conclusion, showing no indication of ballooning prior to reconnection, if the initial state is ballooning stable. The simulation also shows that, after imposing resistivity necessary to initiate reconnection, the reconnection rate and energy release initially remain slow. However, when S becomes reduced from plasmoid ejection and lobe reconnection, forming a negative slope in S as a function of distance from Earth, the reconnection rate and energy release increase drastically. The latter condition has been shown to be necessary for ballooning/interchange instability, and the cross-tail structures that develop subsequently in the MHD simulation are consistent with such modes. The simulations support a concept in which tail activity is initiated by tearing instability but significantly enhanced by the interaction with ballooning/interchange enabled by plasmoid loss and lobe reconnection.« less

  15. Deep water X-mas tree standardization -- Interchangeability approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula, M.T.R.; Paulo, C.A.S.; Moreira, C.C.

    1995-12-31

    Aiming the rationalization of subsea operations to turn the production of oil and gas more economical and reliable, standardization of subsea equipment interfaces is a tool that can play a very important role. Continuing the program initiated some years ago, Petrobras is now harvesting the results from the first efforts. Diverless guidelineless subsea Christmas trees from four different suppliers have already been manufactured in accordance to the standardized specification. Tests performed this year in Macae (Campos Basin onshore base), in Brazil, confirmed the interchangeability among subsea Christmas trees, tubing hangers, adapter bases and flowline hubs of different manufacturers. This interchangeability, associated with the use of proven techniques, results in operational flexibility, savings in rig time and reduction in production losses during workovers. By now, 33 complete sets of subsea Christmas trees have already been delivered and successfully tested. Other 28 sets are still being manufactured by the four local suppliers. For the next five years, more than a hundred of these trees will be required for the exploration of the new discoveries. This paper describes the standardized equipment, the role of the operator in an integrated way of working with the manufacturers on the standardization activities, the importance of a frank information flow through the involved companies and how a simple manufacturing philosophy, with the use of construction jigs, has proved to work satisfactorily.

  16. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for todays engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  17. An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, David K.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Hart, Grant W.

    2010-01-15

    A simplified vacuum arc design [based on metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) concepts] is employed as a plasma source for a study of a {sup 7}Be non-neutral plasma. The design includes a mechanism for interchanging the cathode source. Testing of the plasma source showed that it is capable of producing on the order of 10{sup 12} charges at confinable energies using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs for lower energy and lower density applications by using only the trigger spark rather than the full vacuum arc in high current ion beam designs. The interchangeability of the cathode design gives the source the ability to replace only the source sample, simplifying use of radioactive materials in the plasma source. The sample can also be replaced with a completely different conductive material. The design can be easily modified for use in other plasma confinement or full MeVVA applications.

  18. Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z.; Berk, H. L.

    2014-10-15

    The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  19. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Böcklin, Christoph Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-02-14

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers.

  20. Possible Improvements of the ACE Diversity Interchange Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; McManus, Bart; Loutan, Clyde

    2010-07-26

    North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) grid is operated by about 131 balancing authorities (BA). Within each BA, operators are responsible for managing the unbalance (caused by both load and wind). As wind penetration levels increase, the challenges of managing power variation increases. Working independently, balancing area with limited regulating/load following generation and high wind power penetration faces significant challenges. The benefits of BA cooperation and consolidation increase when there is a significant wind energy penetration. To explore the benefits of BA cooperation, this paper investigates ACE sharing approach. A technology called ACE diversity interchange (ADI) is already in use in the western interconnection. A new methodology extending ADI is proposed in the paper. The proposed advanced ADI overcoming some limitations existing in conventional ADI. Simulations using real statistical data of CAISO and BPA have shown high performance of the proposed advanced ADI methodology.

  1. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  2. SU-E-T-58: Calculation of Dose Distribution of Accuboost Brachytherapy in Deformable Polyvinil Alcohol Breast Phantom Using Biomechanical Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammadyari, P; Faghihi, R; Shirazi, M Mosleh; Lotfi, M; Meigooni, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacement of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD dosimetry for validation.

  3. Selected heavy metals and other constituents in soil and stormwater runoff at the Interstate 95 interchange near Atlee, Virginia, April 1993--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speiran, G.K.

    1998-12-31

    Concentrations of the heavy metals copper, lead, and zinc, and other constituents, were measured in soil and runoff before and after construction of a stormwater detention basin at the Interstate 95-State Route 656 interchange near Atlee, VA, from April 1993 through May 1997. The spatial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in soil indicate that the paved traffic lanes of the interstate highway are a source of the metals. Concentrations of the metals in soil decrease with increasing soil depth below the ground surface and with increasing distance from the highway lanes. Of the three metals for which samples were analyzed, lead was generally present at the greatest concentration, and copper was at the lowest concentration in the soil.

  4. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  5. SU-E-T-520: Four-Dimensional Dose Calculation Algorithm Considering Variations in Dose Distribution Induced by Sinusoidal One-Dimensional Motion Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguenang, J; Algan, O; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively the variations in dose-distributions induced by motion by measurements and modeling. A four-dimensional (4D) motion model of dose distributions that accounts for different motion parameters was developed. Methods: Variations in dose distributions induced by sinusoidal phantom motion were measured using a multiple-diode-array-detector (MapCheck2). MapCheck2 was mounted on a mobile platform that moves with adjustable calibrated motion patterns in the superior-inferior direction. Various plans including open and intensity-modulated fields were used to irradiate MapCheck2. A motion model was developed to predict spatial and temporal variations in the dose-distributions and dependence on the motion parameters using pencil-beam spread-out superposition function. This model used the superposition of pencil-beams weighted with a probability function extracted from the motion trajectory. The model was verified with measured dose-distributions obtained from MapCheck2. Results: Dose-distribution varied considerably with motion where in the regions between isocenter and 50% isodose-line, dose decreased with increase of the motion amplitude. Dose levels increased with increase in the motion amplitude in the region beyond 50% isodose-line. When the range of motion (ROM=twice amplitude) was smaller than the field length both central axis dose and the 50% isodose-line did not change with variation of motion amplitude and remained equal to the dose of stationary phantom. As ROM became larger than the field length, the dose level decreased at central axis dose and 50% isodose-line. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the dose distributions which were delivered over an extended time longer than few motion cycles, however, they played an important role for doses delivered with high-dose-rates within one motion cycle . Conclusion: A 4D-dose motion model was developed to predict and correct variations in dose distributions induced by one-dimensional sinusoidal motion. This model was verified with measured dose-distributions and can be expanded to consider complicated patient motion patterns.

  6. SRU Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculator SRU Calculator About SRUs You can use this form to estimate your mass storage charges (in SRUs). SRUs are calculated on a daily basis. Enter your estimated daily average number of files and data storage and your yearly estimate of data transferred to and from the HPSS system. Click on Calculate and your SRU charge will appear in the light blue boxes. Enter average daily values for the allocation year Number of files*: Amount of data stored*: GB Enter total HPSS I/O for the allocation

  7. Pd/Cu Site Interchange and Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in UCu{sub 4}Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C.H.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Heffner, R.H.; Kwei, G.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); MacLaughlin, D.E. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Chau, R.; Maple, M.B. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    X-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements of the local structure in UCu{sub 4}Pd are described which indicate a probable lattice-disorder origin for non-Fermi-liquid behavior in this material. Short Pd-Cu distances are observed, consistent with (24{plus_minus}3){percent} of the Pd atoms occupying nominally Cu sites. A {open_quotes}Kondo disorder{close_quotes} model, based on the effect on the local Kondo temperature T{sub K} of this interchange and some additional bond-length disorder, agrees quantitatively with previous experimental susceptibility data, and therefore also with specific heat and magnetic resonance experiments. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  8. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  9. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost.

  10. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  11. Analysis of Hydraulic Conductivity Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, R.E.

    2003-01-06

    Equations by Marshall and by Millington and Quirk for calculating hydraulic conductivity from pore-size distribution data are dependent on an arbitrary choice of the exponent on the porosity term and a correct estimate of residual water. This study showed that a revised equation, based on the pore-interaction model of Marshall, accurately predicts hydraulic conductivity for glass beads and a loam soil from the pressure-water content relationships of these porous materials.

  12. Utility Potential Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Potential Studies in the Northwest V1.0 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2007 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2003 Note: BPA developed the Utility...

  13. ARM - Wind Chill Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsWind Chill Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Wind Chill Calculations Wind Chill is the apparent temperature felt on the exposed human body owing to the combination of temperature and wind speed. From 1945 to 2001, Wind Chill was calculated by the Siple

  14. TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; CAPITALIZED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; CAPITALIZED COST; CALCULATION METHODS; PLANNING; COST ESTIMATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS The displacement or deferral of substation...

  15. ARM - Relative Humidity Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CalculatorsRelative Humidity Calculations Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Relative Humidity Calculations Heat Index is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to estimate how hot it actually feels. The human body cools off through perspiration, which

  16. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  17. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  18. Calculation note review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramble, A.L.

    1996-09-30

    This document contains a review of the calculation notes which were prepared for the Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation.

  19. Draft PEI Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Excel spreadsheet is designed to perform the calculations necessary to determine PEI -- a pump's energy index -- as proposed in DOE's Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (Dockets EERE-2011-BT-STD-0031 and EERE-2013-BT-TP-0055). DOE is providing this calculator as a convenience at the request of interested parties.

  20. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  1. Dose Calculation Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-06-10

    VENTSAR XL is an EXCEL Spreadsheet that can be used to calculate downwind doses as a result of a hypothetical atmospheric release. Both building effects and plume rise may be considered. VENTSAR XL will run using any version of Microsoft EXCEL version 4.0 or later. Macros (the programming language of EXCEL) was used to automate the calculations. The user enters a minimal amount of input and the code calculates the resulting concentrations and doses atmore » various downwind distances as specified by the user.« less

  2. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Get Widget Code

  3. Appliance Energy Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage...

  4. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual Fuel Cost gal Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and ...

  5. ARM - Heat Index Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Heat Index Calculations Heat Index is an index that ...

  6. EIS Distribution

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This DOE guidance presents a series of recommendations related to the EIS distribution process, which includes creating and updating a distribution list, distributing an EIS, and filing an EIS with the EPA.

  7. Jobs Calculator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jobs Calculator Jobs Calculator Office spreadsheet icon owip_jobs_calculator_v11-0.xls More Documents & Publications WPN 10-14: Calculation of Job Creation through DOE Recovery Act Funding Progress Report Template Job Counting Guidelines

  8. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  9. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  10. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  11. A new endwall model for axial compressor throughflow calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, J.

    1995-10-01

    It is well recognized that the endwall regions of a compressor--in which the annulus wall flow interacts with the mainstream flow--have a major influence on its efficiency and surge margin. Despite many attempts over the years to predict the very complex flow patterns in the endwall regions, current compressor design methods still rely largely on empirical estimates of the aerodynamic losses and flow angle deviations in these regions. This paper describes a new phenomenological model of the key endwall flow phenomena treated in a circumferentially averaged way. It starts from Hirsch and de Ruyck`s annulus wall boundary layer approach, but makes some important changes. The secondary vorticities arising from passage secondary flows and from tip clearance flows are calculated. Then the radial interchanges of momentum, energy, and entropy arising from both diffusion and convection are estimated. The model is incorporated into a streamline curvature program. The empirical blade force defect terms in the boundary layers are selected from cascade data. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by comparing the predictions with experimental results on both low-speed and high-speed multistage compressors. It is found that the radial variation of flow parameters is quite well predicted, and so is the overall performance, except when significant endwall stall occurs.

  12. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  13. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  14. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  15. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  16. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  17. Calculation of Electron Trajectories

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1982-06-01

    EGUN, the SLAC Electron Trajectory Program, computes trajectories of charged particles in electrostatic and magnetostatic focusing systems including the effects of space charge and self-magnetic fields. Starting options include Child''s Law conditions on cathodes of various shapes, user-specified initial conditions for each ray, and a combination of Child''s Law conditions and user specifications. Either rectangular or cylindrically symmetric geometry may be used. Magnetic fields may be specified using arbitrary configuration of coils, or the outputmore » of a magnet program, such as Poisson, or by an externally calculated array of the axial fields.« less

  18. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Energy Distributed Energy Distributed energy consists of a range of smaller-scale and modular devices designed to provide electricity, and sometimes also thermal energy, in locations close to consumers. They include fossil and renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, microturbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, combustion turbines, and steam turbines); energy storage devices (e.g., batteries and flywheels); and combined heat and power systems.

  19. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,more » roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.« less

  20. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua R; Garrett, Aaron; Erdem, Ender; Huang, Yu

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance, roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.

  1. Distribution Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 24-26, 2012, the GTT presented a workshop on grid integration on the distribution system at the Sheraton Crystal City near Washington, DC.

  2. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of Distribution Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Standardization of

  3. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project ...

  4. How Are Momentum Savings Calculated?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simplifying the Math: How Are Momentum Savings Calculated? Many people have heard about Momentum savings but don't understand how these types of savings are calculated. The short...

  5. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass Lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a

  6. Code for Calculating Regional Seismic Travel Time

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-10

    The RSTT software computes predictions of the travel time of seismic energy traveling from a source to a receiver through 2.5D models of the seismic velocity distribution within the Earth. The two primary applications for the RSTT library are tomographic inversion studies and seismic event location calculations. In tomographic inversions studies, a seismologist begins with number of source-receiver travel time observations and an initial starting model of the velocity distribution within the Earth. A forwardmore » travel time calculator, such as the RSTT library, is used to compute predictions of each observed travel time and all of the residuals (observed minus predicted travel time) are calculated. The Earth model is then modified in some systematic way with the goal of minimizing the residuals. The Earth model obtained in this way is assumed to be a better model than the starting model if it has lower residuals. The other major application for the RSTT library is seismic event location. Given an Earth model, an initial estimate of the location of a seismic event, and some number of observations of seismic travel time thought to have originated from that event, location codes systematically modify the estimate of the location of the event with the goal of minimizing the difference between the observed and predicted travel times. The second application, seismic event location, is routinely implemented by the military as part of its effort to monitor the Earth for nuclear tests conducted by foreign countries.« less

  7. Special Distribution

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Special Distribution Issued: December 1977 ',, Radiological Survey and Decontamination of the Former Main Technical Area (TA-1) at Los Alamos, New Mexico Compiled by A. John Ahlquist Alan K. Stoker Linda K. Trocki c laboratory of, the University of California LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO 87545 An Alfirmdve Action/Equal Opportunity Employer ..-_- .-- .--.-. c T -,--... _ _._-r..l __,.. - .-,_.. ..- _._ -- .--. " . . _ . - . c- - . . . _ -. . _ . - . - . _ - - n - _ _~ ~_. __ _ ~~_ --..&e+

  8. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  9. Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are two separate equations with second derivatives of v ex and v ix instead of one equation including the second derivative of v. The resulting equations still contain E x ,...

  10. Energy Escalation Rate Calculator Download

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Escalation Rate Calculator (EERC) computes an average annual escalation rate for a specified time period, which can be used as an escalation rate for contract payments in energy savings performance contracts and utility energy services contracts.

  11. Home Energy Score Calculation Methodology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Qualified Assessor calculates the Home Energy Score by first conducting a brief walk-through of the home and collecting approximately 40 data points. Next, the Qualified Assessor uses the Home...

  12. Historical development of building energy calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayres, J.M.; Stamper, E.

    1995-08-01

    One of the most significant events in the history of ASHRAE has been its ability to respond to the societal need to reduce energy use in buildings. The development of computer technology and the scare of an Arab oil embargo in the early 1970s stimulated rapid improvements in calculation procedures to predict the thermal performance and energy requirements of buildings. Renewed interest in solar energy applications during that period attracted new scientific talent into ASHRAE, but it was primarily the use of computers for peak-load and energy calculations that attracted the brightest and most talented young engineers into the Society. It is important to note that almost all of the fundamental developments in energy calculation procedures resulted from governmental support. On a national level, it was funding from the U.S. Post Office Department (POD), the US Department of Energy (DOE)--formerly the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and the US Department of Defense (DOD) that resulted in the two major public domain programs--DOE-2 (LBL 1979) and BLAST (Hittle 1977). This support has been continuous since 1973 and, as discussed later, it evolved from two competing load calculation methodologies. All of the DOD funds were focused at the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), while DOE funds were distributed among various governmental laboratories that competed each year for funding from Washington, DC. This led to a curious history in the development of DOE-2, in which several national laboratories made important technical contributions in the early years. These laboratories were Argon National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The DOE funding diminished quickly over time at ANL and somewhat later at LASL. LBL rapidly became the lead laboratory for the addition of new developments and maintenance of DOE-2.

  13. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of ... Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9985 Research Org: Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, ...

  14. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  15. Canister Transfer Facility Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Monroe-Rammsy

    2000-10-13

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the criticality risk in the surface facility for design basis events (DBE) involving Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) standardized canisters (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 2000a). Since some of the canisters will be stored in the surface facility before they are loaded in the waste package (WP), this calculation supports the demonstration of concept viability related to the Surface Facility environment. The scope of this calculation is limited to the consideration of three DOE SNF fuels, specifically Enrico Fermi SNF, Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) SNF, and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF.

  16. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brief details how to calculate the true cost of steam, which is important for monitoring and managing energy use in a plant, evaluating proposed design changes to the generation or distribution infrastructure and the process itself, and for continuing to identify competitive advantages through steam system and plant efficiency improvements.

  17. Petrophysical corner - calculating water cut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elphick, R.Y. )

    1990-02-01

    The problem of determining the amount of water cut that can be expected from a well is discussed in conjunction with a program for making this calculation. The program was written for Amiga, Apple Macintosh, and MS DOS personal computers and source code for the program is provided.

