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1

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

2

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

3

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact Now it is Britain's turn to think harder, says Brian both are true. Most predict that fossil fuels must remain a significant part of our energy supply, Britain has had a comfortable and profitable respite from anxieties about security of energy supply. Now

Cambridge, University of

4

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

8

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05.pdf Edward Beimborn Center for Urban Transportation Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presentation to the District IV Conference Institute of Transportation Engineers June, 2005, updated September

Saldin, Dilano

9

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Distillate in Depth – The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture John Hackworth Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration ... In Response to Price, ...

12

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thai gas demand seen outstripping supply  

SciTech Connect

Thailand's demand for gas will outstrip supplies in the late 1990s as rapid economic growth continues. Gas will be a cornerstone for Thai energy policy throughout the growth, although sources in neighboring countries need development. Thai gas production will rise 25% from 1992 to average 1 bcfd by 1995. Including production from new discoveries, production could rise to 1.5 bcfd by 2000, up almost 90% from the 1992 level. Increased gas flow output in the mid-1990s will be due largely to development of Gulf of Thailand fields. By 1998, production from Gulf of Thailand fields will not be enough to offset the decline in today's fields. Thailand will need to import more than 1 bcfd by 2005 in the absence of future discoveries in the country. The paper discusses new pipelines and imports.

1993-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ous systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power.that snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases andwater supplies from hydroelectric dams or discards renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Distillate in Depth - The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation provides background on distillate supply and demand, and then focuses on how hurricanes Katrina and Rita impact on refining capacity might affect winter fuels.

Information Center

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Understanding Democratic Congruence: A Demand-Supply Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is indeed a stunningly weak link between standard indicatorsstrongly because the link is indeed weak? If this were thelink between democratic supplies and demands is indeed as weak

Welzel, Christian; Klingemann, Hans-Dieter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

20

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

24

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

25

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

26

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

27

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

29

Non-OPEC supply to fill global 1996 demand gain  

SciTech Connect

Excess capacity brought on by rapidly rising oil production from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, coupled with stabilization of output from the Commonwealth of Independent States, will hamper OPEC`s efforts to balance the oil market in 1996. World demand for oil is projected to move up sharply. But non-OPEC output will increase even more, challenging OPEC to reduce production quotas. This paper reviews data on supply, demand, and production from these non-OPEC countries and the overall effects it will have on OPEC operations and costs.

Beck, R.J.

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Outlook for US lube oil supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the domestic demand for automotive and industrial lubricants to the year 2000 and evaluates the ability of U.S. refiners to meet the associated demand for base stocks. Changes in the supply/demand picture over the past several years are also reviewed. In the late 1970's, lube base stocks had been in short supply as healthy increases in demand pushed U.S. refiners to near maximum operating levels. Imports were increased to what were then record high levels and exports were reduced. This situation began to reverse itself in mid-1980 as marketers began to feel the impact of recession here and abroad. U.S. base stock consumption has since declined dramatically, to a level in 1982 estimated to be 17.5% below that of 1979's peak. In the meantime, refiners had added another 7.0 MB/CD to manufacturing capacity. 1982 lube plant operations are estimated to have dropped as low as 62% of nameplate capacity. The outlook for recovery is conservative. Due to continued depressed demand in certain market segments, 1983's increase in base oil demand is projected to be held to only 2%. Gains in 1984 and 1985 will be more robust, in the area of 6% per year. Thereafter, the overall rate of growth will drop to under 1% per year. The outlooks for automotive and industrial lubricants demand are summarized. Due to a forecast of greater relative growth in synthetic and water-based lubricants, base stock consumption is forecast to increase at a slower pace than that of the total finished lubricants volume.

Brecht, F.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

32

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure—from the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Safeguards Education and Training: Short Term Supply vs. Demand  

SciTech Connect

Much has been written and discussed in the past several years about the effect of the aging nuclear workforce on the sustainability of the U.S. safeguards and security infrastructure. This paper discusses the 10-15 year supply and demand forecast for nuclear material control and accounting specialists. The demand side of the review includes control and accounting of the materials at U.S. DOE and NRC facilities, and the federal oversight of those MC&A programs. The cadre of experts referred to as 'MC&A Specialists' available to meet the demand goes beyond domestic MC&A to include international programs, regulatory and inspection support, and so on.

Mathews, Carrie E.; Crawford, Cary E.

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: The price spike that initiated the flood of distillate imports last winter can be easily seen in this chart. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. The January/February 2000 price spike was shorter than the one last winter, largely due to the timing. Since last winter's price spike occurred early in the season, it took some time before prices receded substantially. Currently, the distillate fuel refining spread (the difference between the spot heating oil price and the WTI price) is more "typical". But as was

37

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

38

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

39

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... surplus supply over demand for spring and summer quarters compared with some other forecasters such as Oil Market Intelligence, ...

40

Modeling Structural Changes in Market Demand and Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic events may cause structural changes in markets. To know the effect of the economic event we should analyze the structural changes in the market demand and supply. The purpose of this dissertation is to analyze the effect of selected economic events on market demand and supply using econometric models. Structural changes can be modeled according to the types of changes. For an abrupt and instantaneous break, a dummy variable model can be used. For a smooth and gradual movement, proxy variables which represent the event can be applied, if we know the variables. If we don?t know the appropriate proxy variables, a smooth transition regression model can be employed. The BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) outbreak in the U.S. in 2003 is assumed to make abrupt and instantaneous changes in Korean meat consumption. To analyze the effect on Korean meat consumption, the Korean demands of beef, pork, chicken, and U.S. beef are estimated using an LA/AIDS (Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System) model with the dummy variable specifying the time before and after the BSE. From the results we can confirm that food safety concerns caused by the BSE case changed Korean meat consumption structure. Korean beef and U.S. beef became less elastic, and pork and chicken got more elastic to budget. Korean beef became less price elastic, but pork and U.S. beef got more price elastic. The changes of U.S. natural gas supply caused by technology development and depletion in reserves are analyzed using a smooth transition regression model. From the results, we can confirm that the productivity improvement by technology development is greater than the labor cost increase by depletion, but not greater than the capital cost increase by depletion in mid-2000s. The effects of posting the winning bid in a repeated Vickrey auction are examined using a proxy variable. By applying an unobserved effect Tobit model to the experimental auction done by Corrigan and Rousu (2006) for a candy bar, we can confirm that the changes of bidding behavior are significant, especially when the winning bid is high. By extracting the bid affiliation effects, we showed that true willingness to pay can be estimated.

Park, Beom Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

played a role during the crisis period. 1 Introduction The energy industry provides electrical powerA Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu , Anthony E. Brockwell of supply and demand equilibrium. The model includes latent supply and demand curves, which may vary over

42

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions rate from natural gas supply that occurs upstreamassociated with natural gas supply to the power plant weresuggest natural gas-fired power plants will supply

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electricity and Power Peak Demand . . • . . ELECTRICITYby Major Utility Service Area Projected Peak Demand for1977 Historical Peak Demand by Utility Service Area Weather-

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

47

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves to partially fill off-peak demand troughs. If passivehigher before or after the peak demand hour when hydro powerare highest during off-peak demand hours, and are low at

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-vehicle demand load factor Natural gas price Carbon tax89). They increase with demand (and gross natural gas-firedelectricity demand and by changing natural gas price and CO

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

240 chapter 12 energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR Vincent C. Tidwell;energy: supply, demand, and impacts 241 · Delivery of electricity may become more vulnerable) in 2009, equal to 222 million BTUs per person (EIA 2010). Any change or disruption to the supply of energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

50

Domestic Institutions and the Supply and Demand of Remittances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many countries are dependent upon capital flows for their balance of payments accounts. Sources of expenditures include foreign direct investment (FDI), portfolio investment (PI) and remittances. While the determinants of FDI and PI have been extensively analyzed, the analyses of remittance flows from host to home countries are largely lacking and wide-ranging. Factors predominantly not considered are domestic institutions which support or encourage international remittance exchange. Nations routinely desire to control international immigration and capital movement. Consequently they adopt domestic policies which create and enforce institutions that manage both capital and labor mobility across borders. Additionally, researchers commonly neglect to consider the impact of both the supply and demand factors simultaneously, or in other words, the domestic condition (home and host) which both push and pull migrants to migrate and remit. Further, given the non-dyadic nature of the data, there arises a need to "regionalize" the data. To test the effects of variations in immigration institutional attributes, I employ a pooled data set of approximately 104 nations from 1990 to 2004. Controlling for existing explanations and regional influences, I find that domestic institutions have a significant impact on the ability of an individual to migrate to a host country and to eventually remit back to their country of origin.

Hicks, Brian N.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers

52

EIA forecasts increased oil demand, need for additional supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil demand is forecast to increase by 1.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) ... Cooling demand in the Middle East is expected to rise to record levels this summer.

