National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for interchange distribution calculator

  1. Effective placement of detectors at diamond interchanges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhakar, Dayakar

    1994-01-01

    Most signalized interchanges in Texas are tight urban diamond interchanges of freeways having one-way frontage roads. At these interchanges, traffic actuated control with improper location of detectors may result in inefficient traffic operations...

  2. Distributed Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,DepartmentCalculator Jump to: navigation, search

  3. Algon: from interchangeable distributed algorithms to interchangeable middleware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud, K.V.

    Renaud,K.V. Bishop,J.M. Lo,J. Worrall,B. SC 2004 Software Composition Saturday, April 3, 2004 (http://www.ida.liu.se/~uweas/sc2004). Workshop affiliated with ETAPS 2004 (http://www.lsi.upc.es/etaps04) Barcelona, Spain, March 28-April 4, 2004. Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

  4. Fast vectorial calculation of the volumetric focused field distribution by using a three-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainty, Chris

    Fast vectorial calculation of the volumetric focused field distribution by using a three.rodriguez@nuigalway.ie Abstract: We show that the volumetric field distribution in the focal region of a high numerical aperture

  5. Intersection & Interchange Geometrics (IIG) Training Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    support such as design and operational review. The training agenda includes the following modules: CourseIntersection & Interchange Geometrics (IIG) Training Workshop Rochester, Tuesday, June 30, 2015 audience for this training includes New York DOT, local transportation agency program personnel (LTAP), and

  6. Rapid calculation of the ion energy distribution on a plasma electrode Paola Diomede,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Rapid calculation of the ion energy distribution on a plasma electrode Paola Diomede,a) Demetre J, but not excessively high to compromise selectivity or induce substrate damage. The ion energy distribution (IED 2012; published online 27 June 2012) A model was developed to rapidly calculate the ion energy

  7. Ordenao por Block-Interchanges e Reverses com Sinais

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    interessantes (novas estruturas de dados, algoritmos e etc.). Cleber Mira, João Meidanis Block-Interchanges e interessantes (novas estruturas de dados, algoritmos e etc.). Cleber Mira, João Meidanis Block-Interchanges e interessantes (novas estruturas de dados, algoritmos e etc.). Cleber Mira, João Meidanis Block-Interchanges e

  8. Fuel Interchangeability Considerations for Gas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, D.H.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years domestic natural gas has experienced a considerable growth in demand particularly in the power generation industry. However, the desire for energy security, lower fuel costs and a reduction in carbon emissions has produced an increase in demand for alternative fuel sources. Current strategies for reducing the environmental impact of natural gas combustion in gas turbine engines used for power generation experience such hurdles as flashback, lean blow-off and combustion dynamics. These issues will continue as turbines are presented with coal syngas, gasified coal, biomass, LNG and high hydrogen content fuels. As it may be impractical to physically test a given turbine on all of the possible fuel blends it may experience over its life cycle, the need to predict fuel interchangeability becomes imperative. This study considers a number of historical parameters typically used to determine fuel interchangeability. Also addressed is the need for improved reaction mechanisms capable of accurately modeling the combustion of natural gas alternatives.

  9. Quantum mechanical method of fragment's angular and energy distribution calculation for binary and ternary fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V.; Pen'kov, N. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    In the framework of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the method of calculation for partial fission width amplitudes and asymptotic behavior of the fissile nucleus wave function with strong channel coupling taken into account has been suggested. The method allows one to solve the calculation problem of angular and energy distribution countation for binary and ternary fission.

  10. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-07-03

    The US Department of Energy Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) is funding and overseeing the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed information system providing access to integrated data in support of, and generated in, all phases of geothermal development. NGDS is being built in an open paradigm and will employ state-of-the-art informatics approaches and capabilities to advance the state of geothermal knowledge in the US. This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System. It identifies general specifications for NGDS catalog metadata and data content, and provides specific instructions for preparation and submission of data assets by OGT-funded projects.

  11. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System.

  12. INTERCHANGE OF STREAM AND INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and intragravel oxygen resupply 2 Transport processes: Stream-intragravel interchange 3 Ground-water oxygen transport 6 Intragravel oxygen balance ' Field verification of the slope-interchange mechanism 8 environmental factors causing mortality, such as floods and freezing (Royce, 1959). Other important factors

  13. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION IN A TURBULENT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Servidio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Velli, M., E-mail: rappazzo@udel.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Magnetic reconnection at the interface between coronal holes and loops, the so-called interchange reconnection, can release the hotter, denser plasma from magnetically confined regions into the heliosphere, contributing to the formation of the highly variable slow solar wind. The interchange process is often thought to develop at the apex of streamers or pseudo-streamers, near Y- and X-type neutral points, but slow streams with loop composition have been recently observed along fanlike open field lines adjacent to closed regions, far from the apex. However, coronal heating models, with magnetic field lines shuffled by convective motions, show that reconnection can occur continuously in unipolar magnetic field regions with no neutral points: photospheric motions induce a magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade in the coronal field that creates the necessary small scales, where a sheared magnetic field component orthogonal to the strong axial field is created locally and can reconnect. We propose that a similar mechanism operates near and around boundaries between open and closed regions inducing a continual stochastic rearrangement of connectivity. We examine a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model of a simplified interface region between open and closed corona threaded by a strong unipolar magnetic field. This boundary is not stationary, becomes fractal, and field lines change connectivity continuously, becoming alternatively open and closed. This model suggests that slow wind may originate everywhere along loop-coronal-hole boundary regions and can account naturally and simply for outflows at and adjacent to such boundaries and for the observed diffusion of slow wind around the heliospheric current sheet.

  14. Investigation of the Implementation of Ramp Reversal at a Diamond Interchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bo

    2013-06-25

    Diamond interchange design has been commonly utilized in United States to facilitate traffic exchange between freeway and frontage roads. Another less common interchange design is X-ramp interchange, which is the reversed version of diamond...

  15. Ion finite Larmor radius effects on the interchange instability in an open system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katanuma, I.; Sato, S.; Okuyama, Y.; Kato, S.; Kubota, R. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)] [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A particle simulation of an interchange instability was performed by taking into account the ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. It is found that the interchange instability with large FLR grows in two phases, that is, linearly growing phase and the nonlinear phase subsequent to the linear phase, where the instability grows exponentially in both phases. The linear growth rates observed in the simulation agree well with the theoretical calculation. The effects of FLR are usually taken in the fluid simulation through the gyroviscosity, the effects of which are verified in the particle simulation with large FLR regime. The gyroviscous cancellation phenomenon observed in the particle simulation causes the drifts in the direction of ion diamagnetic drifts.

  16. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diakov, Victor; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas; Margolis, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Using production-cost model (PLEXOS), we simulate the Western Interchange (WECC) at several levels of the yearly renewable energy (RE) generation, between 13% and 40% of the total load for the year. We look at the overall energy exchange between a region and the rest of the system (net interchange, NI), and find it useful to examine separately (i) (time-)variable and (ii) year-average components of the NI. Both contribute to inter-regional energy exchange, and are affected by wind and PV generation in the system. We find that net load variability (in relatively large portions of WECC) is the leading factor affecting the variable component of inter-regional energy exchange, and the effect is quantifiable: higher regional net load correlation with the rest of the WECC lowers net interchange variability. Further, as the power mix significantly varies between WECC regions, effects of ‘flexibility import’ (regions ‘borrow’ ramping capability) are also observed.

  17. Quantum-mechanical calculation of carrier distribution in MOS accumulation and strong inversion layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering/ Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering/ Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    We derive a statistical physics model of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and propose an accurate approximation method for calculating the quantum-mechanical effects of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure in accumulation and strong inversion regions. We use an exponential surface potential approximation in solving the quantization energy levels and derive the function of density of states in 2D to 3D transition region by applying uncertainty principle and Schrödinger equation in k-space. The simulation results show that our approximation method and theory of density of states solve the two major problems of previous researches: the non-negligible error caused by the linear potential approximation and the inconsistency of density of states and carrier distribution in 2D to 3D transition region.

  18. The Evolution of Vertical IS Standards: Electronic Interchange Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinfield, Charles

    on the technical details of IT-related standards, surprisingly little empirical research addresses the development from horizontal standards, not only in their narrower applicability, but also in their technical conteThe Evolution of Vertical IS Standards: Electronic Interchange Standards in the US Home Mortgage

  19. Regulation of the centrifugal interchange cycle in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winglee, Robert M.

    Regulation of the centrifugal interchange cycle in Saturn's inner magnetosphere A. Kidder,1 R. M, except that the heavy ions are being driven outward not by gravity but by centrifugal forces. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parallel to the planetary magnetic field reduces centrifugal forcing, whereas

  20. Effects of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? · Engineering: ·Superconducting magnet surrounded by fusion plasma? #12;EEO_ICC06_INVTLK 5 The Levitated DipoleEffects of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability on Plasma Confined in a Dipolar Magnetic Field Eugenio Ortiz For the Levitated Dipole Experiment Team Innovative Confinement Concepts 2006 Austin, Texas

  1. Interchange Formats for Hybrid Systems: Review and Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    and formal verification) and synthesis of hybrid systems, and we give a recommendation for an interchange to be powerful design representations for system- level design in particular for embedded controllers. The term: one would prefer to define a common model of computation for hybrid systems that should be used

  2. Context Interchange: New Features and Formalisms for the Intelligent Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressan, Stéphane

    mediated data access to both traditional and web-based information sources. Categories and Subject information sources and receivers has grown at an unprecedented rate in the last few years, contributedContext Interchange: New Features and Formalisms for the Intelligent Integration of Information

  3. Evaluation of TexSIM for modeling traffic behavior at diamond interchanges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadors, Allison Christine Cherry

    1995-01-01

    Poor operation of diamond interchanges along a freeway corridor can decrease the mobility of the corridor and increase time and energy costs associated with delay at signalized interchanges. Computer simulation provides a safe and efficient means...

  4. Numerical Calculation of Neoclassical Distribution Functions and Current Profiles in Low Collisionality, Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Lyons, S.C. Jardin, and J.J. Ramos

    2012-06-28

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f ) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and elec trons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h ). We work in a 4D phase space in which ? defines a flux surface, ? is the poloidal angle, v is the total velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and ? is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and ?#21; . The Rosenbluth potentials, ?#8; and ?, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos ? , where #31;? is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos #18;? , and finite elements in v . At each ? , we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe ), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi ). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37 , pp 183-204 (1980).] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C1 [S.C. Jardin, et al ., Computational Science & Discovery, 4 (2012).]).

  5. Numerical calculation of neoclassical distribution functions and current profiles in low collisionality, axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, B. C. [Program in Plasma Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Ramos, J. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and electrons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h). We work in a 4D phase space in which {psi} defines a flux surface, {theta} is the poloidal angle, v is the magnitude of the velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and {lambda} is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and {lambda}. The Rosenbluth potentials, {Phi} and {Psi}, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos{chi}, where {chi} is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos{theta}, and finite elements in v. At each {psi}, we solve a block tridiagonal system for h{sub i} (independent of f{sub e}), then solve another block tridiagonal system for h{sub e} (dependent on f{sub i}). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37, 183-204 (1980)] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C{sup 1}[S. C. Jardin et al., Comput. Sci. Discovery 5, 014002 (2012)]).

  6. Three-dimensional calculation of field electron energy distributions from open hydrogen-saturated and capped metallic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Alexandre

    Three-dimensional calculation of field electron energy distributions from open hydrogen-core potentials and the electronic exchange energy was evaluated using the local density ap- proximation 4 3CX 1 emission from open and capped 5,5 carbon nanotubes, with consideration of hydrogen saturation of the open

  7. Reconnection and interchange instability in the near magnetotail

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Birn, Joachim; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Hesse, Michael; Schindler, Karl

    2015-07-16

    This paper provides insights into the possible coupling between reconnection and interchange/ballooning in the magnetotail related to substorms and flow bursts. The results presented are largely based on recent simulations of magnetotail dynamics, exploring onset and progression of reconnection. 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with different tail deformation demonstrate a clear boundary between stable and unstable cases depending on the amount of deformation, explored up to the real proton/electron mass ratio. The evolution prior to onset, as well as the evolution of stable cases, are governed by the conservation of integral flux tube entropy S as imposed in ideal MHD, maintainingmore »a monotonic increase with distance downtail. This suggests that ballooning instability in the tail should not be expected prior to the onset of tearing and reconnection. 3-D MHD simulations confirm this conclusion, showing no indication of ballooning prior to reconnection, if the initial state is ballooning stable. The simulation also shows that, after imposing resistivity necessary to initiate reconnection, the reconnection rate and energy release initially remain slow. However, when S becomes reduced from plasmoid ejection and lobe reconnection, forming a negative slope in S as a function of distance from Earth, the reconnection rate and energy release increase drastically. The latter condition has been shown to be necessary for ballooning/interchange instability, and the cross-tail structures that develop subsequently in the MHD simulation are consistent with such modes. The simulations support a concept in which tail activity is initiated by tearing instability but significantly enhanced by the interaction with ballooning/interchange enabled by plasmoid loss and lobe reconnection.« less

  8. Error Estimation and Parameter Dependence of the Calculation of the Fast Ion Distribution Function, Temperature and Density using Data from the KF1 High Energy NPA on JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Error Estimation and Parameter Dependence of the Calculation of the Fast Ion Distribution Function, Temperature and Density using Data from the KF1 High Energy NPA on JET

  9. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for today’s engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  10. An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, David K.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Hart, Grant W.

    2010-01-15

    A simplified vacuum arc design [based on metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) concepts] is employed as a plasma source for a study of a {sup 7}Be non-neutral plasma. The design includes a mechanism for interchanging the cathode source. Testing of the plasma source showed that it is capable of producing on the order of 10{sup 12} charges at confinable energies using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs for lower energy and lower density applications by using only the trigger spark rather than the full vacuum arc in high current ion beam designs. The interchangeability of the cathode design gives the source the ability to replace only the source sample, simplifying use of radioactive materials in the plasma source. The sample can also be replaced with a completely different conductive material. The design can be easily modified for use in other plasma confinement or full MeVVA applications.

  11. Deep water X-mas tree standardization -- Interchangeability approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula, M.T.R.; Paulo, C.A.S.; Moreira, C.C.

    1995-12-31

    Aiming the rationalization of subsea operations to turn the production of oil and gas more economical and reliable, standardization of subsea equipment interfaces is a tool that can play a very important role. Continuing the program initiated some years ago, Petrobras is now harvesting the results from the first efforts. Diverless guidelineless subsea Christmas trees from four different suppliers have already been manufactured in accordance to the standardized specification. Tests performed this year in Macae (Campos Basin onshore base), in Brazil, confirmed the interchangeability among subsea Christmas trees, tubing hangers, adapter bases and flowline hubs of different manufacturers. This interchangeability, associated with the use of proven techniques, results in operational flexibility, savings in rig time and reduction in production losses during workovers. By now, 33 complete sets of subsea Christmas trees have already been delivered and successfully tested. Other 28 sets are still being manufactured by the four local suppliers. For the next five years, more than a hundred of these trees will be required for the exploration of the new discoveries. This paper describes the standardized equipment, the role of the operator in an integrated way of working with the manufacturers on the standardization activities, the importance of a frank information flow through the involved companies and how a simple manufacturing philosophy, with the use of construction jigs, has proved to work satisfactorily.

  12. 832 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 25, No. 11 / June 1, 2000 Simultaneous optical wavelength interchange with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    832 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 25, No. 11 / June 1, 2000 Simultaneous optical wavelength interchange January 21, 2000 We present a theoretical analysis for simultaneous optical wavelength interchange and isolation of a pair of collinear input optical signals by use of two concurrent difference

  13. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic) Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic electrostatic dipole vortex [3] that transports mass, energy, and charge [4]. The centrifugally driven

  14. Calculation of the fast ion tail distribution for a spherically symmetric hot spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDevitt, C. J.; Tang, X.-Z.; Guo, Z.; Berk, H. L.

    2014-10-15

    The fast ion tail for a spherically symmetric hot spot is computed via the solution of a simplified Fokker-Planck collision operator. Emphasis is placed on describing the energy scaling of the fast ion distribution function in the hot spot as well as the surrounding cold plasma throughout a broad range of collisionalities and temperatures. It is found that while the fast ion tail inside the hot spot is significantly depleted, leading to a reduction of the fusion yield in this region, a surplus of fast ions is observed in the neighboring cold plasma region. The presence of this surplus of fast ions in the neighboring cold region is shown to result in a partial recovery of the fusion yield lost in the hot spot.

  15. Context Interchange Mediation for Semantic Interoperability and Dynamic Integration of Autonomous Information Sources in the Fixed Income Securities Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Michael

    2003-02-10

    We examine semantic interoperability problems in the fixed income securities industry and propose a knowledge representation architecture for context interchange ...

  16. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (?4 ?m), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup ?7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  17. Finite-Hilbert-basis-set calculations for the angular distribution of ionized electrons produced in p+H impact at 20 keV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, John F.; Fu, J.; Fitzpatrick, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a different method of extracting the angular distribution of ejected electrons in an ion-atom collision from a two-centered finite Hilbert basis-set calculation. We obtain good agreement with experiment for a ...

  18. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  19. Model-independent calculation of $SU(3)_f$ violation in baryon octet light-cone distribution amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Wein; Andreas Schäfer

    2015-01-28

    In this work we present a minimal parametrization of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the baryon octet including higher twist contributions. Simultaneously we obtain the quark mass dependence of the amplitudes at leading one-loop accuracy by the use of three-flavor baryon chiral perturbation theory (BChPT), which automatically yields model-independent results for the leading $SU(3)$ flavor breaking effects. For that purpose we have constructed the nonlocal light-cone three-quark operators in terms of baryon octet and meson fields and have carried out a next-to-leading order BChPT calculation. We were able to find a minimal set of distribution amplitudes (DAs) that do not mix under chiral extrapolation towards the physical point and naturally embed the $\\Lambda$ baryon. Additionally they are chosen in such a way that all DAs of a certain symmetry class have a similar quark mass dependence (independent of the twist of the corresponding amplitude), which allows for a compact presentation. The results are well-suited for the extrapolation of lattice data and for model building.

  20. Two levels interchange format in XML for Petri Nets and other graph-based formalisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribaudo, Marco

    to describe Petri Nets and other graph-based formalisms such as queueing networks and Markov chains. TwoTwo levels interchange format in XML for Petri Nets and other graph-based formalisms Andrea Valente to model Petri Nets and other graph based model speci cation formalismsis presented. In particular

  1. Emission factor estimation in regional air quality studies of residential natural gas fuel interchangeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Emission factor estimation in regional air quality studies of residential natural gas fuel applicable to investigations of modeling the effect of natural gas interchangeability on urban air quality for natural gas burner emissions data. The method is built to compensate for the typically small sample size

  2. Remote sensing of the solar site of interchange reconnection associated with the May 1997 magnetic cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Remote sensing of the solar site of interchange reconnection associated with the May 1997 magnetic configuration at the source. Citation: Crooker, N. U., and D. F. Webb (2006), Remote sensing of the solar site be determined remotely from the direction of suprat

  3. Linear and Quasilinear Model for Pressure-Driven Interchange and Entropy Modes in a !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Math, Columbia University, New York, NY USA Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA USA 56Linear and Quasilinear Model for Pressure-Driven Interchange and Entropy Modes in a ! Warm Electron Dipole Plasma Mike Mauel, Darren Garnier, Max Roberts, and Jay Kesner Dept of Applied Physics and Applied

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 3, AUGUST 2009 1633 Direct Calculation of Line Outage Distribution Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    Outage Distribution Factors Jiachun Guo, Yong Fu, Member, IEEE, Zuyi Li, Member, IEEE, and Mohammad Shahidehpour, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Line outage distribution factors (LODFs) are utilized to perform of LODFs, especially with multiple-line outages, could speed up contingency analyses and improve

  5. Calculation of the Solar Load onto Occupants in a Room using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions and a View Factor Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedek, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    calculation of the solar load of one specific Bin, it willfor the amount of solar load on one polygon of the manikina given day time. The solar radiation on the one hand can be

  6. FHBS calculation of ionized electron angular and energy distribution following the p+H collision at 20 keV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Jun

    2004-11-15

    -Centered Expansion (SCE). In the SCE method a basis is con ned around the target center. This limited basis has proved to be less effective in calculating charge transfer, which is important at the impact energy range we are considering (20 keV). Thus the SCE... is not a good candidate to obtain meaningful differential cross sections. Despite this de ciency the SCE is helpful in checking our ability to describe the electron continuum. The One-and-Half-Centered-Expansion (OHCE) method makes an improvement over...

  7. Development and evaluation of operational strategies for providing an integrated diamond interchange ramp-metering control system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zongzhong

    2004-09-30

    Diamond interchanges and their associated ramps are where the surface street arterial system and the freeway system interface. Historically, these two elements of the system have been operated with little or no coordination between the two...

  8. SU-E-T-58: Calculation of Dose Distribution of Accuboost Brachytherapy in Deformable Polyvinil Alcohol Breast Phantom Using Biomechanical Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammadyari, P; Faghihi, R; Shirazi, M Mosleh; Lotfi, M; Meigooni, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacement of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD dosimetry for validation.

  9. Nonlinear saturation of ideal interchange modes in a sheared magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beklemishev, A.D.

    1990-09-01

    Pressure-driven ideal modes cannot completely interchange flux tubes of a sheared magnetic field; instead, they saturate, forming new helical equilibria. These equilibria are studied both analytically and numerically with reduced MHD equations in a flux-conserving Lagrangian representation. For unstable localized modes, the structure of the nonlinear layer generated around the resonant flux surface depends on the value of Mercier parameter D{sub M}. Its width is found to be proportional to the position of the inflection point on the linear eigenfunction. Perturbed surfaces in equilibrium always have folds, i.e., areas where the direction of the original reduced magnetic field is reserved. But only far from the instability threshold does the internal structure of the nonlinear layer resemble bubble' formation. The appearance of sheet currents and island-like structures along the resonant flux surface may be of interest for the description of forced reconnection in models with finite resistivity. Analytic results are found to be in agreement with 2-D numerical simulations. This study also includes the case of ballooning instability by representing nonlocal driving terms through the matching parameter {Delta}{prime}, which defines the outer boundary conditions for the interchange layer. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Net Interchange Schedule Forecasting of Electric Power Exchange for RTO/ISOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferryman, Thomas A.; Haglin, David J.; Vlachopoulou, Maria; Yin, Jian; Shen, Chao; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lin, Guang; Zhou, Ning; Tong, Jianzhong

    2012-07-26

    Neighboring independent system operators (ISOs) exchange electric power to enable efficient and reliable operation of the grid. Net interchange (NI) schedule is the sum of the transactions (in MW) between an ISO and its neighbors. Effective forecasting of the amount of actual NI can improve grid operation efficiency. This paper presents results of a preliminary investigation into various methods of prediction that may result in improved prediction accuracy. The methods studied are linear regression, forward regression, stepwise regression, and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The work to date is not yet conclusive. The hope is to explore the effectiveness of other prediction methods and apply all methods to at least one new data set. This should enable more confidence in the conclusions.

