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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

2

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

International Oil Supplies and Demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 #12;#12;111 Impacts of changes log demand in 1995. The composites board mills operating in Korea took advantage of flexibility environment changes on the production mix, some economic indications, statistics of demand and supply of wood

5

Response to changes in demand/supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to changes in demand/supply through improved marketing 21.2 http with the mill consuming 450 000 m3 , amounting to 30% of total plywood log demand in 1995. The composites board, statistics of demand and supply of wood, costs and competitiveness were analysed. The reactions

6

SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

7

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Arun Majumdar

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

Arun Majumdar

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Propylene feedstock: supply and demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reasons for the global shortage in propylene in 1981-82 are discussed. The low running rates of ethylene production and refinery operation of which propylene is a byproduct accounts for the reduced propylene supplies. Low prices of the NCL have also shifted incentive from propylene to gas liquids. This situation will continue, with naptha/gas oil becoming the prefered feedstock for ethylene production. The speculative economics for propylene dehydrogenation are not sufficiently attractive for commercialization. But if a country has an internal market for propylene derivatives, production could have a positive influence on the economy. Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Mexico are suggested as examples.

Steinbaum, C.A.; Pickover, B.H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Water supply and demand in an energy supply model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

Abbey, D; Loose, V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand > U.S. Coal Supply and Demand U.S. Coal Supply and Demand 2010 Review (entire report also available in printer-friendly format ) Previous Editions 2009 Review 2008 Review 2007 Review 2006 Review 2005 Review 2004 Review 2003 Review 2002 Review 2001 Review 2000 Review 1999 Review Data for: 2010 Released: May 2011 Next Release Date: April 2012 Table 3. Electric Power Sector Net Generation, 2009-2010 (Million Kilowatthours) New England Coal 14,378 14,244 -0.9 Hydroelectric 7,759 6,861 -11.6 Natural Gas 48,007 54,680 13.9 Nuclear 36,231 38,361 5.9 Other (1) 9,186 9,063 -1.3 Total 115,559 123,210 6.6 Middle Atlantic Coal 121,873 129,935 6.6 Hydroelectric 28,793 26,463 -8.1 Natural Gas 89,808 104,341 16.2 Nuclear 155,140 152,469 -1.7

14

International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Balancing of Energy Supply and Residential Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power demand of private households shows daily fluctuations and ... (BEV) and heat pumps. This additional demand, especially when it remains unmanaged, will ... to an increase in fluctuations. To balance demand,

Martin Bock; Grit Walther

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Networks, Electronic Commerce, and Supply Side and Demand Side Risk Anna Nagurney as well as demand side risk are included in the formulation. The model consists of three tiers of decision chain network equilibrium model with electronic com- merce and with supply side and demand side risk

Nagurney, Anna

20

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems absorb large amounts of hydroelectric power. Duringthat snow melts and hydroelectric power supply increases and

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Energy Demand and Supply Scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An adequate energy supply system is a key issue in ... industrialization that will call for a significantly larger energy supply. Sustaining economic growth in the industrialized ... will add considerably to the ...

H.-H. Rogner; W. Sassin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Supply and Demand Models Based on Electricity Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analyzing how the supply and demand of a commodity changes as a function of its price is one of the many purposes of the field of economics. The supply and demand model of a commodity is also the most efficient a...

Zhaoguang Hu; Zheng Hu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

24

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of renewable resources and on the amount ofprimarily from renewable resources, and to a limited extentintegration of renewable resources and deferrable demand. We

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Balancing Forage Demand with Forage Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ranchers must achieve a balance between stocking rate and forage supply for effective conversion of range forage to animal production. This publication can help ranchers evaluate current forage conditions, make timely forage inventories, plan stock...

Troxel, Tom R.; White, Larry D.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Rice Supply, Demand and Related Government Programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1930-55 Year Weighted Year Weighted beginning average price beginning average price August per cwt. August per cwt. Dollars Dollars 'Includes an allowance for unredeemed loans. response to the strengthening of foreign demand, rice prices by 1952... 91 percent of the average parity price during 1935-54, with !he 4 years of World War I1 omitted. The elasticity of demand was assumed to be about -.2. The annually derived price based on the assumed elasticity and the percentage change in price...

Kincannon, John A.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply, Demand, and Export Outlook for North American Oil and Gas For Energy Infrastructure Summit September 15, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator 0 20 40 60...

29

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline 1995 by Tancred Lidderdale* Provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 designed to reduce ground-level ozone will increase the demand for reformulated motor gaso- line in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas. Refor- mulated motor gasoline is expected to constitute about one-third of total motor gasoline demand in 1995, and refiners will have to change plant opera- tions and modify equipment in order to meet the higher demand. The costs incurred are expected to create a wholesale price premium for reformu- lated motor gasoline of up to 4.0 cents per gallon over the price of conventional motor gasoline. This article discusses the effects of the new regulations on the motor gasoline market and the refining

30

Decentralized demand–supply matching using community microgrids and consumer demand response: A scenario analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Developing countries constantly face the challenge of reliably matching electricity supply to increasing consumer demand. The traditional policy decisions of increasing supply and reducing demand centrally, by building new power plants and/or load shedding, have been insufficient. Locally installed microgrids along with consumer demand response can be suitable decentralized options to augment the centralized grid based systems and plug the demand–supply gap. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) develop a framework to identify the appropriate decentralized energy options for demand–supply matching within a community, and, (2) determine which of these options can suitably plug the existing demand–supply gap at varying levels of grid unavailability. A scenario analysis framework is developed to identify and assess the impact of different decentralized energy options at a community level and demonstrated for a typical urban residential community – Vijayanagar, Bangalore in India. A combination of LPG based CHP microgrid and proactive demand response by the community is the appropriate option that enables the Vijayanagar community to meet its energy needs 24/7 in a reliable, cost-effective manner. The paper concludes with an enumeration of the barriers and feasible strategies for the implementation of community microgrids in India based on stakeholder inputs.

Kumudhini Ravindra; Parameshwar P. Iyer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

32

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2001 Review (Revised 5/6/2002) 1 by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration 1 This article has been revised, deleting 17.6 millions short tons of coal consumed by the manufacturers of synthetic coal from the consumption of coal by "other industrial plants." This change was made because the synthetic coal those plants produced was primarily consumed in the electric sector and reported as coal, resulting in an overstating of total coal consumption. Overview With the dawning of a new century came the beginning of a new era in the coal industry. Instead of the traditional prac- tice of only buying and selling produced coal in the United

33

How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transactions 86 2.5.2. Impact of Aggregate Transactions 86 2.5.3. Hidden Order Impact 88 2.5.4. Upstairs Market Impact 90 2.6. Theory of Market Impact 90 2.6.1. Why Is Individual Transaction Impact Concave? 91 2CHAPTER 2 How Markets Slowly Digest Changes in Supply and Demand Jean-Philippe Bouchaud Science

34

ISOTOPESuses, demand, and supply NIST Center for Neutron Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Neutron reflectometry study of the conformation of HIV Nef bound to lipid membranes #12;Ultra ColdISOTOPESuses, demand, and supply NIST Center for Neutron Research Rob Dimeo, Director at #12;We CENTER FOR NEUTRON RESEARCH ENGINEERING LABORATORY INFORMATIONTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY MATERIAL MEASUREMENT

Dimeo, Robert M.

35

Electricity demand and supply projections for Indian economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with an econometric model to forecast future electricity requirements for various sectors of Indian economy. Following the analysis of time series of sectoral GDPs, number of consumers in various sectors and price indices of electricity, a logarithmic linear regression model has been developed to forecast long-term demand of electricity up to the year 2045. Using the historical GDP growth in various sectors and the corresponding electricity consumption for the period 1971-2005, it is predicted that the total electricity demand will be 5000 billion kWh, against a supply of 1500 billion kWh in the year 2045. This may lead to a disastrous situation for the country unless drastic policy measures are taken to improve the supply side as well as to reduce demand.

Subhash Mallah; N.K. Bansal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Data centres’ power profile selecting policies for Demand Response: Insights of Green Supply Demand Agreement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand Response mechanisms serve to preserve the stability of the power grid by shedding the electricity load of the consumers during power shortage situations in order to match power generation to demand. Data centres have been identified as excellent candidates to participate in such mechanisms. Recently a novel supply demand agreement have been proposed to foster power adaptation collaboration between energy provider and data centres. In this paper, we analyse the contractual terms of this agreement by proposing and studying different data centres’ power profile selecting policies. To this end, we setup a discrete event simulation and analysed the power grid’s state of a German energy provider. We believe that our analysis provides insight and knowledge for any energy utility in setting up the corresponding demand supply agreements.

Robert Basmadjian; Lukas Müller; Hermann De Meer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Late January Cold Impacted Both Supply & Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of A brief cold spell occurred in the second half of January on top of the low stocks. Cold weather increases demand, but it also can interfere with supply, as happened this past January. During the week ending January 22, temperatures in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic areas shifted from being15 percent and 17 percent warmer than normal, respectively, to 24 percent and 22 percent colder than normal. The weather change increased weekly heating requirements by about 40 percent. Temperature declines during the winter affect heating oil demand in a number of ways: Space heating demand increases; Electricity peaking demand increases and power generators must turn to distillate to meet the new peak needs; Fuel switching from natural gas to distillate occurs among large

38

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Western Western Interior Appalachian Energy Information Administration/ U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review 1 Figure 1. Coal-Producing Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Coal Industry Annual 1996, DOE/EIA-0584(96) (Washington, DC, November 1997). U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 1997 Review by B.D. Hong Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Overview U.S. coal production totaled a record high of 1,088.6 million short tons in 1997, up by 2.3 percent over the 1996 production level, according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1). The electric power industry (utilities and independent power producers)-the dominant coal consumer-used a record 922.0 million short tons, up by 2.8 percent over 1996. The increase in coal use for

40

Safeguards Education and Training: Short Term Supply vs. Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much has been written and discussed in the past several years about the effect of the aging nuclear workforce on the sustainability of the U.S. safeguards and security infrastructure. This paper discusses the 10-15 year supply and demand forecast for nuclear material control and accounting specialists. The demand side of the review includes control and accounting of the materials at U.S. DOE and NRC facilities, and the federal oversight of those MC&A programs. The cadre of experts referred to as 'MC&A Specialists' available to meet the demand goes beyond domestic MC&A to include international programs, regulatory and inspection support, and so on.

Mathews, Carrie E.; Crawford, Cary E.

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Reflected in Spreads  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: The price spike that initiated the flood of distillate imports last winter can be easily seen in this chart. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. The January/February 2000 price spike was shorter than the one last winter, largely due to the timing. Since last winter's price spike occurred early in the season, it took some time before prices receded substantially. Currently, the distillate fuel refining spread (the difference between the spot heating oil price and the WTI price) is more "typical". But as was

42

Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: EIA sees a tenuous supply/demand balance over the remainder of 2001 and into the beginning of 2002, as illustrated by the low OECD inventory levels. Global inventories remain low, and need to recover to more adequate levels in order to avoid continued price volatility. While we saw some stocking in April and May, typical third quarter stock builds may not occur. Even with Iraqi oil exports resuming in early July, OPEC was going to need to increase its oil production to account for demand increases over the 2nd half of the year to prevent stocks from falling further. However, they not only haven't agreed to increase production, but agreed to cut production quotas by 1 million barrels per day beginning on September 1! EIA's forecast of a continued low stock cushion implies we not only

43

The world supply/demand outlook for minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mining and agriculture are the fundamental industries that convert natural resources into useable forms. Mining and modern agriculture are inextricably interlinked because modern agriculture is heavily dependent upon the use of machinery power and fertilizers ? all of which are mineral based products and in some applications mineral and agricultural products are mutually substitutable. Steel production is common denominator for assessing demand for many minerals and in the last 2–1/2 decades world steel production has grown at an annual rate of about 5–1/2%. Currently the United States uses about 4 billion tons ? 40 000 pounds per person ? of new mineral supplies each year about equally divided between the mineral fuels and other mineral materials. The value of energy and processed materials of mineral origin used in the U.S. is estimated to exceed $270 billion per year. Rising world population coupled with aspirations for higher living standards points to steadily increasing world demand for mineral materials. Studies by the U.S. Bureau of Mines show that the ratio of recoverable world mineral reserves to cumulate demand over the next few decades is satisfactory for most mineral materials. However if world mineral production is to keep pace with demand there must be increased efforts to find mine beneficiate process and recycle mineral materials and there must also exist politico?economic climates that encourage long?term mineral development while also making appropriate provisions for humanitarian and envronmental concerns.

John D. Morgan Jr.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Service facilities with Markovian demand and deterministic supply with an application in repair modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......calculus|supply and demand|transient analysis...SCILAB| IMA Journal of Management Mathematics (2010...facilities with Markovian demand and deterministic supply...result on deterministic demand and Markovian supply...event on the left-hand side of (2) can be rewritten......

Attila Csenki

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Review 3 Review 1 U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2003 Review by Fred Freme U.S. Energy Information Administration Overview U.S. coal production fell for the second year in a row in 2003, declining by 24.8 million short tons to end the year at 1,069.5 million short tons according to preliminary data from the Energy Information Administration (Table 1), down 2.3 percent from the 2002 level of 1,094.3 million short tons. (Note: All percentage change calculations are done at the short ton level.) Total U.S. coal consumption rose in 2003, with all coal-consuming sectors increasing or remaining stable for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector increased by 2.4 percent. However, there were only slight gains in consumption by the other sectors. U.S. coal exports rose in 2003 for the first time in

47

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage and demand management can complement solarwith energy storage to firm the resource, or solar thermaland solar generation. And demand response or energy storage

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is increasingly supplemented by supplies from coal gasification, Alaska, unconventional sources, LNG, Canada, and Mexico. At the same time, however, gas demand is characterized by price-induced conservation in all markets, together with continuing gas demand...

Schlesinger, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Balance of supply and demand in the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various methods are considered for calculating the balance of supply and demand in the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates within the planning (prediction) period....

V. A. Brodskii

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No.4 Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario towe projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-relatedcrises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production Under Demand and Cost Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production Under Demand and Cost framework for supply chain networks with global outsourcing and quick-response production under demand University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 May 2011; revised September 2011 Annals

Nagurney, Anna

52

A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dependency of an electronic system to primary energy sources (i.e. AC power or battery). For reliable energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization

Bhunia, Swarup

53

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 34. Regional electricity cost duration curves in 2010especially focus on electricity costs and grid compositionrelatively higher electricity costs. If electricity demand

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the design of extended warranties in a supply chain consisting of a manufacturer and an independent retailer. The manufacturer produces a single product and sells it exclusively through the retailer. The extended ...