53

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM's hourly real-time energy prices corresponding to the week of hourly demand values are shown below. Prices also vary by hour and are much more volatile than demand.

54

Propane Demand is Highly Seasonal, But Fresh Supply is Not  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Propane, like heating oil, has a highly seasonal demand pattern. Demand increases about 50% from its low point to its peak. Production and net imports, on the other hand,...

55

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability, operational limits, ramp rates, and start-up costs Reliability requirements Transmission andavailability, electricity demand, and dispatches power plants based on operating costs and transmission

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Supply chain network equilibrium with revenue sharing contract under demand disruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract is a common and effective mechanism for supply chain coordination, which has been studied extensively in recent years. For a supply chain network model, contracts can be used to coordinate it because it is too ideal to obtain the network equilibrium ... Keywords: Supply chain network, coordination, demand disruptions, equilibrium, revenue sharing contract

A. -Ting Yang; Lin-Du Zhao

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Survey and Forecast of Marketplace Supply and Demand for Energy-Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility incentive programs have placed significant demands on the suppliers of certain types of energy-efficient lighting products--particularly compact fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts. Two major federal programs may soon place even greater demands on the lighting industry. This report assesses the program-induced demand for efficient lighting products and their likely near-term supply.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the availability of hydro power has the greatest impact oncontribute to a redesigned hydro power supply system in thein 2050 (like all non-hydro power plants in this analysis,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

World Petroleum Supply/Demand Forecast - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

With the major problem being price, what does EIA expect for the rest of this year? After two relatively mild winters with growing crude oil supplies and the Asian ...

60

Supply and demand planning for crude oil procurement in refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upstream petroleum supply chain is inefficient and uneconomical because of the independence of the four complex and fragmented functions which comprise it. Crude oil exploration, trading, transportation, and refining ...

Nnadili, Beatrice N. (Beatrice Nne)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hourly distribution of hydro energy does change with demand,drawn down, non-baseload hydro energy is assumed to be load-the spread of annual hydro energy has varied by more than a

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Non-OPEC oil supply gains to outpace demand in 1997  

SciTech Connect

Rising oil supplies in 1997 will relax some of the market tightness that drove up crude prices last year. Worldwide demand for petroleum products in 1996 rose faster than anticipated and faster than supply from outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. This increased demand for OPEC oil and pushed up prices for crude. At year end, the world export price of crude was up more than 25% from the same period a year earlier. Market conditions will change in 1997. While worldwide economic growth will continue to boost demand for energy and petroleum, non-OPEC petroleum supply will grow even more. Increases in North Sea and Latin American production will help boost non-OPEC output by 1.9 million b/d. And revenues from 1996 production gains will make additional investment possible in exploration and production. The paper discusses world economic growth, world oil demand, worldwide supply, supply outlook, prices and international drilling.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Estimating relative confidence of conditional world oil supply and demand equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

This paper draws from the survey by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) of industry representatives and consulting/forecasting organizations on the likely market configuration under two different world oil price scenarios. The pseudo-data approach treats the forecast price and quantity variables from the various forecasts as pooled time-series, cross-sectional data, and applies traditional econometric techniques to estimate supply and demand curves. We focus on estimating US domestic supply and demand curves and respondent-specific shift factors from a subsample of the NPC survey. We find that all respondents in the survey are more confident about demand than supply forecasts. The underlying differences in individual GNP forecasts account for much of the uncertainty in demand for most respondents, but are still 2 to 6 times more confident of demand than supply. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boyd, G.A.; Hanson, D.A.; Hochheiser, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Distillate Imports Surged to Meet Supply/Demand Imbalance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

receded when weather moderated and new supply began to receded when weather moderated and new supply began to arrive. Imports were the largest source of new supply that arrived to relieve the imbalance that was behind the price spike. This graph shows the dramatic increase on a calendar monthly average basis. During the three weeks ending February 25, distillate fuel oil imports averaged 566 thousand barrels per day. During the prior four weeks, imports only averaged 162 thousand barrels per day. Refinery production on the East Coast also increased. For the three weeks ending February 25, East Coast distillate production averaged 478 thousand barrels per day, which was an increase of about 91 thousand barrels per day or 24% over the prior four weeks. (During the same time period, national distillate production only rose 7 percent.)

66

Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: During 1999, we saw stock draws during the summer months, when we normally see stock builds, and very large stock draws during the winter of 1999/2000. Normally, crude oil production exceeds product demand in the spring and summer, and stocks build. These stocks are subsequently drawn down during the fourth and first quarters (dark blue areas). When the market is in balance, the stock builds equal the draws. During 2000, stocks have gradually built, but following the large stock draws of 1999, inventories needed to have been built more to get back to normal levels. As we look ahead using EIA's base case assumptions for OPEC production, non-OPEC production, and demand, we expect a more seasonal pattern for the next 3 quarters. But since we are beginning the year with

67

World uranium supply and demand: Buyer`s banquet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This articule reviews the present (end of 1993) world-wide uranium market and attempts to focus on the 1994-2004 market. Market forces discussed include: (1) reactor uranium demand, (2) natural uranium production (3) utility inventory drawdown, (4) reprocessing products, (5) the Russian stockpile, (6) loans, and (7) inventories of HEU. The following conclusions were reached: (1) reactor demand will be satisfied during this period, (2) Russia could be the single most important influence on the world uranium market, (3) there would be no need for new mine development is the Russian material is allowed into the market, and (4) the market will be in oversupply, so price increases will be limited.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Supply, demand and ICT-based services: A local level perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While much of the economic development literature urges greater emphasis on demand-based strategies, policies designed to create economic development advantage by leveraging telecommunications investment continue to be supply side oriented. The rationale ... Keywords: Information technology utilization, Municipal telecommunications service, Public broadband network, Rural economic development, Supply side policies, Technology transfer

Jan Youtie; Philip Shapira; Greg Laudeman

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand time ever, a utility-scale solar power plant can supply elec- tricity when the utility needs it most achievement. The design is based on lessons learned at Solar One, this country's first power tower. Solar One

Laughlin, Robert B.

70

Agent-based coordination techniques for matching supply and demand in energy networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lot of effort directed toward realizing the power network of the future. The future power network is expected to depend on a large number of renewable energy resources connected directly to the low and medium voltage power network. Demand ... Keywords: Supply and demand matching, market and non-market algorithms, multi-agent systems

Rashad Badawy; Benjamin Hirsch; Sahin Albayrak

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional power on the real-time market, if necessary, to balance supply and demand. We derive the optimal and variability of renewable generation on these optimal decisions and on social welfare. I. INTRODUCTION Future and solar is their uncertainty. Furthermore, there is also randomness in user demand. Despite the uncer

Low, Steven H.

72

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the demand for renewable electricity has accelerated as a consequence of state and federal policies and the growth of voluntary green power purchase markets, along with the generally improving economics of renewable energy development. This paper reports on a preliminary examination of the supply and demand balance for renewable electricity in the United States, with a focus on renewable energy projects that meet the generally accepted definition of "new" for voluntary market purposes, i.e., projects installed on or after January 1, 1997. After estimating current supply and demand, this paper presents projections of the supply and demand balance out to 2010 and describe a number of key market uncertainties.

Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.; Bird, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While crude oil prices will be a major factor impacting distillate prices this winter, another important factor is the U.S. distillate supply/demand balance, as measured by distillate stocks. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. While high stocks in the distillate market are good news for consumers, an excess is bad news for refiners. Distillate spreads during the winter of 1998-99 and throughout most of 1999 were well below average. Distillate stocks were very high during this period, partially as a result of warm weather keeping demand down.

75

Description of the global petroleum supply and demand outlook updated for the 1993 edition of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand, December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic planning of the research and development program carried out by Gas Research Institute (GRI) is supported by an annual GRI baseline projection of U.S. energy supply and demand. Because petroleum products compete in a wide variety of energy uses, oil prices serve as a market clearing force for the entire energy system. A significant portion of the U.S. petroleum supply is imported, and the price of crude oil to U.S. refiners is determined by the international oil trade. Any projection of the U.S. energy situation, therefore, requires the evaluation of the global oil market and the impact of oil price changes on the supply/demand balances of market participants. The 1992 edition of the projection completed in August 1991 assumed that in the aftermath of the war in the Middle East the fundamentals of oil trade would reassert their influence. This did indeed occur and with astonishing speed. In the face of this outlook, GRI has revised its 1993 oil price track downward.