  18. Barrier Distributions for Cold-Fusion Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikezoe, Hiroshi; Mitsuoka, Shin-ichi; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Tsuruta, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka; Jeong, Sunchan; Satou, Ken-ichiro

    2006-08-14

    Coulomb barrier distributions for the capture process in the cold fusion reactions for 48Ti, 54Cr, 56Fe, 64Ni, 70Zn projectiles incident on 208Pb target are obtained by the measurement of the quasi-elastic scattering cross sections at backward angles. The obtained barrier distributions are compared with the result of a coupled-channels calculation. It is found that the barrier distributions are well reproduced by the calculation taking account of the coupling of one phonon of the quadrupole vibration for these projectile nuclei and two phonons of the octupole vibration for 208Pb.

  19. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  20. Distributed Hierarchical Control Architecture for Transient Dynamics Improvement in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-08-24

    In this paper, a novel distributed hierarchical coordinated control architecture is proposed for large scale power systems. The newly considered architecture facilitates frequency restoration and power balancing functions to be decoupled and implemented at different levels. At the local level, decentralized robust generator controllers are designed to quickly restore frequency after large faults and disturbances in the system. The controllers presented herein are shown to improve transient stability performance, as compared to conventional governor and excitation control. At the area level, Automatic Generation Control (AGC) is modified and coordinates with the decentralized robust controllers to reach the interchange schedule in the tie lines. The interaction of local and zonal controllers is validated through detailed simulations.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on

  2. Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call...

  3. USAID Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application ComplexityEase of Use: Not Available Website: www.afolucarbon.org Cost: Free Language: English USAID Carbon Calculator Screenshot Logo: USAID Carbon Calculator This...

  4. Calculation of chemical equilibrium between aqueous solution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculation of chemical equilibrium between aqueous solution and minerals: the EQ36 ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of chemical equilibrium between ...

  5. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9, ...

  6. China 2050 Pathways Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2050 Pathways Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: China 2050 Pathways Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: China's Energy Research Institute...

  7. California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators AgencyCompany...

  8. Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are...

  9. Campus Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Campus Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Campus Carbon Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: Clean Air-Cool Planet Phase: Create a...

  10. Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: ...

  11. EIA - Coal Distribution

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal > Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, method of transportation; foreign coal distribution by major coal-exporting state and method of transportation; and domestic and foreign coal distribution by origin state. Year Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of

  12. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  13. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables...

  14. Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

  15. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  16. Annual Coal Distribution Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: April 16, 2015 | Next Release Date: March 2016 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report ...

  17. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-07-01

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  18. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energys Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  19. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  20. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROGRAM PROJECT PROFILE Distributed Energy Project Profile * Verizon System Technical Overview During ... to the grid-a connected generation limit of 3 MVA set by the ...

  1. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Johnson, Seth R.

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple because it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.

  2. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Johnson, Seth R.

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple becausemore » it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.« less

  3. An Effective Method to Accurately Calculate the Phase Space Factors for β - β - Decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neacsu, Andrei; Horoi, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Accurate calculations of the electron phase space factors are necessary for reliable predictions of double-beta decay rates and for the analysis of the associated electron angular and energy distributions. We present an effective method to calculate these phase space factors that takes into account the distorted Coulomb field of the daughter nucleus, yet it allows one to easily calculate the phase space factors with good accuracy relative to the most exact methods available in the recent literature.

  4. Annual Coal Distribution

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  5. Distributed Wind Ordinances: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    an introduction to distributed wind projects and a brief overview of topics to consider when developing a distributed wind energy ordinance. Distributed Wind Ordinances Photo from Byers and Renier Construction, NREL 18820 Distributed Wind Ordinances The U.S. Department of Energy defines distributed wind projects as: (a) The use of wind turbines, on- or off-grid, at homes, farms and ranches, businesses, public and industrial facilities, or other sites to offset all or a portion of the local

  6. Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an introduction to distributed wind projects and a brief overview of topics to consider when developing a distributed wind energy ordinance. Distributed Wind Ordinances Photo from Byers and Renier Construction, NREL 18820 Distributed Wind Ordinances The U.S. Department of Energy defines distributed wind projects as: (a) The use of wind turbines, on- or off-grid, at homes, farms and ranches, businesses, public and industrial facilities, or other sites to offset all or a portion of the local

  7. Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    179D DOE Calculator EERE Building Technologies Office 179D DOE Calculator Printable Version Bookmark and Share What is the 179D federal tax deduction? Section 179D of the...

  8. Relativistic Thomson Scatter from Factor Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this program is calculate the fully relativistic Thomson scatter from factor in unmagnetized plasmas. Such calculations are compared to experimental diagnoses of plasmas at such facilities as the Jupiter laser facility here a LLNL.

  9. Sandia Energy - Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Grid Integration Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Grid Integration Distribution Grid Integration Distribution Grid...

  10. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pion mass Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass You ...

  11. Doubly Distributed Transactions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-08-25

    Doubly Distributed Transactions (D2T) offers a technique for managing operations from a set of parallel clients with a collection of distributed services. It detects and manages faults. Example code with a test harness is also provided

  12. Distributed Wind 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wind 2015 is committed to the advancement of both distributed and community wind energy. This two day event includes a Business Conference with sessions focused on advancing the...

  13. Building the Distribution Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Edison Quadrennial Energy Review Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West ... optimal locations, additional investment, and barriers to deployment of ...

  14. Momentum distributions for H2(e,e'p)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. W.

    2014-12-29

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and finalmore » state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this process can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.« less

  15. Momentum distributions for H2(e,e?p)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and finalmorestate interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this procedure can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.less

  16. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Barrios, Matthew N.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  17. Transmutation calculations for the accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, W.B.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Engel, L.N.; England, T.R.; Hughes, H.G.; Lisowski, P.W.; Perry, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste by the transmutation of long-lived radionuclides is being considered; now using neutrons produced with an intense beam of 1.6-GeV protons on a Pb-Bi target. Study teams have been active in the areas of accelerator design, beam transport, radiation transport, transmutation, fluid flow and heat transfer, process chemistry and system analyses. Work is of a preliminary and developmental nature. Here we describe these preliminary efforts in transmutation calculations; the tools developed, status of basic nuclear data, and some early results. These calculations require the description of the intensity and spectrum of neutrons produced by the beam, the distribution of nuclides produced in the medium-energy reactions, the transport of particles produced by the beam, the transmutation of the target materials and transmutation products, and the decay properties of the inventory of radionuclides produced.

  18. Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Economic Calculator (United States) Focus Area: Solar Topics: System & Application...

  19. Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and...

  20. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  1. CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.usccrctopicsurban-forestsctcc Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator1 Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon...

  2. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  3. Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, February 26, 2015.

  4. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TOOL Name: Cool Roof Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online...

  5. Calculating and Communicating Program Results | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Calculating and Communicating Program Results, Call Slides and Summary, February 23, 2012. Call Slides and Summary More Documents &...

  6. Bill Calculator V1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-08-19

    Utitlity tariffs vary significantly from utility to utility. Each utility has its own rates and sets of rules by which bills are calculated. The Bill Calculator reconstructs the tariff based on these rules, stored in data tables, and access the appropriate charges for a given energy consumption and demand. The software reconstructs the tariff logic from the rules stored in data tables. Changes are tallied as the logic is reconstructed. This is essentially an accountingmore » program. The main limitation is on the time to search for each tariff element. It is currently on O(N) search. Also, since the Bill calculator first stores all tariffs in an array and then reads the array to reconstruct a specific tariff, the memory limitatins of a particular system would limit the number of tariffs that could be handled. This tool allows a user to calculate a bill from any sampled utility without prior knowledge of the tariff logic or structure. The peculiarities of the tariff logic are stored in data tables and manged by the Bill Calculator software. This version of the software is implemented as a VB module that operates within Microsoft Excel. Input data tables are stored in Excel worksheets. In this version the Bill Calculator functions can be assessed through Excel as user defined worksheet functions. Bill Calculator can calculate approximately 50,000 bills in less than 30 minutes.« less

  7. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  8. Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

    1993-06-01

    Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

  9. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2001 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by...

  10. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is...

  11. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  12. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TF RailroadVesselShip Fuel It is also noted that Destination State code of "X Export" indicates movements to foreign destinations. 1 68 Domestic Coal Distribution...

  13. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  14. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fission of 240Pu (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 20, 2017 Title: Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional

  15. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2014-12-16

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  16. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2015-01-27

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  17. End-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linge, I. I.; Mitenkova, E. F. Novikov, N. V.

    2012-12-15

    The results of end-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent nuclear fuel are presented. Details of formation of neutron and gamma-radiation sources are analyzed. Distributed sources of different types of radiation are considered. A comparative analysis of calculated radiation characteristics is performed with the use of nuclear data from different ENDF/B and EAF files and ANSI/ANS and ICRP standards.

  18. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  19. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ≈ 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ≈ 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al.more »[Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹⁸⁰Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹⁸⁰Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ≤ Z ≤ 85 and 100 ≤ N ≤ 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.« less

  20. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  1. Dipping of terms in atomic calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelichenko, V.M.; Samsonov, B.F.; Nyavro, A.V.

    1983-11-01

    The paper discusses the orthogonality conditions for calculations in the single-configuration approximation of the autoionization states 1s2s/sup 2/ and 2s/sup 2/ in Li and He/sup -/ and He and He/sup -/, respectively. The necessity is demonstrated of considering the conditions of orthogonality of the complete wave functions of these configurations to the wave functions of the corresponding continuous spectrum in the calculation of energy by means of the variational method.

  2. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  3. Statistical assessment of Monte Carlo distributional tallies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C; Solomon, Clell J

    2010-12-09

    Four tests are developed to assess the statistical reliability of distributional or mesh tallies. To this end, the relative variance density function is developed and its moments are studied using simplified, non-transport models. The statistical tests are performed upon the results of MCNP calculations of three different transport test problems and appear to show that the tests are appropriate indicators of global statistical quality.

  4. Distribution Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Variable distributed generation Dispatchable distributed generation Electric vehicle charging and electrolyzers Energy storage Building and industrial loads and demand response ...

  5. WINDExchange: Distributed Wind

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Distributed Wind Photo of a small wind turbine next to a farm house with a colorful sunset in the background. The distributed wind market includes wind turbines and projects of many sizes, from small wind turbines less than 1 kilowatt (kW) to multi-megawatt wind farms. The term "distributed wind" describes off-grid or grid-connected wind turbines at homes, farms and ranches, businesses, public and industrial facilities, and other sites. The turbines can provide all of the power used at

  6. Distributed Wind Energy Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join instructor Brent Summerville for a fun and interactive workshop at Appalachian State University's Small Wind Research and Demonstration Site. Learn about a variety of distributed wind energy...

  7. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  8. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  9. EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation ... YearQuarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 ...

  10. Domestic and Foreign Distribution

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2008 Final May 2010 Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2008 (Thousand Short Tons) State Region Domestic Foreign...

  11. Distributed Energy Resource Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: A series of orders issued on July 15, 2015 in  Docket 2015-53-E, Docket 2015-54-E, and Docket 2015-55-E approved the incentive programs for South Carolina's Distributed Energy Resource...

  12. Distributed generation hits market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The pace at which vendors are developing and marketing gas turbines and reciprocating engines for small-scale applications may signal the widespread growth of distributed generation. Loosely defined to refer to applications in which power generation equipment is located close to end users who have near-term power capacity needs, distributed generation encompasses a broad range of technologies and load requirements. Disagreement is inevitable, but many industry observers associate distributed generation with applications anywhere from 25 kW to 25 MW. Ten years ago, distributed generation users only represented about 2% of the world market. Today, that figure has increased to about 4 or 5%, and probably could settle in the 20% range within a 3-to-5-year period, according to Michael Jones, San Diego, Calif.-based Solar Turbines Inc. power generation marketing manager. The US Energy Information Administration predicts about 175 GW of generation capacity will be added domestically by 2010. If 20% comes from smaller plants, distributed generation could account for about 35 GW. Even with more competition, it`s highly unlikely distributed generation will totally replace current market structures and central stations. Distributed generation may be best suited for making market inroads when and where central systems need upgrading, and should prove its worth when the system can`t handle peak demands. Typical applications include small reciprocating engine generators at remote customer sites or larger gas turbines to boost the grid. Additional market opportunities include standby capacity, peak shaving, power quality, cogeneration and capacity rental for immediate demand requirements. Integration of distributed generation systems--using gas-fueled engines, gas-fired combustion engines and fuel cells--can upgrade power quality for customers and reduce operating costs for electric utilities.

  13. IBS for non-gaussian distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, A.; Sidorin, A.O.; Smirnov, A.V.

    2010-09-27

    In many situations distribution can significantly deviate from Gaussian which requires accurate treatment of IBS. Our original interest in this problem was motivated by the need to have an accurate description of beam evolution due to IBS while distribution is strongly affected by the external electron cooling force. A variety of models with various degrees of approximation were developed and implemented in BETACOOL in the past to address this topic. A more complete treatment based on the friction coefficient and full 3-D diffusion tensor was introduced in BETACOOL at the end of 2007 under the name 'local IBS model'. Such a model allowed us calculation of IBS for an arbitrary beam distribution. The numerical benchmarking of this local IBS algorithm and its comparison with other models was reported before. In this paper, after briefly describing the model and its limitations, they present its comparison with available experimental data.

  14. Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Lee C. Cadwallader; David A. Petti

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.

  15. MEAM interatomic force calculation subroutine for LAMMPS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-10-25

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine tobe used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluates the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to cubic spine-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM).

  16. Calculated fission properties of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    A quantitative calculation is presented that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. For the macroscopic part a Yukawa-plus-exponential model is used and for the microscopic part a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential is used. The three-quadratic-surface parameterization generates shapes for which the potential-energy surfaces are calculated. The use of this parameterization and the use of the finite-range macroscopic model allows for the study of two touching spheres and similar shapes. The results of the calculations in terms of potential-energy surfaces and fission half-lives are presented for heavy even nuclei. The surfaces are displayed in the form of contour diagrams as functions of two moments of the shape. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  18. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne; Dunson, David

    2008-06-03

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  19. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne; Dunson, David

    2006-08-08

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  20. Distributed Sensors Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-08-30

    The Distributed Sensors Simulator (DSS) is an infrastructure that allows the user to debug and test software for distributed sensor networks without the commitment inherent in using hardware. The flexibility of DSS allows developers and researchers to investigate topological, phenomenological, networking, robustness, and scaling issues; explore arbitrary algorithms for DSNs; and is particularly useful as a proof-of-concept tool. The user provides data on node location and specifications, defines event phenomena, and plugs in the application(s)more » to run. DSS in turn provides the virtual environmental embedding — but exposed to the user like no true embedding could ever be.« less

  1. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  2. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  3. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  4. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5; Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 ; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 ; La Russa, Daniel J.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  5. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  6. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  7. WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 2: Parameter documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.

    1997-11-14

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program and were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probability models require input parameters that are defined by a statistical distribution. Developing parameters begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. Parameter development may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling laboratory or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformations. Documentation of parameter development is designed to answer two questions: What source information was used to develop this parameter? and Why was this particular data set/information used? Therefore, complete documentation requires integrating information from code sponsors, parameter task leaders, performance assessment analysts, and experimental principal investigators. This paper, Part 2 of 2 parts, contains a discussion of the WIPP CCA PA Parameter Tracking System, document traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

  8. Distributed Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Wind Distributed Wind The Wind Program's activities in wind technologies in distributed applications-or distributed wind-address the performance and reliability challenges associated with smaller turbines by focusing on technology development, testing, certification, and manufacturing. What is Distributed Wind? Photo of a turbine behind a school. The Wind Program defines distributed wind in terms of technology application, based on a wind plant's location relative to end-use and

  9. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Wilcox, Trevor; Bathke, Charles G.; James, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  10. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  11. Distributed Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the National Clean Energy Summit 8.0 in Nevada, President Obama announced that the Loan Programs Office (LPO) has issued guidance for potential applicants on the kinds of Distributed Energy Projects it can support, in the form of supplements to its existing Renewable Energy and Efficient Energy (REEE) Projects and Advanced Fossil Energy Projects solicitations.

  12. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 State Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 14,828 4,508 19,336 Alaska 825 698 1,524 Arizona 13,143 - 13,143...

  13. Distribution Category: Water R

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Distribution Category: Water R e a c t o r Safety- R e s e a r c h - - A n a l y s i s ... 8 10 I TOTAL VOLUMETRIC FLUX, ms Fig. 9. Fully Developed Air-Water Flow Data.30 ANL Neg. ...

  14. Permeability Calculation in a Fracture Network - 12197

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheo Kyung; Kim, Hyo Won [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Sung Paal [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Laminar flow of a viscous fluid in the pore space of a saturated fractured rock medium is considered to calculate the effective permeability of the medium. The effective permeability is determined from the flow field which is calculated numerically by using the finite element method. The computation of permeability components is carried out with a few different discretizations for a number of fracture arrangements. Various features such as flow field in the fracture channels, the convergence of permeability, and the variation of permeability among different fracture networks are discussed. The longitudinal permeability in general appears greater than the transverse ones. The former shows minor variations with fracture arrangement whereas the latter appears to be more sensitive to the arrangement. From the calculations of the permeability in a rock medium with a fracture network (two parallel fractures aligned in the direction of 45-deg counterclockwise from the horizontal and two connecting fractures(narrowing, parallel and widening) the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium not only depends on the primary orientation of the main fractures but also is noticeably influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The transverse permeability (the permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the externally imposed macro-scale pressure gradient) is only a fraction of the longitudinal one, but is sensitive to the arrangement of the connecting fractures. 3. It is important to figure out the pattern of the fractures that connect (or cross) the main fractures for reliable calculation of the transverse permeability. (authors)

  15. Radiative accelerations for evolutionary model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richer, J.; Michaud, G.; Rogers, F.; Iglesias, C.; Turcotte, S.; LeBlanc, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monochromatic opacities from the OPAL database have been used to calculate radiative accelerations for the 21 included chemical species. The 10{sup 4} frequencies used are sufficient to calculate the radiative accelerations of many elements for T{gt}10{sup 5}K, using frequency sampling. This temperature limit is higher for less abundant elements. As the abundances of Fe, He, or O are varied, the radiative acceleration of other elements changes, since abundant elements modify the frequency dependence of the radiative flux and the Rosseland opacity. Accurate radiative accelerations for a given element can only be obtained by allowing the abundances of the species that contribute most to the Rosseland opacity to vary during the evolution and recalculating the radiative accelerations and the Rosseland opacity during the evolution. There are physical phenomena that cannot be included in the calculations if one uses only the OPAL data. For instance, one should correct for the momentum given to the electron in a photoionization. Such effects are evaluated using atomic data from Opacity Project, and correction factors are given. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  16. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Jessee, M. A.; Mertyurek, U.