Li, Kumpeg; Mallik, Suman; Chhajed, Dilip

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy in Europe: Demand, Forecast, Control and Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adequate and reasonably-priced energy supplies are fundamental to the functioning of the economy and to the stability of the society of all countries. Energy questions, therefore, have become of steadily incre...

H.-F. Wagner

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Outlook for Energy Supply and Demand in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the new century, China has entered the phase of Homeland Construction. As the process of urbanization and industrialization accelerates, demand on energy has experienced unprecedentedly rapid growth. By far .....

Yande Dai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Distillate Imports Surged to Meet Supply/Demand Imbalance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

receded when weather moderated and new supply began to receded when weather moderated and new supply began to arrive. Imports were the largest source of new supply that arrived to relieve the imbalance that was behind the price spike. This graph shows the dramatic increase on a calendar monthly average basis. During the three weeks ending February 25, distillate fuel oil imports averaged 566 thousand barrels per day. During the prior four weeks, imports only averaged 162 thousand barrels per day. Refinery production on the East Coast also increased. For the three weeks ending February 25, East Coast distillate production averaged 478 thousand barrels per day, which was an increase of about 91 thousand barrels per day or 24% over the prior four weeks. (During the same time period, national distillate production only rose 7 percent.)

59

Supply/Demand Forecasts Begin to Show Stock Rebuilding  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: During 1999, we saw stock draws during the summer months, when we normally see stock builds, and very large stock draws during the winter of 1999/2000. Normally, crude oil production exceeds product demand in the spring and summer, and stocks build. These stocks are subsequently drawn down during the fourth and first quarters (dark blue areas). When the market is in balance, the stock builds equal the draws. During 2000, stocks have gradually built, but following the large stock draws of 1999, inventories needed to have been built more to get back to normal levels. As we look ahead using EIA's base case assumptions for OPEC production, non-OPEC production, and demand, we expect a more seasonal pattern for the next 3 quarters. But since we are beginning the year with

60

Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production Under Demand and Cost Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production Under Demand and Cost University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 May 2011 Abstract This paper develops a modeling and computational framework for supply chain networks with global outsourcing and quick-response production under

Nagurney, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Agent-based coordination techniques for matching supply and demand in energy networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a lot of effort directed toward realizing the power network of the future. The future power network is expected to depend on a large number of renewable energy resources connected directly to the low and medium voltage power network. Demand ... Keywords: Supply and demand matching, market and non-market algorithms, multi-agent systems

Rashad Badawy; Benjamin Hirsch; Sahin Albayrak

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While crude oil prices will be a major factor impacting distillate prices this winter, another important factor is the U.S. distillate supply/demand balance, as measured by distillate stocks. The distillate supply/demand balance influences the spread between spot distillate and spot crude oil prices. For example, when stocks are higher than normal, the spread will be lower than usual. This spread is the price incentive that encourages or discourages changes in supply. While high stocks in the distillate market are good news for consumers, an excess is bad news for refiners. Distillate spreads during the winter of 1998-99 and throughout most of 1999 were well below average. Distillate stocks were very high during this period, partially as a result of warm weather keeping demand down.

64

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cut primary energy demand per GDP ( T P E S / G D P ) inhowever, primary energy supply per GDP decelerated a declineattention to primary energy supply per GDP, per capita GDP

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

1.0 Motivation............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................2 1.1Overview of Energy Supply and Demand in the 21st Century..........................2 1.2 UK Energy ...................................................................................24 6.6 Correlation between Wind Strength and Demand for Electricity..................24 6

66

Isenberg and Potvin 1 Financing REDD in Developing Countries: A Supply and Demand Analysis.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isenberg and Potvin 1 Financing REDD in Developing Countries: A Supply and Demand Analysis.1 2 3 4 at the centre of negotiations on a renewed international2 climate regime. Developing countries made it clear Jordan Isenberg was an intern at the Climate Change office of Panama's National22 Authority

Potvin, Catherine

67

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the generalized impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2.2011Q2, to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks and to study...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Monte Carlo approach to forecasting the demand for offshore supply vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the near future, the demand for offshore supply vessels in Brazil will be driven by the activities induced by the bids carried out by the regulatory agency, ANP. The likely tendency is to increase the number of bids and consequently, the demand for vessels in the coming years. The proposed model consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the offshore oil exploration and production projects. The model considers some parameters that aim at capturing the effect of the operators patterns, water depth, duration of seismic research and exploration and drilling work, number of wells, geographic location and geological risk. An estimate is obtained for the additional offshore supply vessels demand, for the period of 2006-2008.

Jr">Floriano C.M. Pires Jr; Augusto R. Antoun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review Release Date: June 1, 2011 | Next Release Date: Periodically | full report Introduction Coal production in the United States in 2010 increased to a level of 1,085.3 million short tons according to preliminary data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), an increase of 1.0 percent, or 10.4 million short tons above the 2009 level of 1,074.9 million short tons (Table 1). In 2010 U.S. coal consumption increased in all sectors except commercial and institutional while total coal stocks fell slightly for the year. Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector increased by 7.1 percent. The commercial and

70

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

71

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

72

Development and application of econometric demand and supply models for selected Chesapeake Bay seafood products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five models were developed to forecast future Chesapeake seafood product prices, harvest quantities, and resulting income. Annual econometric models are documented for oysters, hard and soft blue crabs, and hard and soft clams. To the degree that data permit, these models represent demand and supply at the retail, wholesale, and harvest levels. The resulting models have broad applications in environmental policy issues and regulatory analyses for the Chesapeake Bay. 37 references, 10 figures, 99 tables.

Nieves, L.A.; Moe, R.J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Of course, petroleum product prices don't move in lockstep to crude oil prices, for a number of reasons. We find it useful to look at variations in the spread between product and crude oil prices, in this case comparing spot market prices for each. The difference between heating oil and crude oil spot prices tends to vary seasonally; that is, it's generally higher in the winter, when demand for distillate fuels is higher due to heating requirements, and lower in the summer. (Gasoline, as we'll see later, generally does the opposite.) However, other factors affecting supply and demand, including the relative severity of winter weather, can greatly distort these "typical" seasonal trends. As seen on this chart, the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 featured

74

Demand-Supply Optimization with Risk Management for a Multi-Connection Water Reservoir Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we propose a framework to solve a demand-supply optimization problem of long-term water resource allocation on a multi-connection reservoir network which, in two aspects, is different to the problem considered in previous works. First, while all previous works consider a problem where each reservoir can transfer water to only one fixed reservoir, we consider a multi-connection network being constructed in Thailand in which each reservoir can transfer water to many reservoirs in one period of time. Second, a demand-supply plan considered here is static, in contrast to a dynamic policy considered in previous works. Moreover, in order to efficiently develop a long-term static plan, a severe loss (a risk) is taken into account, i.e. a risk occurs if the real amount of water stored in each reservoir in each time period is less than what planned by the optimizer. The multi-connection function and the risk make the problem rather complex such that traditional stochastic dynamic programming and determi...

Chatpatanasiri, Ratthachat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy demand and supply, energy policies, and energy security in the Republic of Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Republic of Korea (ROK) has enjoyed rapid economic growth and development over the last 30 years. Rapid increases in energy use—especially petroleum, natural gas, and electricity, and especially in the industrial and transport sectors—have fueled the ROK's economic growth, but with limited fossil fuel resources of its own, the result has been that the ROK is almost entirely dependent on energy imports. The article that follows summarizes the recent trends in the ROK energy sector, including trends in energy demand and supply, and trends in economic, demographic, and other activities that underlie trends in energy use. The ROK has been experiencing drastic changes in its energy system, mainly induced by industrial, supply security, and environmental concerns, and energy policies in the ROK have evolved over the years to address such challenges through measures such as privatization of energy-sector activities, emphases on enhancing energy security through development of energy efficiency, nuclear power, and renewable energy, and a related focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The assembly of a model for evaluating energy futures in the ROK (ROK2010 LEAP) is described, and results of several policy-based scenarios focused on different levels of nuclear energy utilization are described, and their impacts on of energy supply and demand in the ROK through the year 2030 are explored, along with their implications for national energy security and long-term policy plans. Nuclear power continues to hold a crucial position in the ROK's energy policy, but aggressive expansion of nuclear power alone, even if possible given post-Fukushima global concerns, will not be sufficient to attain the ROK's “green economy” and greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

Hoseok Kim; Eui-soon Shin; Woo-jin Chung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Oak Ridge Isotope Products and Services - Current and Expected Supply and Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been a major center of isotope production research, development, and distribution for over 50 years. Currently, the major isotope production activities include (1) the production of transuranium element radioisotopes, including 252 Cf; (2) the production of medical and industrial radioisotopes; (3) maintenance and expansion of the capabilities for production of enriched stable isotopes; and, (4) preparation of a wide range of custom-order chemical and physical forms of isotope products, particularly in accelerator physics research. The recent supply of and demand for isotope products and services in these areas, research and development (R&D), and the capabilities for future supply are described in more detail below. The keys to continuing the supply of these important products and services are the maintenance, improvement, and potential expansion of specialized facilities, including (1) the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), (2) the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) and Radiochemical Development Laboratory (RDL) hot cell facilities, (3) the electromagnetic calutron mass separators and the plasma separation process equipment for isotope enrichment, and (4) the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML) equipment for preparation of specialized chemical and physical forms of isotope products. The status and plans for these ORNL isotope production facilities are also described below.

Aaron, W.S.; Alexander, C.W.; Cline, R.L.; Collins, E.D.; Klein, J.A.; Knauer, J.B., Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Energy Policies and Energy Demand in Northeastissue of whether rising energy demand generates new securityoverall regional energy demand (Fesharaki, Sara Banaszak,

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Creating balanced energy market structures: equal valuation of supply and demand side initiatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Now in its fifth year, the Bordeaux Energy Colloquium was originally created to bring together the voices of various industry constituents to engage in a series of dialogues regarding the creation of a competitive energy marketplace. Each year, Colloquium members consider key variables within various contexts and evaluate their effect on the global transition trend from regulation to competition in energy markets. Fall-2005 Colloquium members agreed that the fundamental imbalance between how supply and demand options are valued is a key stumbling block in the proper functioning of energy markets. Working under the auspices of the Bordeaux Energy Colloquium, 2005 members created a call for action paper that attempts to identify important points of leverage that can be used to further unleash the potential of energy systems in favour of new lines of development.

Kimberly E. Samaha; Thomas L. Welch; John A. Anderson; Thomas R. Casten; Cody Graves

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Future scenarios and trends in energy generation in brazil: supply and demand and mitigation forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The structure of the Brazilian energy matrix defines Brazil as a global leader in power generation from renewable sources. In 2011, the share of renewable sources in electricity production reached 88.8%, mainly due to the large national water potential. Although the Brazilian energy model presents a strong potential for expansion, the total energy that could be used with most current renewable technologies often outweighs the national demand. The current composition of the national energy matrix has outstanding participation of hydropower, even though the country has great potential for the exploitation of other renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and biomass. This document therefore refers to the trend of evolution of the Brazilian Energy Matrix and exposes possible mitigation scenarios, also considering climate change. The methodology to be used in the modeling includes the implementation of the LEAP System (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning) program, developed by the Stockholm Environment Institute, which allows us to propose different scenarios under the definition of socioeconomic scenarios and base power developed in the context of the REGSA project (Promoting Renewable Electricity Generation in South America). Results envision future scenarios and trends in power generation in Brazil, and the projected demand and supply of electricity for up to 2030.

José Baltazar Salgueirinho Osório De Andrade Guerra; Luciano Dutra; Norma Beatriz Camisăo Schwinden; Suely Ferraz de Andrade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Forward Look into Rare Earth Supply and Demand: A Role for Sedimentary Phosphate Deposits?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rare earth elements, key to many high-technology applications, are regularly making headlines, even in general public newspapers. Will the word run short of rare earth elements and of the many applications that rest on their use? In support to French and European Union policy making, as well as in support to industrial clients, BRGM is monitoring rare earth markets from the supply and the demand sides, as well as for technological shifts that drive them. Not every rare earth element is effectively rare and there are well over 400 ongoing rare earth exploration projects worldwide. Nevertheless, some rare earth elements such as dysprosium, europium and terbium are rare, in high and fast growing demand; as they either are indispensable to the production of Fe-B-Nd (Dy) permanent magnets, the highest performance magnetic material currently being available at industrial scale, or to the production of phosphors essential to the production of fluorescent compact, energy saving, light bulbs and video displays. At the current 10% compound annual growth rate of the demand for these elements, the question arises of their the future availability. Among the many rare-earth bearing minerals apatite is of particular interest as a potential source of rare earth elements, as it is a widespread mineral, forming huge deposits such as the sedimentary and magmatic phosphate deposits. An overview of the potential of sedimentary phosphate deposits as an important source for future rare earth production is presented and discussed. In addition to knowledge about the distribution and concentration of individual rare earth elements in sedimentary phosphate deposits, it is also necessary to understand the partitioning of the individual elements between phosphogypsum and phosphoric acid in the fertilizer production process, as well as available technologies to recover and separate individual rare earth elements from these materials. This could pave the way to the generation of extra added-value for phosphate producers, and to the broadening of the international production base of rare earth elements in high demand by the global economy.

Patrice Christmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Investigation of rolling horizon flexibility contracts in a supply chain under highly variable stochastic demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Demand Forecasting for Inventory Management Investigation of rolling...variable stochastic demand Patrick M. Walsh Peter...and supplier (CM) side of the RHF contract...the stochastic market demand. 3. Model description......

Patrick M. Walsh; Peter A. Williams; Cathal Heavey

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

On-demand e-supply chain integration: A multi-agent constraint-based approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With e-business emerging as a key enabler to drive supply chains, the focus of supply chain management has been shifted from production efficiency to customer-driven and partnership synchronization approaches. This strategic shift depends on the match ... Keywords: Constraints management, Electronic business, Intelligent agents, Supply chain integration

Minhong Wang; Jiming Liu; Huaiqing Wang; William K. Cheung; Xiaofeng Xie

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comfort demand leading the optimization to energy supply from the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The control of loads in the building, may also be a resource to the grid using the flexibilities in service of the grid in Demand Side Management (DSM) scenarios as so called Demand Response (DR) or Load Control (LC). (Callaway and Hiskens 2011) However... of energy management, building management, and comfort management have to be developed to anticipate on the coming possible changes on Demand Side Management by Demand Response (DR) and Load Control (LC). This study is a first step towards...

Aduba,K.; Zeiler,W.; Boxem,G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

85

The outlook for Operations Research: will business education supply enough management science new entrants to meet forecast demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Can Management Science in Business Education become sufficiently popular to fill forecast demands for new entrants to its Operations Research (OR) subset? Based upon papers by numerous authors, this paper identifies an interesting phenomenon â?? an increasingly applicable field of Management Science plagued by students avoiding entry. This paper discusses the results of an examination of this phenomenon's background, provides data collected concerning current supply of and projected demand for new entrants in a subset of Management Science; examines the continuing call for new approaches to teaching Management Science as a means of attracting new entrants; and presents continued research suggestions.