Dreyfus, D.A.; Koklauner, A.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Consensus forecast of U. S. electricity supply and demand to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

Recent forecasts of total electricity generating capacity and energy demand as well as for electricity produced from nuclear energy and hydroelectric power are presented in tables and graphs to the year 2000. A forecast of the distribution of type of fuel and energy source that will supply the future electricity demand is presented. Use of electricity by each major consuming sector is presented for 1975. Projected demands for electricity in the years 1985 and 2000, as allocated to consuming sectors, are derived and presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Survey and forecast of marketplace supply and demand for energy- efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in demand for energy-efficient lighting products has led to supply shortages for certain products. To understand the near-term (1- to 5-year) market for energy-efficient lighting products, a selected set of utilities and lighting product manufacturers were surveyed in early 1991. Two major U. S. government programs, EPA's Green Lights and DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, were also examined to assess their effect on product demand. Lighting product manufacturers predicted significant growth through 1995. Lamp manufacturers indicated that compact fluorescent lamp shipments tripled between 1988 and 1991, and predicted that shipments would again triple, rising from 25 million units in 1991 to 72 million units in 1995. Ballast manufacturers predicted that demand for power-factorcorrected ballasts (both magnetic and electronic) would grow from 59.4 million units in 1991 to 71.1 million units in 1995. Electronic ballasts were predicted to grow from 11% of ballast demand in 1991 to 40% in 1995. Manufacturers projected that electronic ballast supply shortages would continue until late 1992. Lamp and ballast producers indicated that they had difficulty in determining what additional supply requirements might result due to demand created by utility programs. Using forecasts from 27 surveyed utilities and assumptions regarding the growth of U. S. utility lighting DSM programs, low, median, and high forecasts were developed for utility expenditures for lighting incentives through 1994. The projected median figure for 1992 was $316 million, while for 1994, the projected median figure was $547 million. The allocation of incentive dollars to various products and the number of units needed to meet utility-stimulated demand were also projected. To provide a better connection between future supply and demand, a common database is needed that captures detailed DSM program information including incentive dollars and unit-volume mix by product type.

Gough, A. (Lighting Research Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Blevins, R. (Plexus Research, Inc., Donegal, PA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

79

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Future world oil supply and demand-the impact on domestic exploration  

SciTech Connect

Current world oil consumption (demand) of about 68 million B/D will increase to over 81 million B/D in 10 years. World oil production capacity (supply), currently 6-8% over current demand, cannot meet this demand without adequate investments to boost capacity, particularly in the Middle East. Because of low oil prices these investments are not being made. In 10 years the Middle East needs to supply over 50% of the worlds oil; the Far East will by then surpass North America in demand. It is very possible that there will soon be a period of time when the supply/demand balance will be, or will perceived to be failing. This may cause rapid rises in crude oil prices until the balance is again achieved. Crude oil prices are actually quite volatile; the steadiness and abnormally low prices in recent years has been due to several factors that probably won`t be present in the period when the supply/demand situation is seen to be unbalanced. Domestic oil exploration is strongly affected by the price of crude oil and domestic producers should soon benefit by rising oil prices. Exploration will be stimulated, and small incremental amounts of new oil should be economically viable. Oil has been estimated to be only 2% of the total cost of producing all U.S. goods and services-if so, then oil price increase should not create any real problems in the total economic picture. Nevertheless, certain industries and life styles heavily dependent on cheap fuel will have problems, as the days of cheap oil will be gone. Future undiscovered oil in the Earth could be one trillion barrels or more, equal to the amount now considered as proved reserves. There will soon be more of a challenge to find and produce this oil in sufficient quantity and at a competitive cost with other sources of energy. This challenge should keep us busy.

Townes, H.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The addition of a US Rare Earth Element (REE) supply-demand model improves the characterization and scope of the United States Department of Energy's effort to forecast US REE Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a new US Rare Earth Element (REE) Supply-Demand Model for the explicit forecast of US REE supply and demand in the 2010 to 2025 time period. In the 2010 Department of Energy (DOE) ...

Mancco, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

83

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

84

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

85

Engineering manpower supply and demand in the petroleum industry as affected by engineering salary trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the changes that occur periodically in engineering manpower supply/demand trends in the petroleum industry, it is desirable to have an awareness of some of the major activity factors affecting such trends, of starting Petroleum Engineering salaries relating to that background, of the on-going engineering salary status which developed from these activities and of the large effect that high starting and on-going salaries do have in attracting and retaining engineers within the petroleum industry.

Brown, D.C.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Consensus forecast of U. S. energy supply and demand to the year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods used in forecasting energy supply and demand are described, and recent forecasts are reviewed briefly. Forecasts to the year 2000 are displayed in tables and graphs and are used to prepare consensus forecasts for each form of fuel and energy supply. Fuel demand and energy use by consuming sector are tabulated for 1972 and 1975 for the various fuel forms. The distribution of energy consumption by use sector, as projected for the years 1985 and 2000 in the ERDA-48 planning report (Scenario V), is normalized to match the consensus energy supply forecasts. The results are tabulated listing future demand for each fuel and energy form by each major energy-use category. Recent estimates of U.S. energy resources are also reviewed briefly and are presented in tables for each fuel and energy form. The outlook for fossil fuel resources to the year 2040, as developed by the Institute for Energy Analysis at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, is also presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydro. International Hydro Power and Dam Construction.suggested) Supply of hydro-electric power * Supply of waterrights ? Supply of hydro-electric power ? Supply of water

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

91

Factors that will influence oil and gas supply and demand in the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report published by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) in the United States predicted a 50-60% growth in total global demand for energy by 2030. Because oil, gas, and coal will continue to be the primary energy sources during this time, the energy industry will have to continue increasing the supply of these fuels to meet this increasing demand. Achieving this goal will require the exploitation of both conventional and unconventional reservoirs of oil and gas in (including coalbed methane) an environmentally acceptable manner. Such efforts will, in turn, require advancements in materials science, particularly in the development of materials that can withstand high-pressure, high-temperature, and high-stress conditions.

Holditch, S.A.; Chianelli, R.R. [Texas A& amp; M University, College Station, TX (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Policy implications of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand to 2015, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The summary of the 1997 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand discusses the implications of the projection that are important for GRI strategic planning and scenario development, and for the gas industry. The projection indicates that with adequate technology advances, natural gas will play a major role in an increasingly competitive energy mix well into the next century. It is expected that the expansion in gas markets experienced over the last decade will continue over the long term.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A supply-demand model for OPEC oil-pricing policies  

SciTech Connect

OPEC and its pricing policies have been subjected to constant international attention as well as criticism since 1973. Consumers find OPEC behavior irrational, while OPEC tries to justify its policies as rational and in accordance with the realities of the international oil market. The focus of this study is to contribute toward an analytical and empirical work on OPEC pricing behavior, and highlight the various factors believed to affect the future oil policies of OPEC member countries. After a survey of literature on the theoretical framework of world oil models in general, and OPEC models in particular, a linear econometric model for pricing OPEC oil is formulated which is a supply-demand equilibrium model comprising of supply, demand, and inflation-rate functions. Estimation of the behavioral equations are carried out by Ordinary and Two-Stage Least Square estimators. Econometric results from the estimation and simulation of the model seem to indicate that OPEC's pricing behavior is market-responsive and may best be explained by employing the theoretical framework of market-equilibrium condition.

Heiat, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major analysis completed recently by the gas transmission and distribution industry concludes that available supplies of gas energy will fall into the range of 23-31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by the year 2000, as conventional gas production is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand constraints and financial burdens imposed by Government regulators at all levels. With these restrictions and burdens eased, the gas industry can rebuild its marketing acumen and capacity. Thus, gas demand may likely increase in both the traditional heating and industrial fuel and feedstock applications, as well as such new non-traditional uses as cogeneration, natural gas vehicles and select gas use with coal. With regard to impending gas price decontrol, analyses conducted by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.), as well as studies by the U.S. Department of Energy and other groups, concur in the important finding that natural gas will be able to compete with alternate fuels in the energy marketplace after decontrol, as long as indefinite price escalators and other rigidities in gas purchase contracts can be defused so as to enable the market system to operate successfully. A.G.A.'s analysis, indeed, concluded that gas prices are rising rapidly enough under the existing law between now and 1985, so that concerns of a sudden price increase after deregulation in that year may be somewhat overstated, as long as the indefinite price escalators are defused.