    2013-07-01

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has considerably improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This manuscript extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system. (authors)

  17. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  18. Annual Emergency Preparedness Grant Distributed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Emergency Preparedness Grant Distributed The Emergency Preparedness Working Group (EPWG) recently came together to distribute approximately 415,000 in grant funding for ...

  19. Multipartite secure state distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duer, W.; Briegel, H.-J.; Calsamiglia, J.

    2005-04-01

    We introduce the distribution of a secret multipartite entangled state in a real-world scenario as a quantum primitive. We show that in the presence of noisy quantum channels (and noisy control operations), any state chosen from the set of two-colorable graph states (Calderbank-Shor-Steane codewords) can be created with high fidelity while it remains unknown to all parties. This is accomplished by either blind multipartite entanglement purification, which we introduce in this paper, or by multipartite entanglement purification of enlarged states, which offers advantages over an alternative scheme based on standard channel purification and teleportation. The parties are thus provided with a secret resource of their choice for distributed secure applications.

  20. Properly Understanding the Impacts of Distributed Resources on Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Li, Huijuan; Adhikari, Sarina; Kueck, John D

    2010-01-01

    The subject paper discusses important impacts of distributed resources on distribution networks and feeders. These include capacity, line losses, voltage regulation, and central system support (such as volt/var via central generators and substation) as the number, placement and penetration levels of distributed resources are varied. Typically, the impacts of distributed resources on the distribution system are studied by using steady-state rather than dynamic analysis tools. However, the response time and transient impacts of both system equipment (such as substation/feeder capacitors) and distributed resources needs to be taken into account and only dynamic analysis will provide the full impact results. ORNL is wrapping up a study of distributed resources interconnected to a large distribution system considering the above variables. A report of the study and its results will be condensed into a paper for this panel session. The impact of distributed resources will vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system. The question is how high of a penetration of distributed resource can be accommodated on the distribution feeder/system without any major changes to system operation, design and protection. The impacts most surely will vary depending upon load composition, distribution and level. Also, it is expected that various placement of distributed resources will impact the distribution system differently.

  1. Symmetric generalized binomial distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, H.; Curado, E. M. F.; Instituto Nacional de Cincia e Tecnologia - Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ ; Gazeau, J. P.; APC, UMR 7164, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 75205 Paris ; Rodrigues, Ligia M. C. S. E-mail: evaldo@cbpf.br E-mail: ligia@cbpf.br

    2013-12-15

    In two recent articles, we have examined a generalization of the binomial distribution associated with a sequence of positive numbers, involving asymmetric expressions of probabilities that break the symmetry win-loss. We present in this article another generalization (always associated with a sequence of positive numbers) that preserves the symmetry win-loss. This approach is also based on generating functions and presents constraints of non-negativeness, similar to those encountered in our previous articles.

  2. MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 20, 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: MICHAEL W. OWEN /<f /c / DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEM.ENT SUBJECT: Compliance with Established Policies and Guidance for Contractor Work Force Restructuring As you know, the Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the Department's fical point for all work force restructuring actions. As a reminder of policies and guidance that should continue to be followed when implementing work force

  3. Molecular resonance phenomena. [Calculation of resonance widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A.U.

    1980-01-01

    It is attempted to show that the Stieltjes-moment-theory provides a practical and a reasonably accurate method for calculating the widths of molecular resonances. The method seems to possess a number of advantages for molecular applications, since it avoids the explicit construction of continuum wavefunctions. It is very simple to implement the technique numerically, because it requires only existing bound-state electronic structure codes. Through the use of configuration interaction techniques, many-electron correlation and polarization effects can be included in the description of both the resonance and the non-resonant background continuum. To illustrate the utility and the accuracy of the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, used in conjunction with configuration interaction (CI) wave functions, recent applications to the /sup 1/..sigma../sub u/(1sigma/sub u/ 2sigma/sub g/) autoionizing resonance state of H/sub 2/ and the well known /sup 2/PI/sub g/ state of N/sub 2//sup -/ are discussed. The choices of the one-electron basis sets and the types of many-electron configurations appropriate for these two cases are described. Also, guidelines for the selection of the projection operators defining the resonant and non-resonant subspaces in the case of both Feshbach and shape-resonances are given. The numerical results indicate that the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, which employs L/sup 2/ basis functions exclusively, produces as accurate resonance parameters as can be extracted from direct electron-molecule scattering calculations, provided approximately the same approximations are used to describe important physical effects such as target polarization. Furthermore the method provides sufficiently accurate fixed-nuclei electronic resonance parameters to be used in ab initio calculation of resonant vibrational excitation cross sections. (WHK)

  4. Distributed generation implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzy, L.; O`Sullivan, J.B.; Jacobs, K.; Major, W.

    1999-11-01

    The overall economics of a distributed generation project is based on cost elements which include: Equipment and financing, fuel, displaced electricity cost, operation and maintenance. Of critical importance is how the facility is managed, including adequate provision for a comprehensive operator training program. Proper equipment maintenance and fuel procurement policy will also lead to greater system availability and optimal system economics. Various utility tariffs are available which may be economically attractive, with an added benefit to the utility of providing a peak shaving resource during peak periods. Changing modes of operation of the distributed generation system may affect staff readiness, require retraining and could affect maintenance costs. The degree of control and oversight that is provided during a project`s implementation and construction phases will impact subsequent maintenance and operating costs. The long term effect of siting impacts, such as building facades that restrict turbine inlet airflow will affect subsequent operations and require supplemental maintenance action. It is possible to site a variety of distributed generation technologies in settings which vary from urban to remote unattended locations with successful results from both an economic and operational perspective.

  5. Linear Transformation Method for Multinuclide Decay Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yuan

    2010-12-29

    A linear transformation method for generic multinuclide decay calculations is presented together with its properties and implications. The method takes advantage of the linear form of the decay solution N(t) = F(t)N{sub 0}, where N(t) is a column vector that represents the numbers of atoms of the radioactive nuclides in the decay chain, N{sub 0} is the initial value vector of N(t), and F(t) is a lower triangular matrix whose time-dependent elements are independent of the initial values of the system.

  6. Rooftop Unit Comparison Calculator User Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.

    2015-04-30

    This document serves as a user manual for the Packaged rooftop air conditioners and heat pump units comparison calculator (RTUCC) and is an aggregation of the calculator’s website documentation. Content ranges from new-user guide material like the “Quick Start” to the more technical/algorithmic descriptions of the “Methods Pages.” There is also a section listing all the context-help topics that support the features on the “Controls” page. The appendix has a discussion of the EnergyPlus runs that supported the development of the building-response models.

  7. Calculation of cross sections for binary reactions between heavy ion projectiles and heavy actinide targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Hoffman, M.M.

    1990-11-01

    The computer program, described in this report, is identified as PWAVED5. It was developed to calculate cross sections for nucleon transfer reactions in low energy heavy ion bombardments. The objective was to calculate cross sections that agree with experimental results for ions of different charge and mass and to develop a predictive capability. It was undertaken because previous heavy ion calculations, for which programs were readily available, appeared to focus primarily on reactions resulting in compound nucleus formation and were not particularly applicable to calculations of binary reaction cross sections at low interaction energies. There are to principal areas in which this computation differs from several other partial wave calculations of heavy-ion reaction cross sections. First, this program is designed specifically to calculate cross sections for nucleon exchange interactions and to exclude interactions that are expected to result in fusion of the two nuclei. A second major difference in this calculation is the use of a statistical distribution to assign the total interaction cross section to individual final mass states.

  8. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  9. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D.

    2012-07-01

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  11. Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations (Conference)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations You are accessing a...

  12. Calculating impacts of energy standards on energy demand in U...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculating impacts of energy standards on energy demand in U.S. buildings with uncertainty in an integrated assessment model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculating ...

  13. Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic Nuclei Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Calculations Of Nuclear Reactions And Exotic ...

  14. Non-equilibrium chemical partitioning calculation for phase transforma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and time dependent phase selection. The calculation programs were developed in C++ and fortran. In this program, we will integrate the existing calculation programs. Research area:...

  15. Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for...

  16. Building America Webinar: HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1-Calculating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations. ... HVAC Right-Sizing Part 1: Calculating Loads ZERH Webinar: Low Load HVAC in Zero Energy ...

  17. Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven Lecture) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations...

  18. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of nuclear reaction cross ...

  19. Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Upgrade Value Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator (for Office Properties) AgencyCompany...

  20. EPA Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator Website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calculator Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator Website Abstract This website allows...

  1. Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator AgencyCompany Organization:...

  2. Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory of Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic ...

  3. Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Natural Gas Vehicle Cost Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: United States Department of...

  4. Water-saving Measures: Energy and Cost Savings Calculator | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Cost Savings Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Water-saving Measures: Energy and Cost Savings Calculator AgencyCompany Organization:...

  5. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  6. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  7. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  8. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  9. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (?s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-24

    We present an analytic O(?s) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness ?. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of the 1-jettiness distribution.

  10. Distributed Optimization System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurtado, John E.; Dohrmann, Clark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2004-11-30

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  11. Distribution Category: Water R

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Distribution Category: Water R e a c t o r Safety- R e s e a r c h - - A n a l y s i s Development (NRG-4) A N L - 7 7 - 4 7 ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South C a s s Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 ONE-DIMENSIONAL D R I F T - F L U X MODEL AND CONSTITUTIVE EQUATIONS FOR RELATIVE MOTION BETWEEN PHASES IN VARIOUS TWO-PHASE FLOW REGIMES by M. Ishii Reactor Analysis and Safety Division October 1977 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government

  12. Spark Distributed Analytic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apache Spark Spark Distributed Analytic Framework Description and Overview Apache Spark(tm) is a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. How to Use Spark Because of its high memory and I/O bandwidth requirements, we recommend you run your spark jobs on Cori. Follow the steps below to use spark, note that the order of the commands matters. DO NOT load the spark module until you are inside a batch job. Interactive mode Submit an interactive batch job with at least 2 nodes in the

  13. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this design calculation is to perform a criticality evaluation of the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) and the operations and processes performed therein. The current intent of the FHF is to receive transportation casks whose contents will be unloaded and transferred to waste packages (WP) or MGR Specific Casks (MSC) in the fuel transfer bays. Further, the WPs will also be prepared in the FHF for transfer to the sub-surface facility (for disposal). The MSCs will be transferred to the Aging Facility for storage. The criticality evaluation of the FHF features the following: (I) Consider the types of waste to be received in the FHF as specified below: (1) Uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF); (2) Canistered CSNF (with the exception of horizontal dual-purpose canister (DPC) and/or multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)); (3) Navy canistered SNF (long and short); (4) Department of Energy (DOE) canistered high-level waste (HLW); and (5) DOE canistered SNF (with the exception of MCOs). (II) Evaluate the criticality analyses previously performed for the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified transportation casks (under 10 CFR 71) to be received in the FHF to ensure that these analyses address all FHF conditions including normal operations, and Category 1 and 2 event sequences. (III) Evaluate FHF criticality conditions resulting from various Category 1 and 2 event sequences. Note that there are currently no Category 1 and 2 event sequences identified for FHF. Consequently, potential hazards from a criticality point of view will be considered as identified in the ''Internal Hazards Analysis for License Application'' document (BSC 2004c, Section 6.6.4). (IV) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the fuel transfer bay for defense in depth. The SNF/HLW waste transfer activity (i.e., assembly and canister transfer) that is being carried out in the FHF has been classified as safety category in the ''Q-list'' (BSC 2003, p. A-6). Therefore, this design calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004), even though the FHF itself has not yet been classified in the Q-list. Performance of the work scope as described and development of the associated technical product conform to the procedure AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''.

  14. Model-centric distribution automation: Capacity, reliability, and efficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Onen, Ahmet; Jung, Jaesung; Dilek, Murat; Cheng, Danling; Broadwater, Robert P.; Scirbona, Charlie; Cocks, George; Hamilton, Stephanie; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2016-02-26

    A series of analyses along with field validations that evaluate efficiency, reliability, and capacity improvements of model-centric distribution automation are presented. With model-centric distribution automation, the same model is used from design to real-time control calculations. A 14-feeder system with 7 substations is considered. The analyses involve hourly time-varying loads and annual load growth factors. Phase balancing and capacitor redesign modifications are used to better prepare the system for distribution automation, where the designs are performed considering time-varying loads. Coordinated control of load tap changing transformers, line regulators, and switched capacitor banks is considered. In evaluating distribution automation versus traditionalmore » system design and operation, quasi-steady-state power flow analysis is used. In evaluating distribution automation performance for substation transformer failures, reconfiguration for restoration analysis is performed. In evaluating distribution automation for storm conditions, Monte Carlo simulations coupled with reconfiguration for restoration calculations are used. As a result, the evaluations demonstrate that model-centric distribution automation has positive effects on system efficiency, capacity, and reliability.« less

  15. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Division of Education and Human Services, Neumann University, One Neumann Drive, Aston, Pennsylvania 19014-1298 ; Mallory, Clelia W.; Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 ; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 212 kJ?mol{sup ?1} range.

  16. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  17. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  18. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  19. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Calculators | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculators Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Calculators From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archive for the Calculators site for fiscal year 2011. Microsoft Office document icon Calculators FY11 More Documents & Publications Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Office of EERE Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Information Center Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Kids Site

  20. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  1. Subject: Calculation of Job Creating Through Recovery Act Funding |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Subject: Calculation of Job Creating Through Recovery Act Funding Subject: Calculation of Job Creating Through Recovery Act Funding PDF icon Subject: Calculation of Job Creating Through Recovery Act Funding More Documents & Publications WPN 10-14a: Calculation of Job Creation through DOE Recovery Act Funding - Updated Calculation of Job Creation Through DOE Recovery Act Funding WPN 10-14: Calculat

  2. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  3. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  4. Integrated Distribution Planning Concept Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distribution Planning Concept Paper www.irecusa.org A Proactive Approach for Accommodating High Penetrations of Distributed Generation Resources May 2013 Integrated Distribution Planning Concept Paper A Proactive Approach for Accommodating High Penetrations of Distributed Generation Resources Tim Lindl and Kevin Fox Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. Abraham Ellis and Robert Broderick Sandia National Laboratories May 2013 IREC enables greater use of clean energy in a sustainable way by

  5. Interconnection of Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interconnection of Distributed Energy Resources Delivered to: Transmission and Grid Basics for Tribal Economic and Energy Development Dave Narang Principal Engineer, NREL March 30, 2016 2 Discussion Topics * Distribution System Interconnections - Part 1 o Background o Distribution Systems Overview o Electric Utility Operations o Emerging Topics in Grid Integration o DOE Grid Modernization Initiative * Distribution System Interconnections - Part 2 o Permitting o Interconnection * Wrap up o

  6. A new approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidelman, Yu.; Mokhov, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. It is based on joint solution of equations of longitudinal and transverse motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field of the linac. This field is a given by distribution (measured or calculated) of the component of the longitudinal electric field on the axis of the linac. New approach is compared with other matrix methods to solve the same problem. The comparison with code ASTRA has been carried out. Complete agreement for tracking results for a TESLA-type cavity is achieved. A corresponding algorithm will be implemented into the MARS15 code. A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. Complete agreement for tracking results with existed code ASTRA is achieved. New algorithm will be implemented into MARS15 code.

  7. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2005-03-01

    This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.

  8. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1 g?cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  9. Energy distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by intense short pulses of light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altybaev, G. S.; Kumekov, S. E. Mahmudov, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    Deviation from the Fermi distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and distribution of 'hot' optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by picosecond pulses of light are calculated.

  10. Distributed Merge Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther

    2013-01-08

    Improved simulations and sensors are producing datasets whose increasing complexity exhausts our ability to visualize and comprehend them directly. To cope with this problem, we can detect and extract significant features in the data and use them as the basis for subsequent analysis. Topological methods are valuable in this context because they provide robust and general feature definitions. As the growth of serial computational power has stalled, data analysis is becoming increasingly dependent on massively parallel machines. To satisfy the computational demand created by complex datasets, algorithms need to effectively utilize these computer architectures. The main strength of topological methods, their emphasis on global information, turns into an obstacle during parallelization. We present two approaches to alleviate this problem. We develop a distributed representation of the merge tree that avoids computing the global tree on a single processor and lets us parallelize subsequent queries. To account for the increasing number of cores per processor, we develop a new data structure that lets us take advantage of multiple shared-memory cores to parallelize the work on a single node. Finally, we present experiments that illustrate the strengths of our approach as well as help identify future challenges.