Richard A. McMahon; Peter D. DeVries

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ELECTRICITY DEMAND AND SUPPLY PROJECTIONS IN IEA WORLD ENERGY SCENARIOS: HOW MUCH, HOW CLEAN?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract (40-Word Limit): The presentation will highlight and discuss projections for electricity demand up to 2050 based on the recent publication Energy Technology Perspectives 2012:...

Frankl, Paolo

88

Opportunities for LNG supply infrastructure and demand growth in US and International markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Countries are looking beyond their borders for options to satiate a forecasted increase in natural gas consumption. A strong option for importing natural gas is by way of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain where ...

Connell, Richard Perry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Joint Mail-In Rebate Decisions in Supply Chains Under Demand Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the joint decisions of offering mail-in rebates (MIRs) in a single-manufacturer–single-retailer supply chain using a game theoretic framework. Either party can offer an MIR to the end consumer if it is in his best interest. The consumer...

Geng, Qin; Mallik, Suman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Estimation of a supply and demand model for the hired farm labor market in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Wage Elasticities of Hired Farm Labor Markets , , 3O 3. Order Condition of the Hypothesized Model 4. Estimated Model Coefficients for Texas Hired Farm Labor (1951-1975) 5. Wage El asti cities of Oemand and Immigration Elas- ticities of Supply 58...

Turley, Keith Pool

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if conventional oil production was no longer able to satisfy demand? Fuels from non-conventional oil resources would then become the backstop fuel. These resources involve higher CO2 emissions per unit of energy produced than conventional oil as they require... ?EMUC ? GDPgrowth ?POPgrowth? ? (13) r is the consumption discount rate (% per year) EMUC is the elasticity of marginal utility of consumption (no unit) ptp is the pure time preference rate (% per year) GDPgrowth is the growth of GDP (% per year...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

93

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

94

Integrating the cold load pickup effect of reserve supplying demand response resource in social cost minimization based system scheduling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Expansion of smart grids and aggregator business facilitates the utilization of reserve supplying demand response (RSDR) resources. One of the loads that are increasingly used for reserve provision is air-conditioning load (ACL) that have cold load pickup (CLPU) or “payback” characteristics. With larger scale utilization of RSDR resources, as an effect of increasing DR aggregation business, CLPU characteristics of ACL can affect system optimal operation. Actual utilization time and duration of RSDR resources are probabilistic and affected by system scheduling and contingency occurrence. Therefore the CLPU effect of RSDR resources is probabilistic. This creates extra burden on the system reliability maintenance that should be considered from social cost minimization point of view. This complexity is addressed in this paper by modeling the extra expected load not supplied (ELNS) that the probabilistic CLPU of RSDR can impose on system. Then the aggregated RSDR resources, with CLPU characteristics, are integrated into day-ahead simultaneous system scheduling with the objective function of social cost minimization. This study showed that CLPU can have considerable effects on system scheduling and RSDR effectiveness. The proposed method of this paper proved to be useful for reducing the negative effects of CLPU while using RSDR resources.

Mahdi Behrangrad; Hideharu Sugihara; Tsuyoshi Funaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Coal: evolving supply and demand in world seaborne steam coal trade. [1975 to 1985; forecasting to 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of world seaborne steam coal trade since 1975. It highlights current trends and the historic and present sources of supply and demand and discusses selected factors that may affect future world trade patterns. It concludes with a general discussion on the prospects for United States participation in the growing world markets for steam coal. Worldwide seaborne steam coal trade is linked very closely to the generation of electricity and industrial use of process heat in cement and other manufacturing plants. The main factors that influence this trade are: economic growth, electricity demand, indigenous coal production (and degree of protection from lower cost coal imports), and the delivered costs of coal relative to other substitutable fuels. It may be of interest to know how these factors have changed seaborne steam coal trade in the past twelve years. In 1970, the total world use of steam coal was about two billion short tons. International trade in steam coal was only 80 million tons or about 4% of the total. Seaborne trade accounted for about 30% of international trade, or about 25 million tons. In 1982, the latest year for which good statistics are available, total world use of steam coal was about 3.6 billion tons. Seaborne steam coal trade was 110 million tons which is about 3% of the total and 37% of the international trade. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Yancik, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors behind declining demand for oil include a shift fromfuel. In the industrial sector, oil demand will decrease dueto a falling demand for oil for chemical materials. In the

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Energy Demand and Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The world consumption of primary energy has been on the increase ever since the Industrial Revolution . The energy consumption in 1860 is estimated to have ... particularly marked since WWII when the sources of primary

Kimio Uno

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Market efficiency and the long-memory of supply and demand: Is price impact variable and permanent or fixed and temporary?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market efficiency and the long-memory of supply and demand: Is price impact variable and permanent vs. seller initiated transactions. For example, during a period where there is an excess of buyer initiated transactions, there is also more liquidity for buy orders than sell orders, so that buy orders

99

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary energy supply growth has gradually slowed down as energy conservation efforts have been enhanced with interest growing in global

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Coordinating production and shipment decisions in a two-stage supply chain with time-sensitive demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates a supply chain system consisting of one manufacturer who receives an order from a single retailer and then coordinates a production and shipment schedule to fulfill the retailer's order as quickly and cost effectively as possible. ... Keywords: Direct shipping, Inventory control, Supply chain responsiveness

Emmett J. Lodree, Jr.; Christopher D. Geiger; Kandace N. Ballard

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal for power generation is expected to remain stable due to its stable supply and economiccoal and L N G combustion within Japan. IEEJ Energy Journal Vol.4, No.4 Key Assumptions Economic

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Pricing and rebate policies in the two-echelon supply chain with asymmetric information under price-dependent, stochastic demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the manufacturers’ strategy of optimizing the direct rebate to the final customer and the wholesale price to a profit-maximizing retailer with a price-dependent stochastic demand. The manufacturer possesses full information about the cost and the functional relationship among demand, price and rebate, but may or may not know about the nature of the underlying demand uncertainty faced by the retailer. The conditions under which a retailer benefits from passing on such information are identified. The main features of the model are illustrated analytically and numerically, using linear or iso-elastic demand functions, with additive or multiplicative error structures. Several important implications have been derived, especially those dealing with price and rebate pass-throughs and with the cost to the manufacturer of asymmetric information.

F.J. Arcelus; Satyendra Kumar; G. Srinivasan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Forecasting and inventory performance in a two-stage supply chain with ARIMA(0,1,1) demand: Theory and empirical analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ARIMA(0,1,1) demand model has been analysed extensively by researchers and used widely by forecasting practitioners due to its attractive theoretical properties and empirical evidence in its support. However, no empirical investigations have been conducted in the academic literature to analyse demand forecasting and inventory performance under such a demand model. In this paper, we consider a supply chain formed by a manufacturer and a retailer facing an ARIMA(0,1,1) demand process. The relationship between the forecasting accuracy and inventory performance is analysed along with an investigation on the potential benefits of forecast information sharing between the retailer and the manufacturer. Results are obtained analytically but also empirically by means of experimentation with the sales data related to 329 Stock Keeping Units (SKUs) from a major European superstore. Our analysis contributes towards the development of the current state of knowledge in the areas of inventory forecasting and forecast information sharing and offers insights that should be valuable from the practitioner perspective.

M.Z. Babai; M.M. Ali; J.E. Boylan; A.A. Syntetos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

106

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(This page intentionally left blank) (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

107

Building sustainable energy systems: Homeostatic control of grid-connected microgrids, as a means to reconcile power supply and energy demand response management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The issue of worldwide over consumption and squandering of electrical energy has resulted in what one might call an energy obesity problem in terms of energy intake and its expenditure. It is indeed something that must change if modern society is to become sustainable someday. This is to be realized in conjunction with adequate government policies and innovative strategies aimed at effectively integrating non-conventional renewable energies (NCRE), with thriftiness and energy efficiency (EE) – the three pillars of energy sustainability (ES) – in today?s electric power systems generation and distribution infrastructure. This ought to be done in a way that incorporates them jointly, as part of a comprehensive energy strategy to propitiate a wider penetration of distributed generation (DG) solutions. Departing from mainstream literature on the subject, this paper proposes such strategies for integrating hybrid micro-generation power systems to the grid through homeostatic control (HC), as a means to reconcile power supply and energy demand response management (EDRM). These strategies can be designed and implemented in the microgrid?s supervisory control system for the purpose of eliciting EE and thriftiness in consumers to build ES in the system. The theoretical model behind the HC strategies is presented and a numerical example is provided, using real electricity consumption data of a small rural community in Chile. Upon examining a particular set of criteria designed to control renewable power (RP) supply from a grid-tie microgrid to residential consumers, simulation results show that the model proves effective when testing such criteria for different power supply scenarios. Particularly revealing is the role of the energy storage system (ESS) – the energy buffer – in the HC strategies being proposed and the difference that it makes in eliciting thrifty, efficient energy consumption as a result of individual and collective efforts to ensure energy sustainability of the system as a whole.

Franco Fernando Yanine; Federico I. Caballero; Enzo E. Sauma; Felisa M. Córdova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy Demand-Energy Supplies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Just a few years after the U.S. celebrated its first centennial it passed another milestone. In about 1885, coal replaced wood as the nation’s primary energy source. Wood, properly managed, is a renewable reso...

V. P. Kenney; J. W. Lucey

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

World Energy Use — Trends in Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to provide adequate energy supplies in the future, trends in energy demand must be evaluated and projections of future demand developed. World energy use is far from static, and an understanding of the demand

Randy Hudson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response for Continuous PowerintensiveFACTS, $ Demand Response Energy Storage HVDC Industrial Customer PEV Renewable Energy Source: U.S.-Canada Power: To balance supply and demand of a power system, one can manipulate both: supply and demand demand response

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

114

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can plan an active role in… (more)

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can plan an active role… (more)

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

118

Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

Banerjee, Rangan

119

China, India demand cushions prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the hopes of coal consumers, coal prices did not plummet in 2006 as demand stayed firm. China and India's growing economies, coupled with solid supply-demand fundamentals in North America and Europe, and highly volatile prices for alternatives are likely to keep physical coal prices from wide swings in the coming year.

Boyle, M.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic forces pushing up energy demand are population increase and economic growth. From ... of these it is possible to estimate future energy requirements.

Geoffrey Greenhalgh

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Balancing Forage Demand with Forage Supply (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diaria de paso. De nuevo, si no se conoce la GDP, pueden usarse flechas para indicar el aumento, decremento o estabili- dad en la GDP. a73 UA.?Unidad animal. Los requerimientos de forraje son diferentes para las distintas clases de ganado, tama?o, edad...

White, Larry D.; Troxel, Tom R.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8.2 Wind Integration in a System without Transmission8.3 Wind Integration in a System with TransmissionRobert Zavadil. Minnesota wind integration study, volume I.

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations has been load-following: controllable generationtime dispatch (also load following or supplemental energysystem frequency, and load-following reserves are re-

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, • renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

128

Market power analysis in electricity markets using supply function equilibrium model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......market operator aggregates the supply and demand bid curves to determine market clearing prices as well as the corresponding supply and demand schedules. In our model, we do not consider the demand side bidding because the load is almost inelastic......

Tao Li; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ali Keyhani

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

130

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving , D. Craigie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving G. Zakeri , D. Craigie , A. Philpott , M. Todd for the demand response of such a consumer. We will establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply

Todd, Michael J.

131

Marginal Cost Pricing: An Efficient Tool to Ensure Electricity Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The constant adaptation between electricity supply and demand can be achieved in two ways : On the supply side, through the construction of additional facilities, and on the demand side, by implementing tariffs, ...

B. Lescoeur; J. B. Galland; E. Husson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

133

Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

134

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

135

Performance analysis of demand planning approaches for aggregating, forecasting and disaggregating interrelated demands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A synchronized and responsive flow of materials, information, funds, processes and services is the goal of supply chain planning. Demand planning, which is the very first step of supply chain planning, determines the effectiveness of manufacturing and logistic operations in the chain. Propagation and magnification of the uncertainty of demand signals through the supply chain, referred to as the bullwhip effect, is the major cause of ineffective operation plans. Therefore, a flexible and robust supply chain forecasting system is necessary for industrial planners to quickly respond to the volatile demand. Appropriate demand aggregation and statistical forecasting approaches are known to be effective in managing the demand variability. This paper uses the bivariate VAR(1) time series model as a study vehicle to investigate the effects of aggregating, forecasting and disaggregating two interrelated demands. Through theoretical development and systematic analysis, guidelines are provided to select proper demand planning approaches. A very important finding of this research is that disaggregation of a forecasted aggregated demand should be employed when the aggregated demand is very predictable through its positive autocorrelation. Moreover, the large positive correlation between demands can enhance the predictability and thus result in more accurate forecasts when statistical forecasting methods are used.

Argon Chen; Jakey Blue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and demand for flaxseed, the source of linseed oil.2 Wright noted the difficulty of obtaining estimatesInstrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural variables involved attempts to estimate demand and supply curves.1 Economists such as P.G. Wright, Henry

Ahmad, Sajjad

137

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

138

Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts per month based on more than 50 manually-created document types. The fact that DAMA and FM&T desired to move from paper-based manual architectures to digitally based computer architectures gave further incentive for the partnership to grow. FM&T's greatest strength was its knowledge of NWC-wide scheduling and planning with its role as the NWC leader in manufacturing logistics. DAMA's asset was its new knowledge gained in the research and development of advanced architectures and tools for supply chain management in the textiles industry. These complimentary strengths allowed the two parties to provide both the context and the tools for the pilot. Bender: Honeywell FM&T participated in a four-site supply chain project, also referred to as an Inter-Enterprise Pipeline Evaluation. The MSAD project was selected because it involves four NWC sites: FM&T, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). FM&T had previously participated with Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY98 to model a two-site supply chain project, between FM&T and LANL. Evaluation of a Supply Chain Methodology is a subset of the DAMA project for the AMTEX consortium. LANL organization TSA-7, Enterprise Modeling and Simulation, has been involved in AMTEX and DAMA through development of process models and simulations for LANL, the NWC, and others. The FY 1998 and this FY 1999 projects directly involved collaboration between Honeywell and the Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (TSA-7) and Detonation Science and Technology (DX1) organizations at LANL.

Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

2001-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Managing risk in premium fruit and vegetable supply chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production planning in premium fresh produce supply chains is challenging due to the uncertainty of both supply and demand. A two-stage planning algorithm using mixed integer linear programming and Monte Carlo simulation ...