  11. A NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyowon

    to oxygen scavenging [5]. High CO2 levels (10- 80 %) are desirable for foods such as meat and poultryA NEW LED-LED PORTABLE CO2 GAS SENSOR BASED ON AN INTERCHANGEABLE MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS Abstract A new system for CO2 measurement (0-100%) by based on a paired emitter-detector diode

  12. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2015-06-10

    MA 15300Y Calculator Policy. ONLY a computer desktop calculator in scientific view is allowed on exams. If you have questions, please email the course ...

  13. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2015-08-21

    MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  14. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by vortex density structures associated with interchange instability: Analytical and large scale plasma simulation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Lundberg, J.; Paraschiv, I.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    The presence of plasma turbulence can strongly influence propagation properties of electromagnetic signals used for surveillance and communication. In particular, we are interested in the generation of low frequency plasma density irregularities in the form of coherent vortex structures. Interchange or flute type density irregularities in magnetized plasma are associated with Rayleigh-Taylor type instability. These types of density irregularities play an important role in refraction and scattering of high frequency electromagnetic signals propagating in the earth ionosphere, in high energy density physics, and in many other applications. We will discuss scattering of high frequency electromagnetic waves on low frequency density irregularities due to the presence of vortex density structures associated with interchange instability. We will also present particle-in-cell simulation results of electromagnetic scattering on vortex type density structures using the large scale plasma code LSP and compare them with analytical results.

  15. Pd/Cu Site Interchange and Non-Fermi-Liquid Behavior in UCu{sub 4}Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, C.H.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Heffner, R.H.; Kwei, G.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); MacLaughlin, D.E. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Chau, R.; Maple, M.B. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    X-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements of the local structure in UCu{sub 4}Pd are described which indicate a probable lattice-disorder origin for non-Fermi-liquid behavior in this material. Short Pd-Cu distances are observed, consistent with (24{plus_minus}3){percent} of the Pd atoms occupying nominally Cu sites. A {open_quotes}Kondo disorder{close_quotes} model, based on the effect on the local Kondo temperature T{sub K} of this interchange and some additional bond-length disorder, agrees quantitatively with previous experimental susceptibility data, and therefore also with specific heat and magnetic resonance experiments. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  16. Stabilization of Interchange Modes by Rotating Magnetic Fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, R. D. Milroy, K. E. Miller, and G. R. Votroubek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    a key limiting instability for many magnetic confinement fusion configurations. In previous studies and are often referred to as fluting) and many other low magnetic shear confinement configurationsStabilization of Interchange Modes by Rotating Magnetic Fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, R. D

  17. Playful calculation : tangible coding for visual calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ham, Derek (Derek Allen)

    2015-01-01

    Play and calculation are often considered to be at odds. Play embraces the wildness of youth, imagination, and a sense of freedom. Calculation, to most, represents rigor, mechanistic behavior, and following inflexible ...

  18. R-value Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Wall Systems ORNL Home ASTM Testing BEP Home Related Sites Work With Us Advanced Wall Systems Home Interactive Calculators New Whole Wall R-value Calculators As A Part Of...

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributed generation data used within this calculator. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database...

  20. Calculation Complexity and Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockshott, W.P.

    Cockshott,W.P. Cottrell,A. Socialism and the market: the socialist calculation debate revisited By Peter J. Boettke

  1. TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; CAPITALIZED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER SUBSTATIONS; CAPITALIZED COST; CALCULATION METHODS; PLANNING; COST ESTIMATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS The displacement or deferral of substation...

  2. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  3. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  4. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  5. Appliance Energy Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage...

  6. quantum scattering calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    in a given quantum state per solid angle unit cross section : integral of the differential cross section) converged integral and differential cross sections geometriquantum scattering calculations on chemical reaction 1st Day #12;schedule day 1. 1.Introduction day

  7. A new endwall model for axial compressor throughflow calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, J.

    1995-10-01

    It is well recognized that the endwall regions of a compressor--in which the annulus wall flow interacts with the mainstream flow--have a major influence on its efficiency and surge margin. Despite many attempts over the years to predict the very complex flow patterns in the endwall regions, current compressor design methods still rely largely on empirical estimates of the aerodynamic losses and flow angle deviations in these regions. This paper describes a new phenomenological model of the key endwall flow phenomena treated in a circumferentially averaged way. It starts from Hirsch and de Ruyck`s annulus wall boundary layer approach, but makes some important changes. The secondary vorticities arising from passage secondary flows and from tip clearance flows are calculated. Then the radial interchanges of momentum, energy, and entropy arising from both diffusion and convection are estimated. The model is incorporated into a streamline curvature program. The empirical blade force defect terms in the boundary layers are selected from cascade data. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by comparing the predictions with experimental results on both low-speed and high-speed multistage compressors. It is found that the radial variation of flow parameters is quite well predicted, and so is the overall performance, except when significant endwall stall occurs.

  8. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-11

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  9. Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOE’s Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

  10. Distributed Estimation Distributed Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vijay

    with a Star Topology 2 2.1 Static Sensor Fusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Combining Estimators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Static Sensor Fusion for Star Topology;Distributed Estimation 3 Non-Ideal Networks with Star Topology 10 3.1 Sensor Fusion in Presence of Message

  11. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  12. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  13. identification Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart. Sandro Zampieri #12;Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart Grids Conclusions Issues

  14. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  15. Calculated final state probability distributions for T2 -decay measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.6.1 Neutrinoless double beta decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.6.2 Cosmological

  16. Current distribution in HTSC tapes obtained by inverse problem calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amoros, Jaume

    . There have been proposed several methods for non destructive in situ, or nearly in situ, testing of large on a non destructive measurement of the magnetic field created by the own current flowing in the SC. In this work, the QR inversion strategy is extended to non finite systems by considering the effect

  17. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  18. Daylighting Calculation in DOE-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C

    2013-01-01

    2.9) DAYLIGHTING CALCULATION IN DOE-2 Table of Contents 1.55 —-17:-.. LBL-11353 (III.2.9 only) EEB-DOE-2 83—3DAYLIGHTING CALCULATION IN DOE-2 Frederick C. Winkelmann

  19. How Are Momentum Savings Calculated?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simplifying the Math: How Are Momentum Savings Calculated? Many people have heard about Momentum savings but don't understand how these types of savings are calculated. The short...

  20. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity, US Data. 6. Distributed Generation: Standby Generation and Cogeneration Ozz Energy Solutions, Inc. February 28 th , 2005. For more information about...

  1. Distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, E.

    1999-09-02

    Distributed generation, locating electricity generators close to the point of consumption, provides some unique benefits to power companies and customers that are not available from centralized electricity generation. Photovoltaic (PV) technology is well suited to distributed applications and can, especially in concert with other distributed resources, provide a very close match to the customer demand for electricity, at a significantly lower cost than the alternatives. In addition to augmenting power from central-station generating plants, incorporating PV systems enables electric utilities to optimize the utilization of existing transmission and distribution.

  2. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene Surdutovich; David C. Gallagher; Andrey V. Solov'yov

    2012-01-27

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The analysis and assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We studied the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculated the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's track. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. Comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  3. Computational Tools for Supersymmetry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer

    2009-12-16

    I present a brief overview of a variety of computational tools for supersymmetry calculations, including: spectrum generators, cross section and branching fraction calculators, low energy constraints, general purpose event generators, matrix element event generators, SUSY dark matter codes, parameter extraction codes and Les Houches interface tools.

  4. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not be addressed in this calculation.

  5. Calculation of Neutral Beam Injection into SSPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Hill, D N; LoDestro, L L; McLean, H S

    2006-06-13

    The SSPX spheromak experiment has achieved electron temperatures of 350eV and confinement consistent with closed magnetic surfaces. In addition, there is evidence that the experiment may be up against an operational beta limit for Ohmic heating. To test this barrier, there are firm plans to add two 0.9MW Neutral Beam (NB) sources to the experiment. A question is whether the limit is due to instability. Since the deposited Ohmic power in the core is relatively small the additional power from the beams is sufficient to significantly increase the electron temperature. Here we present results of computations that will support this contention. We have developed a new NB module to calculate the orbits of the injected fast fast-ions. The previous computation made heavy use of tokamak ordering which fails for a tight-aspect-ratio device, where B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub pol}. The model calculates the deposition from the NFREYA package [1]. The neutral from the CX deposition is assumed to be ionized in place, a high-density approximation. The fast ions are then assumed to fill a constant angular momentum orbit. And finally, the fast ions immediately assume the form of a dragged down distribution. Transfer rates are then calculated from this distribution function [2]. The differential times are computed from the orbit times and the particle weights in each flux zone (the sampling bin) are proportional to the time spent in the zone. From this information the flux-surface-averaged profiles are obtained and fed into the appropriate transport equation. This procedure is clearly approximate, but accurate enough to help guide experiments. A major advantage is speed: 5000 particles can be processed in under 4s on our fastest LINUX box. This speed adds flexibility by enabling a ''large'' number of predictive studies. Similar approximations, without the accurate orbit calculation presented here, had some success comparing with experiment and TRANSP [3]. Since our procedure does not have multiple CX and relies on disparate time scales, more detailed understanding requires a ''complete'' NB package such as the NUBEAM [4] module, which follows injected fast ions along with their generations until they enter the main thermal distribution.

  6. Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods POCTBT Y-12

  7. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  8. SB EE Calculator | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculator Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator Argonne's Energy Efficiency Decision Support Calculator is a simple tool that small business owners can use to quickly...

  9. Laurent Berger TOPOLOGIE ET CALCUL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Laurent

    Laurent Berger TOPOLOGIE ET CALCUL DIFF´ERENTIEL #12;Laurent Berger UMPA, ENS de Lyon, UMR 5669 du CNRS, Universit´e de Lyon. E-mail : laurent.berger@ens-lyon.fr Url : http://perso.ens-lyon

  10. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related manufacturer. A component produced by one manufacturer certainly varies dimensionally from a similar product produced by a different manufacturer. The internal envelope dimensions are dependent on the selection of the individual components. The external envelope dimensions, as well as, key interface dimensions are established within this calculation and are to be treated as bounding dimensions.

  11. Intensity Distributions of Waves Transmitted through a Multiple Scattering Medium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rossum, Mark; Nieuwenhuizen, Th.M

    1995-04-03

    The distributions of the angular transmission coefficient and of the total transmission are calculated for multiple scattered waves. The calculation is based on a mapping to the known distrribution of eigenvalues of the ...

  12. Log-normal distribution for correlators in lattice QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2012-04-20

    Many hadronic correlators used in spectroscopy calculations in lattice QCD simulations appear to show a log-normal distribution at intermediate time separations.

  13. Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Radinschi

    2000-11-20

    We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and M{\\o}ller.

  14. Understanding Parton Distributions from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dru B. Renner

    2005-08-04

    I examine the past lattice QCD calculations of three representative observables, the transverse quark distribution, momentum fraction, and axial charge, and emphasize the prospects for not only quantitative comparison with experiment but also qualitative understanding of QCD.

  15. Generalized Parton Distributions from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Renner

    2005-01-05

    I review the LHPC Collaboration's lattice QCD calculations of the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon and highlight those aspects of nucleon structure best illuminated by lattice QCD, the nucleon's spin decomposition and transverse quark structure.

  16. Calculation of a fluctuating entropic force by phase space sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, James T

    2015-01-01

    A polymer chain pinned in space exerts a fluctuating force on the pin point in thermal equilibrium. The average of such fluctuating force is well understood from statistical mechanics as an entropic force, but little is known about the underlying force distribution. Here, we introduce two phase space sampling methods that can produce the equilibrium distribution of instantaneous forces exerted by a terminally pinned polymer. In these methods, both the positions and momenta of mass points representing a freely jointed chain are perturbed in accordance with the spatial constraints and the Boltzmann distribution of total energy. The constraint force for each conformation and momentum is calculated using Lagrangian dynamics. Using terminally pinned chains in space and on a surface, we show that the force distribution is highly asymmetric with both tensile and compressive forces. Most importantly, the mean of the distribution, which is equal to the entropic force, is not the most probable force even for long chain...

  17. Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Arthur; P. A. Boyle; D. Brömmel; M. A. Donnellan; J. M. Flynn; A. Jüttner; H. Pedroso de Lima; T. D. Rae; C. T. Sachrajda; B. Samways

    2010-11-12

    We calculated the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes for the pseudoscalar mesons ($\\pi$ and $K$) and the longitudinally polarised vector mesons ($\\rho$, $K^*$ and $\\phi$) as part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' $N_f=2+1$ domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme. These quantities were obtained with a good precision and, in particular, the expected effects of $SU(3)$-flavour symmetry breaking were observed. Operators were renormalised non-perturbatively and extrapolations to the physical point were made, guided by leading order chiral perturbation theory. The main results presented are for two volumes, $16^3\\times 32$ and $24^3\\times 64$, with a common lattice spacing. Preliminary results for a lattice with a finer lattice spacing, $32^3\\times64$, are discussed and a first look is taken at the use of twisted boundary conditions to extract distribution amplitudes.

  18. Petrophysical corner - calculating water cut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elphick, R.Y. )

    1990-02-01

    The problem of determining the amount of water cut that can be expected from a well is discussed in conjunction with a program for making this calculation. The program was written for Amiga, Apple Macintosh, and MS DOS personal computers and source code for the program is provided.

  19. Spurious Effects in perturbative Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hortacsu; B. C. Lutfuoglu

    1998-12-11

    We show spurious effects in perturbative calculations due to different orderings of inhomogeneous terms while computing corrections to Green functions for two different metrics. These effects are not carried over to physically measurable quantities like the renormalized value of the vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor.

  20. Empirical distribution Theoretical2distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, David

    2 distribution. #12;Supplementary Table 1: Simulations using K axes of variation K = 1 K = 2 K = 5 K SNPs 0.4923 0.4916 0.4891 0.4860 Proportion of associations reported as significant by EIGENSTRAT adjusting along the top K axes of variation, for various values of K. #12;Page 2 Supplementary Table 2

  1. Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Properties of a Normal Distribution 6.3 The Standard Normal Distribution 6.4 Applications of Normal Distribution 6.5 The Central Limit Theorem 6.6 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution Definition. A continuous

  2. probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    probabilities in the standard normal table What is the area to the left of Z=1.51 in a standard normal curve? Z=1.51 Z=1.51 Area is 93.45% #12;Exercises · If scores are normally distributed with a mean of 30 beauty of the normal curve: No matter what and are, the area between - and + is about 68%; the area

  3. Calculating loops without loop calculations: NLO computation of pentaquark correlators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Groote; J. G. Körner; A. A. Pivovarov

    2012-08-27

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD corrections to the correlators of interpolating pentaquark currents. We employ modular techniques in configuration space which saves us from the onus of having to do loop calculations. The modular technique is explained in some detail. We present explicit NLO results for several interpolating pentaquark currents that have been written down in the literature. Our modular approach is easily adapted to the case of NLO corrections to multiquark correlators with an arbitrary number of quarks/antiquarks.

  4. Equilibrium surface distributions for constant energy ensembles B. I. Henry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Bruce Ian

    Equilibrium surface distributions for constant energy ensembles B. I. Henry Department of Applied distributions are seen [11,12]. In this paper we shall discuss how one calculates the constant energy energy en­ semble are discussed. An equilibrium surface density is introduced and used to calculate

  5. Quantum statistical calculation of cluster abundances in hot dense matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerd Ropke

    2014-07-01

    The cluster abundances are calculated from a quantum statistical approach taking into account in-medium corrections. For arbitrary cluster size the self-energy and Pauli blocking shifts are considered. Exploratory calculations are performed for symmetric matter at temperature $T=5$ MeV and baryon density $\\varrho=0.0156$ fm$^{-3}$ to be compared with the solar element distribution. It is shown that the abundances of weakly bound nuclei with mass number $4

  6. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  7. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (?s)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kang, Daekyoung; Los Alamos National Lab.; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-24

    We present an analytic O(?s) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness ?. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of themore »1-jettiness distribution.« less

  8. Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Incorporating Weather Data into Energy Savings Calculations Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call...

  9. Health Calculators & Logs - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculators & Logs Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Body Mass Index Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

  10. Using a calculator to do statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave

    2012-03-25

    Statistics on a Scientific Calculator. NOTE: Some of these may not be regular keys on your calculator and may appear in a different color above another key.

  11. NAPL Calculator - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncrief Ames019NAPL Calculator

  12. 558: Calculation of Eddy Currents in the ETE Spherical Torus G.O. Ludwig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    558: Calculation of Eddy Currents in the ETE Spherical Torus G.O. Ludwig Instituto Nacional de model based on the Green's function method. The distribution of eddy currents is calculated using a thin well with values of the eddy currents measured in ETE. INTRODUCTION This paper presents a magnetostatic

  13. Energy Distribution of Nanoflares in Three-Dimensional Simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    Energy Distribution of Nanoflares in Three-Dimensional Simulations of Coronal Heating Chung-Sang Ng difficulties. We will present energy distributions and other statistics based on our simulations, calculated simulation results. · Parker's nanoflare heating model vs observations · Energy distributions of nanoflares

  14. The First Calculation of Fractional Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Jesse Thaler; Jonathan R. Walsh

    2015-05-14

    In collider physics, jet algorithms are a ubiquitous tool for clustering particles into discrete jet objects. Event shapes offer an alternative way to characterize jets, and one can define a jet multiplicity event shape, which can take on fractional values, using the framework of "jets without jets". In this paper, we perform the first analytic studies of fractional jet multiplicity $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ in the context of $e^+e^-$ collisions. We use fixed-order QCD to understand the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section at order $\\alpha_s^2$, and we introduce a candidate factorization theorem to capture certain higher-order effects. The resulting distributions have a hybrid jet algorithm/event shape behavior which agrees with parton shower Monte Carlo generators. The $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ observable does not satisfy ordinary soft-collinear factorization, and the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section exhibits a number of unique features, including the absence of collinear logarithms and the presence of soft logarithms that are purely non-global. Additionally, we find novel divergences connected to the energy sharing between emissions, which are reminiscent of rapidity divergences encountered in other applications. Given these interesting properties of fractional jet multiplicity, we advocate for future measurements and calculations of $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ at hadron colliders like the LHC.

  15. Distributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    system with a varying number of arbitrarily many cars. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems with joint discrete a multi-agent system, e.g., distributed car control systems. Such systems form distributed hybrid systemsDistributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems David W. Renshaw, Sarah M. Loos

  16. Seasonal Run Distribution Seasonal Run Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The term "total run" defines the number of adult sockeye salmon that home to the Karluk River before197 Seasonal Run Distribution CHAPTER 6 Seasonal Run Distribution They arrived from the sea in one, what was the seasonal run distribution of its sockeye salmon? Was the original run distribution which

  17. Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution Debasis Kundu and Rameshwar D. Gupta Abstract Recently it is observed that the generalized exponential distribution can be used quite effectively exponential distribution so that the marginals have generalized exponential distributions. It is observed

  18. Introduction Constrained distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuel, Gregory

    Introduction Constrained distribution Observed pattern distribution Counting patterns-9 September 2009 G. Nuel Counting patterns in degenerated sequences #12;Introduction Constrained distribution Observed pattern distribution Outline 1 Introduction Special letters in biological sequences Counting

  19. Interchange Format for Hybrid Systems: Abstract Semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    used by the algorithms. Modelica, for instance, pro- vides a language for describing systems in terms

  20. Discrete multivariate distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Yu. Vorobyev; Lavrentiy S. Golovkov

    2011-02-22

    This article brings in two new discrete distributions: multidimensional Binomial distribution and multidimensional Poisson distribution. Those distributions were created in eventology as more correct generalizations of Binomial and Poisson distributions. Accordingly to eventology new laws take into account full distribution of events. Also, in article its characteristics and properties are described

  1. RTU Comparison Calculator Enhancement Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.; Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two years, Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office (BTO) has been investigating ways to increase the operating efficiency of the packaged rooftop units (RTUs) in the field. First, by issuing a challenge to the RTU manufactures to increase the integrated energy efficiency ratio (IEER) by 60% over the existing ASHRAE 90.1-2010 standard. Second, by evaluating the performance of an advanced RTU controller that reduces the energy consumption by over 40%. BTO has previously also funded development of a RTU comparison calculator (RTUCC). RTUCC is a web-based tool that provides the user a way to compare energy and cost savings for two units with different efficiencies. However, the RTUCC currently cannot compare savings associated with either the RTU Challenge unit or the advanced RTU controls retrofit. Therefore, BTO has asked PNNL to enhance the tool so building owners can compare energy and savings associated with this new class of products. This document provides the details of the enhancements that are required to support estimating energy savings from use of RTU challenge units or advanced controls on existing RTUs.

  2. DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON ALLOTROPES AND MIXTURES EDUARDO WARSZAWSKI #12;#12;DENSITY OF STATES CALCULATIONS FOR CARBON ALLOTROPES AND MIXTURES Research Thesis Submitted in Partial;#12;Contents Abstract xiii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Carbon allotropes

  3. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  4. On parton distributions in a photon gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Alikhanov

    2009-06-19

    In some cases it may be useful to know parton distributions in a photon gas. This may be relevant, e.g., for the analysis of interactions of high energy cosmic ray particles with the cosmic microwave background radiation. The latter can be considered as a gas of photons with an almost perfect blackbody spectrum. An approach to finding such parton distributions is described. The survival probability of ultra-high energy neutrinos traveling through this radiation is calculated.

  5. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  6. Prior distribution Andrew Gelman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    Prior distribution Andrew Gelman Volume 3, pp 1634­1637 in Encyclopedia of Environmetrics (ISBN, 2002 #12;Prior distribution The prior distribution is a key part of Bayesian infer- ence (see Bayesian with the probability distribution of new data to yield the posterior distribution, which in turn is used for future

  7. Modeling and applications of two-phase flow distribution in manifolds under microgravity conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Cale Hollis

    1998-01-01

    associated with the flow throughout a manifold was developed. This calculational procedure was developed in order to calculate the flow distribution throughout a system, given only the inlet flow conditions and an arbitrary manifold geometry. Sample...

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of $A=9,10$ nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven C. Pieper; K. Varga; R. B. Wiringa

    2002-06-24

    We report on quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the ground and low-lying excited states of $A=9,10$ nuclei using realistic Hamiltonians containing the Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon potential alone or with one of several three-nucleon potentials, including Urbana IX and three of the new Illinois models. The calculations begin with correlated many-body wave functions that have an $\\alpha$-like core and multiple p-shell nucleons, $LS$-coupled to the appropriate $(J^{\\pi};T)$ quantum numbers for the state of interest. After optimization, these variational trial functions are used as input to a Green's function Monte Carlo calculation of the energy, using a constrained path algorithm. We find that the Hamiltonians that include Illinois three-nucleon potentials reproduce ten states in $^9$Li, $^9$Be, $^{10}$Be, and $^{10}$B with an rms deviation as little as 900 keV. In particular, we obtain the correct 3$^+$ ground state for $^{10}$B, whereas the Argonne $v_{18}$ alone or with Urbana IX predicts a 1$^+$ ground state. In addition, we calculate isovector and isotensor energy differences, electromagnetic moments, and one- and two-body density distributions.

  9. Distribution Grid Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Systems Integration team funds distribution grid integration research and development (R&D) activities to address the technical issues that surround distribution grid planning,...