  11. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver thanmore » water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.« less

  12. Handbook of Industrial Engineering Equations, Formulas, and Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badiru, Adedeji B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2011-01-01

    The first handbook to focus exclusively on industrial engineering calculations with a correlation to applications, Handbook of Industrial Engineering Equations, Formulas, and Calculations contains a general collection of the mathematical equations often used in the practice of industrial engineering. Many books cover individual areas of engineering and some cover all areas, but none covers industrial engineering specifically, nor do they highlight topics such as project management, materials, and systems engineering from an integrated viewpoint. Written by acclaimed researchers and authors, this concise reference marries theory and practice, making it a versatile and flexible resource. Succinctly formatted for functionality, the book presents: Basic Math Calculations; Engineering Math Calculations; Production Engineering Calculations; Engineering Economics Calculations; Ergonomics Calculations; Facility Layout Calculations; Production Sequencing and Scheduling Calculations; Systems Engineering Calculations; Data Engineering Calculations; Project Engineering Calculations; and Simulation and Statistical Equations. It has been said that engineers make things while industrial engineers make things better. To make something better requires an understanding of its basic characteristics and the underlying equations and calculations that facilitate that understanding. To do this, however, you do not have to be computational experts; you just have to know where to get the computational resources that are needed. This book elucidates the underlying equations that facilitate the understanding required to improve design processes, continuously improving the answer to the age-old question: What is the best way to do a job?

  13. XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities. ...

  14. First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Title: First-principles calculations of phonons and Raman spectra in monoclinic CsSnCl 3 Authors: ...

  15. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  16. Ice - an explicit wavelet calculation code for ICE experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUSMATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; SHOCK WAVES; ...

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Methodology Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Methodology Widget Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Widget Assumptions and

  19. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (IDIQ Attachment J-8) | Department of Energy Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Document outlines measurement and verification planning and savings calculation methods for an energy savings performance contract. Microsoft Office document icon Download the M&V Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline. More Documents &

  20. Calculating the habitable zones of multiple star systems with a new interactive Web site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller, Tobias W. A.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology and an interactive Web site for calculating the habitable zone (HZ) of multiple star systems. Using the concept of spectral weight factor, as introduced in our previous studies of the calculations of HZ in and around binary star systems, we calculate the contribution of each star (based on its spectral energy distribution) to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet, and use the models of the HZ of the Sun to determine the boundaries of the HZ in multiple star systems. Our interactive Web site for carrying out these calculations is publicly available at http://astro.twam.info/hz. We discuss the details of our methodology and present its application to some of the multiple star systems detected by the Kepler space telescope. We also present the instructions for using our interactive Web site, and demonstrate its capabilities by calculating the HZ for two interesting analytical solutions of the three-body problem.

  1. Calculating and Communicating Program Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculating and Communicating Program Results Calculating and Communicating Program Results Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Calculating and Communicating Program Results, Call Slides and Summary, February 23, 2012. PDF icon Call Slides and Summary More Documents & Publications Evaluation Tools Utilized by the EnergySmart Program The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 Business of Energy Efficiency Workshop presentation

  2. Application of DYNA3D in large scale crashworthiness calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Igarashi, M.; Shimomaki, K.; Mizuno, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an example of an automobile crashworthiness calculation. Based on our experiences with the example calculation, we make recommendations to those interested in performing crashworthiness calculations. The example presented in this paper was supplied by Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd., and provided a significant shakedown for the new large deformation shell capability of the DYNA3D code. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  3. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 7_grey.pdf More Documents & Publications First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials: NMR Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials

  4. Distributed Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Energy Distributed Energy Distributed energy consists of a range of smaller-scale and modular devices designed to provide electricity, and sometimes also thermal energy, in locations close to consumers. They include fossil and renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, microturbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, combustion turbines, and steam turbines); energy storage devices (e.g., batteries and flywheels); and combined heat and power systems.

  5. Distribution of Clokey's Eggvetch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson

    1998-12-01

    The Environment, Safety and Health Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office implements the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program ensures compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, delineates and describes NTS ecosystems, and provides ecological information for predicting and evaluating potential impacts of proposed projects on those ecosystems. Over the last several decades, has taken an active role in providing information on the tatus of plant species proposed for protection under the Endangered Species Act(ESA). One such species is Clokey's eggvetch (Astragalus oophorus var. clokeyanus), which is a candidate species under the listing guidelines of the ESA. Surveys for this species were conducted on the NTS in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Field surveys focused on potential habitat for this species in the southern Belted range and expanded to other areas with similar habitat. Over 30 survey day s were completed; five survey days in 1996, 25 survey days in 1997, and three survey days in 1998. Clokey's eggvetch was located at several sites in the southern Belted Range. It was found through much of the northern section of Kawich Canyon, one site at the head of Gritty Gulch, and a rather extensive location in Lambs Canyon. It was also located further south at Captain Jack Springs in the Eleana Range, in much of Falcon Canyon and around Echo Peak on Pahute Mesa, and was also found in the Timber and Shoshone Mountains. Overall, the locations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appears to form a distinct bridge between populations of the species located further north in the Belted and Kawich Ranges and the population located in the Spring Mountains. Clokey's eggvetch was commonly found along washes and small draws, and typically in sandy loam soils with a covering of light tuffaceous rock. It occurs primarily above 1830 meters (6000 feet) in association with single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata). Overall, the populations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appear to be vigorous and do not appear threatened. It is estimated that there are approximately 2300 plants on the NTS. It should be considered as a species of concern because of its localized distribution, but it does not appear to warrant protection under the ESA.

  6. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Robert Evans at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  7. AGENDA: PETROLEUM PRODUCT TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The agenda for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public stakeholder meeting in New Orleans on petroleum product transmission, distribution, and storage.

  8. Distribution Drive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Distribution Drive Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75205 Product: Biodiesel fuel distributor. Coordinates: 32.778155, -96.795404 Show Map Loading map......

  9. Singularities of Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anatoly Radyushkin

    2012-05-14

    The basic ideas of the theory of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are reviewed. Recent developments in the study of singularities of GPDs are discussed.

  10. Distributed Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    facility's anaerobic digesters. Photo from Kathryn Craddock, NREL 16710 Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve...

  11. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, A. C.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the status of the U.S. distributed wind industry in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  12. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the status of the U.S. distributed wind market in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  13. Interchangeable whole-body and nose-only exposure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, William C.; Allemann, Rudolph T.; Moss, Owen R.; Decker, Jr., John R.

    1992-01-01

    An exposure system for experimental animals includes a container for a single animal which has a double wall. The animal is confined within the inner wall. Gaseous material enters a first end, flows over the entire animal, then back between the walls and out the first end. The system also includes an arrangement of valve-controlled manifolds for supplying gaseous material to, and exhausting it from, the containers.

  14. Data interchange standards for biotechnology: Issues and alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report outlines a framework for discussion of what aspects of biotechnical information might be good candidates for guidelines or standards, what existing data exchange standards might be appropriate building blocks upon which to build, and what procedural mechanisms might be appropriate for adoption of such guidelines or standards. It builds on experience from other scientific communities which have already benefitted from development of discipline-specific data exchange standards. 33 refs.

  15. Interchangeable whole-body and nose-only exposure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, W.C.; Allemann, R.T.; Moss, O.R.; Decker, J.R. Jr.

    1992-03-31

    An exposure system for experimental animals includes a container for a single animal which has a double wall. The animal is confined within the inner wall. Gaseous material enters a first end, flows over the entire animal, then back between the walls and out the first end. The system also includes an arrangement of valve-controlled manifolds for supplying gaseous material to, and exhausting it from, the containers. 6 figs.

  16. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... at: http:energy.goveeregeothermaldata-provision-instruc... 2) is registered for harvesting by an NGDS catalog ... A pattern for matching a linear array of wind ...

  17. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintaining a ...

  18. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintaining a ...

  19. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume III: Control Rods and Burnable Absorber Calculations. Perturbation Theory for Nuclear Reactor Analysis. Thermal Reactors Calculations. Fast Reactor Calculations. Seed-Blanket Reactors. Index.

  20. Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    current Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: April 8, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 2016 | full report Archive Domestic coal distribution by ...

  1. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway Cost Distributions Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Presentation on hydrogen pathway cost distributions presented January 25, 2006. PDF icon wkshpstorageuihlein.pdf...

  2. Articles about Distributed Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Articles about Distributed Wind Articles about Distributed Wind Below are stories about distributed wind featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. October 1,...

  3. Distributed Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributed Power Inc Place: Lime Rock, Connecticut Zip: 6039 Product: Focused on distributed generation power technology. References: Distributed Power Inc1 This article is a...

  4. Distributed Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distributed Energy Projects Distributed Energy Projects Distributed Energy Projects At the National Clean Energy Summit 8.0 in Nevada, President Obama announced that the Loan...

  5. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  6. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  7. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funded "Best Practices for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind" to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth).

  8. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orell, A.; Foster, N.

    2015-08-01

    The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report.According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment across 24 states. In 2014, America's distributed wind energy industry supported a growing domestic industrial base as exports from United States-based small wind turbine manufacturers accounted for nearly 80% of United States-based manufacturers' sales.

  9. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  10. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdollahy, Shahin; Lavrova, Olga; Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building.more » Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.« less

  11. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Since 1901 Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9, 2013 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 campo.jpg These maps show the changes in air temperatures over land as measured using thermometers (left side) and as calculated by the 20th Century Reanalysis project (left side). While more than 80 percent of the observed variation is captured by

  12. Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Efficient Products » Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products Estimate energy and cost savings for energy- and water-efficient product categories using these interactive calculators provided by the Federal Energy Management Program or ENERGY STAR. Commercial Heating and Cooling Air-Cooled Chillers Boilers Commercial Heat Pumps Commercial Rooftop Air Conditioners Residential

  13. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  14. CALCULATION OF STOPPING POWER VALUES AND RANGES OF FAST IONS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-18

    STOPOW calculates a set of stopping power values and ranges of fast ions in matter for any materials. Furthermore STOPOW can calculate a set of values for one special auxiliary function (e.g. kinematic factors, track structure parameters, time of flight or correction factors in the stopping function) . The user chooses the physical units for stopping powers and ranges and the energy range for calculations.

  15. Energy Cost Calculator for Urinals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Urinals Energy Cost Calculator for Urinals Vary water cost, frequency of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION This calculator assumes that early replacement of a urinal or toilet will take place with 10 years of life remaining for existing fixture. Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Water Saving Product Urinal Urinal Gallons per Flush gpf 1.0 gpf Quantity to be Purchased 1 Water Cost (including waste water charges)

  16. Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Air-Cooled Electric Chillers This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the calculator assumptions and definitions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement How many chillers will you purchase? Performance Factors Existing What is the existing design condition? Full Load

  17. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-24

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of themore » 1-jettiness distribution.« less

  18. Thermal calculation of a thermogenerator at changing temperatures along thermocontact surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varshavskiy, G.A.; Rezgol', I.A.

    1986-01-13

    The article finds expressions for the output power of efficiency of a thermoelectric generator and temperature distribution along the heat carrier under the condition that temperatures of the thermocontact surfaces vary due to the cooling and heating of the heat carriers. Simple approximation calculation formulas are given for the particular cases examined. This work is devoted to the finding of analytical bonds, which make it possible to make the calculation of the thermogenerator at changing (as a result of heat transfer) temperatures of the solderings. The obtained expressions can be useful in the preliminary determination of the optimal parameters of the generators (maximal power and efficiency, minimal weight, etc.) and an analysis of processes of regulation.

  19. Extended step characteristic model for quarter-core gamma heating calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.; Webb, R.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Discrete ordinates codes are seldom used in lattice or core calculation, because of their limitation to simple geometries, which can be represented using an orthogonal mesh in a given coordinate system. Rough geometric approximations are often applied to obtain an estimate for a flux distribution. However, other methods, such as integral transport or Monte Carlo approaches, are generally more suited to irregular geometries. Each of these methods has its own weaknesses: integral transport methods are limited to problems in which the angular variation of the flux is isotropic or linearly anisotropic; Monte Carlo methods can be time consuming. The extended step characteristic (ESC) method has been developed to apply the discrete ordinates approximation to complicated geometries for which other methods provide less satisfactory solutions. The CENTAUR code has been developed to solve the two-dimensional transport equation using the ESC approach. This paper presents results of CENTAUR calculations for a quarter-core gamma redistribution problem for the Savannah River site (SRS) K reactor, under drained tank conditions following a postulated double-ended guillotine break loss-of-coolant accident. The calculations were used to confirm TWOTRAN calculations, which were based on a coarse approximation of the core geometry. A comparison of the results serves to demonstrate the capabilities and efficiency of the ESC approach.

  20. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2014-12-07

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer.

  1. Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, the Netherlands Knap, Wouter Royal Netherlands Meteorological...

  2. Ab Initio Calculations of Light-Ion Fusion Reactions (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ab Initio Calculations of Light-Ion Fusion Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  3. Leading-order calculation of electric conductivity in hot quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACTION INTEGRAL; CALCULATION METHODS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; GAUGE INVARIANCE; INTEGRAL EQUATIONS; QUANTUM ...

  4. Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Beams For Super-Heavy Element Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams For Super-Heavy Element ...

  5. A general higher-order remap algorithm for ALE calculations ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The locations of the shock and contact discontinuity in the Riemann shock tube problem are well captured. Cercion demonstrates a high degree of symmetry when calculating the Sedov ...

  6. A Perturbation Approach to Calculating the Behavior of Hulti...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Perturbation Approach to Calculating the Behavior of Hulti-cell Radiofrequeocy Accelerating Strectures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Perturbation Approach to...

  7. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the ...

  8. Microscopic Calculation of Fission Fragment Energies for the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    these calculations also highlight the importance of local constraints on the fragments ... DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Lawrence ...

  9. EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse...

  10. Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    field theory calculations for the compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory ...

  11. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy savings ...

  12. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    enabling the investigation of high beta physics in a compact stellarator geometry. ... In this paper, we report on the magnetic field line tracing calculations used to evaluate ...

  13. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interested in owning or benefiting from wind energy projects * Applicants pursuing 2002 ... The program can also calculate minimum energy contract price when the user enters minimum ...

  14. Calculations in Support of JAEA Experiments. Update Oct 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Joetta Marie; James, Michael R.

    2015-10-16

    An update on calculations provided in support of the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) experiments is summarized in PowerPoint form.

  15. FEMP Solar Hot Water Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Calculator AgencyCompany Organization: Federal Energy Management Program Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Determine Baseline Topics: Baseline projection...

  16. Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Screenshot...

  17. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document outlines measurement and verification planning and savings calculation methods for an energy savings performance contract. Microsoft Office document icon Download the M&V ...

  18. Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light ...

  19. Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Even, Wesley P. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frey, Lucille H. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer,...

  20. Microscopic Calculation of Fission Fragment Energies for the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We calculate the total kinetic and excitation energies of fragments produced in the ... 239Pu (nsub th, f) reaction and extracted their total kinetic and excitation energies. ...

  1. EPA - Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for EPA - Rainfall Erosivity Factor Calculator webpage Citation Environmental...

  2. First Principles Calculations (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials) First Principles Calculations (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  3. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle ...

  4. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  5. Qualified Software for Calculating Commercial Building Tax Deductions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On this page you'll find a list of qualified computer software for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements.

  6. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials: NMR First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials: NMR 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  7. IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment to Protect the Environment (GRAPE) Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Gold Standard Program Model ... further results The GHG Calculator for Solid Waste is a...

  8. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Flowers, Larry T.; Gagne, Matthew N.; Pro, Boyd H.; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-20

    The purpose of this report is to quantify and summarize the 2013 U.S. distributed wind market to help plan and guide future investments and decisions by industry stakeholders, utilities, state and federal agencies, and other interested parties.

  9. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming R. Evans, S. Czernik, R. French, M. Ratcliff National ... GAS 7 BIOMASS BIO-OIL CHAR For reactor or export Gas recycle For fluidization or export ...

  10. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

  11. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Photo of two men in safety glasses working with electric equipment in a laboratory. NREL's distributed grid integration projects develop and test technologies, systems, and methods to interconnect variable renewable energy with the electric power grid. NREL's distributed energy projects support the integration of new technologies into the electric power grid. This work involves industry, academia, other national laboratories, and various standards organizations. Learn more about our

  12. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, Michael G. [New Mexico State University; Musch, Bernhard U. [Tech. University Munich; Haegler, Philipp G. [Tech. University Munich; Negele, John W. [MIT; Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  13. Barrier distribution of quasi-elastic backward scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuoka, S.; Ikezoe, H.; Nishio, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Jeong, S. C.; Ishiyama, H.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Miyatake, H.

    2009-05-04

    In order to study the nucleus-nucleus interaction in Pb-based cold fusion, we have measured excitation functions for quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 48}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 64}Ni, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 86}Kr projectiles on {sup 208}Pb target at backward angles. The barrier distributions were derived from the first derivative of measured quasi-elastic scattering cross sections relative to the Rutherford scattering cross section. The centroids of the barrier distributions show a deviation from several predicted barrier heights toward the low energy side. The shape of the barrier distributions is well reproduced by the results of a coupled-channel calculation taking account of the coupling effects of two phonon excitations of the quadrupole vibration for the projectiles and of the octupole vibration for the {sup 208}Pb target.

  14. Double distributions and evolution equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.V. Radyushkin

    1998-05-01

    Applications of perturbative QCD to deeply virtual Compton scattering and hard exclusive meson electroproduction processes require a generalization of usual parton distributions for the case when long-distance information is accumulated in nonforward matrix elements < p{prime} {vert_bar}O(0,z){vert_bar}p > of quark and gluon light-cone operators. In their previous papers the authors used two types of nonperturbative functions parameterizing such matrix elements: double distributions F(x,y;t) and nonforward distribution functions F{sub {zeta}}(X;t). Here they discuss in more detail the double distributions (DD's) and evolution equations which they satisfy. They propose simple models for F(x,y;t=0) DD's with correct spectral and symmetry properties which also satisfy the reduction relations connecting them to the usual parton densities f(x). In this way, they obtain self-consistent models for the {zeta}-dependence of nonforward distributions. They show that, for small {zeta}, one can easily obtain nonforward distributions (in the X > {zeta} region) from the parton densities: F{sub {zeta}} (X;t=0) {approx} f(X{minus}{zeta}/2).