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An Automation System for Optimizing a Supply Chain Network Design under the Influence of Demand Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

threshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can be

Polany, Rany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-3 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of “provocation sessions ” with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. U.S. Water Demand, Supply and Allocation: Trends and Outlook Given the overall importance of water, the long-term adequacy of water supply is a major national concern. This first in a series of Water Resources Outlook papers reviews future trends

Jack C. Kiefer, Ph.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Di¤erential E¤ects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2–2011Q2, as well as bounds on impact price elasticities of oil supply and oil demand to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks, and to study the time pro…le of their macroeconomic e¤ects across a wide range of countries and real/…nancial variables. We show that the above identi…cation scheme can greatly bene…t from the cross-sectional dimension of the GVAR — by providing a large number of additional cross-country sign restrictions and hence reducing the set of admissible models. The results indicate that the economic consequences of a supply-driven oil-price shock are very di¤erent from those of an oil-demand shock driven by global economic activity, and vary for oilimporting countries compared to energy exporters. While oil importers typically face a long-lived fall in economic activity in response to a supply-driven surge in oil prices, the impact is positive for energy-exporting countries that possess large proven oil/gas reserves. However, in response to an oil-demand disturbance, almost all countries in

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Maziar Raissi C; Mehdi Raissi Ay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The energy water nexus : increasing water supply by desalination integrated with renewable power and reducing water demand by corporate water footprinting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Growing populations and periodic drought conditions have exacerbated water stress in many areas worldwide. Consequently, it would be valuable to manage both supply and demand… (more)

Clayton, Mary Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

Information Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Design of bioethanol supply chains including commodity market dynamics and multiple demand scenarios.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The establishment of a bioethanol supply chain in northern Italy will be simulated in this work by evaluating its spatial explicit layout. The economic details… (more)

Mazzetto, Filippo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resulting in a rise in coal prices have been designed tooil prices and unstable oil supplies helped make coal andprices remain higher. In developing countries, growth of coal

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The dynamics of electricity demand and supply in the low voltage distribution grid: a model study:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis a simulation study is executed that analyses how new developments of household electricity demand and decentralised electricity generation affect the low voltage… (more)

Van Zoest, P.L.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy Demand and Fuel Supply in Developing Countries Brazil, Korea and the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased o f coke hydroelectricity. S u b s t a n t i a l roccurred of in industry, hydroelectricity, in the demand for

Sathaye, Jayant A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Quarterly update. [Oil supply and demand data for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report presents detailed statistics on oil supply and demand in the countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The information consists of complete balances of production, trade, refinery intake/output, final consumption, stock levels, and changes for crude oil, natural gas liquids, refinery feedstocks, and 9 product groups; separate trade data for main product groups, LPG, and naphtha; imports for 48 origins; exports for 31 destinations; international marine bunkers and deliveries by product group; aggregates of quarterly data to annual totals; and natural gas supply and consumption. The information supplied is for Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, UK, European Economic Community, Austria, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, OECD Europe, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the US.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Structuring energy supply and demand networks in a general equilibrium model to simulate global warming control strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming control strategies which mandate stringent caps on emissions of greenhouse forcing gases can substantially alter a country's demand, production, and imports of energy products. Although there is a large degree of uncertainty when attempting to estimate the potential impact of these strategies, insights into the problem can be acquired through computer model simulations. This paper presents one method of structuring a general equilibrium model, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program/Global Climate Change (ENPEP/GCC), to simulate changes in a country's energy supply and demand balance in response to global warming control strategies. The equilibrium model presented in this study is based on the principle of decomposition, whereby a large complex problem is divided into a number of smaller submodules. Submodules simulate energy activities and conversion processes such as electricity production. These submodules are linked together to form an energy supply and demand network. Linkages identify energy and fuel flows among various activities. Since global warming control strategies can have wide reaching effects, a complex network was constructed. The network represents all energy production, conversion, transportation, distribution, and utilization activities. The structure of the network depicts interdependencies within and across economic sectors and was constructed such that energy prices and demand responses can be simulated. Global warming control alternatives represented in the network include: (1) conservation measures through increased efficiency; and (2) substitution of fuels that have high greenhouse gas emission rates with fuels that have lower emission rates. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Hamilton, S.; Veselka, T.D.; Cirillo, R.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Republic pipeline grid Source: “Oil and Gas in the Russianin stabilizing Middle East oil supply sources and shippingChina’s Oil Exports and Imports, 1980-1995 Source: East-West

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Integration of supply and demand for water in central Illinois urban areas. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water demand functions were estimated using two sets of data for Central Illinois -- community-wide data and household data. The community-wide data consist of total residential consumption for each of four pre-selected medium-sized cities in Central Illinois. The household data consist of residents from five cities who responded to a mail survey. The study investigates comparability of parameter estimates from the two approaches. If the parameter estimates are comparable, it would suggest water demand estimates need not require costly and time-consuming household surveys. Estimates of price elasticity are negative and less than unitary based on the two data sets used. The estimated price elasticity based on community-wide data is -.037, while using household data estimated price elasticities are in the range from -.14 to -.16. The reasons for these differences are not immediately apparent and warrant further investigation.

Miranda, C.S.; Braden, J.B.; Martin, W.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the present level. Natural gas demand is expected to avoid2030 to 2050, however, natural gas demand will fall slowly

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Skyscrapers and District Heating, an inter-related History 1876-1933.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Skyscrapers and District Heating, an inter-related History 1876-1933. Introduction: The aim, and an equally new urban infrastructure, district heating, both of witch were born in the north-east United example in Europe of skyscrapers and district heating planned together, at Villeurbanne near Lyons

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

118

Water and Sustainability (Volume 2): An Assessment of Water Demand, Supply, and Quality in the U.S. -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

World Supply and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Gallium arsenide ingot, wafer, and device manufacturers...X Sweden Semitronics AB X United Kingdom General Electricity Company (U.K.) X X X X X MCP Electronic Materials Ltd. X United States Airtron Division of Litton Industries X Anadigics Inc. X X X Applied Solar Energy Corporation X X AT & T Bell Laboratories X X X X Bertram Laboratories X Crystal Specialties,...

120

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current and future restructuring energy marketplace represents a number of challenges and opportunities to maximize value through the management of peak power. This is true both on the demand-side regarding peak power use and on the supply-side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs, but also in delivering a net saving in capital cost versus conventional, non-storage approaches. This capital cost saving is often realized in situations where investments in chiller plant capacity, or in on-site power generating capacity, are required. On the demand-side, TES has long been used to shift air-conditioning loads and process cooling loads from on-peak to off-peak periods. In today's and tomorrow's restructuring energy markets, price spikes are increasingly likely during periods of peak power demand. TES is performing an important role, especially when coupled with a proper understanding of modern TES technology options. The inherent advantages and limitations of the available TES technology options are briefly reviewed and discussed. Examples of existing large TES installations are presented, identifying the TES technology types they utilize. The applications include industrial facilities, as well as universities, hospitals, government, and District Cooling utility systems. The power management impact and the economic benefits of TES are illustrated through a review of several TES case studies. Combustion Turbines (CTs) are a common choice for modern on-site and utility power generation facilities. Inlet air cooling of CTs enhances their hot weather performance and has been successfully accomplished for many years, using a variety of technologies. In many instances, TES can and does provide a uniquely advantageous method of optimizing the economics of CT Inlet Cooling (CTIC) systems. TES systems can achieve low inlet air temperatures, with resulting high levels of power augmentation. The TES approach also minimizes the installed capacity (and capital cost) of cooling systems, as well as limiting the parasitic loads occurring during periods of peak power demand and peak power value. Chilled water, ice, and low temperature fluid TES systems are all applicable to CTIC. The inherent pros and cons of each TES type are discussed. Sensitivity analyses are presented to explore the impact of cooling hours per day on capital cost per kW of power enhancement. Case histories illustrate the beneficial impact of TES-based CTIC on both capital cost and operating cost of CT power plants. TES-based CTIC is advantageous as an economical, peaking power enhancement for either peaking or base-load plants. It is applied to both new and existing CTs. TES is projected to have even greater value in future restructuring energy markets.

Andrepont, J. S.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

1.0 Motivation............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................24 6.6 Correlation between Wind Strength and Demand for Electricity..................24 6 important. These variations can then be compared to the fluctuations of electricity demand on similar of electricity demand (Figure 19), which can be compared to the corresponding fluctuations of wind power shown

123

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and in the coke manufacturing efficiency in thesystems and next-generation coke ovens. Demand for steamingsystems and next-generation coke ovens. Steaming coal

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy sources (excluding hydro and geothermal)C O ; Hydro and 4 Po geothermal energies I Nuclear Gas I OilNuclear Hydro/geothermal Renewables Primary energy supply

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient natural gas power generation) Developing Ccoal natural gas thermal power generation Sources : Preparednatural gas demand will fall slowly because of improvements in L N G thermal power generation

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

129

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(This page intentionally left blank) (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

130

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the… (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas Storage for Power Generation -- Critical New Bridge Between Power Demand and Gas Supply: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas storage is a "sleeper" issue for the power industry that will demand a great deal of attention very soon as the building boom of gas-fired capacity draws to a close and these plants begin to operate. While an entire industry has emerged in recent years to develop high-deliverability gas storage, the new facilities are likely the tip of an iceberg. Pipelines will be taxed to meet fluctuating requirements of new units, and companies will turn to gas storage for reliability at an affordable cost...