  10. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  11. Energy Distribution of a Black Hole Solution in Heterotic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Radinschi

    2003-02-12

    We calculate the energy distribution of a charged black hole solution in heterotic string theory in the M{\\o}ller prescription.

  12. 13_050406_CLN_01.doc TO: DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    on the linear pressure distribution model [3]. ! MEM _ IP = ITF 71167 " # $ % & ' 2 * 70653 ! MJoint_ IP = CStructure _ IP * MEM _ IP #12;#12;In PSRTC the in-plane and out-of-plane pressures are calculated separately

  13. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  14. Distributed Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation,DepartmentCalculator Jump to:Distributed Wind

  15. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, X H; Ning, P Z

    2004-01-01

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  16. Some Calculations for Cold Fusion Superheavy Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. H. Zhong; L. Li; P. Z. Ning

    2004-10-18

    The Q value and optimal exciting energy of the hypothetical superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reaction are calculated with relativistic mean field model and semiemperical shell model mass equation(SSME) and the validity of the two models is tested. The fusion barriers are also calculated with two different models and reasonable results are obtained. The calculations can give useful references for the experiments in the superheavy nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions.

  17. Momentum distributions for H2(e,e?p)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and finalmore »state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this procedure can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.« less

  18. Momentum distributions for H2(e,e'p)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. W.

    2014-12-29

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and finalmore »state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this process can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.« less

  19. Momentum distributions for $^2$H$(e,e'p)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William P. Ford; Sabine Jeschonnek; J. W. Van Orden

    2014-11-12

    Background: A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. Purpose: We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. Method: The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and final state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. Results: In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental" distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. Conclusions: In the examples we compared, the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this procedure can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.

  20. Momentum distributions for 2H(e,e'p)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. Wallace

    2014-12-01

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and finalmore »state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this procedure can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.« less

  1. Cooling airflow design calculations for UFAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Benedek, Corinne

    2007-01-01

    written permission. Cooling Airflow Design Calculations form) height. Table 2: Design cooling airflow performance fortool predictions of UFAD cooling airflow rates and associ-

  2. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from field measurements available to calculate feeder PV production based in installed Capacity per feeder (Example: capture clear day vs cloudy day): PV gen. on circuit...

  3. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  4. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2014-12-16

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  5. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Industrial Distributed Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in owning and operating costs, thereby improving the economics of distributed power generation using reciprocating gas engines. Caterpillar's Phase I technologies have...

  6. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    2015-01-01

    6. ! Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Engineeredon Simulations of the Multimedia Distribution of ParticulateCohen, Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Engineered

  7. Chemistry 365: Force Constant Calculations David Ronis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    cost energy, and hence, there will no force in thy y or z directions (thereby resulting in 4 zero eigenChemistry 365: Force Constant Calculations © David Ronis McGill University Here is an example of a force constant matrix calculation. We will consider a diatomic molecule, where the two atoms interact

  8. PVWatts (R) Calculator India (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The PVWatts (R) Calculator for India was released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2013. The online tool estimates electricity production and the monetary value of that production of grid-connected roof- or ground-mounted crystalline silicon photovoltaics systems based on a few simple inputs. This factsheet provides a broad overview of the PVWatts (R) Calculator for India.

  9. Definition of a Random Variable Distribution Functions Properties of Distribution Functions Random Variables and Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Definition of a Random Variable Distribution Functions Properties of Distribution Functions Topic 7 Random Variables and Distribution Functions Distribution Functions 1 / 11 #12;Definition of a Random Variable Distribution Functions Properties of Distribution Functions Outline Definition of a Random

  10. Tools for calculations in color space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malin Sjodahl; Stefan Keppeler

    2013-07-04

    Both the higher energy and the initial state colored partons contribute to making exact calculations in QCD color space more important at the LHC than at its predecessors. This is applicable whether the method of assessing QCD is fixed order calculation, resummation, or parton showers. In this talk we discuss tools for tackling the problem of performing exact color summed calculations. We start with theoretical tools in the form of the (standard) trace bases and the orthogonal multiplet bases (for which a general method of construction was recently presented). Following this, we focus on two new packages for performing color structure calculations: one easy to use Mathematica package, ColorMath, and one C++ package, ColorFull, which is suitable for more demanding calculations, and for interfacing with event generators.

  11. Useful Probability Distributions Standard Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the proportion t as a variable which is continuous over the interval (0,1) For small consignments, say N Consignment of tablets, a proportion of which are suspected drugs. For large consignments, probability distribution of the proportion t which are drugs can be modeled with a beta distribution, which treats

  12. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ? 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ? 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al.more »[Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹??Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹??Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ? Z ? 85 and 100 ? N ? 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.« less

  13. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  14. Linear response calculation using the canonical-basis TDHFB with a schematic pairing functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuichiro Ebata; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Kazuhiro Yabana

    2010-09-17

    A canonical-basis formulation of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (TDHFB) theory is obtained with an approximation that the pair potential is assumed to be diagonal in the time-dependent canonical basis. The canonical-basis formulation significantly reduces the computational cost. We apply the method to linear-response calculations for even-even nuclei. E1 strength distributions for proton-rich Mg isotopes are systematically calculated. The calculation suggests strong Landau damping of giant dipole resonance for drip-line nuclei.

  15. Rooftop Unit Comparison Calculator User Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James D.

    2015-04-30

    This document serves as a user manual for the Packaged rooftop air conditioners and heat pump units comparison calculator (RTUCC) and is an aggregation of the calculator’s website documentation. Content ranges from new-user guide material like the “Quick Start” to the more technical/algorithmic descriptions of the “Methods Pages.” There is also a section listing all the context-help topics that support the features on the “Controls” page. The appendix has a discussion of the EnergyPlus runs that supported the development of the building-response models.

  16. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Spatially DistributedSpatially Distributed Experimentation toExperimentation to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    : Spatially distributed atomic layer deposition Spatially Distributed Atomic LayerSpatially Distributed Atomic properties Significance Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely sought for its atomic-scale thickness control, MKS Instruments #12;Rubloff: Spatially distributed atomic layer deposition Spatially Distributed

  18. INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

  19. HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR A MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    LBL-1 0431 UC-91 HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR A MODIFIED IN-REFERENCES • . • • • • . , . HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR ACalifomia. LBL-10431 HYDRAULIC CALCULATIONS FOR A MODIFIED

  20. Medical physics calculations with MCNP: a primer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarine, Alexis D

    2006-10-30

    of Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values using the ORNL MIRD phantom, x-ray phototherapy effectiveness, prostate brachytherapy lifetime dose calculations, and a radiograph of the head using the Zubal head phantom. Also...

  1. Essential Value, Pmax, and Omax Automated Calculator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Brent A.; Reed, Derek D.

    2014-08-21

    Behavioral economic measures of demand are often calculated in sophisticated spreadsheet programs. Unfortunately, no closed form models for exact pmax (point of unit elasticity) and omax (response output at pmax) can be applied to initial regression...

  2. First principle thousand atom quantum dot calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Li, Jingbo

    2004-03-30

    A charge patching method and an idealized surface passivation are used to calculate the single electronic states of IV-IV, III-V, II-VI semiconductor quantum dots up to a thousand atoms. This approach scales linearly and has a 1000 fold speed-up compared to direct first principle methods with a cost of eigen energy error of about 20 meV. The calculated quantum dot band gaps are parametrized for future references.

  3. Distributed Wind 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wind 2015 is committed to the advancement of both distributed and community wind energy. This two day event includes a Business Conference with sessions focused on advancing the...

  4. Efficient ab initio sampling methods in rate constant calculations for proton-transfer reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    a molecular mechanics guidance potential for the simulation of the proton transfer reaction which improves integrated correlation lengths in calculations of quantum static correlation functions. © 2001 American distribution. It was demonstrated that the utilization of a reasonably accurate molecular mechanics potential

  5. Energy Distribution of Black Plane Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Halpern

    2006-03-27

    We use the Einstein energy-momentum complex to calculate the energy distribution of static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. This solution is expressed in terms of three parameters: the mass, electric charge and cosmological constant. We compare the energy distribution to that of the Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-de Sitter solution, pointing to qualitative differences between the models. Finally, we examine these results within the context of the Cooperstock hypothesis.

  6. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  7. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  8. Simplified calculation method for design cooling loads in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    and P.L. Linden, The EnergyPlus UFAD module. Proceedings ofUS, (2008) 23-28. EnergyPlus, Engineering Reference. U.S.uc/item/7gr8r3d3 EnergyPlus. Testing and Validation. http://

  9. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  10. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, William P. (Tracy, CA); Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L. (San Ramon, CA); Rathkopf, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  11. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  12. Benchmarking calculations of excitonic couplings between bacteriochlorophylls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Elise P

    2015-01-01

    Excitonic couplings between (bacterio)chlorophyll molecules are necessary for simulating energy transport in photosynthetic complexes. Many techniques for calculating the couplings are in use, from the simple (but inaccurate) point-dipole approximation to fully quantum-chemical methods. We compared several approximations to determine their range of applicability, noting that the propagation of experimental uncertainties poses a fundamental limit on the achievable accuracy. In particular, the uncertainty in crystallographic coordinates yields an uncertainty of about 20% in the calculated couplings. Because quantum-chemical corrections are smaller than 20% in most biologically relevant cases, their considerable computational cost is rarely justified. We therefore recommend the electrostatic TrEsp method across the entire range of molecular separations and orientations because its cost is minimal and it generally agrees with quantum-chemical calculations to better than the geometric uncertainty. We also caution ...

  13. LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J. Anderson

    1999-07-19

    The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository.

  14. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

    2013-01-01

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

  15. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5; Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 ; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Heart and Stroke Foundation Centre for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 ; La Russa, Daniel J.; The Faculty of Medicine, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm ?-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  16. Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

    2004-01-20

    PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The “customer-owned” backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the “customer owned” backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

  17. Analytical calculation of neutral transport and its effect on ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, M.D.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Solano, E.R. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Inst. for Fusion Studies Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Fusion Research Center)

    1991-06-01

    We analytically calculate the neutral particle distribution and its effects on ion heat and momentum transport in three-dimensional plasmas with arbitrary temperature and density profiles. A general variational principle taking advantage of the simplicity of the charge-exchange (CX) operator is derived to solve self-consistently the neutral-plasma interaction problem. To facilitate an extremal solution, we use the short CX mean-free-path ({lambda}{sub x}) ordering. Further, a non-variational, analytical solution providing a full set of transport coefficient is derived by making the realistic assumption that the product of the CX cross section with relative velocity is constant. The effects of neutrals on plasma energy loss and rotation appear in simple, sensible forms. We find that neutral viscosity dominates ion viscosity everywhere, and in the edge region by a large factor. 13 refs.

  18. Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Lee C. Cadwallader; David A. Petti

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.

  19. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  20. Statistical assessment of Monte Carlo distributional tallies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C; Solomon, Clell J

    2010-12-09

    Four tests are developed to assess the statistical reliability of distributional or mesh tallies. To this end, the relative variance density function is developed and its moments are studied using simplified, non-transport models. The statistical tests are performed upon the results of MCNP calculations of three different transport test problems and appear to show that the tests are appropriate indicators of global statistical quality.

  1. Energy and Isotope Dependence of Neutron Multiplicity Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Lestone

    2014-09-17

    Fission neutron multiplicity distributions are known to be well reproduced by simple Gaussian distributions. Many previous evaluations of multiplicity distributions have adjusted the widths of Gaussian distributions to best fit the measured multiplicity distributions Pn. However, many observables do not depend on the detailed shape of Pn, but depend on the first three factorial moments of the distributions. In the present evaluation, the widths of Gaussians are adjusted to fit the measured 2nd and 3rd factorial moments. The relationships between the first three factorial moments are estimated assuming that the widths of the multiplicity distributions are independent of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system. These simple calculations are in good agreement with experimental neutron induced fission data up to an incoming neutron energy of 10 MeV.

  2. Benchmarking calculations of excitonic couplings between bacteriochlorophylls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elise P. Kenny; Ivan Kassal

    2015-09-09

    Excitonic couplings between (bacterio)chlorophyll molecules are necessary for simulating energy transport in photosynthetic complexes. Many techniques for calculating the couplings are in use, from the simple (but inaccurate) point-dipole approximation to fully quantum-chemical methods. We compared several approximations to determine their range of applicability, noting that the propagation of experimental uncertainties poses a fundamental limit on the achievable accuracy. In particular, the uncertainty in crystallographic coordinates yields an uncertainty of about 20% in the calculated couplings. Because quantum-chemical corrections are smaller than 20% in most biologically relevant cases, their considerable computational cost is rarely justified. We therefore recommend the electrostatic TrEsp method across the entire range of molecular separations and orientations because its cost is minimal and it generally agrees with quantum-chemical calculations to better than the geometric uncertainty. We also caution against computationally optimizing a crystal structure before calculating couplings, as it can lead to large, uncontrollable errors. Understanding the unavoidable uncertainties can guard against striving for unrealistic precision; at the same time, detailed benchmarks can allow important qualitative questions--which do not depend on the precise values of the simulation parameters--to be addressed with greater confidence about the conclusions.

  3. Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    R EVISED PAG E PR O O FS ia617 Spin Contamination in Inorganic Chemistry Calculations Jason L . In such cases, 0 is said to be spin contaminated owing to incorporation of higher spin state character of Iron­Sulfur ia618 Clusters). It is important to note that while spin-contaminated and broken

  4. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  5. Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Multipole Electrostatics in Hydration Free Energy Calculations YUE SHI,1 CHUANJIE WU,2 JAY W: Hydration free energy (HFE) is generally used for evaluating molecular solubility, which is an important interactions. The effect of long-range correction to van der Waals interaction on the hydration free energies

  6. PIC : Protein Interaction Calculator HELP AND GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    PIC : Protein Interaction Calculator HELP AND GUIDELINES CONTENTS 1. Overview 2. Method 3. Input 4 (PIC) is a server which, given the coordinate set of threedimensional structure of a protein colored by PIC programmes can be downloaded and conveniently displayed with structural viewers

  7. Calculated fission properties of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    A quantitative calculation is presented that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. For the macroscopic part a Yukawa-plus-exponential model is used and for the microscopic part a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential is used. The three-quadratic-surface parameterization generates shapes for which the potential-energy surfaces are calculated. The use of this parameterization and the use of the finite-range macroscopic model allows for the study of two touching spheres and similar shapes. The results of the calculations in terms of potential-energy surfaces and fission half-lives are presented for heavy even nuclei. The surfaces are displayed in the form of contour diagrams as functions of two moments of the shape. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Oberseminar -ICP Temperature Calculation for Tribological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    and passing to third parties. 0 #12;Overview Where to calculate the heat: diesel injection pump First focus in the steel in the meantime of one step It takes some rotations to have the heat penetrate the whole pump even in the event of industrial property rights. We reserve all rights of disposal such as copying

  9. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

  10. SCALE Sensitivity Calculations Using Contributon Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Perfetti, Chris [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Petrie Jr, Lester M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity and uncertainty analysis sequence computes the sensitivity of k-eff to each constituent multigroup cross section using adjoint techniques with the KENO Monte Carlo codes. A new technique to simultaneously obtain the product of the forward and adjoint angular flux moments within a single Monte Carlo calculation has been developed and implemented in the SCALE TSUNAMI-3D analysis sequence. A new concept in Monte Carlo theory has been developed for this work, an eigenvalue contributon estimator, which is an extension of previously developed fixed-source contributon estimators. A contributon is a particle for which the forward solution is accumulated, and its importance to the response, which is equivalent to the adjoint solution, is simultaneously accumulated. Thus, the contributon is a particle coupled with its contribution to the response, in this case keff. As implemented in SCALE, the contributon provides the importance of a particle exiting at any energy or direction for each location, energy and direction at which the forward flux solution is sampled. Although currently implemented for eigenvalue calculations in multigroup mode in KENO, this technique is directly applicable to continuous-energy calculations for many other responses such as fixed-source sensitivity analysis and quantification of reactor kinetics parameters. This paper provides the physical bases of eigenvalue contributon theory, provides details of implementation into TSUNAMI-3D, and provides results of sample calculations.

  11. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. B. Ma; W. L. Zhong; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; J. Cao

    2013-06-30

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. the second one is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The last one is more carefully calculation of the average energy taken away by antineutrinos in thermal fission with the comparison of antineutrino spectrum from different models. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.32%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 50% smaller.

  12. Calculating the mass spectrum of primordial black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam Young; Christian T. Byrnes; Misao Sasaki

    2015-03-04

    We reinspect the calculation for the mass fraction of primordial black holes (PBHs) which are formed from primordial perturbations, finding that performing the calculation using the comoving curvature perturbation $\\mathcal{R}_{c}$ in the standard way vastly overestimates the number of PBHs, by many orders of magnitude. This is because PBHs form shortly after horizon entry, meaning modes significantly larger than the PBH are unobservable and should not affect whether a PBH forms or not - this important effect is not taken into account by smoothing the distribution in the standard fashion. We discuss alternative methods and argue that the density contrast, $\\Delta$, should be used instead as super-horizon modes are damped by a factor $k^{2}$. We make a comparison between using a Press-Schechter approach and peaks theory, finding that the two are in close agreement in the region of interest. We also investigate the effect of varying the spectral index, and the running of the spectral index, on the abundance of primordial black holes.

  13. Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

  14. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  15. MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 20, 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: MICHAEL W. OWEN

  16. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  17. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  18. IBS for non-gaussian distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, A.; Sidorin, A.O.; Smirnov, A.V.

    2010-09-27

    In many situations distribution can significantly deviate from Gaussian which requires accurate treatment of IBS. Our original interest in this problem was motivated by the need to have an accurate description of beam evolution due to IBS while distribution is strongly affected by the external electron cooling force. A variety of models with various degrees of approximation were developed and implemented in BETACOOL in the past to address this topic. A more complete treatment based on the friction coefficient and full 3-D diffusion tensor was introduced in BETACOOL at the end of 2007 under the name 'local IBS model'. Such a model allowed us calculation of IBS for an arbitrary beam distribution. The numerical benchmarking of this local IBS algorithm and its comparison with other models was reported before. In this paper, after briefly describing the model and its limitations, they present its comparison with available experimental data.

  19. Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

    2004-05-31

    Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

  20. Distributed Road Grade Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Distributed Road Grade Estimation for Heavy Duty Vehicles PER SAH LHOLM Doctoral Thesis in Automatic Control Stockholm, Sweden 2011 #12;Distributed Road Grade Estimation for Heavy Duty Vehicles PER state-of-charge control decrease the energy consumption of vehicles and increase the safety

  1. Isogeometric analysis in electronic structure calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cimrman, Robert; Kolman, Radek; T?ma, Miroslav; Vacká?, Ji?í

    2016-01-01

    In electronic structure calculations, various material properties can be obtained by means of computing the total energy of a system as well as derivatives of the total energy w.r.t. atomic positions. The derivatives, also known as Hellman-Feynman forces, require, because of practical computational reasons, the discretized charge density and wave functions having continuous second derivatives in the whole solution domain. We describe an application of isogeometric analysis (IGA), a spline modification of finite element method (FEM), to achieve the required continuity. The novelty of our approach is in employing the technique of B\\'ezier extraction to add the IGA capabilities to our FEM based code for ab-initio calculations of electronic states of non-periodic systems within the density-functional framework, built upon the open source finite element package SfePy. We compare FEM and IGA in benchmark problems and several numerical results are presented.

  2. Asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth M. Nollett; R. B. Wiringa

    2011-04-14

    We present calculations of asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for one-nucleon removals from nuclear states of mass numbers 3 to 9. Our ANCs were computed from variational Monte Carlo solutions to the many-body Schroedinger equation with the combined Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. Instead of computing explicit overlap integrals, we applied a Green's function method that is insensitive to the difficulties of constructing and Monte Carlo sampling the long-range tails of the variational wave functions. This method also allows computation of the ANC at the physical separation energy, even when it differs from the separation energy for the Hamiltonian. We compare our results, which for most nuclei are the first ab initio calculations of ANCs, with existing experimental and theoretical results and discuss further possible applications of the technique.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven C. Pieper

    2004-10-27

    Variational Monte Carlo and Green's function Monte Carlo are powerful tools for calculations of properties of light nuclei using realistic two-nucleon and three-nucleon potentials. Recently the GFMC method has been extended to multiple states with the same quantum numbers. The combination of the Argonne v_18 two-nucleon and Illinois-2 three-nucleon potentials gives a good prediction of many energies of nuclei up to 12C. A number of other recent results are presented: comparison of binding energies with those obtained by the no-core shell model; the incompatibility of modern nuclear Hamiltonians with a bound tetra-neutron; difficulties in computing RMS radii of very weakly bound nuclei, such as 6He; center-of-mass effects on spectroscopic factors; and the possible use of an artificial external well in calculations of neutron-rich isotopes.

  4. Equation of State from Lattice QCD Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan Gupta

    2011-04-01

    We provide a status report on the calculation of the Equation of State (EoS) of QCD at finite temperature using lattice QCD. Most of the discussion will focus on comparison of recent results obtained by the HotQCD and Wuppertal-Budapest (W-B) collaborations. We will show that very significant progress has been made towards obtaining high precision results over the temperature range of T=150-700 MeV. The various sources of systematic uncertainties will be discussed and the differences between the two calculations highlighted. Our final conclusion is that the lattice results of EoS are getting precise enough to justify being used in the phenomenological analysis of heavy ion experiments at RHIC and LHC.

  5. A Methodology for Calculating Radiation Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Marc Louis; Wilcox, Trevor; Bathke, Charles G.; James, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    A rigorous formalism is presented for calculating radiation signatures from both Special Nuclear Material (SNM) as well as radiological sources. The use of MCNP6 in conjunction with CINDER/ORIGEN is described to allow for the determination of both neutron and photon leakages from objects of interest. In addition, a description of the use of MCNP6 to properly model the background neutron and photon sources is also presented. Examinations of the physics issues encountered in the modeling are investigated so as to allow for guidance in the user discerning the relevant physics to incorporate into general radiation signature calculations. Furthermore, examples are provided to assist in delineating the pertinent physics that must be accounted for. Finally, examples of detector modeling utilizing MCNP are provided along with a discussion on the generation of Receiver Operating Curves, which are the suggested means by which to determine detectability radiation signatures emanating from objects.

  6. Index calculation by means of harmonic expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamura, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    We review derivation of superconformal indices by means of supersymmetric localization and spherical harmonic expansion for 3d N=2, 4d N=1, and 6d N=(1,0) supersymmetric gauge theories. We demonstrate calculation of indices for vector multiplets in each dimensions by analysing energy eigenmodes in S^pxR. For the 6d index we consider the perturbative contribution only. We put focus on technical details of harmonic expansion rather than physical applications.

  7. Index calculation by means of harmonic expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Imamura

    2015-10-28

    We review derivation of superconformal indices by means of supersymmetric localization and spherical harmonic expansion for 3d N=2, 4d N=1, and 6d N=(1,0) supersymmetric gauge theories. We demonstrate calculation of indices for vector multiplets in each dimensions by analysing energy eigenmodes in S^pxR. For the 6d index we consider the perturbative contribution only. We put focus on technical details of harmonic expansion rather than physical applications.