  15. Inclusive hadron distributions in p+p collisions from saturation models of HERA DIS data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribedy, P.; Venugopalan, R.

    2010-12-06

    Dipole models based on various saturation scenarios provide reasonable fits to small-x DIS inclusive, diffractive and exclusive data from HERA. Proton un-integrated gluon distributions extracted from such fits are employed in a k{sub {perpendicular}}-factorization framework to calculate inclusive gluon distributions at various energies. The n-particle multiplicity distribution predicted in the Glasma flux tube approach shows good agreement with data over a wide range of energies. Hadron inclusive transverse momentum distributions expressed in terms of the saturation scale demonstrate universal behavior over a wider kinematic range systematically with increasing center of mass energies.

  16. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. • Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. • Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. • Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind’s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  17. Relativistic configuration interaction calculations for the K{alpha} and K{beta} X-ray satellites of iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou Haijun Jiang Gang Hu Feng; Hao Lianghuan

    2009-03-15

    Multi-configuration Dirac-Fock and relativistic configuration interaction calculations with the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics, and finite nuclear mass corrections were carried out in the extended optimal level scheme for the transition wavelengths, electric dipole transition rates, and oscillator strengths of the K{alpha} and K{beta} X-rays from Fe XVII through Fe XXV. The calculated values were compared with the available data on He-like, Li-like, Be-like, and F-like iron, and were in very good agreement. These data provide reference values for level lifetime, charge state distribution, and average charge of iron plasmas.

  18. Distribution:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    bav@ @esiaw*cp Suppl. file 'Br & Div rf's shealth (lic.only) UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL NUCLEAB MATERIAL LICENSE pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 ...

  19. Distributed resource management: garbage collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagherzadeh, N.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in designing high-performance distributed symbolic-processing computers. These architectures have special needs for resource management and dynamic reclamation of unused memory cells and objects. The memory management or garbage-collection aspects of these architectures are studied. Also introduced is a synchronous distributed algorithm for garbage collection. A special data structure is defined to handle the distributed nature of the problem. The author formally expresses the algorithm and shows the results of a synchronous garbage-collection simulation and its effect on the interconnection-network message to traffic. He presents an asynchronous distributed garbage collection to handle the resource management for a system that does not require a global synchronization mechanism. The distributed data structure is modified to include the asynchronous aspects of the algorithm. This method is extended to a multiple-mutator scheme, and the problem of having several processors share portion of a cyclical graph is discussed. Two models for the analytical study of the garbage-collection algorithms discussed are provided.

  20. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION SECTION FOR ASHRAE STANDARD 152.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2001-09-07

    In a recent draft report titled ''Impacts of Refrigerant Line Length on System Efficiency in Residential Heating and Cooling Systems Using Refrigerant Distribution,'' (Andrews 2000) some baseline calculations were performed to estimate various impacts on system efficiency of long refrigerant distribution lines. Refrigerant distribution refers to ''mini-splits'' and other types of space beating and cooling equipment that utilize refrigerant lines, rather than ducts or pipes, to transport heat and cooling effect from the outdoor unit to the building spaces where this heat or cooling is used. Five factors affecting efficiency were studied in each of the space conditioning modes (heating and cooling) for a total of ten factors in all. Temperature changes and pressure drops in each of the two refrigerant lines accounted for four of the factors, with the remaining one being elevation of the indoor unit relative to the outdoor unit. Of these factors, pressure drops in the suction line in cooling showed by far the largest effect. This report builds on these baseline calculations to develop a possible algorithm for a refrigerant distribution section of ASHRAE Standard 152. It is based on the approximate treatment of the previous report, and is therefore subject to error that might be corrected using a more detailed analysis, possibly including computer modeling and field testing. However, because the calculated efficiency impacts are generally small (a few percent being typical) it may be that the approximate treatment is sufficient. That question is left open for discussion. The purpose of this report is not to advocate the adoption of the methodology developed, but rather to present it as an option that could either be adopted as-is or used as a starting point for further analysis. It is assumed that the reader has available and is familiar with ASHRAE Standard 152P and with the previous analysis referred to above.

  2. Integrated Transmission and Distribution Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-16

    Distributed, generation, demand response, distributed storage, smart appliances, electric vehicles and renewable energy resources are expected to play a key part in the transformation of the American power system. Control, coordination and compensation of these smart grid assets are inherently interlinked. Advanced control strategies to warrant large-scale penetration of distributed smart grid assets do not currently exist. While many of the smart grid technologies proposed involve assets being deployed at the distribution level, most of the significant benefits accrue at the transmission level. The development of advanced smart grid simulation tools, such as GridLAB-D, has led to a dramatic improvement in the models of smart grid assets available for design and evaluation of smart grid technology. However, one of the main challenges to quantifying the benefits of smart grid assets at the transmission level is the lack of tools and framework for integrating transmission and distribution technologies into a single simulation environment. Furthermore, given the size and complexity of the distribution system, it is crucial to be able to represent the behavior of distributed smart grid assets using reduced-order controllable models and to analyze their impacts on the bulk power system in terms of stability and reliability. The objectives of the project were to: • Develop a simulation environment for integrating transmission and distribution control, • Construct reduced-order controllable models for smart grid assets at the distribution level, • Design and validate closed-loop control strategies for distributed smart grid assets, and • Demonstrate impact of integrating thousands of smart grid assets under closed-loop control demand response strategies on the transmission system. More specifically, GridLAB-D, a distribution system tool, and PowerWorld, a transmission planning tool, are integrated into a single simulation environment. The integrated environment allows the load flow interactions between the bulk power system and end-use loads to be explicitly modeled. Power system interactions are modeled down to time intervals as short as 1-second. Another practical issue is that the size and complexity of typical distribution systems makes direct integration with transmission models computationally intractable. Hence, the focus of the next main task is to develop reduced-order controllable models for some of the smart grid assets. In particular, HVAC units, which are a type of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs), are considered. The reduced-order modeling approach can be extended to other smart grid assets, like water heaters, PVs and PHEVs. Closed-loop control strategies are designed for a population of HVAC units under realistic conditions. The proposed load controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing the end-use performance. Finally, using the T&D simulation platform, the benefits to the bulk power system are demonstrated by controlling smart grid assets under different demand response closed-loop control strategies.

  3. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  4. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Roy, Subinit [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block AF, Sector 1, Kolkata- 700 064 (India)

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  5. Numerical calculation of the ion polarization in MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2015-09-01

    Ion polarization in the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is controlled by means of universal 3D spin rotators designed on the basis of "weak" solenoids. We use numerical calculations to demonstrate that the 3D rotators have negligible effect on the orbital properties of the ring. We present calculations of the polarization dynamics along the collider's orbit for both longitudinal and transverse polarization directions at a beam interaction point. We calculate the degree of depolarization due to the longitudinal and transverse beam emittances in case when the zero-integer spin resonance is compensated.

  6. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume II: Monte Carlo Calculations for Nuclear Reactors. In-Core Management of Four Reactor Types. In-Core Management in CANDU-PHW Reactors. Reactor Dynamics. The Theory of Neutron Leakage in Reactor Lattices. Index.

  7. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartzsch, Stefan Oelfke, Uwe; Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco; Bruer-Krisch, Elke

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartnez-Rovira et al. [Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy, Med. Phys. 39(1), 119131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside the field center, increased beam width and center to center distance due to the beam propagation from the collimator to the phantom surface and imperfect absorption in the absorber material of the Multislit Collimator. These corrections have an effect of approximately 10% on the valley dose and suffice to describe doses in MRT within the measurement uncertainties of currently available dosimetry techniques. Conclusions: The source for the first clinical pet trials in MRT is characterized with respect to its phase space and the photon polarization. The results suggest the use of a presented simplified phase space model in dose calculations and hence pave the way for alternative and fast dose calculation algorithms. They also show that the polarization is of minor importance for the clinical important peak and valley doses inside the microbeam field.

  8. Property:Building/MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingMeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Mean annual temperature during the...

  9. Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon-12 (ESP Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon-12 (ESP Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab-initio Reaction ...

  10. Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon-12 (ESP Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Carbon-12 (ESP Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab-initio Reaction Calculations for Carbon-12 (ESP ...

  11. Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays: Application to Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission Reactions on U-235 and Pu-239 ...

  12. Calculate Gas Phase Transport Properties of Pure Species and Mixtures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-10-20

    DRFM is a set of routines and data bases used to calculate gas phase transport properties of pure species and mixtures. The program(s) may stand alone or may be used as part of a larger simulation.

  13. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-10-26

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  14. Comparative study of defect transition energy calculation methods...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comparative study of defect transition energy calculation methods: The case of oxygen vacancy in In2O3 and ZnO Prev Next Title: Comparative study of defect transition energy ...

  15. CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR THE MOST REACTIVE DEGRADED CONFIGURATIONS OF THE FFTF SNF CODISPOSAL WP CONTAINING AN INTACT IDENT-69 CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Moscalu

    2002-08-28

    The objective of this calculation is to perform additional degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed in a 5-Defense High-Level Waste (5-DHLW) Waste Package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the most reactive degraded configurations of the codisposal WP with an almost intact Ident-69 container (breached and flooded but otherwise non-degraded) containing intact FFTF SNF pins. The configurations have been identified in a previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the present evaluations include additional relevant information that was left out of the original calculations. The additional information describes the exact distribution of fissile material in each container (DOE 2002a). The effects of the changes that have been included in the baseline design of the codisposal WP (CRWMS M&O 2000) are also investigated. The calculation determines the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for selected degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. These calculations will support the demonstration of the technical viability of the design solution adopted for disposing of MOX (FFTF) spent nuclear fuel in the potential repository. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (DOE 2002b) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310M2 in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-000010 REV 01 (BSC 2002).

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Distribution to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Distribution on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

  17. TU-F-18A-03: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using DECT Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di, Salvio A; Bedwani, S; Carrier, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new segmentation technique using dual energy CT (DECT) to overcome limitations related to segmentation from a standard Hounsfield unit (HU) to electron density (ED) calibration curve. Both methods are compared with a Monte Carlo analysis of dose distribution. Methods: DECT allows a direct calculation of both ED and effective atomic number (EAN) within a given voxel. The EAN is here defined as a function of the total electron cross-section of a medium. These values can be effectively acquired using a calibrated method from scans at two different energies. A prior stoichiometric calibration on a Gammex RMI phantom allows us to find the parameters to calculate EAN and ED within a voxel. Scans from a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source system provided the data for our study. A Monte Carlo analysis compares dose distribution simulated by dosxyz-nrc, considering a head phantom defined by both segmentation techniques. Results: Results from depth dose and dose profile calculations show that materials with different atomic compositions but similar EAN present differences of less than 1%. Therefore, it is possible to define a short list of basis materials from which density can be adapted to imitate interaction behavior of any tissue. Comparison of the dose distributions on both segmentations shows a difference of 50% in dose in areas surrounding bone at low energy. Conclusion: The presented segmentation technique allows a more accurate medium definition in each voxel, especially in areas of tissue transition. Since the behavior of human tissues is highly sensitive at low energies, this reduces the errors on calculated dose distribution. This method could be further developed to optimize the tissue characterization based on anatomic site.

  18. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  19. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-04-02

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

  20. K-effective of the world: and other concerns for Monte Carlo Eigenvalue calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Forrest B

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been used to compute k{sub eff} and the fundamental model eigenfunction of critical systems since the 1950s. Despite the sophistication of today's Monte Carlo codes for representing realistic geometry and physics interactions, correct results can be obtained in criticality problems only if users pay attention to source convergence in the Monte Carlo iterations and to running a sufficient number of neutron histories to adequately sample all significant regions of the problem. Recommended best practices for criticality calculations are reviewed and applied to several practical problems for nuclear reactors and criticality safety, including the 'K-effective of the World' problem. Numerical results illustrate the concerns about convergence and bias. The general conclusion is that with today's high-performance computers, improved understanding of the theory, new tools for diagnosing convergence (e.g., Shannon entropy of the fission distribution), and clear practical guidance for performing calculations, practitioners will have a greater degree of confidence than ever of obtaining correct results for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  1. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ≈ 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ≈ 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹⁸⁰Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹⁸⁰Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ≤ Z ≤ 85 and 100 ≤ N ≤ 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.

  2. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mller, Peter; Randrup, Jrgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ? 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ? 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ??Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ??Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ? Z ? 85 and 100 ? N ? 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of nuclear-chart plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.

  3. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ≈ 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ≈ 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al.more » [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹⁸⁰Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹⁸⁰Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ≤ Z ≤ 85 and 100 ≤ N ≤ 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.« less

  4. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  5. Basis functions for electronic structure calculations on spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Peter M. W. Loos, Pierre-François Agboola, Davids

    2014-12-28

    We introduce a new basis function (the spherical Gaussian) for electronic structure calculations on spheres of any dimension D. We find general expressions for the one- and two-electron integrals and propose an efficient computational algorithm incorporating the Cauchy-Schwarz bound. Using numerical calculations for the D = 2 case, we show that spherical Gaussians are more efficient than spherical harmonics when the electrons are strongly localized.

  6. Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Authors: Even, Wesley P. [1] ; Frey, Lucille H. [1] ; Fryer, Christopher L. [1] ; Young, Patrick [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Arizona State University Publication Date: 2013-04-29 OSTI Identifier: 1077017 Report Number(s):

  7. Ab Initio Calculations of Even Oxygen Isotopes with Chiral

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-Plus-Three-Nucleon Interactions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Initio Calculations of Even Oxygen Isotopes with Chiral Two-Plus-Three-Nucleon Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Calculations of Even Oxygen Isotopes with Chiral Two-Plus-Three-Nucleon Interactions Authors: Hergert, H. ; Binder, S. ; Calci, A. ; Langhammer, J. ; Roth, R. Publication Date: 2013-06-10 OSTI Identifier: 1102833 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical

  8. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  9. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials Authors: Lynn, J. E. ; Carlson, J. ; Epelbaum, E. ; Gandolfi, S. ; Gezerlis, A. ; Schwenk, A. Publication Date: 2014-11-04 OSTI Identifier: 1181024 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters

  11. Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams For

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Super-Heavy Element Production (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams For Super-Heavy Element Production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculations Of Damage To Rotating Targets Under Intense Beams For Super-Heavy Element Production In the production of the heaviest elements, the cross-sections for evaporation residues are very small, which, in turn, requires the usage of intense beams. Hence, the targets used tend to

  12. Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inputs (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty

  13. Comparison of Methods for Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Abbate, M J

    2012-01-19

    Various approximations for calculating radioactive heat transfer between parallel surfaces are evaluated. This is done by applying the approximations based on total emissivities to a special case of known spectral emissivities, for which exact heat transfer calculations are possible. Comparison of results indicates that the best approximation is obtained by basing the emissivity of the receiving surface primarily on the temperature of the emitter. A specific model is shown to give excellent agreement over a very wide range of values.

  14. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  15. Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy

  16. Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Fluorescent Lamps Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps This tool calculates the payback period for your calc retrofit project. Modify the default values to suit your project requirements. Existing incandescent lamp wattage Watts Incandescent lamp cost dollars Incandescent lamp life 1000 hours calc wattage Watts calc cost dollars calc life (6000 hours for moderate use, 10000 hours for high use) 8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours

  17. Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heating Applications Only | Department of Energy Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only Energy Cost Savings Calculator for Commercial Boilers: Closed Loop, Space Heating Applications Only This cost calculator is a screening tool that estimates a product's lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Learn more about the base model and other assumptions. Project Type Is this a new installation or a replacement? New Replacement What is the deliverable

  18. Theoretical calculating the thermodynamic properties of solid sorbents for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO{sub 2} capture applications (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Theoretical calculating the thermodynamic properties of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theoretical calculating the thermodynamic properties of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture applications Since current technologies for capturing CO{sub 2} to fight global climate change are still too energy intensive, there is a critical need for development

  19. Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lecture) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven Lecture) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven Lecture) Catalysts have been used to speed up chemical reactions as long as yeast has been used to make bread rise. Today, catalysts are used everywhere from home kitchens to industrial chemical factories. In the near future, new catalysts being

  20. CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described.

  1. TH-E-BRE-05: Analysis of Dosimetric Characteristics in Two Leaf Motion Calculator Algorithms for Sliding Window IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, L; Huang, B; Rowedder, B; Ma, B; Kuang, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Smart leaf motion calculator (SLMC) in Eclipse treatment planning system is an advanced fluence delivery modeling algorithm as it takes into account fine MLC features including inter-leaf leakage, rounded leaf tips, non-uniform leaf thickness, and the spindle cavity etc. In this study, SLMC and traditional Varian LMC (VLMC) algorithms were investigated, for the first time, in dosimetric characteristics and delivery accuracy of sliding window (SW) IMRT. Methods: The SW IMRT plans of 51 cancer cases were included to evaluate dosimetric characteristics and dose delivery accuracy from leaf motion calculated by SLMC and VLMC, respectively. All plans were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam Linac. The DVH and MUs of the plans were analyzed. Three patient specific QA tools - independent dose calculation software IMSure, Delta4 phantom, and EPID portal dosimetry were also used to measure the delivered dose distribution. Results: Significant differences in the MUs were observed between the two LMCs (p≤0.001).Gamma analysis shows an excellent agreement between the planned dose distribution calculated by both LMC algorithms and delivered dose distribution measured by three QA tools in all plans at 3%/3 mm, leading to a mean pass rate exceeding 97%. The mean fraction of pixels with gamma < 1 of SLMC is slightly lower than that of VLMC in the IMSure and Delta4 results, but higher in portal dosimetry (the highest spatial resolution), especially in complex cases such as nasopharynx. Conclusion: The study suggests that the two LMCs generates the similar target coverage and sparing patterns of critical structures. However, SLMC is modestly more accurate than VLMC in modeling advanced MLC features, which may lead to a more accurate dose delivery in SW IMRT. Current clinical QA tools might not be specific enough to differentiate the dosimetric discrepancies at the millimeter level calculated by these two LMC algorithms. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  2. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, ...