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

136

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

137

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

138

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

139

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

140

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

142

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

143

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

144

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Related Electricity Demand in California. CEC33 percent of our electricity demand in 2020 from renewablebuildings, heating electricity demand is not included in

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reduce Demand Rather than Increase Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

floor area) 8. Annual cost per square foot for Eco Passes (square fe 6. Annual cost per square foot for cash ou $0.10parking cash out costs 10˘ a year per square foot of office

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Energy storage fundamentally decouples supply and demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... MARKET PRICE 10 – 50 mills Frequency Regulation average market clearing price ... 14 Wind Challenge: Persistent Cycling Intermittency ...

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.2 Wind Integration in a System without Transmission8.3 Wind Integration in a System with Transmissionmulti-area wind integration case study. . . . . . . . . . .

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with significant wind power generation. IEEE Transactions oncommitment with wind power generation. IEEE Transactions onto scheduling in power-generation systems. Operations

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, • renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China, Europe (Denmark, Germany, Greece) and the United States (PJM, NYISO, CAISO, Ontario IMO) accept renewable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Global Energy Demand, Supply, Consequences, Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Joule Population-Energy Equation Power = N x (GDP/N) x (Watts/GDP) C Emission Rate = Power x (Carbon/J) #12;d HVAC Onsite Power & Heat Natural Ventilation, Indoor Environment Building Materials Appliances Thermal · Building Materials Tenants · Lease space from Developer or Property Manager · Professional firms, retailers

Knowles, David William

152

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power system operations, as if the system operator had full controlpower system operations and power market mechanisms, and we describe the optimal control

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term variability of solar power. Technical Report LBNL-sources such as wind and solar power is advancing rapidly inresources such as wind and solar power in power systems is

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting for wind energy: Temperature dependence andlarge amounts of wind energy with a small electric system.Large scale integration of wind energy in the european power

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current and projected capacity of wind power installations (electricity prices (left) and wind power production (right)of wind speed (left) and wind power pro- duction (right) for

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

159

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

162

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1...

163

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imbalance between natural gas supply and demand will clearlywell the shape of the natural gas supply curve (measured byprice elasticity of natural gas supply, or the percentage

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Lab Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reference materials, bleaching clay, activated bleaching earth and refining cups. Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Lab Supplies Laboratory Services analysis analytical methods aocs certified Certified Reference Materials (CRM) chemist chemists fats lab

165

Institute sees possible uranium supply shortages after 2000  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes factors pertaining to the supply and demand for uranium. Forecasts described in a report titled {open_quotes}The Global Nuclear Fuel Market: Supply and Demand 1995-2015{close_quotes} are discussed.

Newman, P.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

The impact of assured supply inventory policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is presented of a successful quick serve fast food restaurant chain that uses inventory throughout the supply chain as a buffer against uncertainty in supply and demand. This is a common operational strategy ...

Stanton, Daniel Jonathon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Net Demand3 Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) 1. In addition, US DOE has issued a second Request For Information regarding uses of and markets for these critical materials (RFI;(USDOE 2011)). This report examines how critical materials demand for SOFC applications could impact markets for these materials and vice versa, addressing categories 1,2,5, and 6 in the RFI. Category 1 – REE Content of SOFC Yttria (yttrium oxide) is the only critical material (as defined for the timeframe of interest for SOFC) used in SOFC 2. Yttrium is used as a dopant in the SOFC’s core ceramic cells.. In addition, continuing developments in SOFC technology will likely further reduce REE demand for SOFC, providing credible scope for at least an additional 50 % reduction in REE use if desirable. Category 2 – Supply Chain and Market Demand SOFC developers expect to purchase

J. Thijssen Llc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Aluminum Scrap Supply and Environmental Impact Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... It has been applied to the USA to forecast sources of aluminum scrap ... good balance between supply and demand on average over the years.

169

Building the supply chain of the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supply chains: McKinsey Global Survey results,” mckinseyquarterly ... In response, the company examined its portfolio ... the volatility of demand for each ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

171

H. R. 4604: a bill to promote competition in the natural gas market, to ensure open access to transportation service, to encourage production of natural gas, to provide natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices, to eliminate demand restraints, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 16, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Policy Act Amendments of 1986 promotes competition in the natural gas market. Title I ensures open access to transportation service by requiring that interstate pipelines not discriminate in providing transportation services. Title II encourages production of natural gas by removing wellhead price controls and repealing jurisdiction over first sales. Title III provides natural gas consumers with adequate supplies at reasonable prices and eliminates demand restraints. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

173

Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 5 Typical medium-frequency induction power supply incorporating (a) a parallel inverter and (b) a series inverter...

174

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining...

176

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

177

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

178

Forecasting Electricity Demand by Time Series Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is one of the most important variables required for estimating the amount of additional capacity required to ensure a sufficient supply of energy. Demand and technological losses forecasts can be used to control the generation and distribution of electricity more efficiently. The aim of this paper is to utilize time series model

E. Stoimenova; K. Prodanova; R. Prodanova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

180

Strategic Spot Trading in Supply Chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a variety of industries ranging from agriculture to electronics and oil, procurement takes place through a combination of bilateral fixed-price contracts and open market trading among supply chain participants, which allows them to improve supply ... Keywords: demand and cost information, fixed-price contracts, procurement and supply chain, spot trading

Haim Mendelson; Tunay I. Tunca

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Intermediate-Term Uranium Supply Curve Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to estimate U.S. natural uranium supply capacities and associated production costs over the period 1979-1990 and to develop the general supply outlook to 2000. Annual supply capacity schedules were estimated on an individual mill and mine family basis. Future production schedules were estimated by balancing estimated supply capacity with DOE's future demand projections; the impact of private-sector inventory levels was accounted for.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the perspective of `peak oil', that is from the pers- pective of the supply of crude, and price#12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion is given on the problems within the value chain, with an explanation of the reasons why the price of oil

Langendoen, Koen

184

Managing risk in premium fruit and vegetable supply chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production planning in premium fresh produce supply chains is challenging due to the uncertainty of both supply and demand. A two-stage planning algorithm using mixed integer linear programming and Monte Carlo simulation ...

Merrill, Joshua Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

186

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

187

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

188

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

189

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

190

Polynomial policies in supply chain networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

He, Liwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Power supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul (Seminole, FL); Hamilton, Pamela Jane (Seminole, FL); Brubaker, Michael Allen (Loveland, CO)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

194

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Power supply  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

Hart, Edward J. (Albuquerque, NM); Leeman, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); MacDougall, Hugh R. (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Calvin C. (Amarillo, TX)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Two market models for demand response in power networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply and shape power demand, respectively. We characterize the resulting equilibria in competitive as well as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models serve as a starting point to include the appliance-level details and constraints for designing practical demand response schemes for smart power grids. I.

Lijun Chen; Na Li; Steven H. Low; John C. Doyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The 3He Supply Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply and Demand Response Anthony from the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources and deferrable demand in power systems. We- sorbing the uncertainty and variability associated with renewable supply: centralized co

Oren, Shmuel S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, it’s also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if it’s cold, consumers will use ...

202

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

203

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Consumption in California: Data Collection and Analysis,"analysis of electricity requirements for irrigated agri- electrical energy

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Sustainable ecosystems: enabled by supply and demand management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continued population growth, coupled with increased per capita consumption of resources, poses a challenge to the quality of life of current and future generations. We cannot expect to meet the future needs of society simply by extending existing infrastructures. ... Keywords: IT, available energy, data center, ecosystems, energy, exergy, sustainability, sustainable

Chandrakant D. Patel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicles on Regional Power Generation, ORNL/TM-2007/150, Oakincrease renewable power generation, and reduce greenhouserecharging or renewable power generation, and the technical

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California, NREL/I. (2007) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Resources, Cost,in supplementing future solar power plants, as represented

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Emissions impacts of marginal electricity demand California hydrogen supply pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hicksian own-price elasticities for PV-cap in the weightedsigni?cant. Own-price elasticities for PV-cap in all otherprice. On the other hand, some positive, signi?cant results (PV

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy Policy,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation, Energy Policy,wind or solar power will singularly provide a majority of renewable generation in a future with energy policies

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competition between gas turbines and compressed air energyby fuel type, prime mover (gas turbine versus steam turbine,cycle NGCT Natural gas combustion turbine NGST Natural gas

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimize fossil capacity requirements does not reduce costsCA does not necessarily reduce fossil capacity requirementsdoes little to change peak dispatchable capacity requirements,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Emissions impacts of marginal electricity demand California hydrogen supply pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges, gasoline and motor oil, vehicle maintenance andcharges Gasoline and motor oil Vehicle maintenance andplanes). • Gasoline and motor oil. Gasoline, diesel fuel,

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 regions Illinois Colorado, Xcel Energy service area LADWPVehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Servicecomprised 30% of LDVs in Xcel Energy’s Colorado service

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. EPA (2008) eGRID Year 2005 Summary Tables,DSW Desert Southwest eGRID Emissions and Generation Resourceare based on those from the EPA’s eGRID database *47+, which

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PARAMETERS A Wind turbine rotor-swept area (m 2 ) AEOm 3 ), A is rotor-swept area of the turbine (m 2 ), C p is

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Global crude oil supply disruptions and strong demand support high ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While Brent crude oil spot prices have increased as much as $7 per barrel (6%) since the chemical weapons incident in Syria on August 21, 2013, market fundamentals ...