Merrill, Joshua Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ris-R-1565(EN) Analyses of Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1565(EN) Analyses of Demand Response in Denmark Frits Møller Andersen Stine Grenaa Jensen. Larsen, Peter Meibom, Hans Ravn, Klaus Skytte, Mikael Togeby Title: Analyses of Demand Response and security of supply, the report describes demand response from a microeconomic perspective and provides

142

Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

Low, Steven H.

143

Value of Demand Response Theoretical thoughts Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value of Demand Response ­ Theoretical thoughts Klaus Skytte Systems Analysis Department February 7 A B C MB C' B' DR q'load CP #12;Innovative tariffs · Intelligent demand response · Energy tariffs if the consumers are price elastic. · The value of DR also depends on the fuel and supply mix · Intelligent demand

144

Polynomial policies in supply chain networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to solve the periodic-reviewed inventory control problem in supply chain networks with uncertain demand so as to minimize the overall cost of the system over a fixed planning time horizon. In such problems, ...

He, Liwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electricity demand analysis - unconstrained vs constrained scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In India, the electricity systems are chronically constrained by shortage of both capital and energy resources. These result in rationing and interruptions of supply with a severely disrupted electricity usage pattern. From this background, we try to analyse the demand patterns with and without resource constraints. Accordingly, it is necessary to model appropriately the dynamic nature of electricity demand, which cannot be captured by methods like annual load duration curves. Therefore, we use the concept - Representative Load Curves (RLCs) - to model the temporal and structural variations in demand. As a case study, the electricity system of the state of Karnataka in India is used. Four years demand data, two unconstrained and two constrained, are used and RLCs are developed using multiple discriminant analysis. It is found that these RLCs adequately model the variations in demand and bring out distinctions between unconstrained and constrained demand patterns. The demand analysis attempted here helped to study the differences in demand patterns with and without constraints, and the success of rationing measures in reducing demand levels as well as greatly disrupting the electricity usage patterns. Multifactor ANOVA analyses are performed to find out the statistical significance of the ability of logically obtained factors in explaining overall variations in demand. The results showed that the factors that are taken into consideration accounted for maximum variations in demand at very high significance levels.

P. Balachandra; V. Chandru; M.H. Bala Subrahmanya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The world energy supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pattern of the world's energy supply has undergone dramatic changes over the last century, and particularly over the last twenty years. The growth in the world's population and the ever-greater demand for energy will lead to the global environment being subjected to considerable strain. The world will require a new type of energy system, one that is technically feasible, but which will face many difficulties in gaining social and economic acceptance. The world's future energy supply will depend upon the rational exploitation of resources and the development of high technical standards in the fields of reliability and safety. The required social changes will include a change to more energy-conserving life styles and a strengthening of international co-operation in long-term energy and environmental research and development.

L.H.Th. Rietjens

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

148

Supply Chain Networks: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Department of Management, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains may span thousands of miles across the globe, involve as the stability and resiliency of supply chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events

Nagurney, Anna

149

Supply Chains and Transportation Networks Anna Nagurney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 December, and consumers at the demand markets. Supply chains are the backbones of our globalized Network Economy of cooperation. For example, in a vertically integrated supply chain the same firm may be responsible

Nagurney, Anna

150

An MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand control systems can be divided functionally into supply-side and load-side control/management systems. Supply-side demand management systems, implemented by the utilities, choose between maintainingAn MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar* , Joseph Sottile

Kumar, Ratnesh

151

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The 3He Supply Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Stochastic Unit Commitment Model for Integrating Renewable Supply and Demand Response Anthony from the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources and deferrable demand in power systems. We- sorbing the uncertainty and variability associated with renewable supply: centralized co

Oren, Shmuel S.

154

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dell, Inc.'s closed loop supply chain for computer assembly plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many authors and researchers cite Dell's supply chain as a model of excellence, yet few look at the entire closed-loop supply chain and the prevalent inventory and logistics techniques that enable this complex process to work. The techniques reviewed ... Keywords: Dell, Inc. closed-loop supply chains, demand management, forward supply chains, modularity, postponement, reverse supply chains, vendor managed inventory

Sameer Kumar; Sarah Craig

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

LEAPs and Bounds—an Energy Demand and Constraint Optimised Model of the Irish Energy System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper builds a model of energy demand and supply for Ireland with a focus on evaluating, and providing insights for, energy efficiency policies. The demand-side comprises sectoral sub-models, with a ... line...

Fionn Rogan; Caiman J. Cahill; Hannah E. Daly; Denis Dineen…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Design of Sustainable Supply Chains for Sustainable Cities Anna Nagurney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Sustainable Supply Chains for Sustainable Cities Anna Nagurney Isenberg School of sustainable supply chains with a focus on cities that captures the frequency of network link operations, which and frequency costs, and meeting demand. Keywords: sustainable cities, supply chains, sustainability, network

Nagurney, Anna

159

Safe and Sustainable Seafood Supply Focus Team Report 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe and Sustainable Seafood Supply Focus Team Report 2011 Goal 1: A sustainable supply of safe seafood to meet public demand. Ensuring a sustainable supply of safe seafood requires on small farmers, diversified fishermen/farmers and diversified traditional seafood docks. # 14203

160

Unexpected consequences of demand response : implications for energy and capacity price level and volatility .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Historically, electricity consumption has been largely insensitive to short term spot market conditions, requiring the equating of supply and demand to occur almost exclusively through… (more)

Levy, Tal Z. (Tal Ze'ev)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of Conservation Voltage Reduction as a tool for demand side management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??To ensure stability of the power grid, electricity supply and demand must remain in balance in real time. Traditionally utilities, call upon peaking power plants… (more)

Dorrody, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Exchange Rate Effects on Excess Demand in the United States for Canadian Oil .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper examines a model of excess supply and excess demand for Canadian oil in the United States utilizing an error correction model and time… (more)

Dickey, James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Mass Market Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

164

Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Demand Response with Uncertain Renewable Energy in Smart Grid Libin Jiang and Steven Low manages user load through real-time demand response and purchases balancing power on the spot market and demand response in the presence of uncertain renewable supply and time-correlated demand. The overall

Low, Steven H.

165

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

Kammen, Daniel M.

166

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

167

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

FORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources resulting in water stress. Effective water management ­ a solution Supply side management Demand side management #12;Developing a regression equation based on cluster analysis for forecasting waterFORECASTING WATER DEMAND USING CLUSTER AND REGRESSION ANALYSIS by Bruce Bishop Professor of Civil

Keller, Arturo A.

169

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

170

Quebec urged to match supply and demand for science graduates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... An alliance of Quebec organizations called Science pour Tous (Science for All) is proposing that high-technology companies ... other public figures says that science and technology are not treated with due importance by Quebec institutions. It calls on scientists to share with the public “their questions, their ...

David Spurgeon

1998-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems, Electric Power Systems Research, 73(2): p. 169-problems, Electric Power Systems Research, 77(3-4): p. 212-decomposition, Electric Power Systems Research, 77(7): p.

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Supply and Demand Shifts in the Shorting Market Lauren Cohen,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)) or employ equilibrium prices (e.g., rebate rates) or equilibrium quantities (e.g., short in- terest).1 For example, several recent papers use the rebate rate as a direct measure of the cost of shorting.2 The rebate rate is a fee that the lender of a stock must pay to the borrower of that stock

Kearns, Michael

173

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine NGST Natural gas steam turbine NWPP Northwest Powerfrom natural gas steam turbine (NGST) and natural gasNGST = Natural gas steam turbine; NWPP = Northwest Power

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Estimates of the supply and demand for pork in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Camas Estadisticas Basicas 1965, Buenos Aires, p. 15; for per capita G. N. P. :--from 1927 to 1934 ? U. N. , CFPAL, Desarrollo Economico de la Argentina, Buenos Aires, 1958, p. 15, ? from 1935 to 1965 ? Banco Central de la Republica Argentina, Origen... Camas Estadisticas Basicas 1965, Buenos Aires, p. 15; for per capita G. N. P. :--from 1927 to 1934 ? U. N. , CFPAL, Desarrollo Economico de la Argentina, Buenos Aires, 1958, p. 15, ? from 1935 to 1965 ? Banco Central de la Republica Argentina, Origen...

Pereira, Humberto Armando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Matching renewable energy supply and demand in green datacenters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we propose GreenSlot, a scheduler for parallel batch jobs in a datacenter powered by a photovoltaic solar array and the electrical grid (as a backup). GreenSlot predicts the amount of solar energy that will be available in the near future, and schedules the workload to maximize the green energy consumption while meeting the jobs’ deadlines. If grid energy must be used to avoid deadline violations, the scheduler selects times when it is cheap. Evaluation results show that GreenSlot can increase solar energy consumption by up to 117% and decrease energy cost by up to 39%, compared to conventional schedulers, when scheduling three scientific workloads and a data processing workload. Based on these positive results, we conclude that green datacenters and green-energy-aware scheduling can have a significant role in building a more sustainable IT ecosystem.

Íńigo Goiri; Md E. Haque; Kien Le; Ryan Beauchea; Thu D. Nguyen; Jordi Guitart; Jordi Torres; Ricardo Bianchini

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

121]. Like other renewable resources and nuclear power, inhydro, nuclear, or renewable resources, and average GHGsupplied by each renewable resource and the capacity of

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbines, biomass, or geothermal power. By 2050, thebiomass, geothermal, and nuclear power plants arebiomass Nuclear, geothermal, and biomass power plants are

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optimized supply routing at Dell under non-stationary demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the design and implementation of an optimization model to manage inventory at Dell's American factories. Specifically, the model is a mixed integer program which makes routing decisions on incoming ...

Foreman, John William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 regions Illinois Colorado, Xcel Energy service area LADWPVehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Servicecomprised 30% of LDVs in Xcel Energy’s Colorado service

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2. Well-to-wheel vehicle GHG emissions rates as a functionplant type and average GHG emissions rates by scenario (Generation and average GHG emissions in 2050 for scenarios

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Energy & Environment (12) 19740 (24740) Combustion & Air Pollution Cntrl (12) 19612 Int. Life Cycle:20 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining in Infrastructure (6) 12750 Infrastructure Systems (12) 12651/751 Air Quality Engr. (9/12) TR10:3011:50/NA 12740 Data Acq

McGaughey, Alan

182

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 19740 (24740) Comb. & Air Pollution Ctrl (12 TR1:302:50) 19612 Int. Life Cycle Assessment (12) 19688Phase Flow & Heat Transfer () 24740 Combustion & Air Pollution Ctrl (12 TR 1:302:50) 24642 Special Topics:20) 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining in Infrastructure (6A3 MW910

McGaughey, Alan

183

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

() 19740 (24740) Comb. & Air Pollution Ctrl 19612 Int. Life Cycle Assessment (12) 19739 (18875) Econ& Engr Combustion & Air Pollution (12) 24642 Fuel Cell Systems (12)MW9:3011:20 24643 S.T. Electrochem. Energy Course (18) 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining

McGaughey, Alan

184

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Cmbstn & Air Pollut Ctrl (12 TR1:302:50) 19751 (12751) Air Quality Engineering (12) 19882 S.T. Sem Low:20) 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining in Infrastructure (6A3 MW910:20) 12712 Intro to Sustainable Engineering (12) 12651/751 Air Quality Engineering

McGaughey, Alan

185

39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. & Policy () 19740 (24740) Comb. & Air Pollution Ctrl 19612 Int. Life Cycle Assessment (12) 19739 (18875 Convective Heat Transfer (6) 24736 TwoPhase Flow & Heat Transfer () 24740 Combustion & Air Pollution (12 Course (18) 12711 Adv. Project Management for Construction (12) 12742 Data Mining

McGaughey, Alan

186

Long Term Options for Energy Supply and Demand Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A great deal has been said and written about future energy options and the need for responsibility and caution in protecting the world’s natural environment. Clearly, energy policies and environmental policies...

Tom Morron; Fred Denny

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Schumpeter Versus Keynes: Supply-Side Economics or Demand Management?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 1883 witnessed the birth of two great economists, Joseph Alois Schumpeter and John Maynard Keynes, and the death of another great economist, Karl Marx. Schumpeter, a devoted subject of the Austro-Hung...

Christian Seidl

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation from wind and solar power plants can be highlygrid. When wind stops blowing, another power plant must bethan intermittent wind availability or uncertain power plant

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation Analysis (Preliminary Results), California Public Utilities Commission. NREL (2008) 20% Wind Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Forecasting supply/demand and price of ethylene feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history of the petrochemical industry over the past ten years clearly shows that forecasting in a turbulent world is like trying to predict tomorrow's headlines.

Struth, B.W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

our shorthand notations . AF BPA (C)ARB (C)DWR CEP CERCDC (Power Administration (BPA). This power will be available forOf this 464 MWe is from BPA, 86 MWe is CEP power via DWR

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plant heat rates and generation,natural gas-fired power plants Total incremental generation

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palm Springs solar insolation, and California electricityConcentrating Solar Power in California, NREL/SR-550-39291,generation from wind and solar in California could be very

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Alberta's Energy Reserves 2007 and Supply/Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2007 .............................................................................. 9 6 Alberta conventional crude oil production and price........................................................ 10 7 Alberta mined bitumen production and synthetic crude oil production and price............ 10 8 ........................................................................................1-4 1.2.1 North American Crude Oil Prices

Laughlin, Robert B.

195

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

109 Figure 57. Assumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-in Figure 57. The coal price stays relatively constantAssumed natural gas and coal prices in LEDGE-CA [152]. It

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Geothermal Small Hydro Solar Wind Statewide CA-N CA-with a relatively small hydro resource require additionaldairy Photovoltaic Parabolic Small hydro Wind Hydro 1 Steam

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGCC Integrated gasification combined cycle IID ImperialCorporation NGCC Natural gas combined-cycle NGCT Natural gas79% from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants, and

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

service area. With hydroelectricity severely curtailed byfor the ,reduction in hydroelectricity. Although the impactslargest contribution from hydroelectricity can be considered

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July - August - Rancho Seco 1 PG&E hydroelectric power -PG&E hydroelectric powerPG&E hydroelectric power - PG&E hydroelectric power

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has sharply driven up capital outlays for new generating stations. Power costs have risen accordingly and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Furthermore, the rates of cost increases will vary widely among the utilities on the Gulf Coast...

Posey, L. G., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

near term. Local distribution infrastructure and reliabilityand distribution constraints, Reliability constraints,It does not depict reliability and distribution constraints,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? They are the nearest source of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 10 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666 MB/D of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. Stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 MB/D on average in January and 280 MB/D in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. PADD 1 refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and

204

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cross-sector Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response...

207

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

208

Demand response enabling technology development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

213

Energy Demand Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents alternative approaches used in forecasting energy demand and discusses their pros and cons. It... Chaps. 3 and 4 ...