  8. Transport calculations of antiproton-nucleus interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Larionov; I. N. Mishustin; I. A. Pshenichnov; L. M. Satarov; W. Greiner

    2010-01-15

    The Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model is extended and applied to the antiproton-nucleus interactions in a wide beam momentum range. The model calculations are compared with the experimental data on $\\bar p$-absorption cross sections on nuclei with an emphasis on extraction of the real part of an antiproton optical potential. The possibility of the cold compression of a nucleus by an antiproton in-flight is also considered.

  9. Economic Calculations for the ASHRAE Handbook 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    ESL-TR-93/04-07 Economic Calculations for the ASHRAE Handbook Jeff S. Haberl Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3123 For any proposed capital investment, the capital and interest costs, salvage costs... Office, Washington, D.C. BIBLIOGRAPHY ASTM. 1985. Definition of terms relating to building economics. ASTM Standard E933-S5. ASTM, Philadelphia. Kurtz, M. 1984. Handbook of engineering economics: A guide for engineers, technicians, scientists and managers...

  10. Permeability Calculation in a Fracture Network - 12197

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheo Kyung; Kim, Hyo Won [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Sung Paal [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    Laminar flow of a viscous fluid in the pore space of a saturated fractured rock medium is considered to calculate the effective permeability of the medium. The effective permeability is determined from the flow field which is calculated numerically by using the finite element method. The computation of permeability components is carried out with a few different discretizations for a number of fracture arrangements. Various features such as flow field in the fracture channels, the convergence of permeability, and the variation of permeability among different fracture networks are discussed. The longitudinal permeability in general appears greater than the transverse ones. The former shows minor variations with fracture arrangement whereas the latter appears to be more sensitive to the arrangement. From the calculations of the permeability in a rock medium with a fracture network (two parallel fractures aligned in the direction of 45-deg counterclockwise from the horizontal and two connecting fractures(narrowing, parallel and widening) the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium not only depends on the primary orientation of the main fractures but also is noticeably influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The transverse permeability (the permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the externally imposed macro-scale pressure gradient) is only a fraction of the longitudinal one, but is sensitive to the arrangement of the connecting fractures. 3. It is important to figure out the pattern of the fractures that connect (or cross) the main fractures for reliable calculation of the transverse permeability. (authors)

  11. Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

  12. Iron loss calculation for synchronous reluctance machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonardi, F.; Matsuo, T.; Lipo, T.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A numerical method for iron loss calculation is presented in this paper. The method is suitable for any synchronous and most dc machines, especially if the current waveforms are known a priori . This technique will be principally useful for high speed machines and in particular for the synchronous reluctance machines and in particular for the synchronous reluctance machine, where the iron losses are often an important issue. The calculation is based on Finite Element Analysis, which provides the flux density waveforms in the iron, and on the Fourier Analysis of these waveforms. Several Finite Element Simulations are necessary to obtain the induced voltage versus time waveforms. To reduce the post-processing time the majority of the elements of the model are grouped together to create super elements. Also the periodicity of the motor can be used to reduce the number of required simulations. The method is applied to the calculation of the iron losses of a synchronous reluctance generator, and a number of interesting results are discussed in the paper.

  13. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2007-08-01

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  15. Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

  16. Advanced Neutronics Tools for BWR Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santamarina, A.; Hfaiedh, N.; Letellier, R.; Sargeni, A.; Vaglio, C. [CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Marotte, V. [AREVA NP SAS (France); Misu, S. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Zmijarevic, I. [CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes the developments implemented in the new APOLLO2.8 neutronics tool to meet the required target accuracy in LWR applications, particularly void effects and pin-by-pin power map in BWRs. The Method Of Characteristics was developed to allow efficient LWR assembly calculations in 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry; resonant reaction calculation was improved by the optimized SHEM-281 group mesh, which avoids resonance self-shielding approximation below 23 eV, and the new space-dependent method for resonant mixture that accounts for resonance overlapping. Furthermore, a new library CEA2005, processed from JEFF3.1 evaluations involving feedback from Critical Experiments and LWR P.I.E, is used. The specific '2005-2007 BWR Plan' settled to demonstrate the validation/qualification of this neutronics tool is described. Some results from the validation process are presented: the comparison of APOLLO2.8 results to reference Monte Carlo TRIPOLI4 results on specific BWR benchmarks emphasizes the ability of the deterministic tool to calculate BWR assembly multiplication factor within 200 pcm accuracy for void fraction varying from 0 to 100%. The qualification process against the BASALA mock-up experiment stresses APOLLO2.8/CEA2005 performances: pin-by-pin power is always predicted within 2% accuracy, reactivity worth of B4C or Hf cruciform control blade, as well as Gd pins, is predicted within 1.2% accuracy. (authors)

  17. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Jessee, M. A.; Mertyurek, U.

    2013-07-01

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has considerably improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This manuscript extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system. (authors)

  18. Radiative accelerations for evolutionary model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richer, J.; Michaud, G.; Rogers, F.; Iglesias, C.; Turcotte, S.; LeBlanc, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monochromatic opacities from the OPAL database have been used to calculate radiative accelerations for the 21 included chemical species. The 10{sup 4} frequencies used are sufficient to calculate the radiative accelerations of many elements for T{gt}10{sup 5}K, using frequency sampling. This temperature limit is higher for less abundant elements. As the abundances of Fe, He, or O are varied, the radiative acceleration of other elements changes, since abundant elements modify the frequency dependence of the radiative flux and the Rosseland opacity. Accurate radiative accelerations for a given element can only be obtained by allowing the abundances of the species that contribute most to the Rosseland opacity to vary during the evolution and recalculating the radiative accelerations and the Rosseland opacity during the evolution. There are physical phenomena that cannot be included in the calculations if one uses only the OPAL data. For instance, one should correct for the momentum given to the electron in a photoionization. Such effects are evaluated using atomic data from Opacity Project, and correction factors are given. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  19. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (?s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-24

    We present an analytic O(?s) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness ?. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of the 1-jettiness distribution.

  20. Self-consistent Green's function calculation of 16O at small missing energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barbieri; W. H. Dickhoff

    2004-10-19

    Calculations of the one-hole spectral function of 16O for small missing energies are reviewed. The self-consistent Green's function approach is employed together with the Faddeev equations technique in order to study the coupling of both particle-particle and particle-hole phonons to the single-particle motion. The results indicate that the characteristics of hole fragmentation are related to the low-lying states of 16O and an improvement of the description of this spectrum, beyond the random phase approximation, is required to understand the experimental strength distribution. A first calculation in this direction that accounts for two-phonon states is discussed.

  1. A Dual Method for Computing Power Transfer Distribution Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Power Transfer Distribution Factors (PTDFs) play a crucial role in power grid security analysis, planning, and redispatch. Fast calculation of the PTDFs is therefore of great importance. In this letter, we present a dual method of computing PTDFs. It uses power flows along topological cycles of the network but still relies on simple matrix algebra. For power grids containing a relatively small number of cycles, the method offers a significant speedup of numerical calculations.

  2. Relaxation times calculated from angular deflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Athanassoula; Ch. L. Vozikis; J. C. Lambert

    2001-08-21

    In this paper we measure the two-body relaxation time from the angular deflection of test particles launched in a rigid configuration of field particles. We find that centrally concentrated configurations have relaxation times that can be shorter than those of the corresponding homogeneous distributions by an order of magnitude or more. For homogeneous distributions we confirm that the relaxation time is proportional to the number of particles. On the other hand centrally concentrated configurations have a much shallower dependence, particularly for small values of the softening. The relaxation time increases with the inter-particle velocities and with softening. The latter dependence is not very strong, of the order of a factor of two when the softening is increased by an order of magnitude. Finally we show that relaxation times are the same on GRAPE-3 and GRAPE-4, dedicated computer boards with limited and high precision respectively.

  3. Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory of Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic...

  4. Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant...

  5. Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

  6. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of nuclear reaction cross...

  7. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  8. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  9. Touschek Lifetime Calculations for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash,B.; Kramer, S.

    2009-05-04

    The Touschek effect limits the lifetime for NSLS-II. The basic mechanism is Coulomb scattering resulting in a longitudinal momentum outside the momentum aperture. The momentum aperture results from a combination of the initial betatron oscillations after the scatter and the non-linear properties determining the resultant stability. We find that higher order multipole errors may reduce the momentum aperture, particularly for scattered particles with energy loss. The resultant drop in Touschek lifetime is minimized, however, due to less scattering in the dispersive regions. We describe these mechanisms, and present calculations for NSLS-II using a realistic lattice model including damping wigglers and engineering tolerances.

  10. Excited state contamination in nucleon structure calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Green; Stefan Krieg; John Negele; Andrew Pochinsky; Sergey Syritsyn

    2011-11-28

    Among the sources of systematic error in nucleon structure calculations is contamination from unwanted excited states. In order to measure this systematic error, we vary the operator insertion time and source-sink separation independently. We compute observables for three source-sink separations between 0.93 fm and 1.39 fm using clover-improved Wilson fermions and pion masses as low as 150 MeV. We explore the use of a two-state model fit to subtract off the contribution from excited states.

  11. Microscopic calculations in asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Alonso; F. Sammarruca

    2003-02-06

    A microscopic calculation of the equation of state for asymmetric nuclear matter is presented. We employ realistic nucleon-nucleon forces and operate within the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach to nuclear matter. The focal point of this paper is a (momentum-space) G-matrix which properly accounts for the asymmetry between protons and neutrons. This will merge naturally into the development of an effective interaction suitable for applications to asymmetric nuclei, which will be the object of extensive study in the future.

  12. Calculations of Surface Thermal-Expansion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KENNER, VE; Allen, Roland E.

    1973-01-01

    expansion. At high temperatures, the results for the surface thermal expansion are in agreement with the prediction of an approximate model which we gave earlier, +surface/abu)k ?(3/4) & ur ) su f / (0 )b lk At lOW temperatureS, a,???e/ab?,k paSSeS thr... influence the shifts in the Bragg peaks which are observed experimentally, as has been found to be the case in other attempts to measure surface thermal expansion. A nonkinematical calculation of temperature effects in low-energy-electron diffraction from...

  13. Linear Transformation Method for Multinuclide Decay Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yuan

    2010-12-29

    A linear transformation method for generic multinuclide decay calculations is presented together with its properties and implications. The method takes advantage of the linear form of the decay solution N(t) = F(t)N{sub 0}, where N(t) is a column vector that represents the numbers of atoms of the radioactive nuclides in the decay chain, N{sub 0} is the initial value vector of N(t), and F(t) is a lower triangular matrix whose time-dependent elements are independent of the initial values of the system.

  14. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, EtInformationRoof Calculator Jump to:

  15. Syntax of adverb distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelstein, Elspeth Claire

    2012-11-28

    The distribution of adverbs is particularly difficult to account for, given the amount of variation it encompasses. Not only are adverbs typically optional, but any adverb may also appear in several different positions ...

  16. Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Buildings Technologies Program Date: November 8, 2011 Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems Welcome to the Webinar We will start at 1:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are...

  17. A self-consistent renormalized Jellium approach for calculating structural and thermodynamic properties of charge stabilized colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiago E. Colla; Yan Levin; E. Trizac

    2009-05-11

    An approach is proposed which allows to self-consistently calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged aqueous colloidal suspensions. The method is based on the renormalized Jellium model with the background charge distribution related to the colloid-colloid correlation function. The theory is used to calculate the correlation functions and the effective colloidal charges for suspension containing additional monovalent electrolyte. The predictions of the theory are in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Polygamy of distributed entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscemi, Francesco [Statistical Laboratory, DPMMS, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WB (United Kingdom); Gour, Gilad [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Kim, Jeong San [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    While quantum entanglement is known to be monogamous (i.e., shared entanglement is restricted in multipartite settings), here we show that distributed entanglement (or the potential for entanglement) is by nature polygamous. By establishing the concept of one-way unlocalizable entanglement (UE) and investigating its properties, we provide a polygamy inequality of distributed entanglement in tripartite quantum systems of arbitrary dimension. We also provide a polygamy inequality in multiqubit systems and several trade-offs between UE and other correlation measures.

  19. Equilibrium Distributions and Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashot Vagharshakyan

    2011-06-07

    In this article two models for charges distributions are discussed. On the basis of our consideration we put different points of view for stationary state. We prove that only finite energy model for charges' distribution and well-known variation principle explain some well-known experimental results. A new model for superconductivity was suggested, too. In frame of that model some characteristic experimental results for superconductors is possible to explain.

  20. Calculating chiller emissions and source energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumann, D.J. [Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Various analyses have compared the emissions and over-all source energy use of different chillers. However, these analyses are typically based on national or regional electric power plant annual averages or rely on outdated emissions data that do not account for scrubbers and other pollution controls applied in response to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). Other analyses have used power generation data for a specific utility but require hourly generation profiles, which are difficult to obtain. Thus, many of the existing models are either too general to provide valuable information or too complex to be practical for the day-to-day applications engineers face. This paper introduces a simple yet reliable hand calculation method for estimating the combustion-related emissions and source energy use of gas and electric chillers. The user needs to supply only two inputs: annual chiller system energy use and the utility`s power generation mix during chiller operation. The analysis supplies electric power plant heat rates and emission factors. Referenced guidelines are documented for all calculation inputs.

  1. Particle distribution and nuclear stopping in Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. L. Zhu; C. B. Yang

    2006-05-18

    The transverse momentum distribution of produced charged particles is investigated for gold-gold collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV. A simple parameterization is suggested for the particle distribution based on the nuclear stopping effect. The model can fit very well both the transverse momentum distributions at different pseudo-rapidities and the pseudo-rapidity distributions at different centralities. The ratio of rapidity distributions for peripheral and central collisions is calculated and compared with the data.

  2. The generalized Mackenzie distribution: disorientation angle distributions for arbitrary textures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, J. K.

    A general formulation for the disorientation angle distribution function is derived. The derivation employs the hyperspherical harmonic expansion for orientation distributions, and an explicit solution is presented for ...

  3. A new approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eidelman, Yu.; Mokhov, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. It is based on joint solution of equations of longitudinal and transverse motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field of the linac. This field is a given by distribution (measured or calculated) of the component of the longitudinal electric field on the axis of the linac. New approach is compared with other matrix methods to solve the same problem. The comparison with code ASTRA has been carried out. Complete agreement for tracking results for a TESLA-type cavity is achieved. A corresponding algorithm will be implemented into the MARS15 code. A realistic approach to calculate the transport matrix in RF cavities is developed. Complete agreement for tracking results with existed code ASTRA is achieved. New algorithm will be implemented into MARS15 code.

  4. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  5. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  6. Zero energy scattering calculation in Euclidean space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonell, J

    2016-01-01

    We show that the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the scattering amplitude in the limit of zero incident energy can be transformed into a purely Euclidean form, as it is the case for the bound states. The decoupling between Euclidean and Minkowski amplitudes is only possible for zero energy scattering observables and allows determining the scattering length from the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter amplitude. Such a possibility strongly simplifies the numerical solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and suggests an alternative way to compute the scattering length in Lattice Euclidean calculations without using the Luscher formalism. The derivations contained in this work were performed for scalar particles and one-boson exchange kernel. They can be generalized to the fermion case and more involved interactions.

  7. Followup calculations for the UVAR LEU conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rydin, R.A.; Hosticka, B.; Burns, T. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The UVAR reactor was successfully converted to LEU fuel in April 1994. Void coefficient measurements were made on the 4-by-4 fully-graphite-reflected LEU-1 core configuration, and an isothermal temperature coefficient measurement was made on the operational 4-by-5 partially-graphite-reflected LEU-2 core configuration. Both of these experiments have now been modeled in their critical configurations using the 3DBUM code. The LEU cores were also modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNP in order to obtain a neutron/gamma source for BNCT filter design calculations. Advanced BNCT filters have been evaluated using both MCNP and the discrete ordinates code DORT. The results indicate that the UVAR would be an ideal source for the BNCT treatment of brain tumors.

  8. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, Tatiana [IRSN; Laville, Cedric [IRSN; Dyrda, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Mennerdahl, Dennis [E. Mennerdahl Systems; Golovko, Yury [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Raskach, Kirill [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Tsiboulia, Anatoly [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Russia; Lee, Gil Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Woo, Sweng-Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS); Bidaud, Adrien [Labratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmolo-gie (LPSC); Patel, Amrit [NRC; Bledsoe, Keith C [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Gulliford, J. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  9. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  10. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1 g?cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  11. Value distribution and potential theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-10-01

    We describe some results of value distribution theory of holomorphic. curves and ... Classical value distribution theory studies the following question: Let f be a.

  12. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne (Grain Valley, MO); Dunson, David (Kansas City, MO)

    2006-08-08

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  13. Distributed data transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Kenneth Dewayne (Grain Valley, MO); Dunson, David (Kansas City, MO)

    2008-06-03

    A distributed data transmitter (DTXR) which is an adaptive data communication microwave transmitter having a distributable architecture of modular components, and which incorporates both digital and microwave technology to provide substantial improvements in physical and operational flexibility. The DTXR has application in, for example, remote data acquisition involving the transmission of telemetry data across a wireless link, wherein the DTXR is integrated into and utilizes available space within a system (e.g., a flight vehicle). In a preferred embodiment, the DTXR broadly comprises a plurality of input interfaces; a data modulator; a power amplifier; and a power converter, all of which are modularly separate and distinct so as to be substantially independently physically distributable and positionable throughout the system wherever sufficient space is available.

  14. Angular distributions in the elastic scattering and rotational excitation of molecular hydrogen by atomic hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Dalgarno, A.

    1975-08-01

    The effective close-coupling method of Rabitz is tested and used to calculate the angular distributions of the elastic and inelastic scattering of molecular hydrogen in collision with atomic hydrogen when rotational transitions may occur...

  15. Analysis of Cold Air Distribution System in an Office Building by the Numerical Simulation Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Y.; Li, D.; Xu, H.; Ma, X.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out in this paper to calculate indoor air patterns, which include angles of inlet direction and induced ratios in a typical official room. According to the simulation results, the indoor air distribution and indoor...

  16. Energy Distribution of a Gödel-Type Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragab M. Gad

    2004-01-29

    We calculate the energy and momentum distributions associated with a G\\"{o}del-type space-time, using the well-known energy-momentum complexes of Landau and Lifshitz and M{\\o}ller. We show that the definitions of Landau and Lifshitz and M{\\o}ller do not furnish a consistent result.

  17. Wigner Distribution for the Double Slit Experiment Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    is measured at the detection screen. Position and momentum are conjugate observables connected by a Fourier to calculate the momentum distribution at the detection screen. The slitscreen geometry and therefore reconstructed for the helium atom. [See, Nature, 386, 150 (1997). See Figure 1 of Shadows and Mirrors

  18. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  19. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Division of Education and Human Services, Neumann University, One Neumann Drive, Aston, Pennsylvania 19014-1298 ; Mallory, Clelia W.; Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 ; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 2–12 kJ?mol{sup ?1} range.

  20. Almost uniform distribution modulo 1 and the distribution of primes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiyama, Shigeki

    Almost uniform distribution modulo 1 and the distribution of primes Shigeki Akiyama Abstract Let such as Pn, the n-th prime. We study the distribution of the fractional parts of (an) using the concept of "almost uniform distribution" defined in [9]. Then we can show a generalization of the results of [2

  1. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Ly? photons, since the Ly? line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ?300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  2. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyman alpha photons, since the Lyman alpha line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more ...

  3. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Independent Neutrino Distribution Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christel J. Smith; George M. Fuller; Michael S. Smith

    2008-12-06

    We have performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations which employ arbitrarily-specified, time-dependent neutrino and antineutrino distribution functions for each of up to four neutrino flavors. We self-consistently couple these distributions to the thermodynamics, the expansion rate and scale factor-time/temperature relationship, as well as to all relevant weak, electromagnetic, and strong nuclear reaction processes in the early universe. With this approach, we can treat any scenario in which neutrino or antineutrino spectral distortion might arise. These scenarios might include, for example, decaying particles, active-sterile neutrino oscillations, and active-active neutrino oscillations in the presence of significant lepton numbers. Our calculations allow lepton numbers and sterile neutrinos to be constrained with observationally-determined primordial helium and deuterium abundances. We have modified a standard BBN code to perform these calculations and have made it available to the community.

  4. Distributed Quantum Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellie D'Hondt; Yves Vandriessche

    2010-01-11

    In this paper we explore the structure and applicability of the Distributed Measurement Calculus (DMC), an assembly language for distributed measurement-based quantum computations. We describe the formal language's syntax and semantics, both operational and denotational, and state several properties that are crucial to the practical usability of our language, such as equivalence of our semantics, as well as compositionality and context-freeness of DMC programs. We show how to put these properties to use by constructing a composite program that implements distributed controlled operations, in the knowledge that the semantics of this program does not change under the various composition operations. Our formal model is the basis of a quantum virtual machine construction for distributed quantum computations, which we elaborate upon in the latter part of this work. This virtual machine embodies the formal semantics of DMC such that programming execution no longer needs to be analysed by hand. Far from a literal translation, it requires a substantial concretisation of the formal model at the level of data structures, naming conventions and abstraction mechanisms. At the same time we provide automatisation techniques for program specification where possible to obtain an expressive and user-friendly programming environment.

  5. Web Services Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, William R.

    1 Web Services versus Distributed Objects William R. Cook, Janel Barfield University of Texas at Austin 2 How many times have you heard... 3 "Web Services suck..." ? 4 "WS are a bad version Objects 10 to 100 times faster than Web Services 7 Test Case Call a remote service that returns an integer

  6. Cook Inlet (CI) distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Approximate distribution of beluga whales in Alaska waters. The dark shading displays (DeMaster 1995: pp. 16). CURRENT AND MAXIMUM NET PRODUCTIVITY RATES A reliable estimate of the maximum net productivity rate is currently unavailable for the Beaufort Sea stock of beluga whales. Hence

  7. DISTRIBUTED BEST PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    REPORT A Renewable Energy Applications for Delaware Yearly (READY) Project Center for Energy and development, environmental justice, conservation and renewable energy options, integrated resource planningPOLICY APPROACHES TO SUPPORT DISTRIBUTED RENEWABLE ENERGY: BEST PRACTICES AMONG U.S. STATES FINAL

  8. MAIL DISTRIBUTION MAIL PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAIL DISTRIBUTION AND MAIL PRODUCTION OPERATIONS GUIDE November 07 Revised November 07 #12;2 Mail/billing......................................................................................1-5346 Mail Production of the University non-profit permit. 3. All bulk mailings must be coordinated with Mail Production at the earliest

  9. The Energy Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David L. Band

    2001-05-15

    The distribution of the apparent total energy emitted by a gamma-ray burst reflects not only the distribution of the energy actually released by the burst engine, but also the distribution of beaming angles. Using the observed energy fluences, the detection thresholds and burst redshifts for three burst samples, I calculate the best-fit parameters for lognormal and power-law distributions of the apparent total energy. Two of the samples include a small number of bursts with spectroscopic redshifts, while the third sample has 220 bursts with redshifts determined by the proposed variability-luminosity correlation. I find different sets of parameter values for the three burst samples. The Bayesian odds ratio cannot distinguish between the two model distribution functions for the two smaller burst samples with spectroscopic redshifts, but does favor the lognormal distribution for the larger sample with variability-derived redshifts. The data do not rule out a distribution with a low energy tail which is currently unobservable. I find that neglecting the burst detection threshold biases the fitted distribution to be narrower with a higher average value than the true distribution; this demonstrates the importance of determining and reporting the effective detection threshold for bursts in a sample.