223

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24. Renewable and nuclear power plant cost characteristicsnuclear power plantsgeothermal, and nuclear power plants are represented as

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas power plants and underestimates generation from

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active natural gas generators and imports will decline, inadditional system imports and natural gas-fired generation66%) Natural gas (22%) Renewable (1.4%) DSW imports 3 Coal (

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100-2007-008-CMF, California Energy Commission. ARB (2007)400-2005-006-CMF, California Energy Commission. CEC (2006)400-2005-005-CMF, California Energy Commission. ICC (2009)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based onof dispatchable natural gas power plants, which can beefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P-5) for natural gas use in power plants. Any additionalpower plant to aid in meeting summer peak loads; and 4) use of natural gas

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, andWind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service area. With hydroelectricity severely curtailed byfor the ,reduction in hydroelectricity. Although the impactslargest contribution from hydroelectricity can be considered

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Global demand transparency in the ABB supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to provide a solution to a problem facing many multinational firms: the lack of an accessible and comprehensive database for up-to-date component part forecasts. We consider this problem in the context ...

Lee, Esther, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forGas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forassessment of plug-in hybrid vehicles on electric utilities

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-explored. Natural gas Energy price (2007$/MMBtu) Coal Figureassumed relative prices of natural gas and coal decades into

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the quantity of oil consumed to compensate forof fuel oil would reduce the quantity of air pollutants, thequantity of . air pollutants from power plants burning oil

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine NGST Natural gas steam turbine NWPP Northwest Powerfrom natural gas steam turbine (NGST) and natural gasNGST = Natural gas steam turbine; NWPP = Northwest Power

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regional distribution of generation and average GHGin LEDGE-CA, and the distribution of generation among fossildistribution of hydro generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or off. (With future “smart grids,” utilities might controlsuch as deferring loads with a “smart grid”) on the results.available today, a “smart grid” connected to many active

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle IID ImperialCorporation NGCC Natural gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas79% from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, and

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Units serving baseload needs include nuclear generators; large, efficient coal-fired generators; natural gas combined-cycle generators ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Water Conservation and Sewage Flow ReductionMurray, Residential Water Conservation, California Water1976. c d Table 19 Water Conservation Measures Applicable to

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the coming sum- mer pumped storage potential should notThere are three pumped storage facilities in Californiais no reason to use pumped storage to meet But on days when

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R.H. Socolow (2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling theEfficiency Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems,to more highly-utilized baseload plants with lower operating

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

benzene extracted from the reformulated motor gasoline pool in their conventional motor gasoline. Importers lacking 1990 motor gasoline quality data with which to

245

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daily or annual load profiles [70-78]. The EDGE-CA andleads to an adjusted load profile (illustrated in Step 2b)between the adjusted load profile and hydro generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Determining energy requirement for future water supply and demand alternatives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water and energy are two inextricably linked resources. Each has the potential to limit the development of the other. There is a substantial body of… (more)

Larsen, Sara Gaye

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Biodiesel demand estimates now provided in petroleum supply and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

248

Money, Prices and Liquidity Effects: Separating Demand from Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 2: VAR Model Estimation Models Lags Resid-ACF1 Resid-ACF12 Resid-N Total Draws US full sample 3 0:040 0:073 0:000 743 US late sample 2 0:000 0:090 0:000 959 UK full sample 5 0:079 0:115 0:000 1174 UK late sample 2 0:037 0:023 0:000 1318 Note... : The model is (#1;mt; efpwt) for each case. The column ?Lags?shows lags in VAR selected by several information criteria. ?Resid-ACF1?shows the p-value of a Null hypothesis that there is no serial correlation in residuals at lag 1. The next column show...

Chadha, Jagjit S; Corrado, Luisa; Sun, Qi

249

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the generation shares from coal-fired plants with high GHGof generation from coal-fired plants, marginal emissionsdemand in LADWP, where coal-fired plants may provide most of

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-CA [152]. Itin Figure 57. The coal price stays relatively constant

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (U.S.) DSIRE Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency EIA Energy Information Administration ERCOT Electric Reliability Council of Texas EPA...

252

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine marginal generation sources. Although electricity16. Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (TWh).

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................5-16 5.2.2 Natural Gas Storage........................................................5-25 5.9 Commercial natural gas storage pools as of December 31, 2007 .....................................................................................5-28 5.31 Alberta natural gas storage injection/withdrawal volumes

Laughlin, Robert B.

254

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliances such as dishwashers I and washing machines, forenergy savings are: and dishwashers with full loads and onfor washing machines and dishwashers, and reducing water

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas price .Figure 84. Effects of natural gas prices on screening curvesICE Month Ahead Natural Gas Price Report, Intercontinental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based ondispatchable natural gas power plants, which can be rampedefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from biomass, geothermal, solar (PV and solar thermal), andof generation from wind, solar PV, and solar thermal powergeneration Solar thermal Solar PV Wind Geothermal Biomass

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas price .84. Effects of natural gas prices on screening curves inICE Month Ahead Natural Gas Price Report, Intercontinental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs of natural gas co-firing ignored) Oil 10 plants withcome from natural gas co-firing in some biomass powergeneration from natural gas co-firing) has ranged from 26%

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

U.S. Natural Gas Supply Equation and Price Envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a composite assessment of U.S. natural gas supply and demand balance for the time period 2005 to 2011. The key elements in this outlook, or equation, are changes in supply (rapidly increasing LNG [liquefied natural gas] imports, modest U.S. supply growth, and declining imports from Canada) and in demand (notably, growth for electric power generation and small increases in other sectors). Uncertainties concerning each component are identified and analyzed. While LNG will account for t...

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

benefitting the grid 3 Supply and Demand Tell the (short run) Basic Story Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets - US DOE Feb 2006 4 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000...

264

Interannual Variability of Water Demand and Summer Climate in Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of interannual climate variability on water demand in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are assessed. This city provides an ideal setting for examining the effects of climate on urban water demand, because at present the municipal water supply ...

David S. Gutzler; Joshua S. Nims

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A distributed renewable energy system meeting 100% of electricity demand in Humboldt County: a feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A model of electricity supply and demand in Humboldt County, California over the course of one year is presented. Wind, ocean–wave, solar, and biomass electricity… (more)

Ross, Darrell Adam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Why Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why supply chain explains the importance of supply chains. It includes an introduction to ERP as designed by SAP.

Datta, Shoumen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

269

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

270

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Role of context-awareness for demand response mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently due to major changes in the structure of electricity industry and the rising costs of power generation, many countries have realized the potential and benefits of smart metering systems and demand response programs in balancing between the supply ... Keywords: context-awareness, demand response, smart energy management

Pari Delir Haghighi; Shonali Krishnaswamy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

275

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

278

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Satisfiability of Elastic Demand in the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a stochastic model of electricity production and consumption where appliances are adaptive and adjust their consumption to the available production, by delaying their demand and possibly using batteries. The model incorporates production volatility due to renewables, ramp-up time, uncertainty about actual demand versus planned production, delayed and evaporated demand due to adaptation to insufficient supply. We study whether threshold policies stabilize the system. The proofs use Markov chain theory on general state space.

Tomozei, Dan-Cristian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A hybrid Grey & ANFIS approach to bullwhip effect in supply chain networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand forecasting and decision making processes are among the key activities which directly affect the performance of successful supply chain networks. The variability of the demand information between the stages of the supply chains and the increase ... Keywords: ANFIS, bullwhip effect, forecasting, grey GM (1, 1), supply chain network

Hakan Tozan; Ozalp Vayvay

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors; Analytical I/O and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal… (more)

Li, Yu, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSULTANT REPORT DEMAND FORECAST EXPERT PANEL INITIAL forecast, end-use demand modeling, econometric modeling, hybrid demand modeling, energyMahon, Carl Linvill 2012. Demand Forecast Expert Panel Initial Assessment. California Energy

285

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? They are the nearest source of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 10 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666 MB/D of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. Stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 MB/D on average in January and 280 MB/D in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. PADD 1 refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and

287

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

288

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

289

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

290

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

291

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

292

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

297

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

298

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

302

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

303

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

304

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

May 2013 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending...

305

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 May 2013 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

306

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

307

Petroleum Supply Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

308

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

December 2011 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition...

309

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

310

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 MB/D in January and 280 MB/D in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak months,

311

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

312

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

313

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

314

Preliminary assessment of energy supply and consumption in the Dominican Republic  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary description is presented of the Dominican Republic's energy resources, its recent energy supply-demand pattern, and some energy demand projections for the years 1990 and 2000.