S. C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system...

Guang, L.; Li, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

216

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 MB/D in January and 280 MB/D in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak months,

217

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

218

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply, since they are the nearest source when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Over the last 10 years, stocks have provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260 thousand barrels per day in January and 280 in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month. In addition, East Coast refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other regions -- mostly the Gulf Coast -- supply 40-50% of the region's needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak

219

A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Advertising Without Supply Control: Some Implications of a Study of the Advertising of Oranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Static analysis concerned with the economically optimal expenditure on advertising in the long run. When supplies are ... of demand, the long-run effects of advertising expenditures on demand, the price elasticit...

Marc Nerlove; Frederick V. Waugh

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - automating supply chains Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Engineering 27 Collaboration Software to Reduce Inventory and Increase Response Summary: , Business Intelligence, Supply Chain, Demand Chain, Value Chain, Java,...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated supply chain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Engineering 27 Collaboration Software to Reduce Inventory and Increase Response Summary: , Business Intelligence, Supply Chain, Demand Chain, Value Chain, Java,...

223

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

224

Energy technologies and their impact on demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

Drucker, H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Production Will Meet Demand Increase This Summer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Production must meet increases in demand this year. Last year, increased imports met most of the summer demand increase, and increases in stock draws met almost all of the remainder. Production did not increase much. But this year, inventories will not be available, and increased imports seem unlikely. Thus, increases in production will be needed to meet increased demand. Imports availability is uncertain this summer. Imports in 1999 were high, and with Phase II RFG product requirements, maintaining this level could be challenging since not all refineries exporting to the U.S. will be able to meet the new gasoline specifications. Stocks will also contribute little supply this summer. Last year's high gasoline stocks allowed for a stock draw that was 58 MB/D higher than

226

Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

Coughlin, Katie

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

228

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field...

229

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-October 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply...

230

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, October 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks...

231

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

232

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

233

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

234

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition...

235

Supply Chain Networks: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Boston INFORMS Chapter and suppliers, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains may span chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global environment of increasing

Nagurney, Anna

236

Supply Chain Networks: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 International Conference of manufacturers and suppliers, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global environment of increasing

Nagurney, Anna

237

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

238

demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

239

RTP Customer Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new evidence on customer demand response to hourly pricing from the largest and...real-time pricing...(RTP) program in the United States. RTP creates value by inducing load reductions at times...

Steven Braithwait; Michael O’Sheasy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

242

On making energy demand and network constraints compatible in the last mile of the power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the classical electricity grid power demand is nearly instantaneously matched by power supply. In this paradigm, the changes in power demand in a low voltage distribution grid are essentially nothing but a disturbance that is compensated for by control at the generators. The disadvantage of this methodology is that it necessarily leads to a transmission and distribution network that must cater for peak demand. So-called smart meters and smart grid technologies provide an opportunity to change this paradigm by using demand side energy storage to moderate instantaneous power demand so as to facilitate the supply-demand match within network limitations. A receding horizon model predictive control method can be used to implement this idea. In this paradigm demand is matched with supply, such that the required customer energy needs are met but power demand is moderated, while ensuring that power flow in the grid is maintained within the safe operating region, and in particular peak demand is limited. This enables a much higher utilisation of the available grid infrastructure, as it reduces the peak-to-base demand ratio as compared to the classical control methodology of power supply following power demand. This paper investigates this approach for matching energy demand to generation in the last mile of the power grid while maintaining all network constraints through a number of case studies involving the charging of electric vehicles in a typical suburban low voltage distribution network in Melbourne, Australia.

Iven Mareels; Julian de Hoog; Doreen Thomas; Marcus Brazil; Tansu Alpcan; Derek Jayasuriya; Valentin Müenzel; Lu Xia; Ramachandra Rao Kolluri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.A meta-analysis of the price elasticity of gasoline demand.2007. Consumer demand un- der price uncertainty: Empirical

Scott, K. Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Stocks are important in the Northeast because they are the nearest source of supply when anything unexpected occurs, and they supply a significant portion of demand during the peak heating season. Stocks are normally an important part of East Coast winter distillate supply. Over the last 10 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666,000 barrels per day of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. On average, stocks supply the East Coast with about 260,000 barrels per day on average in January and 280,000 barrels per day in February. Those supplies represent draws of about 8 million barrels in one month.

245

Changing Energy Demand Behavior: Potential of Demand-Side Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a great theoretical potential to save resources by managing our demand for energy. However, demand-side management (DSM) programs targeting behavioral patterns of...

Dr. Sylvia Breukers; Dr. Ruth Mourik…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

247

Reliability modeling of demand response considering uncertainty of customer behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Demand response (DR) has been considered as a generation alternative to improve the reliability indices of the system and load point. However, when the demand resources scheduled in the DR market fail to result in demand reductions, it can potentially bring new problems associated with maintaining a reliable supply. In this paper, a reliability model of the demand resource is constructed considering customers’ behaviors in the same form as conventional generation units, where the availability and unavailability are associated with the simple two-state model. The reliability model is generalized by a multi-state model. In the integrated power market with DR, market players provide the demand reduction and generation, which are represented by an equivalent multi-state demand response and generation, respectively. The reliability indices of the system and load point are evaluated using the optimal power flow by minimizing the summation of load curtailments with various constraints.

Hyung-Geun Kwag; Jin-O Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

251

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

252

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

253

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under demand of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst INFORMS 2012 Annual Meeting, Nov 13-16, 2011 #12

Nagurney, Anna

254

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under demand of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst INFORMS 2012 Annual Meeting, Oct 14-17, 2012 #12

Nagurney, Anna

255

Demand Response In California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

256

On Demand Guarantees in Iran.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??On Demand Guarantees in Iran This thesis examines on demand guarantees in Iran concentrating on bid bonds and performance guarantees. The main guarantee types and… (more)

Ahvenainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

RENEWABLE ENERGY SUPPLY TO RURAL MEXICO, YEAR 2000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT A forecast of the renewable energy supply to rural zones is presented, for Mexico in the year 2000. The social needs of a typical village, the energy requirements associated, the availability of local energy sources and the techno-economic viability of different systems are considered. The required energy to be supplied is about 1.5 and 2.5% of the national total estimated, for electrical and thermal uses, respectively. Eventhough the proposed alternative systems are techno-economically viable, a strong development program could only satisfy 7 to 10% of the electrical demand and 14 to 29% of the heat demand. KEYWORDS Energy supply; Mexico; Forecast studies; Economic Analysis.

Manuel Martinez

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused on End-Use Energy Efficiency ~ 40 Current Projects in China Collaborations with ~50 Institutions in China Researcher #12;Talk OutlineTalk Outline · Overview · China's energy use and CO2 emission trends · Energy

Eisen, Michael

259

Demand growth to continue for oil, resume for gas this year in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand for petroleum products and natural gas in the US will move up again this year, stimulated by economic growth and falling prices. Economic growth, although slower than it was last year, will nevertheless remain strong. Worldwide petroleum supply will rise, suppressing oil prices. Natural gas prices are also expected to fall in response to the decline in oil prices and competitive pressure from other fuels. The paper discusses the economy, total energy consumption, energy sources, oil supply (including imports, stocks, refining, refining margins and prices), oil demand (motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel oil, and other petroleum products), natural gas demand, and natural gas supply.

Beck, R.J.

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

260

Supply Systems Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this position you will serve as a Supply Systems Analyst for Supply Chain Services. The incumbent is responsible for managing and supporting multiple electronic database systems, including Asset...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Demand side management in smart grid: A review and proposals for future direction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper mainly focuses on demand side management and demand response, including drivers and benefits, shiftable load scheduling methods and peak shaving techniques. Demand side management techniques found in literature are overviewed and a novel electricity demand control technique using real-time pricing is proposed. Currently users have no means to change their power consumption to benefit the whole system. The proposed method consists of modern system identification and control that would enable user side load control. This would potentially balance demand side with supply side more effectively and would also reduce peak demand and make the whole system more efficient.

Linas Gelazanskas; Kelum A.A. Gamage

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The glass pipeline: increasing supply chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based upon a year-long project carried out at a UK luxury carmaker, this paper argues for a supply chain where upstream synchronisation is improved by the use of primary demand to calculate second and third-tier component requirements. The paper formulates a case for further developments to the established automotive ''sequenced'' supply model, where synchronised and lean first tiers are frequently supplied by lower tiers that carry higher stock levels, and whose production patterns bear little relationship to primary demand. The proposed development aims to enhance synchronisation of the lower portion of the chain that is outside the reach of full ''sequenced'' supply, but, within the time horizon of the vehicle manufacturers firm build schedule. This ''synchronised'' portion of the chain is achieved through increased information transparency, and hence the term ''glass pipeline'' has been used as a label for the proposed model. A case study illustration of the concept is presented, and a prototype is tested with a series of trials across a four-tier supply chain. A method for measuring synchronisation is developed, and associated business benefits are calculated in order to evaluate the model.

Julian Coleman; Andrew Lyons; Dennis Kehoe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

264

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 of 15 1 of 15 Notes: Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 5 years, they provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. One of the biggest stock draws we have seen was in January 1994, when a prolonged severe cold spell required 666 MB/D of stocks, covering almost 36% of demand for that month. PADD 1 refineries meet about 25% of demand during January and February, and other PADDs -- mostly PADD 3 -- supply 45-50% of the regionÂ’s needs. Imports generally supply about as much as stocks during the peak months, with most of the product coming from Canada, the Virgin Islands and Venezuela. Percentages do not tell the whole story. Stocks supply close to 300

265

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

266

World Crude Production Not Keeping Pace with Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The crude market is the major factor behind todayÂ’s low stocks. This graph shows the balance between world production and demand for petroleum. Normally, production exceeds demand in the summer, building stocks, and is less than demand in the winter months, drawing the stocks back down (dark blue areas). However, production exceeded demand through most of 1997 and 1998, building world stocks to very high levels and driving prices down. But the situation reversed in 1999. Recently, there has been more petroleum demand than supply, requiring the use of stocks to meet petroleum needs. Following the extremely low crude oil prices at the beginning of 1999, OPEC agreed to remove about 6% of world production from the market in order to work off excess inventories and bring prices back up.

267

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

268

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

269

Demand response computation for future smart grids incorporating wind power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study supply and demand management in the presence of conventional and renewable energy sources, where the latter is represented by a single wind turbine. Total social welfare, defined in terms of consumer utility and cost of power ... Keywords: constrained optimization, kuhn-tucker conditions, outage probability, renewable source, smart grid

Nihan Çiçek; Hakan Deliç

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

271

Customer Load Strategies for Demand Response in Bilateral Contracting of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity markets are systems for affecting the purchase and sale of electricity using supply and demand to set energy prices. Electricity can be traded in organized markets or by negotiating forward bilateral ...

Fernando Lopes; Hugo Algarvio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Unexpected consequences of demand response : implications for energy and capacity price level and volatility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, electricity consumption has been largely insensitive to short term spot market conditions, requiring the equating of supply and demand to occur almost exclusively through changes in production. Large scale ...

Levy, Tal Z. (Tal Ze'ev)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An exploration of automotive platinum demand and its impacts on the platinum market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The platinum market is a material market of increasing interest, as platinum demand has grown faster than supply in recent years. As a result, the price of platinum has increased, causing end-user firms to experience ...

Whitfield, Christopher George

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A method to calculate the cumulative energy demand (CED) of lignite extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the utilisation of an energy carrier such as lignite, the whole life cycle including necessary energy supply processes have to be considered. Therefore using the ‘Cumulative Energy Demand’ (CED) is especially...

Michael Röhrlich; Mark Mistry…

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

276

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

277

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

278

Understanding and Analysing Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter introduces the concept of energy demand using basic micro-economics and presents the three-stage decision making process of energy demand. It then provides a set of simple ... (such as price and inco...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Supply Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 11, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million barrels per day. The data is broken down into crude oil, other petroleum supply, other non petroleum supply and liquid fuel consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO disposition EIA liquid fuels Supply Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Liquid Fuels Supply and Disposition- Reference Case (xls, 117 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License

280

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2007 1563 Transmission-Constrained Residual Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IEEE Abstract--The residual demand derivative plays a central role in constructing the best response is obtained straightforwardly by taking the derivative of the residual demand function with respect to price elastic supplies/demands at some buses in the system. We verified our results in three examples: a two

Baldick, Ross

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 861 An Optimal and Distributed Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of demand response management for the future smart grid that integrates plug-in electric vehicles for augmented Lagrangian. I. INTRODUCTION I N THE electricity market, demand response [1] is a mech- anism to manage users' consumption behavior under spe- cific supply conditions. The goal of demand response

Nehorai, Arye

282

Demand Response: Load Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

Simon, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Marketing Demand-Side Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they the only game in town, enjoying a captive market. Demand-side management (DSM) again surfaced as a method for increasing customer value and meeting these competitive challenges. In designing and implementing demand-side management (DSM) programs we... have learned a great deal about what it takes to market and sell DSM. This paper focuses on how to successfully market demand-side management. KEY STEPS TO MARKETING DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT Management Commitment The first key element in marketing...

O'Neill, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Demand Charges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Charges Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDemandCharges&oldid488967"...

285

Magnets and Power Supplies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal Bibliography Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 1 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Bending radius 38.9611 m Power supply limit 500.0 A Field at 7 GeV 0.599 T Dipole trim coils Number 80+1 No. of power supplies 80 Magnetic length 3.06 m Core length 3.00 m Power supply limit 20.0 A Maximum field 0.04 T Horizontal Correction Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317 Magnetic length 0.160 m Core length 0.07 m Power supply limit 150.0 A Maximum field 0.16 T Max. deflection at 7 GeV 1.1 mrad Vertical Corrector Dipoles Number 317 No. of power supplies 317

286

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for...