  10. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide estimated annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of building materials, ceiling and deck insulation, and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate an energy/cost savings estimate between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, CA.

  11. Development of a Roof Savings Calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Erdem, Ender [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs the latest web technologies and usability design to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned and can provide annual energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than building location. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool can simulate multiple roof types at arbitrary inclinations. There are options for above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces. The tool also accommodates HVAC ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic with custom air leakage rates. Multiple layers of thermal mass, ceiling insulation and other parameters can be compared side-by-side to generate energy/cost savings between two buildings. The RSC tool was benchmarked against field data for demonstration homes in Ft Irwin, CA.

  12. Visual Analytics for Roof Savings Calculator Ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Chad [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Kwan-Liu [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis

    2012-01-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for DOE as an industry-consensus, web-based tool for easily running complex building energy simulations. These simulations allow both homeowners and experts to determine building-specific cost and energy savings for modern roof and attic technologies. Using a database of over 3 million RSC simulations for different combinations of parameters, we have built a visual analytics tool to assist in the exploration and identification of features in the data. Since the database contains multiple variables, both categorical and continuous, we employ a coordinated multi-view approach that allows coordinated feature exploration through multiple visualizations at once. The main component of our system, a parallel coordinates view, has been adapted to handle large-scale, mixed data types as are found in RSC simulations. Other visualizations include map coordinated plots, high dynamic range (HDR) line plot rendering, and an intuitive user interface. We demonstrate these techniques with several use cases that have helped identify software and parametric simulation issues.

  13. PEP-X IMPEDANCE AND INSTABILITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Lee, L.-Q.; Ng, C.; Stupakov, G.; au Wang, L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    PEP-X, a next generation, ring-based light source is designed to run with beams of high current and low emittance. Important parameters are: energy 4.5 GeV, circumference 2.2 km, beam current 1.5 A, and horizontal and vertical emittances, 185 pm by 8 pm. In such a machine it is important that impedance driven instabilities not degrade the beam quality. In this report they study the strength of the impedance and its effects in PEP-X. For the present, lacking a detailed knowledge of the vacuum chamber shape, they create a straw man design comprising important vacuum chamber objects to be found in the ring, for which they then compute the wake functions. From the wake functions they generate an impedance budget and a pseudo-Green function wake representing the entire ring, which they, in turn, use for performing microwave instability calculations. In this report they, in addition, consider in PEP-X the transverse mode-coupling, multi-bunch transverse, and beam-ion instabilities.

  14. Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison.www.gastechnology.org 2 #12;Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated-Battelle for the Department of Energy Subcontract Number: 4000052360 GTI Project Number: 20441 New York State Energy Research

  15. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. ”ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions

  16. Handbook of Industrial Engineering Equations, Formulas, and Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badiru, Adedeji B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2011-01-01

    The first handbook to focus exclusively on industrial engineering calculations with a correlation to applications, Handbook of Industrial Engineering Equations, Formulas, and Calculations contains a general collection of the mathematical equations often used in the practice of industrial engineering. Many books cover individual areas of engineering and some cover all areas, but none covers industrial engineering specifically, nor do they highlight topics such as project management, materials, and systems engineering from an integrated viewpoint. Written by acclaimed researchers and authors, this concise reference marries theory and practice, making it a versatile and flexible resource. Succinctly formatted for functionality, the book presents: Basic Math Calculations; Engineering Math Calculations; Production Engineering Calculations; Engineering Economics Calculations; Ergonomics Calculations; Facility Layout Calculations; Production Sequencing and Scheduling Calculations; Systems Engineering Calculations; Data Engineering Calculations; Project Engineering Calculations; and Simulation and Statistical Equations. It has been said that engineers make things while industrial engineers make things better. To make something better requires an understanding of its basic characteristics and the underlying equations and calculations that facilitate that understanding. To do this, however, you do not have to be computational experts; you just have to know where to get the computational resources that are needed. This book elucidates the underlying equations that facilitate the understanding required to improve design processes, continuously improving the answer to the age-old question: What is the best way to do a job?

  17. CALCULATION Water cooling process SHEET 1 OF 1 CALCULATION BY Cale Caldwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Assumptions steady state conditions; heat distributed evenly over entire cylinder; no heat lost to surroundings; uniform heat flux Q 2500kW Heat to be removed Coolant is Water c 4180 J kg K Specific heat 998/2in pipe, schedule 10) v 5 m s Velocity of coolant (assumed) As d L1 Surface area n flowrate v

  18. Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Validating computed grain boundary energies in fcc metals using the grain boundary character. Since the GBCD is inversely related to the grain boundary energy distribution, it offers a useful metric for validating grain boundary energy calculations. Comparisons between the measured GBCD and calculated energies

  19. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  20. A comparison of material balance calculations based on equilibrium ratios with Schilthuis balance calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clanton, John L

    1956-01-01

    . CALCULATION OF OIL INITIALLY IN PLACE BY SCHILTHUIS MATERIAL BALANCE . . . ZO 6. MATERIAL BALANCE BASED ON EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS 7. DISCUSSION OF RESULTS 8. CONCLUSIONS 9. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 10. REFERENCES 11. BIBLIOGRAPHY , 36 . 38 39 LIST... OF FIGURES AND TABLES FIGURES FOLLOWING PAGE Isovol Map of Scurry Reef Reservoir 22 Histogram of Production, Gas-Oil Ratio, Pressure and Water Injection History. Shrinkage of Scurry Reef Reservoir Oil, Scurry County, Texas. Gas Volumes Liberated from...

  1. TDHF fusion calculations for spherical+deformed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker

    2006-04-04

    We outline a formalism to carry out TDHF calculations of fusion cross sections for spherical + deformed nuclei. The procedure incorporates the dynamic alignment of the deformed nucleus into the calculation of the fusion cross section. The alignment results from multiple E2/E4 Coulomb excitation of the ground state rotational band. Implications for TDHF fusion calculations are discussed. TDHF calculations are done in an unrestricted three-dimensional geometry using modern Skyrme force parametrizations.

  2. Symmetric generalized binomial distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, H.; Curado, E. M. F.; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia - Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ ; Gazeau, J. P.; APC, UMR 7164, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris ; Rodrigues, Ligia M. C. S. E-mail: evaldo@cbpf.br E-mail: ligia@cbpf.br

    2013-12-15

    In two recent articles, we have examined a generalization of the binomial distribution associated with a sequence of positive numbers, involving asymmetric expressions of probabilities that break the symmetry win-loss. We present in this article another generalization (always associated with a sequence of positive numbers) that preserves the symmetry win-loss. This approach is also based on generating functions and presents constraints of non-negativeness, similar to those encountered in our previous articles.

  3. Light-Cone Distribution Amplitudes for the Light $1^1P_1$ Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwei-Chou Yang

    2005-10-27

    We present a study of light-cone distribution amplitudes of the light $1^1P_1$ mesons. The first few Gegenbauer moments of leading twist light-cone distribution amplitudes are calculated by using the QCD sum rule technique.

  4. Inclusive distributions at the LHC as predicted from the DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ranft; F. W. Bopp; R. Engel; S. Roesler

    2007-06-26

    DPMJET-III with chain fusion is used to calculate inclusive distributions of Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies. We present rapidity distributions as well as scaled multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy and the number of participants.

  5. Distributional Similarity of Multi-Word Expressions Laura Ingram and James R. Curran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, James R.

    Distributional Similarity of Multi-Word Expressions Laura Ingram and James R. Curran School, 1994) to include multi-word terms and syntactic contexts. Curran (2004) experiments with different) and Curran (2004) evaluate many measures for calculating distributional similarity. We follow (Curran, 2004

  6. Distributional Similarity of Multi-Word Expressions Laura Ingram and James R. Curran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributional Similarity of Multi-Word Expressions Laura Ingram and James R. Curran School, 1994) to include multi-word terms and syntactic contexts. Curran (2004) experiments with different for distributional similarity. Weeds (2003) and Curran (2004) evaluate measures for calculating dis- tributional

  7. hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals Real Estate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate The STAT menu Confidence Intervals Practice finding confidence intervals ­ Real Estate #12;hp calculators HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate hp calculators - 2 - HP 50g Confidence Intervals ­ Real Estate The STAT menu The Statistics menu

  8. hp calculators HP 50g Hypothesis tests Real Estate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    hp calculators HP 50g Hypothesis tests ­ Real Estate The STAT menu Hypothesis tests Practice evaluating hypothesis tests ­ Real Estate #12;hp calculators HP 50g Hypothesis tests ­ Real Estate hp calculators - 2 - HP 50g Hypothesis tests ­ Real Estate The STAT menu The Statistics menu is accessed from

  9. The melting lines of model systems calculated from coexistence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    rapidly as a function of the potential cutoff, indicating that long-range corrections to the free energies of the solid and liquid phases very nearly cancel. This approach provides an alternative to traditional methods them. Tradition- ally, these calculations have been made using free energy calculations: by calculating

  10. A solvable model of fracture with power-law distribution of fragment sizes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Yamamoto; Yoshihiro Yamazaki

    2011-06-08

    The present paper describes a stochastic model of fracture, whose fragment size distribution can be calculated analytically as a power-law-like distribution. The model is basically cascade fracture, but incorporates the effect that each fragment in each stage of cascade ceases fracture with a certain probability. When the probability is constant, the exponent of the power-law cumulative distribution lies between -1 and 0, depending not only on the probability but the distribution of fracture points. Whereas, when the probability depends on the size of a fragment, the exponent is less than -1, irrespective of the distribution of fracture points.

  11. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  12. Universality of electron distributions in high-energy air showers - description of Cherenkov light production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Nerling; J. Blümer; R. Engel; M. Risse

    2005-12-22

    The shower simulation code CORSIKA has been used to investigate the electron energy and angular distributions in high-energy showers. Based on the universality of both distributions, we develop an analytical description of Cherenkov light emission in extensive air showers, which provides the total number and angular distribution of photons. The parameterisation can be used e.g. to calculate the contribution of direct and scattered Cherenkov light to shower profiles measured with the air fluorescence technique.

  13. Data Distribution Schemes of Sparse Arrays on Distributed Memory Multicomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    (CFS) and Encoding-Decoding (ED), for sparse array distribution. In the CFS scheme, the data are performed before and after the data distribution phase, respectively. To evaluate the CFS and the ED schemes. In theoretical analysis, we analyze the SFC, the CFS, and the ED schemes in terms of the data distribution time

  14. Distributed Computing Column 36 Distributed Computing: 2009 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Computing Column 36 Distributed Computing: 2009 Edition Idit Keidar Dept. of Electrical computing events. Awards First, let's look at awards. This year we learned that two women were recognized with ACM and IEEE prestigious awards for their achievements in, (among other things), distributed computing

  15. Computing stationary distributions in equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems with Forward Flux Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantal Valeriani; Rosalind J. Allen; Marco J. Morelli; Daan Frenkel; Pieter Rein ten Wolde

    2009-07-03

    We present a method for computing stationary distributions for activated processes in equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems using Forward Flux Sampling (FFS). In this method, the stationary distributions are obtained directly from the rate constant calculations for the forward and backward reactions; there is no need to perform separate calculations for the stationary distribution and the rate constant. We apply the method to the non-equilibrium rare event problem proposed by Maier and Stein, to nucleation in a 2-dimensional Ising system, and to the flipping of a genetic switch.

  16. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    distributed energy resource technology characterizations, National Renewable EnergyEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Distributed

  17. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Distributed Energy ProgramDistributed Energy Resources Characterizations. National Renewable Energy

  18. Once-through steam-generator sensitivity calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, J.L.; Siebe, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of TRAC-PF1/MOD2 thermal-hydraulic calculations has been performed to determine the effect of uncertainties in modeling once through steam-generator (OTSG) secondary-side phenomena on the calculated behavior of Babcock and Wilcox power plants. The calculations were performed by varying parameters in correlations for the secondary-side phenomena. The parameters and transients were chosen to show the maximum expected sensitivity of the calculated results to the parameter variations. The parameters were then varied over a range representing the estimated uncertainty in the correlation. In this manner, the sensitivity if the calculated plant behavior to the modeling uncertainties was determined with a reasonable number of calculations. The sensitivity of calculated plant behavior to variations in interfacial heat-transfer in the OTSG secondaries was determined in a series of steam-generator overfill transient calculations. Calculations were performed for a main steam line break (MSLB) transient to quantify the sensitivity to variations in interfacial drag in the secondaries; the interfacial drag was varied in these calculations to indicate the effects of entrainment and de-entrainment processes, for which no specific models exist in the code. In addition to the transient calculations, a series of steady-state calculations was performed to determine the sensitivity of the OTSG primary-to-secondary heat transfer to the assumed fraction of tubes wetted by the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) injection. The plant model used for the sensitivity calculations was qualified by performing a benchmark calculation for a natural circulation test in the TMI-1 plant.

  19. Synchrotron radiation from a runaway electron distribution in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahl, A; Papp, G; Hollmann, E; Fülöp, T

    2013-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation emitted by runaway electrons in a fusion plasma provides information regarding the particle momenta and pitch-angles of the runaway electron population through the strong dependence of the synchrotron spectrum on these parameters. Information about the runaway density and its spatial distribution, as well as the time evolution of the above quantities, can also be deduced. In this paper we present the synchrotron radiation spectra for typical avalanching runaway electron distributions. Spectra obtained for a distribution of electrons are compared to the emission of mono-energetic electrons with a prescribed pitch-angle. We also examine the effects of magnetic field curvature and analyse the sensitivity of the resulting spectrum to perturbations to the runaway distribution. The implications for the deduced runaway electron parameters are discussed. We compare our calculations to experimental data from DIII-D and estimate the maximum observed runaway energy.

  20. Nuclear parton distributions and the Drell-Yan process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Kulagin; R. Petti

    2014-10-14

    We study the nuclear parton distribution functions on the basis of our recently developed semi-microscopic model, which takes into account a number of nuclear effects including nuclear shadowing, Fermi motion and nuclear binding, nuclear meson-exchange currents, and off-shell corrections to bound nucleon distributions. We discuss in detail the dependencies of nuclear effects on the type of parton distribution (nuclear sea vs valence), as well as on the parton flavor (isospin). We apply the resulting nuclear parton distributions to calculate ratios of cross sections for proton-induced Drell-Yan production off different nuclear targets. We obtain a good agreement on the magnitude, target and projectile $x$, and the dimuon mass dependence of proton-nucleus Drell-Yan process data from the E772 and E866 experiments at Fermilab. We also provide nuclear corrections for the Drell-Yan data from the E605 experiment.

  1. Distributed Optimization System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurtado, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2004-11-30

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  2. Discrete Probability Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William J.

    , 2, . . . , n, the moments of the discrete uniform distribution are given by E[Xk ] = nX i=1 ik /n. In particular, E[X] = nX i=1 i/n = 1 n nX i=1 i = 1 n n(n + 1) 2 = n + 1 2 , and, using the well-known formula for the sum of the squares of the first n integers, E[X2 ] = nX i=1 i2 /n = 1 n nX i=1 i2 = 1 n n(n + 1)(2n

  3. Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzel, Michael

    2010-11-18

    stream_size 1487 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name ku_gis_day_2010_schaetzel.pdf.txt stream_source_info ku_gis_day_2010_schaetzel.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Mapping Biomass... Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of the nation’s power o Currently 1% of...

  4. Testing Closeness of Discrete Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortnow, Lance

    Given samples from two distributions over an n-element set, we wish to test whether these distributions are statistically close. We present an algorithm which uses sublinear in n, specifically, O(n[superscript 2/3]?[superscript ...

  5. Testing symmetric properties of distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valiant, Paul (Paul Andrew)

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the notion of a Canonical Tester for a class of properties on distributions, that is, a tester strong and general enough that "a distribution property in the class is testable if and only if the Canonical ...

  6. Lab 3a: Distribution functions Histogram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Lab 3a: Distribution functions Outline · Histogram · Basic concepts · Gaussian (normal) distribution ­Limiting distribution · Poisson distribution ­Counting measurements #12;Histogram and bin A histogram is a graphical representation of the distribution of data. It is a representation of tabulated

  7. THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser, Wesley C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, MC 150-21, 1200 E. California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-11-20

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the size distribution would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the size distribution at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.

  8. Network aware distributed applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gunter, Dan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, Jason [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Johnston, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-02-04

    Most distributed applications today manage to utilize only a small percentage of the needed and available network bandwidth. Often application developers are not aware of the potential bandwidth of the network, and therefore do not know what to expect. Even when application developers are aware of the specifications of the machines and network links, they have few resources that can help determine why the expected performance was not achieved. What is needed is a ubiquitous and easy-to-use service that provides reliable, accurate, secure, and timely estimates of dynamic network properties. This service will help advise applications on how to make use of the network's increasing bandwidth and capabilities for traffic shaping and engineering. When fully implemented, this service will make building currently unrealizable levels of network awareness into distributed applications a relatively mundane task. For example, a remote data visualization application could choose between sending a wireframe, a pre-rendered image, or a 3-D representation, based on forecasts of CPU availability and power, compression options, and available bandwidth. The same service will provide on-demand performance information so that applications can compare predicted with actual results, and allow detailed queries about the end-to-end path for application and network tuning and debugging.

  9. Distribution Theory Practice Exam 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorlas, Teunis C.

    Distribution Theory Practice Exam 2011 April 7, 2011 Assume 40-45 minutes per question. 1. (a) Let (p = 1, 2, . . . ). Show that one can define a regularised distribution corresponding to f by ~Tf is a distribution such that ~Tf () = Tf () if 0 / supp().) In what circumstances can we take the limit b ? (b) Let

  10. DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS IN PHYSICS: FUNDAMENTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connell, Robert F.

    DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS IN PHYSICS: FUNDAMENTALS M. HILLERY Institute for Modern Optics, University of Physics Letters) 106, No. 3 (1984) 121--167. North-Holland, Amsterdam DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS IN PHYSICS. Introduction 123 4.1. Normal ordering 156 2. Wigner distribution 126 4.2. Symmetric ordering 158 2

  11. Radiation interchange modeling for active infrared proximity sensor design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, James Clarice

    1999-01-01

    . This research focuses on information gathered using active optical proximity sensors in the reflectance sensing mode. The portion of energy reflected to a given sensor in combination with the known location of the source and sensor elements provide the basic...

  12. Interchangeable whole-body and nose-only exposure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, W.C.; Allemann, R.T.; Moss, O.R.; Decker, J.R. Jr.

    1992-03-31

    An exposure system for experimental animals includes a container for a single animal which has a double wall. The animal is confined within the inner wall. Gaseous material enters a first end, flows over the entire animal, then back between the walls and out the first end. The system also includes an arrangement of valve-controlled manifolds for supplying gaseous material to, and exhausting it from, the containers. 6 figs.

  13. High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been made in the presence of the magnetic levitation fields. We find the HEI mode is characterized observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously that characterize these modes now incorporate fast magnetic measurements in an attempt to put together a coherent

  14. Data interchange standards for biotechnology: Issues and alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.L.

    1990-06-01

    This report outlines a framework for discussion of what aspects of biotechnical information might be good candidates for guidelines or standards, what existing data exchange standards might be appropriate building blocks upon which to build, and what procedural mechanisms might be appropriate for adoption of such guidelines or standards. It builds on experience from other scientific communities which have already benefitted from development of discipline-specific data exchange standards. 33 refs.

  15. Operational characteristics of the three-level diamond interchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCann, Charles Howard Wesley

    1963-01-01

    uels ~ a4 their staffs foc chair essieteeeo ia tba eolleecioa of 4sts that uas uss4 ia chio cbeeist 1. cooper Nsgeeborae Rireatore Reyerceeac of Traffia sa4 Tcsasportsti, oa Cicy of Nouscoa, R. R. Cooper, Riceetor& Truffle Sivisioa, gtate... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o 1 4 3 1 1o Stoky Prooo4oro Thai Artor iol Ss?P ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o LOCOtisaa ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ Staa4ios ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 111. Oa?alts of Cha Oaaoorah Stoky...

  16. Velocity shear stabilization of interchange modes in elongated plasma configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassam, Adil

    ) University of Maryland, Institute for Plasma Research, College Park, Maryland 20742 Received 3 March 1999

  17. Strategic level expert system design for diamond interchange control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrone, David Michael

    1999-01-01

    29 31 31 V. PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT A. Prototyping Overview B. Fuzzy Logic. C. FuzzyCLIPS . D. Rule Development. . E. Control Design . 37 . 37 41 41 . 43 F. Rule Base Design, 1. Situation Assessment Design. 2. Situation Assessment Rules.... Revised strategic architecture Fig. 21. Example membership function definitions for AVERAGE. . 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 27 28 29 . . . . 33 35 Fig. 22. Fuzzy Rule inference example Fig. 23. Examples of defuzzification. Fig. 24. Top level...

  18. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North-West Power Pool PV Photovoltaic power generation RE Renewable energy: PV andor wind RMPP Rocky Mountains Power Pool TEPPC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee...

  19. Chapter 2 Interchanges and Contracts Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    officials at the other UW institution. The form may be initiated by the UW- Madison department involved at the selling institution's extramural support fringe benefit rate. iii. "Accounting Code" Line 1. If UW-Madison is the buying institution, the "Accounting Code" line should be used to specify the fund, account, UDDS

  20. An Architecture for Hypermedia Systems Using MHEG Standard Objects Interchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colcher, Sérgio

    - Brasil E-mail: lfgs@inf.puc-rio.br Marco Antonio Casanova Centro Científico Rio, IBM Brasil Caixa Postal 4624 20001 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil E-mail: casanova@vnet.ibm.com Sérgio Colcher Departamento de Informática, PUC-Rio R. Marquês de São Vicente 225 22453 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brasil E-mail: colcher

  1. Calculating work in weakly driving quantum master equations: backward and forward equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Liu

    2015-06-28

    We present a technical report that the two methods of calculating characteristic functions for the work distribution in the weakly driven quantum master equations are equivalent. One is obtained by the notion of quantum jump trajectory [Phys. Rev. E 89, 042122 (2014)], while the other is based on the two time energy measurements on the combined system and reservoir [Silaev, et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 022103 (2014)]. They are indeed the backward and forward methods, respectively, which is very similar to the case of the Kolmogorov backward and forward equations in classical stochastic theory. The microscopic basis of the former method is also clarified.

  2. A Cosmology Calculator for the World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward L. Wright

    2006-10-10

    A cosmology calculator that computes times and distances as a function of redshift for user-defined cosmological parameters is available on the World Wide Web. This note gives the formulae used by the cosmology calculator and discusses some of its implementation. A version of the calculator that allows one to specify the equation of state parameter w and w' and neutrino masses, and a version for converting the light travel times usually given in the popular press into redshifts are also available.

  3. Binding Energies in Benzene Dimers: Nonlocal Density Functional Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Puzder; Maxime Dion; David C. Langreth

    2005-09-15

    The interaction energy and minimum energy structure for different geometries of the benzene dimer has been calculated using the recently developed nonlocal correlation energy functional for calculating dispersion interactions. The comparison of this straightforward and relatively quick density functional based method with recent calculations can elucidate how the former, quicker method might be exploited in larger more complicated biological, organic, aromatic, and even infinite systems such as molecules physisorbed on surfaces, and van der Waals crystals.