McGranahan, G.; Mitchell, G.; Mubayi, V.; Stern, R.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Strategic information sharing and transparency of information acquisition in supply chains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xi, 116 p. : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis ISOM 2010 Li In a supply chain serving a market with random demand,… (more)

Li, Tian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... peak electricity demand and determined that another 117 GW should be available in case of supply outages or extreme weather ...

320

Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth.

The reported data can be used to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Non-OPEC supply to test OPEC`s quota resolve in second half  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the oil market, the worldwide outlook for demand, crude oil prices, petroleum product prices, natural gas prices, US outlook, US energy demand, sector demand, US natural gas consumption, US petroleum demand, motor gasoline, distillates, resid, LPG and other products, US petroleum supply, refining, imports, stocks, and Strategic Petroleum Reserve stocks.

Beck, R.J.

1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Supply Curves of Conserved Energy  

SciTech Connect

Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

Meier, Alan Kevin

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

324

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

325

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

326

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

327

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Travel Demand Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Identification of time series model of heat demand using mathematica environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents possibility of model design of time series of heat demand course. The course of heat demand and heat consumption can be demonstrated by means of heat demand diagrams. The most important one is the Daily Diagram of Heat Supply (DDHS) ... Keywords: box-jenkins, control algorithms, district heating control, modelling, prediction, time series analysis

Bronislav Chramcov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Changing fuel formulations will boost hydrogen demand  

SciTech Connect

Refinery demand in the U.S. for on-purpose hydrogen will continue to increase by 5-10 %/year, depending on the extent of implementation of the 1990 U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and other proposed environmental legislation. Although the debate on the economic wisdom of the legislation still rages, it is evident that refiners likely will see a large upswing in hydrogen demand while existing hydrogen production may decline. To better understand the potential impact various reformulation scenarios may have on the refining industry, and specifically, on the demand for hydrogen, Texaco analyzed the hydrogen supply/demand scenario in great detail. Two cases were studied in this analysis: mild and severe reformulation. The mild reformulation case is based on current CAAA legislation along with minor modifications to automobile hardware. The severe case is based on a nationwide implementation of Phase 2 of the CAAA and California's proposed reformulated fuels. The paper discusses the current capacity balance; growth in demand; reformulated gasoline; steam methane reforming; and partial oxidation technology.

Simonsen, K.A.; O' Keefe, L.F. (Texaco Inc., White Plains, N.Y. (United States)); Fong, W.F. (Texaco Development Corp., White Plains, N.Y. (United States))

1993-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

336

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

339

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen demand and the biomass supply distributed in space?and distribution of biomass supply what is the least-costfacilities be? o Which biomass supply points should serve

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen demand and the biomass supply distributed in space?and distribution of biomass supply what is the least-costfacilities be? o Which biomass supply points should serve

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Stocks are important in the Northeast because they are the nearest source of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply. Over the last 10 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666,000 barrels per day of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260,000 barrels per day on average in January and 280,000 barrels per day in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month.

342

A general water supply planning model: Evaluation of decentralized treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing population, diminishing supplies and variable climatic conditions can cause difficulties in meeting water demands; especially in arid regions where water resources are limited. Given the complexity of the system and the interactions among ... Keywords: Decentralized wastewater treatment system, System dynamics, Water conservation, Water supply

G. Chung; K. Lansey; P. Blowers; P. Brooks; W. Ela; S. Stewart; P. Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

344

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

345

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

346

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-May 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

348

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 11 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

349

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies The Infrastructure Challenge of...

350

Increased demand spurs gas compression industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas in the last five years has led to dynamic development in the gas compression industry as producers and transmission companies expand operations to supply gas. To handle the increase, for example, transmission companies have been steadily adding new lines to the pipeline infrastructure--3,437 miles in 1995 and an estimated 4,088 miles in 1997. New compression for pipelines has also increased from 212,637 horsepower added in 1989 to an estimated 311,685 horsepower to be added in 1997. Four key trends which influence the gas compression business have developed since the mid 1980s: first, a steady resurgence of demand for natural gas each year; second, a phenomenal number of mergers and buyouts among gas compression companies; third, an alarming drop in average daily gas production per well since 1972; and fourth, high drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Honea, M. [Weatherford Enterra, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

LPG export growth will exceed demand by 2000  

SciTech Connect

LPG supplies for international trade will increase sharply through 2000 and begin to outstrip demand by 1997 or 1998. This outlook depends on several production projects proceeding as planned. Leading the way to increased volumes are projects in Algeria, Nigeria, and Australia, among others. Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, projected this trend earlier this year at an international LPG seminar near Houston. Representatives from LPG-supplying countries also presented information to support this view and subsequently supplied more specifics to OGJ in response to questions. This paper discusses this information. Trends in Africa, Australia, North America, and South America are forecast.

True, W.R.

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind todayÂ’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

356

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

357

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

358

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

359

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

360

Estimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Properties of the AIDS Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator 24 #12;Estimating a Demand SystemEstimating a Demand System with Nonnegativity Constraints: Mexican Meat Demand Amos Golan* Jeffrey with nonnegativity constraints is presented. This approach, called generalized maximum entropy (GME), is more

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

362

Demand response computation for future smart grids incorporating wind power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study supply and demand management in the presence of conventional and renewable energy sources, where the latter is represented by a single wind turbine. Total social welfare, defined in terms of consumer utility and cost of power ... Keywords: constrained optimization, kuhn-tucker conditions, outage probability, renewable source, smart grid

Nihan Çiçek; Hakan Deliç

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 of 15 1 of 15 Notes: Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 5 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666 MB/D of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. PADD 1 refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other PADDs -- mostly PADD 3 -- supply 45-50% of the regionÂ’s needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak months, with most of the product coming from Canada, the Virgin Islands and Venezuela. Percentages do not tell the whole story. Stocks supply close to 300

364

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

365

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

366

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

367

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

368

Growing demand for gas spawns pipeline projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that burgeoning demand for gas is fueling pipeline construction in Eastern and Western hemispheres. In the East, the North Sea is the focal point for activity. And in the West, the U.S. gas market is the power behind construction. As predictions of U.S. gas demand increase, Canadian pipeliners adjust expansion plans to be ready to capture greater shares of markets. Canada's TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. is racing to step up its share of the U.S. market. TransCanada's Western Gas Marketing Ltd. sold 242.3 bcf of gas in the 3 months ended last June 30, a 9.8% increase from last year. TransCanada reported lower volumes sold into Canadian markets, while exports into the U.S. continued to rise. Gas Research Institute (GRI) projects Canadian gas exports to the U.S. by 2000 will reach 2 tcf/year and LNG exports 800 bcf/year. U.S. gas supplies could increase to 23.9 tcf/year by 2010, mostly from Lower 48 production. GRI says supplies from Canada will make up the balance. In the past 2 years, TransCanada has spent about $1 billion expanding its interprovincial main line system.

Not Available

1991-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

370

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

371

Magnets and Power Supplies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

372

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

373

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2011 49 Table 37. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, ...

374

Supplying Water Social Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects SUPPLYING OUR WATER NEEDS: Africa Project Summary Scenario Student Pages References Index SubjectContent Area: World CulturesSocial Studies...

375

Power supply apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The outputs of a plurality of modules or generators of electrical energy, such as fuel cells, chemical storage batteries, solar cells, MHD generators and the like, whose outputs are different are consolidated efficiently. The modules supply a power distribution system through an inverter. The efficiency is achieved by interconnecting the modules with an alternating voltage supply and electronic valves so controlled that the alternating-voltage supply absorbs power from modules whose output voltage is greater than the voltage at which the inverter operates and supplies this power as a booster to modules whose output voltage is less than the voltage at which the inverter operates.

Dickey, D. E.

1984-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Accuracy of published data in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, the Petroleum Supply Monthly, and the Petroleum Supply Annual.

Tammy G. Heppner

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

An exploration of automotive platinum demand and its impacts on the platinum market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The platinum market is a material market of increasing interest, as platinum demand has grown faster than supply in recent years. As a result, the price of platinum has increased, causing end-user firms to experience ...