287

Assessment of Demand Response Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

288

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre;Definitions of Demand Response · `The short-term adjustment of energy use by consumers in response to price to market or reliability conditions.' (NAESB) #12;Definitions of Demand Response · The common threads

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

289

Pricing data center demand response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is crucial for the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. In this paper, we focus on a particularly promising industry for demand response: data centers. We use simulations to show that, not only are data centers large loads, ... Keywords: data center, demand response, power network, prediction based pricing

Zhenhua Liu; Iris Liu; Steven Low; Adam Wierman

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Overview of Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

291

Quantifying flexibility of residential thermostatically controlled loads for demand response: a data-driven approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are undergoing a paradigm shift due to the influx of variable renewable generation to the supply side. The resulting increased uncertainty has system operators looking to new resources, enabled by smart grid technologies, on the demand ... Keywords: demand response, inverse building model, load shedding, thermostatically controlled loads

Emre Can Kara; Michaelangelo D. Tabone; Jason S. MacDonald; Duncan S. Callaway; Sila Kiliccote

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comfort-Aware Home Energy Management Under Market-Based Demand-Response Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf-based pricing. In peak capping, each home is allocated an energy quota. In market-based pricing, the price of energy varies based on market supply-demand. Market-based This research was supported by World Class

Boutaba, Raouf

293

Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress) Vicente Botti1 , Antonio Scientific Research Council, {vbotti,agarridot,agiret}@dsic.upv.es, pablo@iiia.csic.es I. WATER MANAGEMENT management models are based on equa- tional descriptions of aggregate supply and demand in a water basin [2

Garrido, Antonio

294

Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Managing water demand as a regulated open MAS. (Work in progress) Vicente Botti 1 , Antonio Scientific Research Council, {vbotti,agarridot,agiret}@dsic.upv.es, pablo@iiia.csic.es I. WATER MANAGEMENT management models are based on equa­ tional descriptions of aggregate supply and demand in a water basin [2

Garrido, Antonio

295

NUFinancials Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUFinancials Supply Chain FMS801 & 803 Purchasing Glossary 03/31/2010 © 2010 Northwestern University FMS801 & 803 1 Purchasing Glossary Guide to terms used in iBuyNU and NUFinancials purchasing Term, faculty salary, office supplies. Similar to CUFS Object Code, Revenue Source, and Balance Sheet. Note

Shull, Kenneth R.

296

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of control. Water heater demand response options are notcurrent water heater and air conditioning demand responsecustomer response Demand response water heater participation

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Like HECO actual utility demand response implementations canindustry-wide utility demand response applications tend toobjective. Figure 4. Demand Response Objectives 17  

Levy, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

312

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

313

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

314

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

315

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

316

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

317

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 3.5. Avoided Costeconomic analysis of DR. Avoided cost approaches are simplecase include not only avoided costs of supply but also the

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Barloworld Supply Chain Software USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barloworld Supply Chain Software USA Supply Chain Consultant / Inventory Analyst Position November 2011 #12;Barloworld SCS USA ­ Supply Chain / Inventory Analyst Aug 2011 Page 2 of 4 INTRODUCTION Barloworld Supply Chain Software (SCS) USA would like to invite you to apply for a Supply Chain

Heller, Barbara

319

Power Supply Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Crystal Displays require dedicated power supply circuits to support their specific requirements. Many different display technologies coexist in the market and compete for their market share. While the p...

Oliver Nachbaur

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

GSA Wind Supply Opportunity  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wind Supply Opportunity 1 2 3 Proposed Location * Size: 100-210 MegaWatts *Location: Bureau County, IL *Planned COD: December 2014 or 2015 *Site Control: 17,000 acres *Wind...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

European supply chain study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction: Supply chain management has been defined as, "..a set of approaches utilized to efficiently integrate suppliers, manufacturers, warehouses and stores, so that merchandise is produced and distributed at the ...

Puri, Mohitkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Washington's power supply collapse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON 25 July 1983 the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) defaulted on 2,250 million of municipal revenue bonds. This, ... has been polemical and accusatory in nature, blaming the Washington State Supreme Court, the Bonneville ...

Roger H. Bezdek

1985-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analytic Solutions for Supply Function Equilibria: Uniqueness and Stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

responsive, i.e. > 0, then it is no longer necessary to impose a price cap to ensure ?nite solutions and so, in the absence of a price cap, there should be no perfectly elastic segments of the SFE. Consider the deterministic demand case in which... Anderson and Hu (2008) give similar propositions for more general cost and demand functions for strong supply function equilibria but under the assumption that demand is su˘ ciently elastic to prevent any price caps binding. Proposition 1 In equilibrium...

Newbery, David

324

Harnessing the power of demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Manufacturer-To-Retailer versus Manufacturer-To-Consumer Rebates in a Supply Chain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Starting with a newsvendor model (single-product, single-period, stochastic demand), we build a single-retailer, single-manufacturer supply chain with endogenous manufacturer rebates and retail pricing. The deman...

Goker Aydin; Evan L. Porteus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,...

327

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

330

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

331

Grand Challenges and Opportunities Supply Chain Network Analysis to Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isenberg School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 NetGCoop 2011, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains may span thousands of miles as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global environment of increasing risk and uncertainty can only

Nagurney, Anna

332

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

333

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global gasoline and diesel price and income elasticities.shift in the short-run price elasticity of gasoline demand.Habits and Uncertain Relative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con-

Scott, K. Rebecca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supply chain coordination through rebate induced contracts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper three different types of rebate induced contract namely direct-rebate and revenue sharing contract; downward direct rebate contract; direct-rebate and effort sharing contract are proposed for supply chain coordination perspective. Effectiveness and flexibility of proposed contracts under linear and iso-elastic demand are discussed analytically. It is shown that under certain conditions both manufacturer and retailer can gain more profit by means of appropriate coordination contracts. Several important implications are derived analytically to point out relationship among characteristically different contracts. Results are illustrated with numerical examples.

Subrata Saha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst DSI 2012 Annual Meeting, Nov 17-20, 2012 San Francisco, CA Introduction Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under

Nagurney, Anna

338

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 366,285 - - - - 501,418 159,175 -109,633 -12,929 918,349 11,825 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 122,918 -4,579 37,556 21,926 4,444 - - 15,132 24,244 34,819 108,070 58,830 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

339

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 20 September 2013 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 1,188,751 - - - - 1,015,091 -112,708 94,064 20,399 2,158,191 6,608 0 882,207 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 440,766 -88 123,986 10,625 46,383 - - 16,960 76,972 72,880 454,860 114,138 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

340

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,003,948 - - - - 2,123,490 65,265 6,899 4,157,486 28,318 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 686,936 -4,909 195,516 47,812 - - 36,219 127,051 118,364 643,721 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 92,842 -4,909 - - 10,243 - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.PDF 1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 36,593 - - - - 31,429 - 4,534 890 71,666 - 0 55,877 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,154 -11 1,013 192 - - - -786 2,587 629 918 3,544 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,013 -11 - - - - - - -35 842 110 85 36 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

342

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE7.PDF TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 109,919 - - - - 142,073 -20,272 -3,481 6,003 222,236 - 0 858,776 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 43,678 -17 9,648 1,838 7,546 - - -2,299 8,340 4,663 51,989 65,215 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 4,840 -17 - - 1,688 -3,010 - -

343

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 32 - - - - 843 -1 230 8 1,061 35 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 71 0 45 40 77 - - 1 16 10 205 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 12 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 2 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

344

Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Petroleum Supply Monthly Archives With Data for December 2011 | Release Date: February 29, 2012 Changes to Table 26. "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State": Current State-level data are now included in Table 26, in addition to current U.S. and PAD District sums. State offshore production for Louisiana, Texas, Alaska, and California, which are included in the State totals, are no longer reported separately in a "State Offshore Production" category. Previously, State-level values lagged 2 months behind the U.S. and PAD District values. Beginning with this publication, they will be on the same cycle. Also included in this publication are two additional pages for Table 26 that provide October and November data. With the release of

345

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 5,877 - - - - 8,716 83 -218 14,841 53 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,351 -20 372 252 - - -417 566 206 2,600 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 296 -20 - - 78 - - 37 172 71 75 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,055 - - 372 174 - - -454 394 135 2,525

346

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 September 2013 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 300,668 - - - - 297,837 - 31,342 -3,713 633,292 267 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 17,739 -73 18,288 1,401 - - - 3,536 17,170 3,791 12,858 8,270 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7,914

347

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 751 - - - - 26,471 -300 1,308 -869 28,999 100 0 9,902 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,313 -7 839 2,091 3,702 - - -929 816 33 8,018 7,618 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 225 -7 - - - - - - 3 - 11 204 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

348

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 8,672 - - - - 230,125 -359 62,824 2,069 289,586 9,606 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 19,329 -83 12,151 10,808 21,118 - - 168 4,287 2,821 56,047 6,541 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

349

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. TABLE1.PDF 1. TABLE1.PDF Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

350

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.PDF 2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,180 - - - - 1,014 - 146 29 2,312 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 33 6 - - - -25 83 20 30 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 33 0 - - - - - - -1 27 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 33 6 - - - -24 56 17 27 Ethane/Ethylene

351

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

352

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 182,188 - - - - 270,188 2,576 -6,767 460,074 1,646 0 1,026,829 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 72,869 -607 11,545 7,801 - - -12,921 17,534 6,391 80,604 128,709 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 9,170 -607 - - 2,421 - - 1,146 5,321 2,200 2,317 17,598 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

353

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,175 - - - - 10,226 -3,426 -1,436 132 17,407 1 0 15,969 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,584 -10 52 460 -10,314 - - -12 611 282 1,891 1,375 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,788 -10 - - - -1,036 - - -15 174 273 310 180 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

354

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 3,327 - - - - 4,646 -720 39 -191 7,482 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,380 -1 304 84 227 - - -113 306 108 1,693 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 155 -1 - - 77 -58 - - 35 106 1 31 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

355

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,019 - - - - 52,699 26,041 2,973 12 109,175 1,544 0 93,189 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 14,079 -560 812 2,541 -423 - - -6,605 4,051 2,114 16,889 48,197 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,354 -560 - - 21 2,843 - - 110 1,049

356

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,354 - - - - 3,718 -413 345 75 7,905 24 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,615 0 454 39 170 - - 62 282 267 1,666 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 195 0 - - 36 -65 - - 15 113 4 35 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

357

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE9.PDF TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 12,961 - - - - 10,783 -3,879 896 2,868 17,893 0 0 18,695 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 12,770 -9 127 502 -11,116 - - -50 621 280 1,423 1,326 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,484 -9 - - - -1,152 - - 7 122 264 -70 187 Liquefied Petroleum Gases

358

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 734 - - - - 26,368 419 -1,209 627 25,554 130 0 10,529 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 1,314 -6 923 1,606 2,621 - - -1,556 707 53 7,254 6,409 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 213 -6 - - - - - - 3 5 6 193 34 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

359

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

360

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE5.PDF TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 29,902 - - - - 53,695 23,732 5,619 2,406 108,247 2,295 0 95,547 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 13,989 -544 1,333 2,797 949 - - -6,644 3,628 2,687 18,853 41,545 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 1,274 -544 - - 11 4,162 - - 233 966

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 7,340 - - - - 7,778 239 25 15,229 104 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,516 -18 716 175 - - 133 465 434 2,358 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 340 -18 - - 38 - - 20 168 134 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,176 - - 716

362

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 September 2013 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 139,573 - - - - 79,019 -46,108 -13,333 1,073 158,068 10 0 19,287 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 86,184 -86 3,535 3,052 -71,945 - - 423 4,378 4,054 11,885 1,893 Pentanes Plus ..................................................

363

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

30 30 September 2013 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,101 - - - - 1,091 - 115 -14 2,320 1 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 65 0 67 5 - - - 13 63 14 47 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 29 0 - - - - - - 1 21 4 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

364

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.PDF .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 6,133 - - - - 8,527 205 413 14,374 78 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 2,384 -19 421 224 - - -366 512 268 2,595 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 285 -19 - - 55 - - -26 160 89 98 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 2,099 - - 421 169 - - -340 353 179 2,497 Ethane/Ethylene

365

Petroleum supply monthly, February 1988. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total US demand for petroleum products during February 1988 averaged about 17.6 million barrels per day, 0.9 million barrels per day above the average of a year earlier. This marks the third consecutive month in which total product supplied has exceeded 17.0 million barrels per day. For the most part, the disposition of the major products continued to follow seasonal patterns. Total products stocks dropped by 26.0 million barrels to 683.1 million barrels. Refinery utilization fell from January's 82.8 percent rate to 81.1 percent. Crude oil imports from Saudi Arabia rose to 1.2 million barrels per day, 0.4 million barrels per day above the average for January. Unusually mild weather, especially in the Mid-Atlantic states and New England, kept deliveries of both distillate and residual fuel oil virtually unchanged from January's high seasonal levels, although both were still well above the levels for these products the same time last year. Distillate demand averaged 3.5 million barrels per day in February, five percent above the February 1987 average. Residual fuel oil demand was 1.6 million barrels per day this month, nine percent greater than a year ago. Part of this increase in demand from the previous year reflects the improved competitive position of residual fuel oil in some utility and industrial markets, mostly due to increases in natural gas prices starting in the fourth quarter of 1987. 12 figs.

Not Available

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

U.S. oil, natural gas demand still climbing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady economic growth and slightly lower prices will boost demand for petroleum and natural gas in the US again this year. Economic growth will lag behind last year`s level but will remain strong. Increased worldwide petroleum production should lower oil prices and encourage fuel-switching, which will suppress natural gas prices. In the US, total energy consumption will grow less rapidly than economic activity due to continuing improvement in energy efficiency. US petroleum product demand will move up to 1.5% in 1997 to average 18.45 million b/d. And natural gas consumption will be up 0.7% at 22.05 tcf. Despite the oil price increases of 1996, US crude oil production will continue to slide in 1997; Oil and Gas Journal projects a drop of 1.1%. US production has been falling since 1985, except for a modest increase in 1991 related to the Persian Gulf War. The rate of decline has diminished in the past 2 years, but US crude oil production has still fall at an average rate of about 226,000 b/d/year since 1985. The paper discusses the economy, total energy consumption, the oil supply, imports, stocks, refining, refining margins and prices, demand for motor gasoline, jet fuel, distillate fuel, residual fuel oil, and other petroleum products, and natural gas demand and supply.

Beck, R.J.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Reshaping the electricity supply industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cigre`s Electra magazine published this interview with Alfonso Limbruno, CEO of ENEL S.p.A. To put the interview in perspective, this article begins with a brief overview of ENEL and a biographical sketch of Alfonso Limbruno, and also carries comments from Y. Thomas, secretary general of CIGRE. ENEL is a vertically integrated nationwide electricity company engaged in the generation, transmission, distribution, and sale of electricity, predominantly in Italy. ENEL`s share accounts for approximately 80 percent of Italian electricity demand. Measured by amount of electricity sold, ENEL is the third largest electric utility in the OECD countries and the second largest electric utility in Europe. Measured by revenues, ENEL is one of the largest companies in Italy, with a turnover of Lit. 37,632 billion. In 1995, ENEL served approximately 28.5 million customers and sold 211,607 GWh of electricity. ENEL`s gross installed generating capacity at December 31, 1995 was 55,906 MW. Alfonso Limbruno made all his career in the Italian electricity supply industry (ESI) and has had quite a unique experience: he went through a complete cycle of change of the ESI in his country, the nationalization of the sector in 1962 with the merging in ENEL of over 1,200 undertakings, and now the privatization of the company, along with a far reaching restructuring of the industry. He was appointed CEO of ENEL in August 1992.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

369

Demand Response Research in Spain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

370

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

371

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keeping Unit or SKU) employing attribute analysis techniques. The objective of this thesis is to improve Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock

Sun, Yu

373

Perishable Product Supply Chains in Health Care: Models, Analysis, and Computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Chalmers University of Technology of manufacturers and suppliers, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains and resiliency of supply chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global

Nagurney, Anna

374

Perishable Product Supply Chains in Health Care: Models, Analysis, and Computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Royal Institute of Technology -- KTH of manufacturers and suppliers, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains and resiliency of supply chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global

Nagurney, Anna

375

Perishable Product Supply Chains in Health Care: Models, Analysis, and Computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Vienna University of Economics of manufacturers and suppliers, distributors, retailers, and consumers at the demand markets. Today, supply chains and resiliency of supply chains, as well as their adaptability and responsiveness to events in a global

Nagurney, Anna

376

Vol. XV No.2 The Global Seafood Industry: A Perspective on Consumption and Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July 2011 Vol. XV No.2 The Global Seafood Industry: A Perspective on Consumption and Supply Florida. These resulting campaigns (e.g., dolphin-safe tuna, Give Swordfish a Break) aim to affect the seafood demand and lead to a sustainable seafood supply. Although there are indicators of some regional successes, lack

Florida, University of

377

Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal and coke from a macroeconomic perspective, I apply the ...