  4. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  5. Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Even, Wesley P. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frey, Lucille H. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer,...

  6. Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light Curve Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multigroup Radiation Transport in Supernova Light...

  7. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy savings estimates and cost...

  8. Integrated System Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Area Power Administration Basin Electric Power Cooperative Heartland Consumers Power District 1 Integrated System Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation...

  9. Integrated System Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Transmission and Ancillary Services 2013 Rate True-up Calculation Western Area Power Administration Basin Electric Power Cooperative Heartland Consumers Power District 1...

  10. XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: XOP : a graphical user interface for spectral...

  11. Qualified Software for Calculating Commercial Building Tax Deductions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On this page you'll find a list of qualified computer software for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 4, 2015 Title: Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei Using Chiral Potentials...

  13. A Method for Calculating Reference Evapotranspiration on Daily Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, William

    Measures of reference evapotranspiration are essential for applications of agricultural management and water resources engineering. Using numerous esoteric variables, one can calculate daily reference evapotranspiration ...

  14. Remarks on calculation of positron flux from galactic dark matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    involves solving transport equations, which account for interaction of positrons with matter and galactic magnetic fields. Existing calculations solve the equations inside the...

  15. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic...

  16. NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    material. An evaluation of methods for calculation of the dispersion of potential chemical releases for the purpose of estimating the chemical exposure at the co-located worker...

  17. The recursive structure of the distribution of primes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolin Zöbelein

    2014-11-07

    In this work I look at the distribution of primes by calculation of an infinite number of intersections. For this I use the set of all numbers which are not elements of a certain times table in each case. I am able to show that it exists a recursive relationship between primes of different ranges and so to describe some inner structure of this special set of numbers.

  18. Nearest neighbor spacing distribution of prime numbers and quantum chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Wolf

    2014-01-07

    We give heuristic arguments and computer results to support the hypothesis that, after appropriate rescaling, the statistics of spacings between adjacent prime numbers follows the Poisson distribution. The scaling transformation removes the oscillations in the NNSD of primes. These oscillations have the very profound period of length six. We also calculate the spectral rigidity $\\Delta_3$ for prime numbers by two methods. After suitable averaging one of these methods gives the Poisson dependence $\\Delta_3(L)=L/15$.

  19. Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases in Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlemont, R.; Martiny, A. C

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases incontent/79/5/1545 Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential3, 4). Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of en- zyme genes

  20. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2008-01-01

    2003. “Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource TechnologyATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for CarbonFirestone 5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon

  1. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2006-01-01

    International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, 1 (Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resources Characterizations.Firestone, R. (2004) Distributed Energy Resources Customer

  2. Independent review of SCDAP/RELAP5 natural circulation calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, G.M.; Gross, R.J.; Martinez, M.J.; Rightley, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    A review and assessment of the uncertainties in the calculated response of reactor coolant system natural circulation using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code were completed. The SCDAP/RELAP5 calculation modeled a station blackout transient in the Surry nuclear power plant and concluded that primary system depressurization from natural circulation induced primary system failure is more likely than previously thought.

  3. Computing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    and CPU time. In the application of electronic structure calculations in molecular dynamics, the newComputing Partial Eigenvalue Sum in Electronic Structure Calculations Z. Bai M. Faheyy G. Golubz M where computation of the total energy of an electronic structure requires the evaluation of partial

  4. Dynamic Algorithm Selection in Parallel GAMESS Calculations Nurzhan Ustemirov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosonkina, Masha

    and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS) used for ab initio molecular quantum chemistry calculationsDynamic Algorithm Selection in Parallel GAMESS Calculations Nurzhan Ustemirov Masha Sosonkina, network, or disk I/O. For large-scale scientific applications, dynamic adjustments to a computationally

  5. Realistic shell-model calculations: current status and open problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Covello; A. Gargano

    2010-03-29

    The main steps involved in realistic shell-model calculations employing two-body low-momentum interactions are briefly reviewed. The practical value of this approach is exemplified by the results of recent calculations and some remaining open questions and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. Fission life-time calculation using a complex absorbing potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Scamps; Kouichi Hagino

    2015-12-28

    A comparison between the semi-classical approximation and the full quantum calculation with a complex absorbing potential is made with a model of the fission of 258Fm. The potential barrier is obtained with the constrained Skyrme HF+BCS theory. The life-time obtained by the two calculations agree with each other the difference being only by 25%.

  7. An efficient Java implementation of the immediate successors calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An efficient Java implementation of the immediate successors calculation Cl´ement Gu´erin, Karell an effective Java imple- mentation of the concept immediate successors calculation. It is based on the lattice Java library, developed by K. Bertet and the Limited Objects Access algorithm, proposed by C. Demko [5

  8. Processus communicants Communication synchrone CSP/CCS/-calcul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Processus communicants Communication synchrone CSP/CCS/-calcul Rendez-vous étendu Ada Huitième partie Processus communicants CSP/Ada Systèmes concurrents 2 / 44 #12;Processus communicants Communication synchrone CSP/CCS/-calcul Rendez-vous étendu Ada Principes Synchronisation Désignation

  9. Primordial Gravitational Wave Calculations: Nonlinear vs Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    This work is a follow-up to the paper, "Numerical Relativity as a Tool for Studying the Early Universe". In this article, we present the first results of direct numerical simulations of primordial plasma turbulence as it applies to the generation of gravitational waves. We calculate the normalized energy density, strain and degree of polarization of gravitational waves produced by a simulated turbulent plasma similar to what was believed to have existed at the electroweak scale, 246 GeV. This calculation is completed using two numerical codes, one which utilizes full General Relativity calculations based on modified BSSN equations while the other utilizes a linearized approximation of General Relativity. Our results show that there is a significant difference between the spectrum of gravitational waves calculated using a nonlinear code as opposed to that calculated with a linear approximation. This implies that simulations that do not take into account nonlinear effects may not give accurate results.

  10. Primordial Gravitational Wave Calculations: Nonlinear vs Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Garrison

    2015-06-17

    This work is a follow-up to the paper, "Numerical Relativity as a Tool for Studying the Early Universe". In this article, we present the first results of direct numerical simulations of primordial plasma turbulence as it applies to the generation of gravitational waves. We calculate the normalized energy density, strain and degree of polarization of gravitational waves produced by a simulated turbulent plasma similar to what was believed to have existed shortly after the electroweak scale. This calculation is completed using two numerical codes, one which utilizes full General Relativity calculations based on modified BSSN equations while the other utilizes a linearized approximation of General Relativity. Our results show that there is a significant difference between the spectrum of gravitational waves calculated using a nonlinear code as opposed to that calculated with a linear approximation. This implies that simulations that do not take into account nonlinear effects may not give accurate results.

  11. Inclusive hadron distributions in p+p collisions from saturation models of HERA DIS data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribedy, P.; Venugopalan, R.

    2010-12-06

    Dipole models based on various saturation scenarios provide reasonable fits to small-x DIS inclusive, diffractive and exclusive data from HERA. Proton un-integrated gluon distributions extracted from such fits are employed in a k{sub {perpendicular}}-factorization framework to calculate inclusive gluon distributions at various energies. The n-particle multiplicity distribution predicted in the Glasma flux tube approach shows good agreement with data over a wide range of energies. Hadron inclusive transverse momentum distributions expressed in terms of the saturation scale demonstrate universal behavior over a wider kinematic range systematically with increasing center of mass energies.

  12. Universal Protein Distributions in a Model of Cell Growth and Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naama Brenner; C. M. Newman; Dino Osmanovic; Yitzhak Rabin; Hanna Salman; D. L. Stein

    2015-04-08

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast exhibit a universal skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties are reproduced by protein accumulation and division dynamics across generations. We present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured universal distribution shape with high accuracy, and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  13. Calculation of the relative metastabilities of proteins in subcellular compartments of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey M. Dick

    2008-12-01

    [abridged] Background: The distribution of chemical species in an open system at metastable equilibrium can be expressed as a function of environmental variables which can include temperature, oxidation-reduction potential and others. Calculations of metastable equilibrium for various model systems were used to characterize chemical transformations among proteins and groups of proteins found in different compartments of yeast cells. Results: With increasing oxygen fugacity, the relative metastability fields of model proteins for major subcellular compartments go as mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, cytoplasm, nucleus. In a metastable equilibrium setting at relatively high oxygen fugacity, proteins making up actin are predominant, but those constituting the microtubule occur with a low chemical activity. A reaction sequence involving the microtubule and spindle pole proteins was predicted by combining the known intercompartmental interactions with a hypothetical program of oxygen fugacity changes in the local environment. In further calculations, the most-abundant proteins within compartments generally occur in relative abundances that only weakly correspond to a metastable equilibrium distribution. However, physiological populations of proteins that form complexes often show an overall positive or negative correlation with the relative abundances of proteins in metastable assemblages. Conclusions: This study explored the outlines of a thermodynamic description of chemical transformations among interacting proteins in yeast cells. The results suggest that these methods can be used to measure the degree of departure of a natural biochemical process or population from a local minimum in Gibbs energy.

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplgment au no 11-12, Tome 34, Novembre-Dtcembre 1973,page 23 NEUTRON DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,, or on the differencep, -p, bet- ween the neutron and proton distributions. These experiments include scattering NEUTRON DISTRIBUTIONS R. C. BARRETT University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, U. K. RBsumB. -Un rappel des calculs de distributions de densite de neutrons B partir du modtile a particules independantes, du modtile

  15. Distributed storage with communication costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Craig Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    5 Introduction to Coding for Distributed Storage The Repairflow graph for 1 repair with varying storage capac- itythe Capacity of Storage Nodes . . . 4.1 Characterizing

  16. AGENDA: PETROLEUM PRODUCT TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The agenda for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public stakeholder meeting in New Orleans on petroleum product transmission, distribution, and storage.

  17. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Robert Evans at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  18. Underfloor air distribution: thermal stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, T.; Bauman, Fred; Reese, J.

    2002-01-01

    Air Distribution: Thermal Stratification By Tom Webster, Pthermal bypassing of convective loads that occurs above the stratificationthermal plumes that develop over heat sources in the room. A stratification

  19. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, A. C.

    2014-08-15

    This report describes the status of the U.S. distributed wind industry in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook.

  20. Distribution Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distributed generation Electric vehicle charging and electrolyzers Energy storage Building and industrial loads and demand response Smart grid sensing, automation, and...

  1. TU-F-18A-03: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using DECT Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di, Salvio A; Bedwani, S; Carrier, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new segmentation technique using dual energy CT (DECT) to overcome limitations related to segmentation from a standard Hounsfield unit (HU) to electron density (ED) calibration curve. Both methods are compared with a Monte Carlo analysis of dose distribution. Methods: DECT allows a direct calculation of both ED and effective atomic number (EAN) within a given voxel. The EAN is here defined as a function of the total electron cross-section of a medium. These values can be effectively acquired using a calibrated method from scans at two different energies. A prior stoichiometric calibration on a Gammex RMI phantom allows us to find the parameters to calculate EAN and ED within a voxel. Scans from a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source system provided the data for our study. A Monte Carlo analysis compares dose distribution simulated by dosxyz-nrc, considering a head phantom defined by both segmentation techniques. Results: Results from depth dose and dose profile calculations show that materials with different atomic compositions but similar EAN present differences of less than 1%. Therefore, it is possible to define a short list of basis materials from which density can be adapted to imitate interaction behavior of any tissue. Comparison of the dose distributions on both segmentations shows a difference of 50% in dose in areas surrounding bone at low energy. Conclusion: The presented segmentation technique allows a more accurate medium definition in each voxel, especially in areas of tissue transition. Since the behavior of human tissues is highly sensitive at low energies, this reduces the errors on calculated dose distribution. This method could be further developed to optimize the tissue characterization based on anatomic site.

  2. TH-E-BRE-05: Analysis of Dosimetric Characteristics in Two Leaf Motion Calculator Algorithms for Sliding Window IMRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, L; Huang, B; Rowedder, B; Ma, B; Kuang, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Smart leaf motion calculator (SLMC) in Eclipse treatment planning system is an advanced fluence delivery modeling algorithm as it takes into account fine MLC features including inter-leaf leakage, rounded leaf tips, non-uniform leaf thickness, and the spindle cavity etc. In this study, SLMC and traditional Varian LMC (VLMC) algorithms were investigated, for the first time, in dosimetric characteristics and delivery accuracy of sliding window (SW) IMRT. Methods: The SW IMRT plans of 51 cancer cases were included to evaluate dosimetric characteristics and dose delivery accuracy from leaf motion calculated by SLMC and VLMC, respectively. All plans were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam Linac. The DVH and MUs of the plans were analyzed. Three patient specific QA tools - independent dose calculation software IMSure, Delta4 phantom, and EPID portal dosimetry were also used to measure the delivered dose distribution. Results: Significant differences in the MUs were observed between the two LMCs (p?0.001).Gamma analysis shows an excellent agreement between the planned dose distribution calculated by both LMC algorithms and delivered dose distribution measured by three QA tools in all plans at 3%/3 mm, leading to a mean pass rate exceeding 97%. The mean fraction of pixels with gamma < 1 of SLMC is slightly lower than that of VLMC in the IMSure and Delta4 results, but higher in portal dosimetry (the highest spatial resolution), especially in complex cases such as nasopharynx. Conclusion: The study suggests that the two LMCs generates the similar target coverage and sparing patterns of critical structures. However, SLMC is modestly more accurate than VLMC in modeling advanced MLC features, which may lead to a more accurate dose delivery in SW IMRT. Current clinical QA tools might not be specific enough to differentiate the dosimetric discrepancies at the millimeter level calculated by these two LMC algorithms. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  3. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartzsch, Stefan Oelfke, Uwe; Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartínez-Rovira et al. [“Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 119–131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside the field center, increased beam width and center to center distance due to the beam propagation from the collimator to the phantom surface and imperfect absorption in the absorber material of the Multislit Collimator. These corrections have an effect of approximately 10% on the valley dose and suffice to describe doses in MRT within the measurement uncertainties of currently available dosimetry techniques. Conclusions: The source for the first clinical pet trials in MRT is characterized with respect to its phase space and the photon polarization. The results suggest the use of a presented simplified phase space model in dose calculations and hence pave the way for alternative and fast dose calculation algorithms. They also show that the polarization is of minor importance for the clinical important peak and valley doses inside the microbeam field.

  4. Universality of the subsolar mass distribution from critical gravitational collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser; Nicolas Yunes

    2004-04-21

    Self-similarity induced by critical gravitational collapse is used as a paradigm to probe the mass distribution of subsolar objects. At large mass (solar mass and above) there is widespread agreement as to both the form and parameter values arising in the mass distribution of stellar objects. At subsolar mass there is still considerable disagreement as to the qualitative form of the mass distribution, let alone the specific parameter values characterizing that distribution. For the first time, the paradigm of critical gravitational collapse is applied to several concrete astrophysical scenarios to derive robust qualitative features of the subsolar mass distribution. We further contrast these theoretically derived ideas with the observational situation. In particular, we demonstrate that at very low mass the distribution is given by a power law, with an exponent opposite in sign to that observed in the high-mass regime. The value of this low-mass exponent is in principle calculable via dynamical systems theory applied to gravitational collapse. Qualitative agreement between theory, numerical experiments, and observational data is good, though quantitative issues remain troublesome.

  5. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdollahy, Shahin; Lavrova, Olga; Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building.more »Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.« less

  6. Inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies compared with an adjusted DPMJET-III model with chain fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bopp; J. Ranft

    2011-10-28

    A DPMJET-III model (DPMJET-III-2011) with chain fusion adjusted to include energy.dependent parameters is used to calculate inclusive distributions in p-p collisions at LHC energies. Presented are charged hadrons rapidity distributions, transverse momentum distributions, multiplicity distributions as well as multiplicities at mid-rapidity as function of the collision energy. For hadrons with strangeness we present cms-rapidity distributions and transverse momentum distributions. With the considered merely energy-dependent adjustments the obtained agreement with the transversal \\Lambda and \\Xi distribution is not satisfactory.

  7. Calculation of the Solar Load onto Occupants in a Room using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions and a View Factor Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedek, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    J.A. , Beckman, W.A. (1991). Solar engineering of thermalA new method for predicting the solar heat gain of complexfenestration systems. ASHRAE Solar Heat Gain Project 548-RP

  8. Calculation of the Solar Load onto Occupants in a Room using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions and a View Factor Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedek, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    like heat transfer through radiation, convection,J.R. (1972). Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer. New York, NY:radiation, it follows, that adjacent bodies exchange energy in form of heat transfer.

  9. Calculation of the Solar Load onto Occupants in a Room using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions and a View Factor Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedek, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    References References ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55 (2010).that applied in the American ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55 (2010)The adaptive model after ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55 (2010, p.

  10. Automated two-dimensional Acanthamoeba polyphaga tracking and calculation of Salmonella typhimurium distribution in spatio-temporal images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsibidis, George D; Gaze, William; Wellington, Elizabeth M H

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and protozoa is an increasing area of interest, however there are a few systems that allow extensive observation of the interactions. We examined a surface system consisting of non nutrient agar with a uniform bacterial lawn that extended over the agar surface, and a spatially localised central population of amoebae. The amoeba fed on bacteria and migrated over the plate. Automated image analysis techniques were used to locate and count amoebae, cysts and bacteria coverage in a series of spatial images. Most algorithms were based on intensity thresholding, or a modification of this idea with probabilistic models. Our strategy was two tiered, we performed an automated analysis for object classification and bacteria counting followed by user intervention/reclassification using custom written Graphical User Interfaces.

  11. Calculation of the Solar Load onto Occupants in a Room using Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Functions and a View Factor Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedek, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    2007). A concentrated solar thermal energy system. Thesis (thermal energy emissivity of the individual window. As the solar

  12. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, Michael G. [New Mexico State University; Musch, Bernhard U. [Tech. University Munich; Haegler, Philipp G. [Tech. University Munich; Negele, John W. [MIT; Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  13. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  14. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-04-02

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

  15. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74 <=Z <= 94 and 90 <=N <= 150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ? 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ? 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹??Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹??Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ? Z ? 85 and 100 ? N ? 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.

  16. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May...

  17. Relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution, nuclear fusion reaction rate and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2003-07-07

    In solar interior, it is the equilibrium velocity distribution of few high-energy protons and nuclei that participates in determining nuclear fusion reaction rates. So, it is inappropriate to use the Maxwellian velocity distribution to calculate the rates of solar nuclear fusion reactions. We have to use the relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution for the purpose. The nuclear fusion reaction rate based on the relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution has a reduction factor with respect to that based on the Maxwellian distribution. The reduction factor depends on the temperature, reduced mass and atomic numbers of the studied nuclear fusion reactions, in other words, it varies with the sort of neutrinos. Substituting the relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution for the Maxwellian distribution is not important for the calculation of solar sound speeds. The relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution, if adopted in standard solar models, will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but maintain solar sound speeds. This velocity distribution is possibly a solution to the solar neutrino problem.

  18. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  19. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Roy, Subinit [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block AF, Sector 1, Kolkata- 700 064 (India)

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  20. Microscopic Calculation of Heavy-Ion Potentials Based on TDHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard\\

    2011-06-17

    We discuss the implementation and results of a recently developed microscopic method for calculating ion-ion interaction potentials and fusion cross-sections. The method uses the TDHF evolution to obtain the instantaneous many-body collective state using a density constraint. The ion-ion potential as well as the coordinate dependent mass are calculated from these states. The method fully accounts for the dynamical processes present in the TDHF time-evolution and provides a parameter-free way of calculating fusion cross-sections.

  1. Inverse Gamma Distribution John D. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, John D.

    Inverse Gamma Distribution John D. Cook October 3, 2008 Abstract These notes write up some basic facts regarding the inverse gamma distribution, also called the inverted gamma distribution. In a sense this distribution is unnecessary: it has the same distribution as the reciprocal of a gamma distribution. However

  2. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  3. DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration and cogeneration. Additionally, this report describes long-term strategies, pathways, and milestones to take

  4. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  5. Distributed Internet Security and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    , New Mexico May, 2009 #12;Distributed Internet Security and Measurement by Josh Karlin B.A., Computer#12;Distributed Internet Security and Measurement by Josh Karlin B.A., Computer Science for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Computer Science The University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico May

  6. ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE SUM OF n NON-IDENTICALLY DISTRIBUTED UNIFORM RANDOM VARIABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, David

    ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE SUM OF n NON-IDENTICALLY DISTRIBUTED UNIFORM RANDOM distribution, probability density, convolution, * *Fourier transform, sine integrals. Abstract. The distribution of the sum of independent identically distributed * *uniform random variables is well

  7. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orell, A.; Foster, N.

    2015-08-01

    The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report.According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment across 24 states. In 2014, America's distributed wind energy industry supported a growing domestic industrial base as exports from United States-based small wind turbine manufacturers accounted for nearly 80% of United States-based manufacturers' sales.

  8. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations forEnergy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations forEnergy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for

  9. Exploring the Reactivity of Carbene Cycloadditions with Electronic Structure Theory Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sader, Charles Avery

    2015-01-01

    Electronic Structure Theory Calculations and Molecular DynamicsElectronic Structure Theory Calculations and Molecular Dynamicsdynamics simulation requires identification of an electronic structure calculation

  10. TOUSCHEK LIFETIME CALCULATIONS AND SIMULATIONS FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.; BENGTSSON, J.; NASH, B.

    2007-06-25

    The beam lifetime in most medium energy synchrotron radiation sources is limited by the Touschek effect, which describes the momentum transfer from the transverse into the longitudinal direction due to binary collisions between electrons. While an analytical formula exists to calculate the resulting lifetime, the actual momentum acceptance necessary to perform this calculation can only be determined by tracking. This is especially the case in the presence of small vertical apertures at insertion devices. In this case, nonlinear betatron coupling leads to beam losses at these vertical aperture restrictions. In addition, a realistic model of the storage ring is necessary for calculation of equilibrium beam sizes (particularly in the vertical direction) which are important for a self-consistent lifetime calculation.

  11. Ab initio Calculation of the np ? dy Radiative Capture Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beane, Silas R.

    Lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture process np ? d?, and the photo-disintegration processes ?[superscript ...

  12. AIM: Web-Based, Residential Energy Calculator for Homeowners 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, K.; Moss, M.; Liu, B.; Culp, C.; Haberl, J.; Herbert, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses AIM, or Assess, Improve, Measure. AIM is an energy efficiency calculator for existing residences that has been developed to provide homeowners, realtors and builders with a method to rate the energy efficiency of an existing...

  13. Universal calculation formula and calibration method in Fourier transform profilometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen Yongfu; Li Sikun; Cheng Haobo; Su Xianyu; Zhang Qican

    2010-12-01

    We propose a universal calculation formula of Fourier transform profilometry and give a strict theoretical analysis about the phase-height mapping relation. As the request on the experimental setup of the universal calculation formula is unconfined, the projector and the camera can be located arbitrarily to get better fringe information, which makes the operation flexible. The phase-height calibration method under the universal condition is proposed, which can avoid measuring the system parameters directly. It makes the system easy to manipulate and improves the measurement velocity. A computer simulation and experiment are conducted to verify its validity. The calculation formula and calibration method have been applied to measure an object of 22.00 mm maximal height. The relative error of the measurement result is only 0.59%. The experimental results prove that the three-dimensional shape of tested objects can be reconstructed exactly by using the calculation formula and calibration method, and the system has better universality.