  3. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory ...

  4. Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PPL is installing a distribution management system (DMS), distribution automation (DA) ... allows PPL to move forward with future automation projects. "Lack of an advanced DMS was ...

  5. Hydrogen Transmission and Distribution Workshop | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Transmission and Distribution Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Hydrogen Transmission and Distribution ...

  6. US Solar Distributing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributing Place: California Product: California-based distributor of PV modules, inverters, mounting systems and accessories. References: US Solar Distributing1 This article...

  7. Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems This webinar was presented by research team...

  8. Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks You are accessing a document from ...

  9. Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With EERE support, eFormative Options...

  10. Distributed Energy Systems Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributed Energy Systems Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Distributed Energy Systems Corp Place: Wallingford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06492 Product: The former holding company...

  11. IPCC Data Distribution Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Distribution Centre Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IPCC Data Distribution Centre AgencyCompany Organization: World Meteorological Organization,...

  12. ARM - Data Sharing and Distribution Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DocumentationData Sharing and Distribution Policy Policies, Plans, Descriptions Data Documentation Home Data Sharing and Distribution Policy Data Management and Documentation Plan ...

  13. Fact Sheet: 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alice Orrell, Bret Barker

    2013-04-06

    This fact sheet summarizes findings from the forthcoming 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report, offering a snapshot of the distributed wind market based on 2012 data.

  14. Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Distributed Generation Technologies Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives Retrieved from "http:...

  15. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, S.W.

    2003-05-22

    Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

  17. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, Arthur; Ivanov, Kostadin; Arramova, Maria; Hales, Jason

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  18. Distribution Integrity Management Plant (DIMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Jerome F.

    2012-05-07

    This document is the distribution integrity management plan (Plan) for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan meets the requirements of 49 CFR Part 192, Subpart P Distribution Integrity Management Programs (DIMP) for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. This Plan was developed by reviewing records and interviewing LANL personnel. The records consist of the design, construction, operation and maintenance for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System. The records system for the LANL Natural Gas Distribution System is limited, so the majority of information is based on the judgment of LANL employees; the maintenance crew, the Corrosion Specialist and the Utilities and Infrastructure (UI) Civil Team Leader. The records used in this report are: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 7100.1-1, Report of Main and Service Line Inspection, Natural Gas Leak Survey, Gas Leak Response Report, Gas Leak and Repair Report, and Pipe-to-Soil Recordings. The specific elements of knowledge of the infrastructure used to evaluate each threat and prioritize risks are listed in Sections 6 and 7, Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization respectively. This Plan addresses additional information needed and a method for gaining that data over time through normal activities. The processes used for the initial assessment of Threat Evaluation and Risk Prioritization are the methods found in the Simple, Handy Risk-based Integrity Management Plan (SHRIMP{trademark}) software package developed by the American Pipeline and Gas Agency (APGA) Security and Integrity Foundation (SIF). SHRIMP{trademark} uses an index model developed by the consultants and advisors of the SIF. Threat assessment is performed using questions developed by the Gas Piping Technology Company (GPTC) as modified and added to by the SHRIMP{trademark} advisors. This Plan is required to be reviewed every 5 years to be continually refined and improved. Records for all piping system installed after the effective date of this Plan will be captured and retained in the UI records documentation system. Primary Utility Asbuilts are maintained by Utilities Mapping (UMAP) and additional records are maintained on the N drive. Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) are stored on the N drive under configuration management and kept up by Utilities and Infrastructure Division Office (UI-DO). Records include, at a minimum, the location where new piping and appurtenances are installed and the material of which they are constructed.

  19. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. ... The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D ...

  20. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. Results: As expected, RE{sub preplan} for our edema model indicated underdosage in the calculation volume with a clear dependence on seed and calculation point positions, and increased with increasing values of {Delta} and T. Values of RE{sub preplan} were generally larger near the ends of the virtual prostate in the RPC phantom compared with more central locations. For edema characteristics similar to the population average values previously measured at our center, i.e., {Delta}=0.2 and T=28 d, mean values of RE{sub preplan} in an axial plane located 1.5 cm from the center of the seed distribution were 8.3% for {sup 131}Cs seeds, 7.5% for {sup 103}Pd seeds, and 2.2% for {sup 125}I seeds. Maximum values of RE{sub preplan} in the same plane were about 1.5 times greater. Note that detailed results strictly apply only for loose seed implants where the seeds are fixed in tissue and move in synchrony with that tissue. Conclusions: A dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema was developed for which cumulative dose can be written in closed form. The method yields values for RE{sub preplan} that differ from those for spatially isotropic edema. The method is suitable for calculating pre- and postimplant dosimetry correction factors for clinical seed configurations when edema characteristics can be measured or estimated.

  1. Secure key storage and distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Punit

    2015-06-02

    This disclosure describes a distributed, fault-tolerant security system that enables the secure storage and distribution of private keys. In one implementation, the security system includes a plurality of computing resources that independently store private keys provided by publishers and encrypted using a single security system public key. To protect against malicious activity, the security system private key necessary to decrypt the publication private keys is not stored at any of the computing resources. Rather portions, or shares of the security system private key are stored at each of the computing resources within the security system and multiple security systems must communicate and share partial decryptions in order to decrypt the stored private key.

  2. Nation Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    NRADA1.1 is a supplement to NRADA1.0. This version eliminates several bugs, and includes a few new features. The diskettes consist of a distributed subset of information representative of the extensive NRA databases and database access software maintained at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems. Information in the NRA Summary, Inventory, and Bibliographic database is available upon request. Printed reports have been provided inmore » the past. The completion of the NRADA1.1 is the realization of a long standing goal of the staff and advisory committee. Information may be easily distributed to the user in an electronic form which preserves the relationships between the various databases.« less

  3. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  4. Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-08-17

    A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

  5. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  6. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  7. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley; Clark, Nancy H.; Boyes, John D.; Ranade, Satishkumar J.

    2007-07-03

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  8. Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    April 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as

  9. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Photo of a man in safety glasses working with laboratory equipment. NREL's distributed grid integration researchers conduct testing and evaluation at the one-of-a-kind Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL researchers work on advanced approaches to grid interconnection and control technologies, energy management, and grid support applications by performing testing, data visualization, modeling and analysis, and developing standards and codes. Through these efforts, NREL helps

  10. Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rules Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules Applications and micro-benchmarks for the Crossroads/NERSC-9 procurement. You can find more information by clicking on the header for each of the topics listed below. Change Log Change and update notes for the benchmark suite. Application Benchmarks The following applications will be used by the Sustained System Improvement metric in measuring the performance improvement of proposed systems relative to NERSC's Edison platform. General Run Rules

  11. Fuel cells in distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Sullivan, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    In the past the vertically integrated electric utility industry has not utilized Distributed Generation (DG) because it was viewed as competition to central station power production. Gas utilities have been heavily and aggressively involved in the promotion of gas fired DG because for them it is additional load that may also balance the winter load. With deregulation and restructuring of the electricity industry DG is now viewed in a different light. For those utilities that have sold their generation assets DG can be a new retail service to provide to their customers. For those who are still vertically integrated, DG can be an asset management tool at the distribution level. DG can be utilized to defer capital investments involving line and substation upgrades. Coupled to this new interest in DG technologies and their performance characteristics are the associated interests in implementation issues. These range from the codes and standards requirements and hardware for interfacing to the grid as well as C{sup 3}-I (command, control, communication--intelligence) issues. The latter involves dispatching on-grid or customer sited resources, monitoring their performance and tracking the economic transactions. Another important aspect is the impact of DG resources (size, number and location) on service area dynamic behavior (power quality, reliability, stability, etc.). EPRI has ongoing programs addressing all these aspects of DG and the distribution grid. Since fuel cells can be viewed as electrochemical engines, and as with thermomechanical engines, there doesn't have to be a best fuel cell. Each engine can serve many markets and some will be better suited than others in a specific market segment (e.g. spark ignition in cars and turbines in planes). This paper will address the status of developing fuel cell technologies and their application to various market areas within the context of Distributed Generation.

  12. Valence-orbital-electron momentum distributions for butanone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G. Q.; Deng, J. K.; Li, B.; Ren, X. G.; Ning, C. G.

    2005-12-15

    We report here the measurements of the complete valence shell binding energy spectra and the valence-orbital momentum profiles of butanone using the binary (e,2e) electron momentum spectroscopy. The impact energy was 1200 eV plus the binding energy and the symmetric noncoplanar kinematics was used. The experimental momentum profiles of the valence orbitals are compared with the theoretical momentum distributions calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods with various basis sets. The experimental measurements are generally described by theoretical calculations except for summed 4a{sup ''}, 15a{sup '}, 3a{sup ''}, and 14a{sup '} orbital and summed 8a{sup '}, 7a{sup '}, and 6a{sup '} orbitals.

  13. Distributed resonance self-shielding using the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altiparmakov, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the equivalence principle to allow distributed resonance self-shielding in a multi-region fuel configuration. Rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability is applied in order to establish equivalence between the actual fuel configuration and a homogeneous mixture of hydrogen and resonant absorber, which is a commonly used model to calculate library tables of resonance integrals. The main steps in derivation are given along with the basic physics assumptions on which the presented approach relies. The method has been implemented in the lattice code WIMS-AECL and routinely used for calculation of CANDU-type reactor lattices. Its capabilities are illustrated by comparison of WIMS-AECL and MCNP results of {sup 238}U resonance capture in a CANDU lattice cell. In order to determine optimal rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability, the calculations were carried out by varying the number of rational terms from 1 to 6. The results show that 4 terms are sufficient. The further increase of the number of terms affects the computing time, while the impact on accuracy is negligible. To illustrate the convergence of the results, the fuel subdivision is gradually refined varying the number of fuel pin subdivisions from 1 to 32 equal-area annuli. The results show very good agreement with the reference MCNP calculation. (authors)

  14. Jefferson Lab's Distributed Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2006-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) occasionally experiences fast intermittent beam instabilities that are difficult to isolate and result in downtime. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system is being developed to detect and quickly locate such instabilities. It will consist of multiple Ethernet based data acquisition chassis distributed throughout the seven-eights of a mile CEBAF site. Each chassis will monitor various control system signals that are only available locally and/or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The chassis will collect data at rates up to 40 Msps in circular buffers that can be frozen and unrolled after an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults and be distributed via a custom fiber optic event trigger network. This triggering scheme will allow all the data acquisition chassis to be triggered simultaneously and provide a snapshot of relevant CEBAF control signals. The data will then be automatically analyzed for frequency content and transients to determine if and where instabilities exist.

  15. Air ingression calculations for selected plant transients using MELCOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    Two sets of MELCOR calculations have been completed studying the effects of air ingression on the consequences of various severe accident scenarios. One set of calculations analyzed a station blackout with surge line failure prior to vessel breach, starting from nominal operating conditions; the other set of calculations analyzed a station blackout occurring during shutdown (refueling) conditions. Both sets of analyses were for the Surry plant, a three-loop Westinghouse PWR. For both accident scenarios, a basecase calculation was done, and then repeated with air ingression from containment into the core region following core degradation and vessel failure. In addition to the two sets of analyses done for this program, a similar air-ingression sensitivity study was done as part of a low-power/shutdown PRA, with results summarized here; that PRA study also analyzed a station blackout occurring during shutdown (refueling) conditions, but for the Grand Gulf plant, a BWR/6 with Mark III containment. These studies help quantify the amount of air that would have to enter the core region to have a significant impact on the severe accident scenario, and demonstrate that one effect, of air ingression is substantial enhancement of ruthenium release. These calculations also show that, while the core clad temperatures rise more quickly due to oxidation with air rather than steam, the core also degrades and relocates more quickly, so that no sustained, enhanced core heatup is predicted to occur with air ingression.

  16. EXTERNAL CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR DOE SNF CODISPOSAL WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Radulescu

    2002-10-18

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the potential for criticality for the fissile material that could accumulate in the near-field (invert) and in the far-field (host rock) beneath the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the proposed monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The scope of this calculation is limited to the following DOE SNF types: Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Enrico Fermi, Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Fort St. Vrain, Melt and Dilute, Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, and Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics reactor (TRIGA). The results of this calculation are intended to be used for estimating the probability of criticality in the near-field and in the far-field. There are no limitations on use of the results of this calculation. The calculation is associated with the waste package design and was developed in accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan for: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and Plutonium Disposition Work Packages'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC [BSC], 2002a). This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310Ml in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-0000 10 REV 01 (BSC 2002a).

  17. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seker, V.; Thomas, J. W.; Downar, T. J.; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k{sub eff} and the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron transport and CFD solutions. Previous researchers have successfully performed Monte Carlo calculations with limited thermal feedback. In fact, much of the validation of the deterministic neutronics transport code DeCART in was performed using the Monte Carlo code McCARD which employs a limited thermal feedback model. However, for a broader range of temperature/fluid applications it was desirable to couple Monte Carlo to a more sophisticated temperature fluid solution such as CFD. This paper focuses on the methods used to couple Monte Carlo to CFD and their application to a series of simple test problems.

  18. Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average Commercial Price Commercial Price - Local Distribution Companies Commerical Price - Marketers Commercial % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History District of

  19. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar May 23, 2012 | Department of Energy Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects. PDF icon regulatory_considerations_052312.pdf More Documents & Publications Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for

  20. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar May 23, 2012 | Department of Energy Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects PDF icon regulatory_considerations_052312.pdf More Documents & Publications Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory

  1. Process-dependent transverse momentum distributions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard Musch

    2011-12-01

    Certain single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY) can be explained by transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) that are predicted to differ in sign for SIDIS and DY. On the lattice, we can use non-local operators with U-shaped Wilson lines to study these TMDs, in particular the Sivers- and the Boer-Mulders function. We discuss the method, its limitations and preliminary results from an exploratory calculation using lattices generated by the MILC and LHP collaborations.

  2. Probabilistic Vulnerability Assessment Based on Power Flow and Voltage Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jian; Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak C.; Ferryman, Thomas A.

    2010-04-30

    Risk assessment of large scale power systems has been an important problem in power system reliability study. Probabilistic technique provides a powerful tool to solve the task. In this paper, we present the results of a study on probabilistic vulnerability assessment on WECC system. Cumulant based expansion method is applied to obtain the probabilistic distribution function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of power flows on transmission lines and voltage. Overall risk index based on the system vulnerability analysis is calculated using the WECC system. The simulation results based on WECC system is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The methodology can be applied to the risk analysis on large scale power systems.

  3. Materials Databases Infrastructure Constructed by First Principles Calculations: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Lianshan

    2015-10-13

    The First Principles calculations, especially the calculation based on High-Throughput Density Functional Theory, have been widely accepted as the major tools in atom scale materials design. The emerging super computers, along with the powerful First Principles calculations, have accumulated hundreds of thousands of crystal and compound records. The exponential growing of computational materials information urges the development of the materials databases, which not only provide unlimited storage for the daily increasing data, but still keep the efficiency in data storage, management, query, presentation and manipulation. This review covers the most cutting edge materials databases in materials design, and their hot applications such as in fuel cells. By comparing the advantages and drawbacks of these high-throughput First Principles materials databases, the optimized computational framework can be identified to fit the needs of fuel cell applications. The further development of high-throughput DFT materials database, which in essence accelerates the materials innovation, is discussed in the summary as well.

  4. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  5. Chemical-equilibrium calculations for aqueous geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1981-05-01

    Results from four chemical-equilibrium computer programs, REDEQL.EPAK, GEOCHEM, WATEQF, and SENECA2, have been compared with experimental solubility data for some simple systems of interest with geothermal brines. Seven test cases involving solubilities of CaCO/sub 3/, amorphous SiO/sub 2/, CaSO/sub 4/, and BaSO/sub 4/ at various temperatures from 25 to 300/sup 0/C and in NaCl or HCl solutions of 0 to 4 molal have been examined. Significant differences between calculated results and experimental data occurred in some cases. These differences were traced to inaccuracies in free-energy or equilibrium-constant data and in activity coefficients used by the programs. Although currently available chemical-equilibrium programs can give reasonable results for these calculations, considerable care must be taken in the selection of free-energy data and methods of calculating activity coefficients.

  6. Calculating nonlocal optical properties of structures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-16

    In a recent Letter [J. M. McMahon, S. K. Gray, and G. C. Schatz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 097403 (2009)], we outlined a computational method to calculate the optical properties of structures with a spatially nonlocal dielectric function. In this paper, we detail the full method and verify it against analytical results for cylindrical nanowires. Then, as examples of our method, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. We first calculate the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of thin films. Because of their simplicity, these systems demonstrate clearly the longitudinal (or volume) plasmons characteristic of nonlocal effects, which result in anomalous absorption and plasmon blueshifting. We then study the optical properties of spherical nanoparticles, which also exhibit such nonlocal effects. Finally, we compare the maximum and average electric field enhancements around nanowires of various shapes to local theory predictions. We demonstrate that when nonlocal effects are included, significant decreases in such properties can occur.

  7. How Distributed Wind Works | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How Distributed Wind Works How Distributed Wind Works Your browser does not support iframes. Distributed wind energy systems are commonly installed on, but are not limited to, residential, agricultural, commercial, industrial, and community sites, and can range in size from a 5-kilowatt turbine at a home to a multi-megawatt (MW) turbine at a manufacturing facility. Distributed wind systems are connected on the customer side of the meter to meet the onsite load or directly to distribution or

  8. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting asub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  9. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min.

  10. Calculation of anharmonic couplings and THz linewidths in crystalline PETN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereverzev, Andrey Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L.