Li, Yu, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5..., 2009 4 An Innovative Solution to Get the Ball Rolling ? Demand Response (DR) ? Monitoring Based Commissioning (MBCx) EnerNOC has a solution involving two complementary offerings. ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference...

379

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Manufacturer-to-Retailer versus Manufacturer-to-Consumer Rebates in a Supply Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturer-to-Retailer versus Manufacturer-to-Consumer Rebates in a Supply Chain Goker Aydin rebates and retail pricing. The demand uncertainty is multiplicative, and the expected demand depends on the effective (retail) price of the product. A retailer rebate goes from the manufacturer to the retailer

Aydin, Goker

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Long-Term Security of Supply Assessment under Open Electricity Market - Energy Policy Impacts in Slovenia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the steady demand growth and diminishing generation capacity margin due to lack of generation investment, Slovenia is already importing almost a quarter of electricity needed to cover its demand. Coupled with the deregulated electricity market ... Keywords: security of supply, optimal policy measures, energy balance, ELMASplus, generation expansion planning

Iztok Zlatar; Borut Kozan; Andrej F. Gubina

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Investigacin Supply chain collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These interactions among firms' decisions ask for alignment and coordination of actions. Therefore, game theory quantities, among others. Nowadays, business decisions are dominated by the globalization of markets, and that the decisions taken by a firm do also affect the performance of the other parties in the supply chain

Boucherie, Richard J.

383

Negotiations Within Supply Chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we consider a negotiation between a supplier and its retailer. Due to the supplier's commitments with other customers the negotiation is about the maximum order quantity the retailer can order at a fixed price. We propose a structuring ... Keywords: capacity, contract, cooperation, negotiations, scenario, supply chain management

Carsten Homburg; Christoph Schneeweiss

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

385

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations Philip D. Lusk Deputy Director Energy Analyst #12;PLACE CAPTION HERE. #12;#12;#12;#12;City of Port Angeles Demand Response History energy charges · Demand charges during peak period only ­ Reduced demand charges for demand response

386

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

389

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 119 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides

390

Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts (MESSAGE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www-tc.iaea.org/tcweb/abouttc/strategy/Thematic/pdf/presentations/ener References: Overview of IAEA PESS Models [1] "MESSAGE combines technologies and fuels to construct so-called "energy chains", making it possible to map energy flows from supply (resource extraction) to demand (energy services). The model can help design long

391

Environmental inventories for future electricity supply systems for Switzerland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Swiss Association of Producers and Distributors of Electricity (VSE) identified a number of possible supply mix options to meet the future electricity demand in Switzerland. In this context, PSI, in co-operation with ETHZ, analysed environmental inventories for the selected electricity supply systems. Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) was used to establish the inventories, covering the complete energy chains associated with fossil, nuclear and renewable systems. The assessment was performed on three levels: (1) individually for each system considered; (2) comparison of systems; (3) comparison of supply mix options. In absolute value, the emissions of the major pollutants considered are, in most cases, significantly reduced in comparison with the currently operating systems. Due to the considerable advancements in fossil power plant technologies, the relative importance of other activities increases in the fossil energy systems. Selected results for systems and supply options are given in the present paper.

R. Dones; U.; Ganter; S. Hirschberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

\\{HEMSs\\} and enabled demand response in electricity market: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Traditional electricity grid offers demand side management (DSM) programs for industrial plants and commercial buildings; there is no such program for residential consumers because of the lack of effective automation tools and efficient information and communication technologies (ICTs). Smart Grid is, by definition, equipped with modern automation tools such as home energy management system (HEMS), and ICTs. HEMS is an intelligent system that performs planning, monitoring and control functions of the energy utilization within premises. It is intended to offer desirable demand response according to system conditions and price value signaled by the utility. HEMS enables smart appliances to counter demand response programs according to the comfort level and priority set by the consumer. Demand response can play a key role to ensure sustainable and reliable electricity supply by reducing future generation cost, electricity prices, CO2 emission and electricity consumption at peak times. This paper focuses on the review of \\{HEMSs\\} and enabled demand response (DR) programs in various scenarios as well as incorporates various DR architectures and models employed in the smart grid. A comprehensive case study along with simulations and numerical analysis has also been presented.

Aftab Ahmed Khan; Sohail Razzaq; Asadullah Khan; Fatima Khursheed; Owais

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 2012 January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 190,109 - - - - 264,348 6,359 12,794 445,596 2,425 0 1,039,424 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 73,905 -587 13,044 6,935 - - -11,335 15,883 8,313 80,436 118,039 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8,824 -587 - - 1,699 - - -805 4,946 2,754 3,041 16,791 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 65,081 - - 13,044 5,236 - - -10,530 10,937 5,559 77,395 101,248 Ethane/Ethylene

394

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.PDF 3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 734 29,902 109,919 12,961 36,593 190,109 6,133 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 18,374 593 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - - 171,734 5,540 Imports (PAD District of Entry) ............................. 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Commercial ...................................................... 26,368 53,695 142,073 10,783 31,429 264,348 8,527 Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) ................. - - - - - - - Net Receipts .........................................................

395

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 2,374,021 - - - - 3,120,755 53,567 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918

396

Facilitating Renewable Integration by Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Demand response is seen as one of the resources ... expected to incentivize small consumers to participate in demand response. This chapter models the involvement of small consumers in demand response programs wi...

Juan M. Morales; Antonio J. Conejo…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Value of Demand Response -Introduction Klaus Skytte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value of Demand Response - Introduction Klaus Skytte Systems Analysis Department February 7, 2006 Energinet.dk, Ballerup #12;What is Demand Response? Demand response (DR) is the short-term response

400

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Peak oil supply or oil not for sale?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The restrictions imposed by climate change are inevitable and will be exerted either via precautionary mitigation of (mainly energy-related) CO2 emissions or via irreversible impacts on ecosystems and on human habitats. Either way, oil markets are bound to incur drastic shrinking. Concern over peak oil supply will crumble when the irrevocable peak oil demand is created. Replacing oil in the world's energy economies requires redirected market forces, notably in the form of steadily increasing oil end-use prices. Yet, thus far, crude oil prices have obeyed the market fundamentals of expanding-contracting demand and oligopolistic supply. A hockey stick supply curve supports high sales prices, providing large rents to submarginal sources. Cutting oil demand and maintaining high prices implies reducing the supply hockey stick's length by curtailing some oil producers. In such a scenario, the alliances, goals, and tactics of oil geopolitics are set to change. We identify a distribution over friendly and hostile oil suppliers, with others drifting in between the two sides. Conflicts and warfare are less aimed at conquering oil fields for exploitation than at paralyzing production capabilities of opponents or of unreliable transient sources. Covert warfare and instigation of internal conflicts are likely tactics to exhaust hostile opponents.

Aviel Verbruggen; Thijs Van de Graaf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

403

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

404

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Title Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5763E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Venkata Ganti, Nance Matson, and Mary Ann Piette Publisher PG&E/SDG&E/CEC/LBNL Keywords communication and standards, control systems, data centers, demand response, enabling technologies, end-use technologies, load migration, market sectors, technologies Abstract The energy use in data centers is increasing and, in particular, impacting the data center energy cost and electric grid reliability during peak and high price periods. As per the 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company territory, data centers are estimated to consume 500 megawatts of annual peak electricity. The 2011 data confirm the increase in data center energy use, although it is slightly lower than the EPA forecast. Previous studies have suggested that data centers have significant potential to integrate with supply-side programs to reduce peak loads. In collaboration with California data centers, utilities, and technology vendors, this study conducted field tests to improve the understanding of the demand response opportunities in data centers. The study evaluated an initial set of control and load migration strategies and economic feasibility for four data centers. The findings show that with minimal or no impact to data center operations a demand savings of 25% at the data center level or 10% to 12% at the whole building level can be achieved with strategies for cooling and IT equipment, and load migration. These findings should accelerate the grid-responsiveness of data centers through technology development, integration with the demand response programs, and provide operational cost savings.

405

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Demand Response Technology Development The objective ofin planning demand response technology RD&D by conductingNew and Emerging Technologies into the California Smart Grid

Joseph, Eto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Response - Policy Demand Response - Policy Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's...

408

Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

409

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response A pilot program from NSTAR in Massachusetts,Massachusetts, aiming to test whether an intensive program of energy efficiency and demand response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 January 16, 2011 Conference Call...

412

Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools & Strategies Presentation slides from the BetterBuildings...

413

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Conventional and Alternative Fuel Response Simulatormodified to include alternative fuel demand scenarios (whichvehicle adoption and alternative fuel demand) later in the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Demand-based Optimal Control to Save Energy: A Case-Study in a Medical Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be a demand, but those may not be readily available through a control system. The position of dampers and valves, room temperature, static pressure, or fan and pump speed are good indicators of demand for they can be read through the control..., December 15-17, 2008 Discharge Air Temperature Reset The control sequences optimization of supply air temperature reset in the SDVAV is similar to the cold deck temperature reset described in the DDCV above. Static Pressure Reset For the exiting...

Joo, I. S.; Song, L.; Liu, M.; Carico, M.

415

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Oil and Gas Supply Module The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze crude oil and natural gas exploration and development on a regional basis (Figure 8). The OGSM is organized into 4 submodules: Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule[1], and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2011), (Washington, DC, 2011). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum

416

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Smart Buildings and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology the strengthening of the Internet and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems in buildings. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto?DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components systems end?uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used levels of services by energy using systems granularity of control and speed of telemetry. DR when defined as a discrete event requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 February 2012 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii December 2011 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

420

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

With Data for September 2013 With Data for September 2013 November 2013 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii September 2013 EIA DATA ARE AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORM All current EIA publications are available on the EIA web site. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download EIA data and analysis applications, and find out about new EIA information products and services: World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.gov FTP: ftp://ftp.eia.doe.gov Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

422

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

423

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

Tesfatsion, Leigh

424

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Prepared by Richard Perez et al. NREL subcontract response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing by solid evidence from three utility case studies. BACKGROUND Demand Response: demand response (DR

Perez, Richard R.

425

Continuous improvement at a multinational company : dealing with uncertainty in the global supply chain and analyzing implementation dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the problem of global supply chain flexibility in the context of a multinational commonly that we refer to as Company X. Company X faces competitive markets, increasingly demanding customers, and ...

Ochoa Gonzalez, Arturo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spatial Analyses of Electricity Supply and Consumption in Turkey for Effective Energy Management and Policy-making  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the past decades, both public and private institutions have extensively analyzed energy supply and demand on national and international bases (WEC-TNC 2004; Munasinghe and Meier 1993). The main focus of t...

Evren Deniz Yaylaci…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Estimation of changes in energy consumption for heat supply due to interannual temperature variability in the south of the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of low-frequency variability of average over the heating season air temperature on population demands in heat supply is considered. Based on monthly mean temperature values for the period from 18...

A. Kh. Degterev; L. N. Degtereva

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Fact #859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent Event to Affect Crude Oil Prices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Crude oil prices have been extremely volatile over the past few decades. World events can disrupt the flow of oil to the market or cause uncertainty about future supply or demand for oil, leading...

429

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2005 data from initial estimates, to interim values, to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to produce more accurate petroleum supply data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents

430

Prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China based on grey linear regression composition model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scarce of coking coal resources in China results in its short supply. By establishing a grey linear regression composition model, this paper has greatly improved the inadequacy of grey system prediction model and regression analysis method in trend prediction and finished the prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China with this model. As result of the prediction, it is estimated that in the next decade, the demand for coking coal in China will experience a growth trend; China's demand for coking coal will reach more than 1.535 billion tons by 2015, reach the maximum of 1.639 billion tons by 2020 and drop in 2025.

Hai-Dong Zhou; Qiang Wu; Min Fang; Zhong-Bao Ren; Li-Fei Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

432

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Incorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection Transmission Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aggregator Programs. Demand Response Measurement andIncorporating Demand Response into Western Interconnection13 Demand Response Dispatch

Satchwell, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

438

Application-oriented modelling of domestic energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Detailed residential energy consumption data can be used to offer advanced services and provide new business opportunities to all participants in the energy supply chain, including utilities, distributors and customers. The increasing interest in the residential consumption data is behind the roll-out of smart meters in large areas and led to intensified research efforts in new data acquisition technologies for the energy sector. This paper introduces a novel model for generation of residential energy consumption profiles based on the energy demand contribution of each household appliance and calculated by using a probabilistic approach. The model takes into consideration a wide range of household appliances and its modular structure provides a high degree of flexibility. Residential consumption data generated by the proposed model are suitable for development of new services and applications such as residential real-time pricing schemes or tools for energy demand prediction. To demonstrate the main features of the model, an individual household consumption was created and the effects of a possible change in the user behaviour and the appliance configuration presented. In order to show the flexibility offered in creation of the aggregated demand, the detailed simulation results of an energy demand management algorithm applied to an aggregated user group are used.