  14. Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions --A New Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions -- A New Approach Larry Hughes, Kathleen Bohan different sectors and their associated greenhouse gas emissions (principally carbon dioxide, methane of tables relating to national sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (principally carbon dioxide, methane, 1

  15. Reactor physics calculation of BWR fuel bundles containing gadolinia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales, Diego

    1977-01-01

    A technique for the calculation of the neutronic behavior of BWR fuel bundles has been developed and applied to a Vermont Yankee fuel bundle. The technique is based on a diffusion theory treatment of the bundle, with ...

  16. Automating journey fare calculation for transport for London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Joshua J. (Joshua John)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis develops a method to automate journey fare calculation for Transport for London. Today, fares for every possible origin-destination station pair within the London Underground are prepared manually based on the ...

  17. Automated higher-order calculations: Status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Ossola

    2015-08-08

    In this presentation we review the current status in the automated evaluation of scattering amplitudes, with particular attention to the developments related with NLO calculations, which led to the construction of powerful multi-purpose computational tools. After a general overview, we will devote a short section to describe the GoSam framework for NLO calculations and its application to the production of Higgs boson plus jets. We will then briefly comment on the challenges presented by NNLO calculations, whose structure is considerably more complicated. Finally, we will describe some of the features of the integrand-reduction techniques beyond NLO, an alternative promising approach to multi-loop calculations which is currently under development.

  18. Automated higher-order calculations: Status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation we review the current status in the automated evaluation of scattering amplitudes, with particular attention to the developments related with NLO calculations, which led to the construction of powerful multi-purpose computational tools. After a general overview, we will devote a short section to describe the GoSam framework for NLO calculations and its application to the production of Higgs boson plus jets. We will then briefly comment on the challenges presented by NNLO calculations, whose structure is considerably more complicated. Finally, we will describe some of the features of the integrand-reduction techniques beyond NLO, an alternative promising approach to multi-loop calculations which is currently under development.

  19. Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach Calculations of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays: Application to Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission Reactions on U-235 and Pu-239...

  20. Sequential Voronoi diagram calculations using simple chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costello, Ben de Lacy; Adamatzky, Andy

    2012-01-01

    In our recent paper [de Lacy Costello et al. 2010] we described the formation of complex tessellations of the plane arising from the various reactions of metal salts with potassium ferricyanide and ferrocyanide loaded gels. In addition to producing colourful tessellations these reactions are naturally computing generalised Voronoi diagrams of the plane. The reactions reported previously were capable of the calculation of three distinct Voronoi diagrams of the plane. As diffusion coupled with a chemical reaction is responsible for the calculation then this is achieved in parallel. Thus an increase in the complexity of the data input does not utilise additional computational resource. Additional benefits of these chemical reactions is that a permanent record of the Voronoi diagram calculation (in the form of precipitate free bisectors) is achieved, so there is no requirement for further processing to extract the calculation results. Previously it was assumed that the permanence of the results was also a potenti...

  1. Guidelines for the analysis of free energy calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimovich, PV; Shirts, MR; Mobley, DL; Mobley, DL

    2015-01-01

    Free energy calculations for Lennard-Jones systems and waterfree energy change is found as the negative of ?G waterenergy of hydrophobic hydration: A molecular dynam- ics study of noble gases in water.

  2. Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Bo

    2010-01-14

    Coastal bridges are exposed to severe wave, current and wind forces during a hurricane. Most coastal bridges are not designed to resist wave loads in such extreme situations, and there are no existing analytical methods to calculate wave loads...

  3. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-10-26

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  4. Protein Thermostability Calculations Using Alchemical Free Energy Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Groot, Bert

    Protein Thermostability Calculations Using Alchemical Free Energy Simulations Daniel Seeliger by alterations in the free energy of folding. Growing computational power, however, increasingly allows us to use alchem- ical free energy simulations, such as free energy perturbation or thermodynamic integration

  5. Guidelines for the analysis of free energy calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimovich, PV; Shirts, MR; Mobley, DL; Mobley, DL

    2015-01-01

    Efficient estimation of free energy differ- ences from Montenumerical instabilities in free energy calculations based onD.L. , DiCapua, F.M. : Free energy via molecular simulation:

  6. Is Ring breaking feasible in relative binding free energy calculations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S; Wang, L; Mobley, DL

    2015-01-01

    Essex, J. W. Rigorous Free Energy Calculations in Structure-of Hydration Free Energies for SAMPL. J. Comput. -Aided Mol.Basic Ingredients of Free Energy Calcula- tions: A Review.

  7. RESEARCH PAPER Calculating the effective permeability of sandstone with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    RESEARCH PAPER Calculating the effective permeability of sandstone with multiscale lattice microtomo- graphic images of a sandstone, with sample resolution of 3.34 lm. We discuss the predictive

  8. Calculating the hyper--Wiener index of benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Calculating the hyper--Wiener index of benzenoid hydrocarbons Petra Ÿ Zigert 1 , Sandi KlavŸ zar 1. (1) is not easy, especially in the case of large polycyclic molecules, such as benzenoid hydrocarbons

  9. Calculating the hyperWiener index of benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Calculating the hyper­Wiener index of benzenoid hydrocarbons Petra Zigert1 , Sandi Klavzar1) is not easy, especially in the case of large polycyclic molecules, such as benzenoid hydrocarbons. Some time

  10. Ab initio calculations of nuclear widths via an integral relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth M. Nollett

    2012-05-31

    I describe the computation of energy widths of nuclear states using an integral over the interaction region of ab initio variational Monte Carlo wave functions, and I present calculated widths for many states. I begin by presenting relations that connect certain short-range integrals to widths. I then present predicted widths for 5 integral relation, I conclude that overlap calculations can diagnose cases in which computed widths should not be trusted.

  11. Realistic Shell-Model Calculations for 208Pb Neighbors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Coraggio; A. Covello; A. Gargano

    1998-12-17

    We have performed a shell-model study of the two nuclei 210Po and 206Hg, having and lacking two protons with respect to doubly magic 208Pb. In our calculations we have employed realistic effective interactions derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The calculated results are compared with the available experimental data are, however, very scanty for 206Hg. The very good agreement obtained for 210Po supports confidence in our predictions for 206Hg.

  12. Scoping calculations of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Difilippo, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This technical memorandum describes models and calculational procedures to fully characterize the nuclear island of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. Two computer codes were written: one for the gas-cooled NERVA derivative reactor and the other for liquid metal-cooled fuel pin reactors. These codes are going to be interfaced by NASA with the balance of plant in order to making scoping calculations for mission analysis.

  13. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  14. Accurate calculation of thermal noise in multilayer coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Gurkovsky; Sergey Vyatchanin

    2010-05-18

    We derive accurate formulas for thermal fluctuations in multilayer interferometric coating taking into account light propagation inside the coating. In particular, we calculate the reflected wave phase as a function of small displacements of the boundaries between the layers using transmission line model for interferometric coating and derive formula for spectral density of reflected phase in accordance with Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem. We apply the developed approach for calculation of the spectral density of coating Brownian noise.

  15. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  16. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  17. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  18. Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

  19. Posttest calculations of bundle quench test CORA-13 with ATHLET-CD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bestele, J.; Trambauer, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, Garching (Germany); Schubert, J.D. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit is developing, in cooperation with the Institut fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme, Stuttgart, the system code Analysis of Thermalhydraulics of Leaks and Transients with Core Degradation (ATHLET-CD). The code consists of detailed models of the thermal hydraulics of the reactor coolant system. This thermo-fluid dynamics module is coupled with modules describing the early phase of the core degradation, like cladding deformation, oxidation and melt relocation, and the release and transport of fission products. The assessment of the code is being done by the analysis of separate effect tests, integral tests, and plant events. The code will be applied to the verification of severe accident management procedures. The out-of-pile test CORA-13 was conducted by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in their CORA test facility. The test consisted of two phases, a heatup phase and a quench phase. At the beginning of the quench phase, a sharp peak in the hydrogen generation rate was observed. Both phases of the test have been calculated with the system code ATHLET-CD. Special efforts have been made to simulate the heat losses and the flow distribution in the test facility and the thermal hydraulics during the quench phase. In addition to previous calculations, the material relocation and the quench phase have been modeled. The temperature increase during the heatup phase, the starting time of the temperature escalation, and the maximum temperatures have been calculated correctly. At the beginning of the quench phase, an increased hydrogen generation rate has been calculated as measured in the experiment.

  20. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. Results: As expected, RE{sub preplan} for our edema model indicated underdosage in the calculation volume with a clear dependence on seed and calculation point positions, and increased with increasing values of {Delta} and T. Values of RE{sub preplan} were generally larger near the ends of the virtual prostate in the RPC phantom compared with more central locations. For edema characteristics similar to the population average values previously measured at our center, i.e., {Delta}=0.2 and T=28 d, mean values of RE{sub preplan} in an axial plane located 1.5 cm from the center of the seed distribution were 8.3% for {sup 131}Cs seeds, 7.5% for {sup 103}Pd seeds, and 2.2% for {sup 125}I seeds. Maximum values of RE{sub preplan} in the same plane were about 1.5 times greater. Note that detailed results strictly apply only for loose seed implants where the seeds are fixed in tissue and move in synchrony with that tissue. Conclusions: A dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema was developed for which cumulative dose can be written in closed form. The method yields values for RE{sub preplan} that differ from those for spatially isotropic edema. The method is suitable for calculating pre- and postimplant dosimetry correction factors for clinical seed configurations when edema characteristics can be measured or estimated.

  1. Structure and distribution of abnormal pressures in the Vicksburg Formation (Oligocene), Hinde Field, Starr County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrell, Kirk Arthur

    1988-01-01

    resistivities that were calculated from spontaneous potential on well logs. A salinity- depth plot was constructed and compared to the normal trend. Geothermal gradients were calculated and temperatures were obtained from well logs and bottom- hole pressure... where pressure gradients reach 0. 92 psi/ft. The distribution of abnormal pressures in the Lower Vicksburg indicates that hydrodynamic flow takes place upward from the Jackson shale and then continues along fault planes across the unconformity on top...

  2. K-Eigenvalue sensitivities of secondary distributions of continuous-energy data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS A143, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    MCNP6 has the capability to produce energy-resolved sensitivity profiles for secondary distributions (fission {Chi} and scattering laws). Computing both unconstrained and constrained profiles are possible. Verification is performed with analytic test problems and a comparison to TSUNAMI-3D, and the comparisons show MCNP6 calculates correct or consistent results. Continuous-energy calculations are performed for three fast critical experiments: Jezebel, Flattop, and copper-reflected Zeus. The sensitivities to the secondary distributions (integrated over chosen energy ranges) are of similar magnitude to those of many of the cross sections, demonstrating the possibility that integral experiments are useful for assessing the fidelity of these data as well. (authors)

  3. Quantitative assessment of the accuracy of dose calculation using pencil beam and Monte Carlo algorithms and requirements for clinical quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Imad, E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2013-10-01

    To compare the doses calculated using the BrainLAB pencil beam (PB) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for tumors located in various sites including the lung and evaluate quality assurance procedures required for the verification of the accuracy of dose calculation. The dose-calculation accuracy of PB and MC was also assessed quantitatively with measurement using ionization chamber and Gafchromic films placed in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose was calculated using PB convolution and MC algorithms in the iPlan treatment planning system from BrainLAB. The dose calculation was performed on the patient's computed tomography images with lesions in various treatment sites including 5 lungs, 5 prostates, 4 brains, 2 head and necks, and 2 paraspinal tissues. A combination of conventional, conformal, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans was used in dose calculation. The leaf sequence from intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or beam shapes from conformal plans and monitor units and other planning parameters calculated by the PB were identical for calculating dose with MC. Heterogeneity correction was considered in both PB and MC dose calculations. Dose-volume parameters such as V95 (volume covered by 95% of prescription dose), dose distributions, and gamma analysis were used to evaluate the calculated dose by PB and MC. The measured doses by ionization chamber and EBT GAFCHROMIC film in solid water and heterogeneous phantoms were used to quantitatively asses the accuracy of dose calculated by PB and MC. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions calculated by PB and MC in the brain, prostate, paraspinal, and head and neck were in good agreement with one another (within 5%) and provided acceptable planning target volume coverage. However, dose distributions of the patients with lung cancer had large discrepancies. For a plan optimized with PB, the dose coverage was shown as clinically acceptable, whereas in reality, the MC showed a systematic lack of dose coverage. The dose calculated by PB for lung tumors was overestimated by up to 40%. An interesting feature that was observed is that despite large discrepancies in dose-volume histogram coverage of the planning target volume between PB and MC, the point doses at the isocenter (center of the lesions) calculated by both algorithms were within 7% even for lung cases. The dose distributions measured with EBT GAFCHROMIC films in heterogeneous phantoms showed large discrepancies of nearly 15% lower than PB at interfaces between heterogeneous media, where these lower doses measured by the film were in agreement with those by MC. The doses (V95) calculated by MC and PB agreed within 5% for treatment sites with small tissue heterogeneities such as the prostate, brain, head and neck, and paraspinal tumors. Considerable discrepancies, up to 40%, were observed in the dose-volume coverage between MC and PB in lung tumors, which may affect clinical outcomes. The discrepancies between MC and PB increased for 15 MV compared with 6 MV indicating the importance of implementation of accurate clinical treatment planning such as MC. The comparison of point doses is not representative of the discrepancies in dose coverage and might be misleading in evaluating the accuracy of dose calculation between PB and MC. Thus, the clinical quality assurance procedures required to verify the accuracy of dose calculation using PB and MC need to consider measurements of 2- and 3-dimensional dose distributions rather than a single point measurement using heterogeneous phantoms instead of homogenous water-equivalent phantoms.

  4. Investigation of the Accuracy of Calculation Methods for Conduction Transfer Functions of Building Construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, Q.; Spitler, J.; Fisher, D.

    2006-01-01

    Conduction transfer functions (CTFs) are widely used to calculate conduction heat transfer in building cooling load and energy calculations. They can conveniently fit into any load and energy calculation techniques to perform conduction calculations...

  5. Cosmic ray primary mass composition above the knee: deduction from lateral distribution of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. I. Raikin; A. A. Lagutin; A. V. Yushkov

    2008-03-18

    Influence of shower fluctuations on the shape of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS of fixed size measured by scintillation counters is analyzed in framework of scaling formalism. Correction factors for the mean square radius of electrons are calculated for the experimental conditions of KASCADE array. Possible improvement of the primary mass discrimination by analysis of lateral distribution of EAS electrons is discussed in detail.

  6. Power-laws from critical gravitational collapse: The mass distribution of subsolar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser; Nicolas Yunes

    2004-03-15

    Critical gravitational collapse and self similarity are used to probe the mass distribution of subsolar objects. We demonstrate that at very low mass the distribution is given by a power law, with an exponent opposite in sign to that observed at high-mass regime. We further show that the value of this low-mass exponent is in principle calculable via dynamical systems theory applied to gravitational collapse. Qualitative agreement between numerical experiments and observational data is good.

  7. Solar Reflectance Index Calculation Worksheet Instructions The purpose of this calculator is to enable contractors and homeowners to quickly and accurately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Reflectance Index Calculation Worksheet Instructions Usage: The purpose of this calculator is to enable contractors and homeowners to quickly and accurately calculate the solar reflectance product exceeds the Building Energy Efficiency Standards requirement for either the aged solar

  8. Systematic study of projectile structure effect on fusion barrier distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratap Roy; A. Saxena; B. K. Nayak; E. T. Mirgule; B. John; Y. K. Gupta; L. S. Danu; R. P. Vind; Ashok Kumar; R. K. Choudhury

    2011-07-29

    Quasielastic excitation function measurement has been carried out for the $^{4}$He + $^{232}$Th system at $\\theta_{lab}$=160$^\\circ$ with respect to the beam direction, to obtain a representation of the fusion barrier distribution. Using the present data along with previously measured barrier distribution results on $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, and $^{19}$F + $^{232}$Th systems a systematic analysis has been carried out to investigate the role of target and/or projectile structures on fusion barrier distribution. It is observed that for $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, and $^{16}$O + $^{232}$Th, reactions the couplings due to target states only are required in coupled channel fusion calculations to explain the experimental data, whereas for the $^{19}$F+ $^{232}$Th system along with the coupling of target states, inelastic states of $^{19}$F are also required to explain the experimental results on fusion-barrier distribution. The width of the barrier distribution shows interesting transition behavior when plotted with respect to the target-projectile charge product for the above systems.

  9. Distribution of neutron resonance widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans A. Weidenmueller

    2011-10-28

    Recent data on neutron resonance widths indicate disagreement with the Porter-Thomas distribution (PTD). I discuss the theoretical arguments for the PTD, possible theoretical modifications, and I summarize the experimantal evidence.

  10. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Flowers, Larry T.; Gagne, Matthew N.; Pro, Boyd H.; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-20

    The purpose of this report is to quantify and summarize the 2013 U.S. distributed wind market to help plan and guide future investments and decisions by industry stakeholders, utilities, state and federal agencies, and other interested parties.

  11. Common Discrete Distributions Statistics 104

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Mark E.

    must be all 1, so it is omitted. Discrete Distributions 4 #12;H HHH HHH HH k p 0.01 0.05 0.10 0.20 0

  12. Distributed Bio-Oil Reforming

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mines Bio-Derived Liquids Distributed Reforming Working Group Meeting HFC&IT Program Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006 1 Gasification Partial oxidation CH 1.46 O .67 + 0.16 O 2 ...

  13. Modeling hydrogen fuel distribution infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulido, Jon R. (Jon Ramon), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis' fundamental research question is to evaluate the structure of the hydrogen production, distribution, and dispensing infrastructure under various scenarios and to discover if any trends become apparent after ...

  14. The neutron star mass distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiziltan, B; Kottas, A; De Yoreo, M; Thorsett, SE

    2013-01-01

    Science Library, Vol. 326, Neutron Stars 1 : Equation ofBlack holes, white dwarfs, and neutron stars: The physics ofPhys. Rev. , 55, 364 The Neutron Star Mass Distribution van

  15. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  16. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    2015-01-01

    4. Air Mass Distribution (%) Water Air (ng/m ) Water (ng/L)Air (%) Sediment Soil Water Air Fraction Release to Air (%)Interfacial Area (air-water, air-soil) Mixing height Water

  17. Embodied emergence : distributed computing manipulatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouchard, David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Distributed systems and the emergent properties that can arise out of simple localized interactions have fascinated scientists and artists alike for the last century. They challenge the notions of control and creativity, ...

  18. Orbital migration and the period distribution of exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2005-08-28

    We use the model for the migration of planets introduced in Del Popolo, Yesilyurt & Ercan (2003) to calculate the observed mass and semimajor axis distribution of extra-solar planets. The assumption that the surface density in planetesimals is proportional to that of gas is relaxed, and in order to describe disc evolution we use a method which, using a series of simplifying assumptions, is able to simultaneously follow the evolution of gas and solid particles for up to $10^7 {\\rm yr}$. The distribution of planetesimals obtained after $10^7 {\\rm yr}$ is used to study the migration rate of a giant planet through the model of this paper. The disk and migration models are used to calculate the distribution of planets as function of mass and semimajor axis. The results show that the model can give a reasonable prediction of planets' semi-major axes and mass distribution. In particular there is a pile-up of planets at $a \\simeq 0.05$ AU, a minimum near 0.3 AU, indicating a paucity of planets at that distance, and a rise for semi-major axes larger than 0.3 AU, out to 3 AU. The semi-major axis distribution shows that the more massive planets (typically, masses larger than $4 M_{\\rm J}$) form preferentially in the outer regions and do not migrate much. Intermediate-mass objects migrate more easily whatever the distance they form, and that the lighter planets (masses from sub-Saturnian to Jovian) migrate easily.

  19. Benchmark calculations for elastic fermion-dimer scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahin Bour; H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee; Ulf-G. Meißner

    2012-06-08

    We present continuum and lattice calculations for elastic scattering between a fermion and a bound dimer in the shallow binding limit. For the continuum calculation we use the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian (STM) integral equation to determine the scattering length and effective range parameter to high precision. For the lattice calculation we use the finite-volume method of L\\"uscher. We take into account topological finite-volume corrections to the dimer binding energy which depend on the momentum of the dimer. After subtracting these effects, we find from the lattice calculation kappa a_fd = 1.174(9) and kappa r_fd = -0.029(13). These results agree well with the continuum values kappa a_fd = 1.17907(1) and kappa r_fd = -0.0383(3) obtained from the STM equation. We discuss applications to cold atomic Fermi gases, deuteron-neutron scattering in the spin-quartet channel, and lattice calculations of scattering for nuclei and hadronic molecules at finite volume.

  20. Air ingression calculations for selected plant transients using MELCOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    Two sets of MELCOR calculations have been completed studying the effects of air ingression on the consequences of various severe accident scenarios. One set of calculations analyzed a station blackout with surge line failure prior to vessel breach, starting from nominal operating conditions; the other set of calculations analyzed a station blackout occurring during shutdown (refueling) conditions. Both sets of analyses were for the Surry plant, a three-loop Westinghouse PWR. For both accident scenarios, a basecase calculation was done, and then repeated with air ingression from containment into the core region following core degradation and vessel failure. In addition to the two sets of analyses done for this program, a similar air-ingression sensitivity study was done as part of a low-power/shutdown PRA, with results summarized here; that PRA study also analyzed a station blackout occurring during shutdown (refueling) conditions, but for the Grand Gulf plant, a BWR/6 with Mark III containment. These studies help quantify the amount of air that would have to enter the core region to have a significant impact on the severe accident scenario, and demonstrate that one effect, of air ingression is substantial enhancement of ruthenium release. These calculations also show that, while the core clad temperatures rise more quickly due to oxidation with air rather than steam, the core also degrades and relocates more quickly, so that no sustained, enhanced core heatup is predicted to occur with air ingression.

  1. ContentsContents3399the normal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents3399the normal distribution 1. The normal distribution 2. The normal approximation to the binomial distribution 3. Sums and differences of random variables Learning outcomes In a previous Workbook of a continuous random variables: the normal distribution. The probabilities of the normal distribution have

  2. Matching Fully Differential NNLO Calculations and Parton Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Alioli; Christian W. Bauer; Calvin Berggren; Frank J. Tackmann; Jonathan R. Walsh; Saba Zuberi

    2013-11-01

    We present a general method to match fully differential next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) calculations to parton shower programs. We discuss in detail the perturbative accuracy criteria a complete NNLO+PS matching has to satisfy. Our method is based on consistently improving a given NNLO calculation with the leading-logarithmic (LL) resummation in a chosen jet resolution variable. The resulting NNLO$+$LL calculation is cast in the form of an event generator for physical events that can be directly interfaced with a parton shower routine, and we give an explicit construction of the input "Monte Carlo cross sections" satisfying all required criteria. We also show how other proposed approaches naturally arise as special cases in our method.