    2014-03-14

    We have developed a method for calculating the cubic anharmonic couplings in molecular crystals for normal modes with the zero wave vector in the framework of classical mechanics, and have applied it, combined with perturbation theory, to obtain the linewidths of all infrared absorption lines of crystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate in the terahertz region (<100 cm{sup ?1}). Contributions of the up- and down-conversion processes to the total linewidth were calculated. The computed linewidths are in qualitative agreement with experimental data and the results of molecular dynamics simulations. Quantum corrections to the linewidths in the terahertz region are shown to be negligible.

  11. Fast, narrow-band computer model for radiation calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Z.; Holmstedt, G.

    1997-01-01

    A fast, narrow-band computer model, FASTNB, which predicts the radiation intensity in a general nonisothermal and nonhomogeneous combustion environment, has been developed. The spectral absorption coefficients of the combustion products, including carbon dioxide, water vapor, and soot, are calculated based on the narrow-band model. FASTNB provides an accurate calculation at reasonably high speed. Compared with Grosshandler`s narrow-band model, RADCAL, which has been verified quite extensively against experimental measurements, FASTNB is more than 20 times faster and gives almost exactly the same results.

  12. Boiler efficiency calculation for multiple fuel burning boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodabakhsh, F.; Munukutla, S.; Clary, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    A rigorous method based on the output/loss approach is developed for calculating the coal flow rate for multiple fuel burning boilers. It is assumed that the ultimate analyses of all the fuels are known. In addition, it is assumed that the flow rates of all the fuels with the exception of coal are known. The calculations are performed iteratively, with the first iteration taking into consideration coal as the only fuel. The results converge to the correct answer after a few number of iterations, typically four or five.

  13. SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH RECOVERY ACT FUNDING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 10-14A STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 10-07A EECBG PROGRAM NOTICE 10-08A EFFECTIVE DATE: September 29, 2010 SUBJECT: CALCULATION OF JOB CREATION THROUGH DOE RECOVERY ACT FUNDING REFERENCE: OMB Memorandum M-10-08 Updated Guidance on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Data Quality, Non-Reporting Recipients, and Reporting of Job Estimates, December 18, 2009. 1.0 PURPOSE: Provides additional guidance to grantees on the methodology for calculating jobs created and

  14. RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Musat

    2005-03-07

    This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results.

  15. Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Faucets and Showerheads Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads Vary utility cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to the default value). Defaults Water Saving Product Faucet Showerhead Faucet Showerhead Flow Rate gpm 2.2 gpm 2.5 gpm Water Cost (including waste water charges) $/1000 gal $4/1000 gal $4/1000 gal Gas Cost $/therm 0.60 $/therm 0.60 $/therm Electricity Cost $/kWh 0.06

  16. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Timothy D.; Swift, Jonathan

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ?}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ?3 R{sub ?} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  17. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.

    2015-07-13

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 10–30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  18. Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An EGS4 Monte Carlo study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: An EGS4 Monte Carlo study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: An EGS4 Monte Carlo study We present EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations of the spatial distribution of the dose deposited by a single x-ray pencil beam, a planar microbeam, and an array of parallel planar microbeams as

  19. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Imad; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15 MV compared with 6 MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

  20. Distributed Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-11-11

    DDACE is a C++ object-oriented software library for the design and analysis of computer experiments. DDACE can be used to generate samples from a variety of sampling techniques. These samples may be used as input to a application code. DDACE also contains statistical tools such as response surface models and correlation coefficients to analyze input/output relationships between variables in an application code. DDACE can generate input values for uncertain variables within a user's application. Formore » example, a user might like to vary a temperature variable as well as some material variables in a series of simulations. Through the series of simulations the user might be looking for optimal settings of parameters based on some user criteria. Or the user may be interested in the sensitivity to input variability shown by an output variable. In either case, the user may provide information about the suspected ranges and distributions of a set of input variables, along with a sampling scheme, and DDACE will generate input points based on these specifications. The input values generated by DDACE and the one or more outputs computed through the user's application code can be analyzed with a variety of statistical methods. This can lead to a wealth of information about the relationships between the variables in the problem. While statistical and mathematical packages may be employeed to carry out the analysis on the input/output relationships, DDACE also contains some tools for analyzing the simulation data. DDACE incorporates a software package called MARS (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines), developed by Jerome Friedman. MARS is used for generating a spline surface fit of the data. With MARS, a model simplification may be calculated using the input and corresponding output, values for the user's application problem. The MARS grid data may be used for generating 3-dimensional response surface plots of the simulation data. DDACE also contains an implementation of an algorithm by Michael McKay to compute variable correlations. DDACE can also be used to carry out a main-effects analysis to calculate the sensitivity of an output variable to each of the varied inputs taken individually. 1 Continued« less

  1. Distributed optimization system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurtado, John E.; Dohrmann, Clark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2003-06-10

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  2. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by BATTELLE for the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Printed in the United States of America Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062; ph: (865) 576-8401 fax: (865) 576-5728 email: reports@adonis.osti.gov Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee

  3. Universality of Charged Multiplicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    1981-12-01

    The charged multiplicity distributions of the diffractive and non-diffractive components of hadronic interactions, as well as those of hadronic states produced in other reactions, are described well by a universal Gaussian function that depends only on the available mass for pionization, has a maximum at n{sub o} {approx_equal} 2M{sup 1/2}, where M is the available mass in GeV, and a peak to width ratio n{sub o}/D {approx_equal} 2.

  4. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by BATTELLE for the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Printed in the United States of America Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062; ph: (865) 576-8401 fax: (865) 576-5728 email: reports@adonis.osti.gov Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee

  5. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  6. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto; Owens, Jeff F.

    2013-07-01

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  7. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster Please enter your name and email address in the boxes provided, then type your message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Distributed Grid Integration Home Capabilities Projects Research Staff Working with Us Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a

  8. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Lee, Junggi; Lee, Junhyun; Park, Jongsun; Park, Kyungsun; Seough, Jungjoon [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jinhy [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-20

    The present paper provides a possible explanation for the solar wind electron velocity distribution functions possessing asymmetric energetic tails. By numerically solving the electrostatic weak turbulence equations that involve nonlinear interactions among electrons, Langmuir waves, and ion-sound waves, it is shown that different ratios of ion-to-electron temperatures lead to the generation of varying degrees of asymmetric tails. The present finding may be applicable to observations in the solar wind near 1 AU and in other regions of the heliosphere and interplanetary space.

  9. Numerical estimation of adsorption energy distributions from adsorption isotherm data with the expectation-maximization method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, B.J.; Guiochon, G. |

    1993-08-01

    The expectation-maximization (EM) method of parameter estimation is used to calculate adsorption energy distributions of molecular probes from their adsorption isotherms. EM does not require prior knowledge of the distribution function or the isotherm, requires no smoothing of the isotherm data, and converges with high stability towards the maximum-likelihood estimate. The method is therefore robust and accurate at high iteration numbers. The EM algorithm is tested with simulated energy distributions corresponding to unimodal Gaussian, bimodal Gaussian, Poisson distributions, and the distributions resulting from Misra isotherms. Theoretical isotherms are generated from these distributions using the Langmuir model, and then chromatographic band profiles are computed using the ideal model of chromatography. Noise is then introduced in the theoretical band profiles comparable to those observed experimentally. The isotherm is then calculated using the elution-by-characteristic points method. The energy distribution given by the EM method is compared to the original one. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the House and Jaycock algorithm HILDA, and shown to be superior in terms of robustness, accuracy, and information theory. The effect of undersampling of the high-pressure/low-energy region of the adsorption is reported and discussed for the EM algorithm, as well as the effect of signal-to-noise ratio on the degree of heterogeneity that may be estimated experimentally.

  10. Fuzzy-probabilistic calculations of water-balance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete, or subjective information, which may limit the application of conventional stochastic methods in predicting hydrogeologic conditions and associated uncertainty. Instead, redictions and uncertainty analysis can be made using uncertain input parameters expressed as probability boxes, intervals, and fuzzy numbers. The objective of this paper is to present the theory for, and a case study as an application of, the fuzzyprobabilistic approach, ombining probability and possibility theory for simulating soil water balance and assessing associated uncertainty in the components of a simple waterbalance equation. The application of this approach is demonstrated using calculations with the RAMAS Risk Calc code, to ssess the propagation of uncertainty in calculating potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and infiltration-in a case study at the Hanford site, Washington, USA. Propagation of uncertainty into the results of water-balance calculations was evaluated by hanging he types of models of uncertainty incorporated into various input parameters. The results of these fuzzy-probabilistic calculations are compared to the conventional Monte Carlo simulation approach and estimates from field observations at the Hanford site.

  11. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  12. Calculation of Job Creation Through DOE Recovery Act Funding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy Program, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program notices calculating job creation under projects selected by states, local governments, Indian tribes, and overseas U.S. territories with funding under the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act.

  13. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  14. Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1990-07-02

    This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

  15. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  16. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  17. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  18. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  19. Bridging experiment and theory: A template for unifying NMR data and electronic structure calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, David M. L.; Cho, Herman; de Jong, Wibe A.

    2016-02-09

    Here, the testing of theoretical models with experimental data is an integral part of the scientific method, and a logical place to search for new ways of stimulating scientific productivity. Often experiment/theory comparisons may be viewed as a workflow comprised of well-defined, rote operations distributed over several distinct computers, as exemplified by the way in which predictions from electronic structure theories are evaluated with results from spectroscopic experiments. For workflows such as this, which may be laborious and time consuming to perform manually, software that could orchestrate the operations and transfer results between computers in a seamless and automated fashionmore » would offer major efficiency gains. Such tools also promise to alter how researchers interact with data outside their field of specialization by, e.g., making raw experimental results more accessible to theorists, and the outputs of theoretical calculations more readily comprehended by experimentalists.« less

  20. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  1. Hartree-Fock calculation of the differential photoionization cross sections of small Li clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitskiy, S. A.; Artemyev, A. N.; Jänkälä, K.; Lagutin, B. M.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2015-01-21

    Cross sections and angular distribution parameters for the single-photon ionization of all electron orbitals of Li{sub 2−8} are systematically computed in a broad interval of the photoelectron kinetic energies for the energetically most stable geometry of each cluster. Calculations of the partial photoelectron continuum waves in clusters are carried out by the single center method within the Hartree-Fock approximation. We study photoionization cross sections per one electron and analyze in some details general trends in the photoionization of inner and outer shells with respect to the size and geometry of a cluster. The present differential cross sections computed for Li{sub 2} are in a good agreement with the available theoretical data, whereas those computed for Li{sub 3−8} clusters can be considered as theoretical predictions.

  2. Neutron and weak-charge distributions of the 48Ca nucleus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hagen, Gaute; Forssen, Christian; Nazarewicz, Witold; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Bacca, S.; Barnea, Nir; Carlsson, Boris; Drischler, Christian; Hebeler, Kai; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; et al

    2015-11-02

    What is the size of the atomic nucleus? This deceivably simple question is difficult to answer. Although the electric charge distributions in atomic nuclei were measured accurately already half a century ago, our knowledge of the distribution of neutrons is still deficient. In addition to constraining the size of atomic nuclei, the neutron distribution also impacts the number of nuclei that can exist and the size of neutron stars. We present an ab initio calculation of the neutron distribution of the neutron-rich nucleus 48Ca. We show that the neutron skin (difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions)more » is significantly smaller than previously thought. We also make predictions for the electric dipole polarizability and the weak form factor; both quantities that are at present targeted by precision measurements. Here, based on ab initio results for 48Ca, we provide a constraint on the size of a neutron star.« less

  3. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  4. Agent Communications using Distributed Metaobjects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.; Spires, Shannon V.

    1999-06-10

    There are currently two proposed standards for agent communication languages, namely, KQML (Finin, Lobrou, and Mayfield 1994) and the FIPA ACL. Neither standard has yet achieved primacy, and neither has been evaluated extensively in an open environment such as the Internet. It seems prudent therefore to design a general-purpose agent communications facility for new agent architectures that is flexible yet provides an architecture that accepts many different specializations. In this paper we exhibit the salient features of an agent communications architecture based on distributed metaobjects. This architecture captures design commitments at a metaobject level, leaving the base-level design and implementation up to the agent developer. The scope of the metamodel is broad enough to accommodate many different communication protocols, interaction protocols, and knowledge sharing regimes through extensions to the metaobject framework. We conclude that with a powerful distributed object substrate that supports metaobject communications, a general framework can be developed that will effectively enable different approaches to agent communications in the same agent system. We have implemented a KQML-based communications protocol and have several special-purpose interaction protocols under development.

  5. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes of this WD&R model (CRWMS M&O 2000b) are to quantify and evaluate the distribution and drainage of seepage water within emplacement drifts during the period of compliance for post-closure performance. The model bounds the fraction of water entering the drift that will be prevented from contacting the waste by the combined effects of engineered controls on water distribution and on water removal. For example, water can be removed during pre-closure operation by ventilation and after closure by natural drainage into the fractured rock. Engineered drains could be used, if demonstrated to be necessary and effective, to ensure that adequate drainage capacity is provided. This report provides the screening arguments for certain Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that are related to water distribution and removal in the EBS. Applicable acceptance criteria from the Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs) developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; and 1999d) are also addressed in this document.

  6. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-15

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, {sup 48}Ca, and deformed, {sup 244}Pu, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  7. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  8. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2006-06-16

    Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

  9. Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Functions from surface bump maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, B.K.

    1988-06-17

    The interaction of light and matter define what we see. This interaction can be characterized by a function which relates incoming light to the distribution of outgoing or reflected light. The Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Function (BRDF) is just such a function. Computer graphics scientists attempting to model this function have made simplifying assumptions about the reflecting surfaces. These simpler models have produced adequate results but only handle very uniform or isotropic surface characteristics. Reality on the other hand is filled with a variety of surface textures which result in a variety of BRDFs. This thesis broadens the class of BRDFs which can be used in computer graphics to render objects more realistically. It presents two enhancements to previous work done by the author. First, it describes a method for the approximation of surface absorption of light through the use of a computed geometric attentuation factor. This factor is computed by calculating the parts of the surface which are visible in the incident and reflecting directions. Specifically, it describes the algorithms and theory behind the visibility calculations and how it affects the reflection properties of the surface. Second, it describes a method for computing Fresnel's Law for conducting and dielectric surface materials and how Fresnel's Law affects surface reflectivity. This work also presents a method for rendering objects using the computed BRDFs. 38 refs., 29 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Ultraviolet photodissociation of OCS: Product energy and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBane, G. C. [Department of Chemistry, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan 49401 (United States); Schmidt, J. A.; Johnson, M. S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Schinke, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Dynamik und Selbstorganisation (MPIDS), D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-03-07

    The ultraviolet photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was studied using three-dimensional potential energy surfaces and both quantum mechanical dynamics calculations and classical trajectory calculations including surface hopping. The transition dipole moment functions used in an earlier study [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 054313 (2012)] were improved with more extensive treatment of excited electronic states. The new functions indicate a much larger contribution from the 1 {sup 1}A{sup Double-Prime} state ({sup 1}{Sigma}{sup -} in linear OCS) than was found in the previous work. The new transition dipole functions yield absorption spectra that agree with experimental data just as well as the earlier ones. The previously reported potential energy surfaces were also empirically modified in the region far from linearity. The resulting product state distributions P{sub v,j}, angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(j), and carbon monoxide rotational alignment parameters A{sub 0}{sup (2)}(j) agree reasonably well with the experimental results, while those computed from the earlier transition dipole and potential energy functions do not. The higher-j peak in the bimodal rotational distribution is shown to arise from nonadiabatic transitions from state 2 {sup 1}A{sup Prime} to the OCS ground state late in the dissociation.

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  12. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0° to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.

  13. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and newmore » predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.« less

  14. Initial RattleSnake Calculations of the Hot Zero Power BEAVRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ellis; J. Ortensi; Y. Wang; K. Smith; R.C. Martineau

    2014-01-01

    The validation of the Idaho National Laboratory's next generation of reactor physics analysis codes is an essential and ongoing task. The validation process requires a large undertaking and includes detailed, realistic models that can accurately predict the behavior of an operational nuclear reactor. Over the past few years the INL has developed the RattleSnake application and supporting tools on the MOOSE framework to perform these reactor physics calculations. RattleSnake solves the linearized Boltzmann transport equation with a variety of solution meth­ ods. Various traditional reactor physics benchmarks have already been performed, but a more realistic light water reactor comparison was needed to solidify the status of the code and deter­ mine its fidelity. The INL team decided to use the Benchmark for Evaluation and Validation of Reactor Simulations, which was made available in early 2013. This benchmark is a one­ of-a-kind document assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which includes two cycles of detailed, measured PWR operational data. The results from this initial study of the hot zero power conditions show the current INL analysis procedure with DRAGON4 cross section preparation and using the low order diffusion solver in RattleSnake for the whole core calculations yield very encouraging results for PWR analysis. The radial assembly power distributions, radial detector measurements and control rod worths were computed with good accuracy. The computation of the isothermal temperature coefficients of reactivity require further study.

  15. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named tebow, was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  16. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0°more » to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.« less

  17. Performance upgrades to the MCNP6 burnup capability for large scale depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fensin, M. L.; Galloway, J. D.; James, M. R.

    2015-04-11

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5, MCNP6 combined the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. The new MCNP6 depletion capability was first showcased at the International Congress for Advancements in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP) meeting in 2012. At that conference the new capabilities addressed included the combined distributive and shared memory parallel architecture for the burnup capability, improved memory management, physics enhancements, and new predictability as compared to the H.B Robinson Benchmark. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a special purpose cluster named “tebow,” was constructed such to maximize available RAM per CPU, as well as leveraging swap space with solid state hard drives, to allow larger scale depletion calculations (allowing for significantly more burnable regions than previously examined). As the MCNP6 burnup capability was scaled to larger numbers of burnable regions, a noticeable slowdown was realized.This paper details two specific computational performance strategies for improving calculation speedup: (1) retrieving cross sections during transport; and (2) tallying mechanisms specific to burnup in MCNP. To combat this slowdown new performance upgrades were developed and integrated into MCNP6 1.2.