J.K. Gruber; S. Jahromizadeh; M. Prodanovi?; V. Rako?evi?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Supplemental Gas Supplies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 18 0 0 0 18 Colorado...................... 0 344 0 0 a 6,443 6,787 Connecticut ................. 0 48 0 0 0 48 Delaware ..................... 0 1 0 0 0 1 Georgia........................ 0 94 0 0 0 94 Hawaii.......................... 2,761 0 0 0 0 2,761 Illinois .......................... 0 488 3,423 0 0 3,912 Indiana......................... 0 539 0 0 b 2,655 3,194 Iowa............................. 0 301 0 0 0 301 Kentucky...................... 0 45 0 0 0 45 Maine........................... 0 61 0 0 0 61 Maryland...................... 0 882 0 0 0 882 Massachusetts ............ 0 426 0 0 0 426 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,848 21,848 Minnesota.................... 0 709 0 0 0 709 Missouri

440

Switching power supply  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

Mihalka, A.M.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but also has become the backbone for our economic development. The world has witnessed electric power1 THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY and supply in the world in general, and in the US, in particular. The electric power and energy industry

442

Future oil supply scenarios and required investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The supply of oil, like any other commodity, is sensitive to price changes. However, movements in oil supply are dependent on other additional factors, the most important of which are the geology of the region and the fiscal and contractual regimes. Total world oil supply to meet the current demand is estimated at about 52 mb/d (excluding the former CPEs). Since non-OPEC production has plateaued and is expected to fall in the future, the additional future oil supplies must come from OPEC member countries. This conclusion is borne out if we examine the respective reserves and reserves-to-production ratio of OPEC and non-OPEC producers. Of the world's total proven oil reserves of about 922 billion barrels (excluding the former CPEs), OPEC holds 84 per cent. The reserves-to-production ratio of OPEC member countries presently stands at more than 100 years, and with known reserves regularly being revised upwards. For the rest of the world, excluding the former CPEs, the ratio is only 16 years. During the 1990s, the largest growth in production capacity to meet the increasing demand is expected to come from OPEC member countries, particularly the Middle Eastern ones. Non-OPEC regions, such as North America and the Soviet Union, are expected to continue their decline. whereas the North Sea region will mature and start to fall at the end of the decade. The per barrel investment cost in capacity expansion in OPEC region, particularly in the Middle-East, is the lowest in the world to develop a new capacity and to main current output. This is in line with the present low level of production cost in the region. The application of enhanced recovery techniques to some of the mature fields in OPEC countries would not change the picture in general terms, and the impact of the new technology will be to further reduce the cost of oil production. In order to meet the increasing future oil demand, substantial additional investment, especially in the upstream sector, is required by OPEC member countries. To enhance the investment needed, OPEC producers must be able to predict the oil demand, which means that co-operation measures between all producers, oil companies, the consumers and their governments are urgently needed. The future pattern of energy requirements is expected to stimulate upstream exploratory and development activities as well as other development of infrastructures, such as pipelines in the gas and oil industries. The numerous accidents in recent years in energy production, transport, distribution, refining and conversion have confirmed the need to tighten the environmental regulations, and the need to increase investments in all the energy industries after a decade of under-investment, especially in the oil upstream.

A. Miremadi; I.A.H Ismail

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar Today's Energy Supply - Yesterday's Grid Webinar May 30, 2012 11:00AM MDT Online This webinar will include an informative session and discussion on how utilities' generation portfolios are changing, often faster than the grid infrastructure that supports them, and the challenges utilities currently face in integrating new generation and demand (load) response technologies into a grid that was designed to operate a different way. Discussions will include transmission studies from the Western Grid Group and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This webinar is sponsored by the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, Western Area Power Administration, DOE Federal Energy Management Program,

444

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National...

445

A Stochastic Perishable Inventory System with Random Supply Quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers a continuous review perishable inventory system with demands ar-rive according to a Markovian arrival process (MAP). We model, in this paper, the situation in which not all the ordered items are usable and the supply may contain a fraction of defec-tive items. The number of usable items is a random quantity. We consider a modified (s, S) policy which allows a finite number of pending order to be placed. We assume full back-logging of demands that occurred during stock out periods and that the recent backlogged demand may renege the system after an exponentially distributed amount of time. The limiting distribution of the inventory level is derived and shown to have matrix geometric form. The measures of system performance in the steady state are derived.

Paul Manuel; A. Shophia Lawrence; G. Arivarignan

446

Regionalized LCA-Based Optimization of Building Energy Supply: Method and Case Study for a Swiss Municipality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regionalized LCA-Based Optimization of Building Energy Supply: Method and Case Study for a Swiss Municipality ... This paper presents a regionalized LCA-based multiobjective optimization model of building energy demand and supply for the case of a Swiss municipality for the minimization of greenhouse gas emissions and particulate matter formation. ... A suitable method for such analyses is life cycle assessment (LCA). ...

Dominik Saner; Carl Vadenbo; Bernhard Steubing; Stefanie Hellweg

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

Propane Supply & Infrastructure Suggested Slides  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7, 2014 28 * ILLINOIS - retailers indicate the majority of end-users have filled tanks, record corn crop could mean large demand for drying. * IOWA - retailers' storage full...

448

Coordinating supply chains with sales rebate contracts and vendor-managed inventory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coordinating supply chains is an effective way to improve channel performance. This paper details how a sales rebate contract helps achieve supply chain coordination which allows decentralized decisions of chain members to perform a centralized decision for the whole system. A model in the context of a two-echelon supply chain with a single supplier serving multiple retailers in vendor-managed inventory (VMI) partnership is proposed. VMI facilitates the application of the sales rebate contract since information sharing in VMI partnership allows the supplier to obtain actual sales data in a timely manner and determine the rebate for retailers. Retailers are considered in two scenarios: independent retailers with a demand function sensitive only to their own price and competing retailers with a demand function depending on all retailers’ prices. The proposed model demonstrates that the supplier gains more profit with competing retailers than without as competition among the retailers lowers the prices and thus stimulates demand.

W.K. Wong; J. Qi; S.Y.S. Leung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Crude Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Crude Oil Supply Domestic Production (a) .......................................... 6.22 6.29 6.42 7.02 7.11 7.29 7.61 7.97 8.26 8.45 8.57 8.86 6.49 7.50 8.54 Alaska .................................................................. 0.58 0.53 0.44 0.55 0.54 0.51 0.48 0.52 0.51 0.47 0.42 0.49 0.53 0.51 0.47 Federal Gulf of Mexico (b) .................................... 1.34 1.19 1.18 1.36 1.30 1.22 1.27 1.29 1.34 1.36 1.37 1.45 1.27 1.27 1.38 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ................................ 4.31 4.57 4.80 5.11 5.28 5.56 5.87 6.16 6.41 6.61 6.77 6.91 4.70 5.72 6.68 Crude Oil Net Imports (c) ......................................... 8.55 8.88 8.52 7.89 7.47 7.61 7.94 7.36 6.66 6.78 6.83 6.06 8.46 7.60 6.58 SPR Net Withdrawals ..............................................

450

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

452

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director;Demand Response Results, 2004 Load Control ­ Cool Keeper ­ ID Irrigation Load Control Price Responsive

453

Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

454

ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Introduction Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act 2009 requires public agencies and implement energy Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) plans starting in 2014. Requirementsofthe ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan 2014-2019 #12

Abolmaesumi, Purang

455

Energy Demand Analysis at a Disaggregated Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to consider energy demand at the fuel level or at the ... . This chapter first presents the disaggregation of energy demand, discusses the information issues and introduces framewor...

Subhes C. Bhattacharyya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Seasonal temperature variations and energy demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an empirical study of the relationship between residential energy demand and temperature. Unlike previous studies in this ... different regions and to the contrasting effects on energy demand ...

Enrica De Cian; Elisa Lanzi; Roberto Roson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Repetitive resonant railgun power supply  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Basic Costs in Electricity Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ONE of the principal problems in the management of public electricity supply companies is how to reconcile the ... supply companies is how to reconcile the costs with the charges not only from year to year but also in their irregular secular ...

1941-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

459

WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

US Army Corps of Engineers

460

Decentralized demand management for water distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Actual Daily Demand for Model 2 . . 26 4 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 1 27 5 Predicted vs. Actual Peak Hourly Demand for Model 2 28 6 Cumulative Hourly Demand Distribution 7 Bryan Distribution Network 8 Typical Summer Diurnal... locating and controlling water that has not been accounted for. The Ford Meter Box Company (1987) advises the testing and recalibration of existing water meters. Because operating costs in a distribution network can be quite substantial, a significant...

Zabolio, Dow Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," 411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Dataset Summary Description The Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," collects information from the Nation's power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas: the security of the electrical systems; the usage of

462

electricity supply | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

supply supply Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting, among other things, data on the U.S. electricity supply. Source NREL Date Released March 05th, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electricity supply NREL Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Supply (13 worksheets) (xls, 1.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment

463

Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

465

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Matthew M. Breslin Overview For 2007, 66 petroleum supply data series were analyzed to determine how close the PSM values were to the final PSA values. For these series, 50 out of the 66 PSM values were within 1 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error as compared to 38 out of 66 in 2006. Sixty-two petroleum supply data series were analyzed to see how close the MFW estimates were to the final PSA values. For these 62 series, 22 MFW estimates were within 2 percent of the PSA values in terms of mean absolute percent error and, of those, 9 were within 1 percent, compared to 27 and 10, respectively, for 2006. Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division

466

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

467

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

468

Leveraging gamification in demand dispatch systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modern demand-side management techniques are an integral part of the envisioned smart grid paradigm. They require an active involvement of the consumer for an optimization of the grid's efficiency and a better utilization of renewable energy sources. ... Keywords: demand response, demand side management, direct load control, gamification, smart grid, sustainability

Benjamin Gnauk; Lars Dannecker; Martin Hahmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

470

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

471

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

472

Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current world-wide increase of energy demand cannot be matched by energy production and power grid updateModeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Energy demand forecasting: industry practices and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate forecasting of energy demand plays a key role for utility companies, network operators, producers and suppliers of energy. Demand forecasts are utilized for unit commitment, market bidding, network operation and maintenance, integration of renewable ... Keywords: analytics, energy demand forecasting, machine learning, renewable energy sources, smart grids, smart meters

Mathieu Sinn

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Buildings Using Demand Response March 6, 2011 Sila Kiliccote Deputy, Demand Response Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Demand Response Research Center 1 #12;Presentation Outline Demand Response Research Center ­ DRRC Vision and Research Portfolio Introduction to Demand

Kammen, Daniel M.

475

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not prevent manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines from meeting new particulate emissions standards for 1994 and later model years, 1 the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990 (CAAA90) require refiners to reduce the sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel from current average levels of 0.30 percent by weight to no more than 0.05 percent by weight. The new standard, which goes into effect October 1, 1993, also requires that on-highway diesel fuel have a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 percent by volume. 2 (See list of terms and definitions on the fol- lowing page.) This provision is designed to prevent any future rises in aromatics levels. 3 Since the direct mea- surement of aromatics is complex, a minimum cetane

476

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration, MayEleventh Annual Carbon Capture, Utilization & Sequestrationplants with and without carbon capture. Presentation at 2009

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with coal the main energy supplier for the industry. Theboth potential energy suppliers--Russia and possibly

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Projection of world fossil fuel production with supply and demand interactions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Historically, fossil fuels have been vital for our global energy needs. However climate change is prompting renewed interest… (more)

Mohr, Steve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Telecommunications and travel demand and supply: Aggregate structural equation models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a technology assessment of telecommunication- transportationRelationships between Telecommunications and Travel:forthcoming) Does telecommunications affect passenger travel

Choo, Sangho; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Telecommunications and travel demand and supply: Aggregate structural equation models for the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationships between telecommunications and travel:S. , Marvin, S. , 1996. Telecommunications and the City:assessment of telecommunication-transportation interactions.

Choo, Sangho; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "inter-related supply demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Modelling the demand and supply of natural gas from Cyprus and Israel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The use of natural gas as a primary energy source has increased over time and is expected to increase even further in the near… (more)

Taliotis, Constantinos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

2013 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

from a Federal perspective, in various areas including homeland defense, medicine, agriculture, and basic and applied research. Participants will engage in discussions of their...

483

2014 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

from a Federal perspective, in various areas including homeland defense, medicine, agriculture, and basic and applied research. Participants will engage in discussions of their...

484

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible new water and environmental management initiativesminimize the environmental costs) of water management, andenvironmental issues, the focus of the proposed body would be specifically on water management,

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minimize the environmental costs) of water management, andspecifically on water management, with environmental issuespossible new water and environmental management initiatives

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

The relationship between seasonal supply, demand and price of Texas calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Co mp ut ed mo nt hl y ca lf dr op , Te xa s, 19 46 -5 4 c3-PO-P i?! -Paoe xi

Webb, Tarvin Flannis

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

487

Supply and Demand Factors in the Fertility Decline in Matlab, Bangladesh in 1977–1999  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model family planningprogramme started as a component of areproductive and child health project in partof Matlab (the Intervention area), a rural areaof...

Jeroen van Ginneken; Abdur Razzaque

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Brine for CCS. Presented at NETL CO 2 Storage and WaterLaboratory, Golden, CO. NETL (National Energy TechnologyLaboratory, Morgantown, WV. DOE/NETL Report 400/2008/1339.

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

RFID impact in supply chain : innovation in demand planning and customer fulfillment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) hand inventory. The key of RFID implementation is to broaden the collaboration with retailers.

Mei, Qiang Rose, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 T ABLE 1: L ARGER HYDROELECTRIC AND DIVERSION PROJECTSin the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from the

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Linking supply and demand: increasing grower participation and customer attendance at local farmers' markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farmers' markets in the United States have experienced a dramatic increase since the 1970's. In the past three decades the number of farmers' markets has increased from 340 in 1970 to 3,617 by 2006. This interest in farmers' markets has not been...

Lillard, Patrick Terrell

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

energy: Supply, Demand, and impacts CooRDinATinG LeAD AUThoR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This chapter reviews primary energy production and consumption in the Southwest, both past and present position of having low per-capita energy consumption (222 million BTUs per person) relative.1 introduction Energy consumption in the Southwest United States was 12,500 trillion British thermal units (BTUs

Kammen, Daniel M.

493

An Automation System for Optimizing a Supply Chain Network Design under the Influence of Demand Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii 3Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Dashboard/Cockpit Automation . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Polany, Rany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

special issue of Water Nepal, 4, 1, September. Haddad,and its subsequent impacts in Nepal, India and China.Katmandu: WWF Nepal Country Program. Kathmandu Post (2005).

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

2012 Workshop on Isotope Federal Supply and Demand | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Reports Workshops Nuclear Physics Related Brochures and Videos Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

496

Supply and Demand of Helium-3| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26Germantown Building 1000 Independence...

497

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relating to hydroelectricity generation, irrigation water,resources to generate hydroelectricity Managing watershedsFor example, micro-hydroelectricity generation may be an

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2010 Year in Review - Energy Information...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Coal consumption in the electric power sector in 2010 was higher by 4.5 percent, while coking coal consumption increased by 37.9 percent and the other industrial sector...

499

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics  of  power   plants  and  cooling  water  at CCS sites for power plant cooling. Presented at 10thused directly for power plant cooling without desalination (

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

The Management of International Rivers as Demands Grow and Supplies Tighten: India, China, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the promotion of hydroelectric power is not known. Bothwas primarily focused on hydroelectric power coming from theirrigation and hydroelectric power generation schemes better

Crow, Ben; Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z