  3. Chemical-equilibrium calculations for aqueous geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1981-05-01

    Results from four chemical-equilibrium computer programs, REDEQL.EPAK, GEOCHEM, WATEQF, and SENECA2, have been compared with experimental solubility data for some simple systems of interest with geothermal brines. Seven test cases involving solubilities of CaCO/sub 3/, amorphous SiO/sub 2/, CaSO/sub 4/, and BaSO/sub 4/ at various temperatures from 25 to 300/sup 0/C and in NaCl or HCl solutions of 0 to 4 molal have been examined. Significant differences between calculated results and experimental data occurred in some cases. These differences were traced to inaccuracies in free-energy or equilibrium-constant data and in activity coefficients used by the programs. Although currently available chemical-equilibrium programs can give reasonable results for these calculations, considerable care must be taken in the selection of free-energy data and methods of calculating activity coefficients.

  4. Fully microscopic shell-model calculations with realistic effective hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Coraggio; A. Covello; A. Gargano; N. Itaco; T. T. S. Kuo

    2011-01-24

    The advent of nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral perturbation theory, as well as the so-called V-low-k approach to the renormalization of the strong short-range repulsion contained in the potentials, have brought renewed interest in realistic shell-model calculations. Here we focus on calculations where a fully microscopic approach is adopted. No phenomenological input is needed in these calculations, because single-particle energies, matrix elements of the two-body interaction, and matrix elements of the electromagnetic multipole operators are derived theoretically. This has been done within the framework of the time-dependent degenerate linked-diagram perturbation theory. We present results for some nuclei in different mass regions. These evidence the ability of realistic effective hamiltonians to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  5. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, M Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp (1999), the free thermochemical equilibrium code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications), and the example given by White et al. (1958). Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is ...

  6. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  7. Dose calculation for electron therapy using an improved LBR method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebreamlak, Wondesen T.; Alkhatib, Hassaan A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); South Carolina Oncology Associates, Columbia, South Carolina 29210 (United States); Tedeschi, David J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To calculate the percentage depth dose (PDD) of any irregularly shaped electron beam using a modified lateral build-up ratio (LBR) method.Methods: Percentage depth dose curves were measured using 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beam energies for applicator cone sizes of 6 Multiplication-Sign 6, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10, 14 Multiplication-Sign 14, and 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 cm{sup 2}. Circular cutouts for each cone were prepared from 2.0 cm diameter to the maximum possible size for each cone. In addition, three irregular cutouts were prepared.Results: The LBR for each circular cutout was calculated from the measured PDD curve using the open field of the 14 Multiplication-Sign 14 cm{sup 2} cone as the reference field. Using the LBR values and the radius of the circular cutouts, the corresponding lateral spread parameter [{sigma}{sub R}(z)] of the electron shower was calculated. Unlike the commonly accepted assumption that {sigma}{sub R}(z) is independent of cutout size, it is shown that its value increases linearly with circular cutout size (R). Using this characteristic of the lateral spread parameter, the PDD curves of irregularly shaped cutouts were calculated. Finally, the calculated PDD curves were compared with measured PDD curves.Conclusions: In this research, it is shown that the lateral spread parameter {sigma}{sub R}(z) increases with cutout size. For radii of circular cutout sizes up to the equilibrium range of the electron beam, the increase of {sigma}{sub R}(z) with the cutout size is linear. The percentage difference of the calculated PDD curve from the measured PDD data for irregularly shaped cutouts was under 1.0% in the region between the surface and therapeutic range of the electron beam. Similar results were obtained for four electron beam energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV)

  8. Fast spectral source integration in black hole perturbation calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Hopper; Erik Forseth; Thomas Osburn; Charles R. Evans

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a new technique for achieving spectral accuracy and fast computational performance in a class of black hole perturbation and gravitational self-force calculations involving extreme mass ratios and generic orbits. Called \\emph{spectral source integration} (SSI), this method should see widespread future use in problems that entail (i) point-particle description of the small compact object, (ii) frequency domain decomposition, and (iii) use of the background eccentric geodesic motion. Frequency domain approaches are widely used in both perturbation theory flux-balance calculations and in local gravitational self-force calculations. Recent self-force calculations in Lorenz gauge, using the frequency domain and method of extended homogeneous solutions, have been able to accurately reach eccentricities as high as $e \\simeq 0.7$. We show here SSI successfully applied to Lorenz gauge. In a double precision Lorenz gauge code, SSI enhances the accuracy of results and makes a factor of three improvement in the overall speed. The primary initial application of SSI--for us its \\emph{raison d'\\^{e}tre}--is in an arbitrary precision \\emph{Mathematica} code that computes perturbations of eccentric orbits in the Regge-Wheeler gauge to extraordinarily high accuracy (e.g., 200 decimal places). These high accuracy eccentric orbit calculations would not be possible without the exponential convergence of SSI. We believe the method will extend to work for inspirals on Kerr, and will be the subject of a later publication. SSI borrows concepts from discrete-time signal processing and is used to calculate the mode normalization coefficients in perturbation theory via sums over modest numbers of points around an orbit. A variant of the idea is used to obtain spectral accuracy in solution of the geodesic orbital motion.

  9. Mixed-Symmetry Shell-Model Calculations in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Gueorguiev

    2010-02-17

    We consider a novel approach to the nuclear shell model. The one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in a box is used to introduce the concept of an oblique-basis shell-model theory. By implementing the Lanczos method for diagonalization of large matrices, and the Cholesky algorithm for solving generalized eigenvalue problems, the method is applied to nuclei. The mixed-symmetry basis combines traditional spherical shell-model states with SU(3) collective configurations. We test the validity of this mixed-symmetry scheme on 24Mg and 44Ti. Results for 24Mg, obtained using the Wilthental USD intersection in a space that spans less than 10% of the full-space, reproduce the binding energy within 2% as well as an accurate reproduction of the low-energy spectrum and the structure of the states - 90% overlap with the exact eigenstates. In contrast, for an m-scheme calculation, one needs about 60% of the full space to obtain compatible results. Calculations for 44Ti support the mixed-mode scheme although the pure SU(3) calculations with few irreps are not as good as the standard m-scheme calculations. The strong breaking of the SU(3) symmetry results in relatively small enhancements within the combined basis. However, an oblique-basis calculation in 50% of the full pf-shell space is as good as a usual m-scheme calculation in 80% of the space. Results for the lower pf-shell nuclei 44-48Ti and 48Cr, using the Kuo-Brown-3 interaction, show that SU(3) symmetry breaking in this region is driven by the single-particle spin-orbit splitting. In our study we observe some interesting coherent structures, such as coherent mixing of basis states, quasi-perturbative behavior in the toy model, and enhanced B(E2) strengths close to the SU(3) limit even though SU(3) appears to be rather badly broken.

  10. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  11. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  12. Electron-density comparisons between radar observations and 3-D ionospheric model calculations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of electron densities calculated from the Utah State University First-Principals Ionospheric Model with simultaneous observations taken at Sondrestrom, Millstone, and Arecibo incoherent-scatter radars was undertaken to better understanding the response of the ionosphere at these longitudinally similar yet latitudinally separated locations. The comparison included over 50 days distributed over 3 1/2 years roughly symmetrical about the last solar-minimum in 1986. The overall trend of the comparison was that to first-order the model reproduces electron densities responding to diurnal, seasonal, geomagnetic, and solar-cycle variations for all three radars. However, some model-observation discrepancies were found. These include, failure of the model to correctly produce an evening peak at Millstone, fall-spring equinox differences at Sondrestrom, tidal structure at Arecibo, and daytime NmF2 values at Arecibo.

  13. Calculation of anharmonic couplings and THz linewidths in crystalline PETN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereverzev, Andrey Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L.

    2014-03-14

    We have developed a method for calculating the cubic anharmonic couplings in molecular crystals for normal modes with the zero wave vector in the framework of classical mechanics, and have applied it, combined with perturbation theory, to obtain the linewidths of all infrared absorption lines of crystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate in the terahertz region (<100 cm{sup ?1}). Contributions of the up- and down-conversion processes to the total linewidth were calculated. The computed linewidths are in qualitative agreement with experimental data and the results of molecular dynamics simulations. Quantum corrections to the linewidths in the terahertz region are shown to be negligible.

  14. Improved guidelines for RELAP4/MOD6 reflood calculations. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.H.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations were performed for an extensive selection of forced- and gravity-feed reflood experiments. This effort was a portion of the assessment procedure for the RELAP4/MOD6 thermal hydraulic computer code. A common set of guidelines, based on recommendations from the code developers, was used in determining the model and user-selected input options for each calculation. The comparison of code-calculated and experimental data was then used to assess the capability of the RELAP4/MOD6 code to model the reflood phenomena. As a result of the assessment, the guidelines for determining the user-selected input options were improved.

  15. Additional nuclear criticality safety calculations for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hone, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents additional criticality safety analysis calculations for small diameter containers, which were originally documented in Reference 1. The results in Reference 1 indicated that some of the small diameter containers did not meet the criteria established for criticality safety at the Portsmouth facility (K{sub eff} +2{sigma}<.95) when modeled under various contingency assumptions of reflection and moderation. The calculations performed in this report reexamine those cases which did not meet the criticality safety criteria. In some cases, unnecessary conservatism is removed, and in other cases mass or assay limits are established for use with the respective containers.

  16. RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Musat

    2005-03-07

    This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results.

  17. A Parallel Orbital-Updating Approach for Electronic Structure Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Dai; Xingao Gong; Aihui Zhou; Jinwei Zhu

    2014-11-05

    In this paper, we propose an orbital iteration based parallel approach for electronic structure calculations. This approach is based on our understanding of the single-particle equations of independent particles that move in an effective potential. With this new approach, the solution of the single-particle equation is reduced to some solutions of independent linear algebraic systems and a small scale algebraic problem. It is demonstrated by our numerical experiments that this new approach is quite efficient for full-potential calculations for a class of molecular systems.

  18. Using Faddeev Differential Equations to Calculate Three-Body Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kolganova; A. K. Motovilov

    1998-03-19

    Algorithm, based on explicit representations for analytic continuation of the T-matrix Faddeev components on unphysical sheets, is worked out for calculations of resonances in the three-body quantum problem. According to the representations, poles of T-matrix, scattering matrix and Green function on unphysical sheets, interpreted as resonances, coincide with those complex energy values where appropriate truncations of the scattering matrix have zero as eigenvalue. Scattering amplitudes on the physical sheet, necessary to construct scattering matrix, are calculated on the basis of the Faddeev differential equations. The algorithm developed is applied to search for the resonances in the $nnp$ system and in a model three-boson system.

  19. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  20. New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurmanov, R. S., E-mail: kurmanovrs@mail.ru [Omsk State Transport University (Russian Federation); Kosenko, G. I., E-mail: kosenkophys@gmail.com [Omsk Tank Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

  1. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  2. Optimal Distributed Voltage Regulation in Power Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Albert Y S; Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro; Tse, David

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of voltage regulation in power distribution networks with deep-penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs), e.g., renewable-based generation, and storage-capable loads such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. We cast the problem as an optimization program, where the objective is to minimize the losses in the network subject to constraints on bus voltage magnitudes, limits on active and reactive power injections, transmission line thermal limits and losses. We provide sufficient conditions under which the optimization problem can be solved via its convex relaxation. Using data from existing networks, we show that the conditions are expected to be satisfied by most networks. We also provide an efficient distributed algorithm to solve the problem. The algorithm is asynchronous, with a communication topology that is the same as the electrical network topology. We illustrate the algorithm's performance in the IEEE 34-bus and the 123-bus feeder test systems.

  3. Physical Effects of Distributed PV Generation on California's Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) power is expected to have a range of effects -- both positive and negative -- on the distribution grid. The magnitude of these effects may vary greatly depending upon feeder topology, climate, PV penetration level, and other factors. In this paper we present a simulation study of eight representative distribution feeders in three California climates at PV penetration levels up to 100\\%, supported by a unique database of distributed PV generation data that enables us to capture the impact of PV variability on feeder voltage and voltage regulating equipment. When comparing the influence of feeder location (i.e. climate) versus feeder type on outcomes, we find that location more strongly influences the incidence of reverse power flow, reductions in peak loading and the presence of voltage excursions. On the other hand, we find that feeder characteristics more strongly influence the magnitude of loss reduction and changes in voltage regulator operations. We find th...

  4. Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded or Revolutions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensor Networks: Distributed Algorithms Reloaded ­ or Revolutions? Roger Wattenhofer Computer. This paper wants to motivate the distributed algorithms community to study sensor networks. We discuss why community, a sensor network essentially is ­ a database. The distributed algorithms community should join

  5. Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution Max Buot Donald Richards Xavier statistical models which have been proposed for luminosity distributions for the globular clusters galaxies were well fit by Gaussian distributions, subsequent investigations suggested

  6. Absolute Continuous Multivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Absolute Continuous Multivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution Debasis Kundu1,2 & Ankush Kumar1 & Arjun K. Gupta3 Abstract Generalized exponential distribution has received some attention continuous bivariate generalized exponential distribution. In this paper we propose an absolute continuous

  7. Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution Ahad Jamalizadeh§ & Debasis Kundu of weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribu- tions. This new singular distribution has density function; Singular distribution; Maximum likelihood estimators; Fisher information matrix; Asymp

  8. Absolute Continuous Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Absolute Continuous Bivariate Generalized Exponential Distribution Debasis Kundu and Rameshwar D. Gupta Abstract Generalized exponential distribution has been used quite effectively to model posi- tively skewed lifetime data as an alternative to the well known Weibull or gamma distributions

  9. Distributed Averaging Via Lifted Markov Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Kyomin

    Motivated by applications of distributed linear estimation, distributed control, and distributed optimization, we consider the question of designing linear iterative algorithms for computing the average of numbers in a ...

  10. Center for Excellence in Logistics and Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Center for Excellence in Logistics and Distribution (CELDi) A National Science Foundation sponsored providing innovative solutions for logistics and distribution excellence with our member organizations. What organizations to achieve logistics and distribution excellence by delivering meaningful, innovative

  11. Distribution of nearest distances between nodal points for the Berry function in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander I. Saichev; Karl-Fredrik Berggren; Almas F. Sadreev

    2000-12-10

    According to Berry a wave-chaotic state may be viewed as a superposition of monochromatic plane waves with random phases and amplitudes. Here we consider the distribution of nodal points associated with this state. Using the property that both the real and imaginary parts of the wave function are random Gaussian fields we analyze the correlation function and densities of the nodal points. Using two approaches (the Poisson and Bernoulli) we derive the distribution of nearest neighbor separations. Furthermore the distribution functions for nodal points with specific chirality are found. Comparison is made with results from from numerical calculations for the Berry wave function.

  12. Energy and Momentum Distributions of Kantowski and Sachs Space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragab M. Gad; A. Fouad

    2007-04-15

    We use the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson, Landau-Lifshitz and Papapetrou energy-momentum complexes to calculate the energy and momentum distributions of Kantowski and Sachs space-time. We show that the Einstein and Bergmann-Thomson definitions furnish a consistent result for the energy distribution, but the definition of Landau-Lifshitz do not agree with them. We show that a signature switch should affect about everything including energy distribution in the case of Einstein and Papapetrou prescriptions but not in Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz prescriptions.

  13. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  14. Comparison of TRAC calculations with experimental data. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.F.; Vigil, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    TRAC is an advanced best-estimate computer code for analyzing postulated accidents in light water reactors. This paper gives a brief description of the code followed by comparisons of TRAC calculations with data from a variety of separate-effects, system-effects, and integral experiments. Based on these comparisons, the capabilities and limitations of the early versions of TRAC are evaluated.

  15. Semiclassical calculation of an induced decay of false vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Monin; M. B. Voloshin

    2010-04-12

    We consider a model where a scalar field develops a metastable vacuum state and weakly interacts with another scalar field. In this situation we find the probability of decay of the false vacuum stimulated by the presence and collisions of particles of the second field. The discussed calculation is an illustration of the recently suggested thermal approach to treatment of induced semiclassical processes.

  16. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  17. Fuzzy-probabilistic calculations of water-balance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete, or subjective information, which may limit the application of conventional stochastic methods in predicting hydrogeologic conditions and associated uncertainty. Instead, redictions and uncertainty analysis can be made using uncertain input parameters expressed as probability boxes, intervals, and fuzzy numbers. The objective of this paper is to present the theory for, and a case study as an application of, the fuzzyprobabilistic approach, ombining probability and possibility theory for simulating soil water balance and assessing associated uncertainty in the components of a simple waterbalance equation. The application of this approach is demonstrated using calculations with the RAMAS Risk Calc code, to ssess the propagation of uncertainty in calculating potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and infiltration-in a case study at the Hanford site, Washington, USA. Propagation of uncertainty into the results of water-balance calculations was evaluated by hanging he types of models of uncertainty incorporated into various input parameters. The results of these fuzzy-probabilistic calculations are compared to the conventional Monte Carlo simulation approach and estimates from field observations at the Hanford site.

  18. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY A LEARNING TOOL By a complete supply chain #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply

  19. Calculation of the RayleighSommerfeld diffraction integral by exact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calculation of the Rayleigh­Sommerfeld diffraction integral by exact integration of the fast of constant (possibly complex) index of refraction n. The method integrates the Rayleigh­Sommerfeld diffraction integral numerically. After an appropriate change of integration variables, the integrand

  20. Vol.11,No.1,January-February 1995 Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF PROPULSION AND POWER Vol.11,No.1,January-February 1995 Calculations for Steady, and trailing oblique shock. The reaction strengthens the lead shock tothe extent that the far-field wave angle to balance the wave drag. Fora fixed heat release greater than a critical value, two steady propagation

  1. CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE FISSION REACTORS CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZIÈRE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology. 5 gives a self-contained description of the principles of fluctuation analysis for the diagnostics

  2. 2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculation Revision O Sandia National Laboratories Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 Compliance Recertification Application (2 ~"f, Date QA Review Mario Chavez Print WIPP: 1.4.1.1.:P A:QA-L:540232 lof153 #12;2004 Compliance

  3. Solution of Large Eigenvalue Problems in Electronic Structure Calculations \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Andreas

    Solution of Large Eigenvalue Problems in Electronic Structure Calculations \\Lambda Y. Saad y , A the structural and electronic properties of complex systems is one of the outstanding problems in condensed external perturbations. For example, it may be desirable in certain cases to follow the dynamics of atoms/electrons

  4. Patent Citation Analysis: Calculating Science linkage based on Citing Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    1 Patent Citation Analysis: Calculating Science linkage based on Citing Motivation Rui Li used patent bibliometric indicator to measure patent linkage to scientific research based on the frequency of citations to scientific papers within the patent. Science linkage is also regarded as noisy

  5. DATA FOR THE CALCULATION OF ALBEDOS FROM CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    DATA FOR THE CALCULATION OF ALBEDOS FROM CONCRETE IRON, LEAD, AND WATER FOR PHOTONS AND NEUTRONS for the neutron albedo, and (3) the secondary-photon albedo for incident neutrons. Albedo data is provided for four materials: concrete, iron, lead, and water. Unlike previous compilations of albedo data, modern

  6. Improving Cost Calculations for Global Constraints in Local Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    Improving Cost Calculations for Global Constraints in Local Search Markus Bohlin Swedish Institute- straint satisfaction is based on local minimization of a cost function, which is usually the number equivalent to a set of basic constraints but still contributes as little to the cost as a single basic

  7. HOPF CALCULATIONS IN DELAYED CAR-FOLLOWING MODELS Gabor Stepan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    HOPF CALCULATIONS IN DELAYED CAR-FOLLOWING MODELS G´abor St´ep´an and G´abor Orosz Department: A nonlinear car-following model that includes the reaction-time delay of drivers is considered. When, bistability 1. INTRODUCTION There are two important goals of traffic manage- ment when cars follow each other

  8. Using Graphical Representations to Support the Calculation of Infusion Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    Using Graphical Representations to Support the Calculation of Infusion Parameters Sandy J. J. Gould in which participants were asked to solve a num- ber of infusion parameter problems that were represented representations transfer to actual workplace settings. Keywords: Graphical reasoning, infusion pumps, re

  9. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  10. Computationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is valid, it produces a frequency-independent model that may be used to calculate losses for any set and Two- or Three-Dimensional Field Geometry C. R. Sullivan From IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. #12;142 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL

  11. Calculated Phonon Spectra of Plutonium at High Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savrasov, Sergej Y.

    Calculated Phonon Spectra of Plutonium at High Temperatures X. Dai,1 S. Y. Savrasov,2 * G. Kotliar dynamical proper- ties of plutonium using an electronic structure method, which incorporates correlation anharmonic and can be stabilized at high temperatures by its phonon entropy. Plutonium (Pu) is a material

  12. Adaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Averbuch, Amir

    Adaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets Amir in numerical solution of differential and integral equations. Classical methods for discretization lead-based multiplication is af- fected by different input parameters for the algorithm. We integrated a sparse

  13. Systematic perturbation calculation of integrals with applications to physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Amore; Alfredo Aranda; Francisco M. Fernandez; Ricardo A. Saenz

    2004-07-09

    In this paper we generalize and improve a method for calculating the period of a classical oscillator and other integrals of physical interest, which was recently developed by some of the authors. We derive analytical expressions that prove to be more accurate than those commonly found in the literature, and test the convergence of the series produced by the approach.

  14. ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAMMINGARCHITECTURAL PROGRAMMING Program Spreadsheet GSF, NSF, NOSF Calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    ARCHITECTURAL PROGRAMMINGARCHITECTURAL PROGRAMMING Program Spreadsheet ­ GSF, NSF, NOSF Calculation? This is an estimate, based on: · Experience doing these types of layouts · Studying existing successful plans of similar projects (doing area take-offs) #12;To get NOSF* - Guidelines for adding circulation · % of space

  15. Stress field at a sliding frictional contact: Experiments and calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    Stress field at a sliding frictional contact: Experiments and calculations J. Scheibert Ã,1 , A and tangential stress fields at the base of a rough elastomer film in contact with a smooth glass cylinder in steady sliding. This geometry allows for a direct comparison between the stress profiles measured along

  16. Subject Positions and Derivational Scope Calculation in Minimalist Syntax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subject Positions and Derivational Scope Calculation in Minimalist Syntax: A Phase-Based Approach without any other special implement. 1 Introduction This paper explores the correlation between subject in subject positions across languages. We claim that unlike English Nominative Case, C, rather than

  17. General calculations using graphics hardware, with application to interactive caustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    General calculations using graphics hardware, with application to interactive caustics Chris Trendall and A. James Stewart iMAGIS--GRAVIR/IMAG and University of Toronto Abstract. Graphics hardware has been developed with image production in mind, but current hardware can be exploited for much more

  18. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  19. Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1990-07-02

    This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

  20. ELECTROMOTION 2009 3D Analytical Calculation of Forces between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Co or NdFeB, the designers can use magnets owning a really rigid magnetization. They are the magnets whichELECTROMOTION 2009 1 3D Analytical Calculation of Forces between Linear Halbach-Type Permanent Magnet Arrays H. Allag1,2 , J-P. Yonnet1 and M. E. H. Latreche2 1- Laboratoire de Génie Electrique de