  18. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  19. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-Andr

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 201090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (201090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation, Health Phys. 44, 507517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities, Med. Phys. 34, 13981404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions: The data of this work allow for the accurate calculation of structural shielding thickness, taking into account the spectral variation with shield thickness, and broad beam conditions, in a realistic geometry. The simplicity of calculations also obviates the need for the use of crude transmission data estimates such as the half and tenth value layer indices. Although this study was primarily designed for brachytherapy, results might also be useful for radiology and nuclear medicine facility design, provided broad beam conditions apply.

  20. Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H.

    2012-07-01

    Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

  1. Distributed PV Adoption in Maine Through 2021

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, Pieter; Sigrin, Ben

    2015-11-06

    NREL has used its dSolar (distributed solar) model to generate low-medium-high estimates of distributed PV adoption in Maine through 2021. This presentation gives a high-level overview of the model and modeling results.

  2. DWEA July Webinar: Financing Distributed Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Distributed Wind Energy Association (DWEA) for a webinar on financing distributed wind. Presenters are Chris Diaz, Seminole Financial Services LLC, and Russell Tencer, founder and CEO of...

  3. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others. Natural convection can also be used to reduce the number of auxiliary heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures are predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Experimental results are summarized based on the monitoring of 15 passive solar buildings which employ a wide variety of geometrical configurations including natural convective loops.

  4. Calculation of the spatial resolution in two-photon absorption spectroscopy applied to plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Fuentes, L. M.; Grützmacher, K.; Pérez, C. Rosa, M. I. de la

    2014-10-07

    We report a detailed characterization of the spatial resolution provided by two-photon absorption spectroscopy suited for plasma diagnosis via the 1S-2S transition of atomic hydrogen for optogalvanic detection and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A precise knowledge of the spatial resolution is crucial for a correct interpretation of measurements, if the plasma parameters to be analysed undergo strong spatial variations. The present study is based on a novel approach which provides a reliable and realistic determination of the spatial resolution. Measured irradiance distribution of laser beam waists in the overlap volume, provided by a high resolution UV camera, are employed to resolve coupled rate equations accounting for two-photon excitation, fluorescence decay and ionization. The resulting three-dimensional yield distributions reveal in detail the spatial resolution for optogalvanic and LIF detection and related saturation due to depletion. Two-photon absorption profiles broader than the Fourier transform-limited laser bandwidth are also incorporated in the calculations. The approach allows an accurate analysis of the spatial resolution present in recent and future measurements.

  5. Native defects in Tl6SI4: Density functional calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2015-05-05

    In this study, Tl6SI4 is a promising room-temperature semiconductor radiation detection material. Here, we report density functional calculations of native defects and dielectric properties of Tl6SI4. Formation energies and defect levels of native point defects and defect complexes are calculated. Donor-acceptor defect complexes are shown to be abundant in Tl6SI4. High resistivity can be obtained by Fermi level pinning by native donor and acceptor defects. Deep donors that are detrimental to electron transport are identified and methods to mitigate such problem are discussed. Furthermore, we show that mixed ionic-covalent character of Tl6SI4 gives rise to enhanced Born effective charges andmore » large static dielectric constant, which provides effective screening of charged defects and impurities.« less

  6. HLW Canister and Can-In-Canister Drop Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    1999-09-15

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the HLW canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (''can-in-canister'' throughout this document) to the drop event during the handling operation. The objective of the calculation is to provide the structure parameter information to support the canister design and the waste handling facility design. Finite element solution is performed using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. Two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element representations for the standard HLW canister and the can-in-canister are developed and analyzed using the dynamic solver.

  7. Interactive savings calculations for RCS measures, six case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    Many Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audits are based, in whole or in part, on the RCS Model Audit. This audit calculates the savings for each measure independently, that is, as if no other conservation actions were taken. This method overestimates the total savings due to a group of measures, and an explanatory warning is given to the customer. Presenting interactive results to consumers would increase the perceived credibility of the audit results by eliminating the need for the warning about uncalculated interactive effects. An increased level of credibility would hopefully lead to an increased level of conservation actions based on the audit results. Because many of the existing RCS audits are based on the RCS Model Audit, six case studies were produced to show that the Model Audit algorithms can be used to produce interactive savings estimates. These six Model Audit case studies, as well as two Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit cases, are presented along with a discussion of the calculation methods used.

  8. Calculates Neutron Production in Canisters of High-level Waste

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-15

    ALPHN calculates the (alpha,n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the (alpha,n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The (alpha,n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass andmore » do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister.« less

  9. Variational calculations of the HT{sup +} rovibrational energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekbaev, A. K.; Korobov, V. I.; Dineykhan, M.

    2011-04-15

    In this Brief Report, we use the exponential explicitly correlated variational basis set of the type exp(-{alpha}{sub n}R-{beta}{sub n}r{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub n}r{sub 2}) to calculate systematically the nonrelativistic bound-state energies for the hydrogen molecular ion HT{sup +}. We perform calculations for the states of the total orbital angular momentum L=0 and 1 with the complete set of vibrational quantum numbers v= 0-23, as well as for the states of L= 2-5 and v= 0-5. The E1 dipole transition moments, which are of importance for the planning of spectroscopic laser experiments, have been obtained as well.

  10. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  11. Optimized Algorithm for Collision Probability Calculations in Cubic Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    2004-06-15

    An optimized algorithm for implementing a recently developed method of computing collision probabilities (CPs) in three dimensions is reported in this work for the case of a homogeneous cube. Use is made of the geometrical regularity of the domain to rewrite, in a very compact way, the approximate formulas for calculating CPs in general three-dimensional geometry that were derived in a previous work by the author. The ensuing gain in computation time is found to be substantial: While the computation time associated with the general formulas increases as K{sup 2}, where K is the number of elements used in the calculation, that of the specific formulas increases only linearly with K. Accurate numerical results are given for several test cases, and an extension of the algorithm for computing the self-collision probability for a hexahedron is reported at the end of the work.

  12. Distributed Energy Technology Simulator: Microturbine Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simulator: Microturbine Demonstration, October 2001 Distributed Energy Technology Simulator: Microturbine Demonstration, October 2001 This 2001 paper discusses the National Rural ...

  13. Tips: Booklet Distribution | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Booklet Distribution Tips: Booklet Distribution Tips: Booklet Distribution There are many ways to obtain Energy Saver-Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home! You can access Energy Saver, as well as the Spanish-language Energy Saver, in the following ways. Order booklets in bulk quantities through the Energy Saver Partnership. Organizations can order booklet copies in bulk for distribution to your customers, members, or employees. The Energy Saver booklet and the Spanish Energy Saver

  14. NREL: Electric Infrastructure Systems Research - Distributed Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Test Facility Virtual Tour Electricity Integration Research Printable Version Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility Virtual Tour The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF), located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the development and testing of distributed power systems. Researchers use state-of-the-art laboratories and outdoor test beds to characterize the performance and

  15. Agenda: Electricity Transmission and Distribution- East

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting in Newark, NJ. September 8, 2014. Electricity Transmission and Distribution - Eastern Interconnection

  16. Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Systems Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems This presentation is from a Building America webinar conducted on November 8, 2011, by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) about ductless hydronic distribution systems. PDF icon arbi_hydronic_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Ductless Hydronic Distribution Issue #2: What Emerging Innovations are the Key to Future Homes? Building America Best Practices Series Vol. 14: Energy Renovations - HVAC: A Guide for

  17. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations Arlan Burdick IBACOS, Inc. June 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  18. Hot zero power reactor calculations using the Insilico code

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hamilton, Steven P.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Johnson, Seth R.; Pandya, Tara M.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-18

    In this paper we describe the reactor physics simulation capabilities of the insilico code. A description of the various capabilities of the code is provided, including detailed discussion of the geometry, meshing, cross section processing, and neutron transport options. Numerical results demonstrate that the insilico SPN solver with pin-homogenized cross section generation is capable of delivering highly accurate full-core simulation of various PWR problems. Comparison to both Monte Carlo calculations and measured plant data is provided.

  19. Detailed photonuclear cross-section calculations and astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1989-06-15

    We have investigated the role of an isomeric state and its coupling to the ground state (g.s.) via photons and neutron inelastic scattering in a stellar environment by making detailed photonuclear and neutron cross-section calculations for /sup 176/Lu and /sup 210/Bi. In the case of /sup 176/Lu, the g.s. would function as an excellent galactic slow- (s-) process chronometer were it not for the 3.7-h isomer at 123 keV. Our calculations predicted much larger photon cross sections for production of the isomer, as well as a lower threshold, than had been assumed based on earlier measurements. These two factors combine to indicate that an enormous correction, a factor of 10/sup 7/, must be applied to shorten the current estimate of the half-life against photoexcitation of /sup 176/Lu as a function of temperature. This severely limits the use of /sup 176/Lu as a stellar chronometer and indicates a significantly lower temperature at which the two states reach thermal equilibrium. For /sup 210/Bi, our preliminary calculations of the production and destruction of the 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ y isomeric state by neutrons and photons suggest that the /sup 210/Bi isomer may not be destroyed by photons as rapidly as assumed in certain stellar environments. This leads to an alternate production path of /sup 207/Pb and significantly affects presently interpreted lead isotopic abundances. We have been able to make such detailed nuclear cross-section calculations using: modern statistical-model codes of the Hauser-Feshbach type, with complete conservation of angular momentum and parity; reliable systematics of the input parameters required by these codes, including knowledge of the absolute gamma-ray strength-functions for E1, M1, and E2 transitions; and codes developed to compute large, discrete, nuclear level sets, their associated gamma-ray branchings, and the presence and location of isomeric states. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Calculations of pair production by Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe some of the technical design issues associated with the production of particle-antiparticle pairs in very large accelerators. To answer these questions requires extensive calculation of Feynman diagrams, in effect multi-dimensional integrals, which we evaluate by Monte Carlo methods on a variety of supercomputers. We present some portable algorithms for generating random numbers on vector and parallel architecture machines. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  1. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es054_2011_ceder_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D

  2. Application of nuclear models to neutron nuclear cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear theory is used increasingly to supplement and extend the nuclear data base that is available for applied studies. Areas where theoretical calculations are most important include the determination of neutron cross sections for unstable fission products and transactinide nuclei in fission reactor or nuclear waste calculations and for meeting the extensive dosimetry, activation, and neutronic data needs associated with fusion reactor development, especially for neutron energies above 14 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the use of nuclear models for data evaluation and, particularly, in the methods used to derive physically meaningful parameters for model calculations. Theoretical studies frequently involve use of spherical and deformed optical models, Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, preequilibrium theory, direct-reaction theory, and often make use of gamma-ray strength function models and phenomenological (or microscopic) level density prescriptions. The development, application, and limitations of nuclear models for data evaluation are discussed, with emphasis on the 0.1 to 50 MeV energy range. (91 references).

  3. Carcass Functions in Variational Calculations for Few-Body Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donchev, A.G.; Kalachev, S.A.; Kolesnikov, N.N.; Tarasov, V.I.

    2004-12-01

    For variational calculations of molecular and nuclear systems involving a few particles, it is proposed to use carcass basis functions that generalize exponential and Gaussian trial functions. It is shown that the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian are expressed in a closed form for a Coulomb potential, as well as for other popular particle-interaction potentials. The use of such carcass functions in two-center Coulomb problems reduces, in relation to other methods, the number of terms in a variational expansion by a few orders of magnitude at a commensurate or even higher accuracy. The efficiency of the method is illustrated by calculations of the three-particle Coulomb systems {mu}{mu}e, ppe, dde, and tte and the four-particle molecular systems H{sub 2} and HeH{sup +} of various isotopic composition. By considering the example of the {sub {lambda}}{sup 9}Be hypernucleus, it is shown that the proposed method can be used in calculating nuclear systems as well.

  4. Criticality calculations with MCNP{sup TM}: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendius, P.W.; Harmon, C.D. II; Busch, R.D.; Briesmeister, J.F.; Forster, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this Primer is to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst to perform computer calculations using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. Because of the closure of many experimental facilities, reliance on computer simulation is increasing. Often the analyst has little experience with specific codes available at his/her facility. This Primer helps the analyst understand and use the MCNP Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality analyses. It assumes no knowledge of or particular experience with Monte Carlo codes in general or with MCNP in particular. The document begins with a Quickstart chapter that introduces the basic concepts of using MCNP. The following chapters expand on those ideas, presenting a range of problems from simple cylinders to 3-dimensional lattices for calculating keff confidence intervals. Input files and results for all problems are included. The Primer can be used alone, but its best use is in conjunction with the MCNP4A manual. After completing the Primer, a criticality analyst should be capable of performing and understanding a majority of the calculations that will arise in the field of nuclear criticality safety.

  5. Materials Databases Infrastructure Constructed by First Principles Calculations: A Review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Lianshan

    2015-10-13

    The First Principles calculations, especially the calculation based on High-Throughput Density Functional Theory, have been widely accepted as the major tools in atom scale materials design. The emerging super computers, along with the powerful First Principles calculations, have accumulated hundreds of thousands of crystal and compound records. The exponential growing of computational materials information urges the development of the materials databases, which not only provide unlimited storage for the daily increasing data, but still keep the efficiency in data storage, management, query, presentation and manipulation. This review covers the most cutting edge materials databases in materials design, and their hotmore » applications such as in fuel cells. By comparing the advantages and drawbacks of these high-throughput First Principles materials databases, the optimized computational framework can be identified to fit the needs of fuel cell applications. The further development of high-throughput DFT materials database, which in essence accelerates the materials innovation, is discussed in the summary as well.« less

  6. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  7. NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborative Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV interconnection practices, research, and innovation. For more information, contact Kristen Ardani. Subscribe to DGIC Updates Learn about upcoming webinars and other DGIC announcements. NREL facilitates the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC) with support from the Solar Electric Power

  8. Energy Efficiency, Renewables, Advanced Transmission and Distribution

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technologies (2008) | Department of Energy Renewables, Advanced Transmission and Distribution Technologies (2008) Energy Efficiency, Renewables, Advanced Transmission and Distribution Technologies (2008) PDF icon Energy Efficiency, Renewables, Advanced Transmission and Distribution Technologies (2008) More Documents & Publications Financial Institution Partnership Program - Commercial Technology Renewable Energy Generation Projects Issued: October 7, 2009 Nuclear Power Facilities (2008)

  9. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Technology Development Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Development Projects NREL works on several distributed energy integration technology development projects, including the following: High Penetration Photovoltaics Hydrogen Systems Research Metering Solutions Mobile Electric Power Printable Version Distributed Grid Integration Home Capabilities Projects Codes & Standards Data Collection & Visualization Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Microgrids Power Systems Modeling Solar Distributed Grid Integration Technology Development High

  10. Mitigation Measures for Distributed PV Interconnection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigation Measures for Distributed Interconnection" Michael Coddington with National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Robert Broderick with Sandia National Laboratories July 9, 2014 2 Speakers Michael Coddington Principal Investigator Distributed Grid Integration NREL Robert Broderick Technical Lead Distributed Grid Integration Programs Sandia National Laboratories Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL 3 INTERCONNECTION, SCREENING & MITIGATION PRACTICES OF 21 UTILITIES

  11. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary Report,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2004 | Department of Energy Reliability, Executive Summary Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary Report, January 2004 This report summarizes the results of the project, "Distributed Generation Market Transformation Tools: Distributed Generation Reliability and Availability Database," sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Energy Solutions Center (ESC), New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

  12. Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

  13. Virtuality and transverse momentum dependence of the pion distribution amplitude

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-03-08

    We describe basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard exclusive processes. We develop it in application to the transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O (0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as functions of (pz) and z2, they are parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x,σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+ = 0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) ψ(x, k), and writemore » it in terms of VDA Φ(x,σ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ(x, σ) are converted into expressions involving ψ(x, k). Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1/2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. Furthermore, we discuss how one can generate high-k tails from primordial soft distributions.« less

  14. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  15. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

  16. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-15

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  17. Low jitter RF distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  18. Relative efficiency calculations of biological and physical systems exposed to charged particle beams through Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avila, Olga; Brandan, Maria-Ester

    1998-08-28

    A theoretical investigation of thermoluminescence response of Lithium Fluoride after heavy ion irradiation has been performed through Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition process. Efficiencies for the total TL signal of LiF irradiated with 0.7, 1.5 and 3 MeV protons and 3, 5.3 and 7.5 MeV helium ions have been calculated using the radial dose distribution profiles obtained from the MC procedure and applying Track Structure Theory and Modified Track Structure Theory. Results were compared with recent experimental data. The models correctly describe the observed decrease in efficiency as a function of the ion LET.

  19. Understanding the stable boron clusters: A bond model and first-principles calculations based on high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Shao-Gang; Liao, Ji-Hai; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Bao

    2015-06-07

    The unique electronic property induced diversified structure of boron (B) cluster has attracted much interest from experimentalists and theorists. B{sub 30–40} were reported to be planar fragments of triangular lattice with proper concentrations of vacancies recently. Here, we have performed high-throughput screening for possible B clusters through the first-principles calculations, including various shapes and distributions of vacancies. As a result, we have determined the structures of B{sub n} clusters with n = 30–51 and found a stable planar cluster of B{sub 49} with a double-hexagon vacancy. Considering the 8-electron rule and the electron delocalization, a concise model for the distribution of the 2c–2e and 3c–2e bonds has been proposed to explain the stability of B planar clusters, as well as the reported B cages.

  20. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; Kwon, Jake

    2016-05-03

    Here, we formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remainmore » small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.« less