Whitfield, Christopher George

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

382

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

383

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity prices Lower energy prices Participant Reduced svc$42 million); lxi Reduced energy prices during tight supply+ Reduced wholesale energy prices due to sustained energy

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measuring the Impact of Negative Demand Shocks on Car Dealer Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to study the behavior of consumers, dealers, and manufacturers in the car sector and present an approach that can be used by managers and policy makers to investigate the impact of significant demand shocks on profits, prices, ... Keywords: automobile industry, models of demand and supply, spatial competition

Paulo Albuquerque; Bart J. Bronnenberg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Complex-demand knapsack problems and incentives in AC power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider AC electrical systems where each electrical device has a power demand expressed as a complex number, and there is a limit on the magnitude of total power supply. Motivated by this scenario, we introduce the complex-demand knapsack problem ... Keywords: ac electrical system, approximation algorithm, fptas, incentive compatibility, knapsack problem, smart grid, truthfulness

Lan Yu, Chi-Kin Chau

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Particle Swarm Optimization for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Stochastic Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new hybrid algorithmic approach based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for successfully solving one of the most popular supply chain management problems, the Vehicle Routing Problem with Stochastic Demands (VRPSD). The VRPSD ... Keywords: Particle Swarm Optimization, Path relinking, Vehicle Routing Problem with Stochastic Demands

Yannis Marinakis; Georgia-Roumbini Iordanidou; Magdalene Marinaki

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory the intermittency in wind power generation. Our focus is on an isolated microgrid with one wind turbine, one fast supply and demand in an isolated microgrid [2], which is an important concept for renewable energy

Huang, Jianwei

389

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

390

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

391

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

392

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

393

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

394

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

397

Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

None

2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Ending Stocks by PAD District, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production...

409

European supply chain study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

Puri, Mohitkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6...

411

Improving supply chain resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the global expansion of Company A's supply chain network, it is becoming more vulnerable to many disruptions. These disruptions often incur additional costs; and require time to respond to and recover from these ...

Leung, Elsa Hiu Man

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Supply Function Equilibria: Step Functions and Continuous Representations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Daniel Ralph In most wholesale electricity markets generators must submit step- function offers of supply to a uniform price auction, and the market is cleared at the price of the most expensive offer needed to meet realised demand. Such markets... functions and continuous representations1 Pär Holmberg,2 David Newbery3 and Daniel Ralph4 31 December 2008 Abstract In most wholesale electricity markets generators must submit step-function offers of supply to a uniform price auction...

Holmberg, P; Newbery, David; Ralph, Daniel

413

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

417

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Joint Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S.Noureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandelasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline. Results

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model of the Global Crude Oil Market and the U.S. RetailNoureddine. 2002. World crude oil and natural gas: a demandanalysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. Energy

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Integrating Energy Efficiency and Demand Response into Utility Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the methods in which utilities integrate their supply-side and demand-side resources to meet their generating resource requirements. The major steps in developing a resource plan are reviewed, including the alternative methods currently employed. Finally, the report presents the results of a short survey that was administered to the advisors in Energy Utilization. The results show that methods are more sophisticated than 20 years ago, but more could be accomplished in ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

425

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

426

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

427

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

428

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

429

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

430

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

431

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

432

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

433

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

434

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

435

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

436

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

437

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

438

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

439

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

440

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

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441

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

442

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

443

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

444

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

445

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

446

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

447

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

448

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

449

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

450

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

451

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

452

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

454

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

455

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

456

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

457

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

458

Demand for money in China .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the long-run equilibrium relationship between money demand and its determinants in China over the period 1952-2004 for three definitions of money –… (more)

Zhang, Qing

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

460

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

462

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

463

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

465

Supply Chain - Submissions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submissions Sustainable Supply Chains Submissions Let's Talk About Sustainable Supply Chain You are here Data.gov Communities Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Supply...

466

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Aftermarket vehicle hybridization : designing a supply network for a startup company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our thesis introduces a supply chain framework catered for startup companies. Startup companies face unique circumstances such as constraints on financial and human resources, and greater uncertainty in demand. From our ...

Causton, Marcus S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Price of anarchy in supply chains, congested systems and joint ventures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the price of anarchy in supply chains, congested systems and joint ventures. It consists of three main parts. In the first part, we investigate the impact of imperfect competition with nonlinear demand. ...

Sun, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Capacity planning in a general supply chain with multiple contract types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we study capacity planning in a general supply chain that contains multiple products, processes, and resources. We consider situations with demand uncertainty, outsourcing contracts, and option contracts. ...

Huang, Xin, 1978-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy supply network design optimization for distributed energy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the fluctuations in power and heat demand of the consumers in a region, this paper presents a bi-level programming model for the regional DES (distributed energy system) network planning. The model aims to minimize the total cost of the regional ... Keywords: Bi-level programming, Distributed energy system, Energy supply network, Hybrid algorithm

Ming Dong; Fenglan He; Hairui Wei

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A BEP analysis of energy supply for sustainable urban microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper shows the use of GIS and other program to identify the technical and economic feasibility of a self-sufficient community in energy supply/demand, through the integration of ICT, intelligent infrastructure (smart grid) and the economic analysis ... Keywords: BEP, BIPV, distributed generation, geographic information systems, microgrids, urban energy consumption

Pasquale Balena; Giovanna Mangialardi; Carmelo Maria Torre

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electricity Supply Board Smart Grid Host Site Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Supply Board (ESB) Networks Smart Grid Demonstration Project Host Site is part of a five-year collaborative initiative with 19 utility members. This project will integrate distribution and transmission level load management and embedded generation with customer-level storage by means of electric vehicle (EV) batteries, distribution-grid–connected wind farms, and customer demand response from smart meters.

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

474

Petroleum supply monthly, February 1988. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total US demand for petroleum products during February 1988 averaged about 17.6 million barrels per day, 0.9 million barrels per day above the average of a year earlier. This marks the third consecutive month in which total product supplied has exceeded 17.0 million barrels per day. For the most part, the disposition of the major products continued to follow seasonal patterns. Total products stocks dropped by 26.0 million barrels to 683.1 million barrels. Refinery utilization fell from January's 82.8 percent rate to 81.1 percent. Crude oil imports from Saudi Arabia rose to 1.2 million barrels per day, 0.4 million barrels per day above the average for January. Unusually mild weather, especially in the Mid-Atlantic states and New England, kept deliveries of both distillate and residual fuel oil virtually unchanged from January's high seasonal levels, although both were still well above the levels for these products the same time last year. Distillate demand averaged 3.5 million barrels per day in February, five percent above the February 1987 average. Residual fuel oil demand was 1.6 million barrels per day this month, nine percent greater than a year ago. Part of this increase in demand from the previous year reflects the improved competitive position of residual fuel oil in some utility and industrial markets, mostly due to increases in natural gas prices starting in the fourth quarter of 1987. 12 figs.

Not Available

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

475

Hot water supply system  

SciTech Connect

A hot water supply system is described which consists of: a boiler having an exhaust; solar panels; and a frame supporting the solar panels and including a compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler exhaust termining in the compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler being within the compartment.

Piper, J.R.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Power Supplies for Precooler Ring  

SciTech Connect

Eight power supplies will energize the antiproton Precooler ring. there will be two series connected supplies per quadrant. These supplies will power 32 dipole and 19 quadrupole magnets. The resistance and inductance per quadrant is R = 1.4045 Ohms and L = 0.466. Each powr supply will have 12-phase series bridge rectifiers and will be energized from the 480 V 3-phase grid. The total of eight power supplies are numbered IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IB, IIB, IIIB, and IVB. Each quadrant will contain one A and one B supply. A block diagram of the Precooler ring with its power supplies is shown in Figure 1.

Fuja, Raymond; Praeg, Walter

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

477

Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system is offered based on the demands of saving energy. The two systems are very similar, which is analyzed in this paper. Using actual engineering, we compute the air flow rate, cold load and energy consumption in detail, and provide some good conclusions.

Guang, L.; Li, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

484

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

485

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

486

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

487

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

488

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

490

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

491

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power industry primarily to increase energy supply. Theenergy crisis rooted in supply concerns in the oil and natural gas industries.energy use by residents—drive growth in the heavy industries that supply

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

A multi-criterion approach for order distribution in supply chain management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper developed a multi-criteria Genetic Algorithm (GA), specifically designed for solving distribution problems in supply chain management. The proposed algorithm is discussed with an order distribution problem in a demand-driven ... Keywords: AHP, SCM, analytical hierarchy process, distribution methodology, genetic algorithms, multi-criteria GAs, order distribution, supply chain management

S. H. Chung; H. C. W. Lau; F. T. S. Chan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Fuzzy-genetic approach to aggregate production-distribution planning in supply chain management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregate production-distribution planning (APDP) is one of the most important activities in supply chain management (SCM). When solving the problem of APDP, we are usually faced with uncertain market demands and capacities in production environment, ... Keywords: Aggregate production-distribution planning, Fuzzy mathematical programming, Genetic algorithm, Supply chain management

R. A. Aliev; B. Fazlollahi; B. G. Guirimov; R. R. Aliev

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Competitive and Cooperative Inventory Policies in a Two-Stage Supply Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a two-stage serial supply chain with stationary stochastic demand and fixed transportation times. Inventory holding costs are charged at each stage, and each stage may incur a consumer backorder penalty cost, e.g. the upper stage (the ... Keywords: Game Theory, Incentive Contracts, Multiechelon Inventory, Supply Chain

Gérard P. Cachon; Paul H. Zipkin

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal and coke from a macroeconomic perspective, I apply the ...

Li, Yu, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW” by 2030, or 14–

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPP’s

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...