National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for inter na tional

  1. Cloudiness Inter-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Cloudiness Inter- comparison IOP Clouds are an important part of Earth's energy system. We take clouds for granted, but their role in weather and climate is considerable. Without clouds, life on Earth would be impossible. By helping to regulate surface temperatures, clouds establish livable conditions on the planet. Clouds produced by water vapor condensation play a complicated role in our climate system. Clouds decrease the amount of sunlight received by Earth's surface. Decreased sunlight

  2. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  3. InterPhases Research | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    InterPhases Research Jump to: navigation, search Name: InterPhases Research Place: Westlake Village, California Zip: 91361 Sector: Solar Product: US-based developer of copper...

  4. 20Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1951SH38: 20Na; measured T1/2. 1953HO01: 20Na; measured T1/2. 1964MA44, 1969MAZT: 20Na; measured T1/2, α-spectrum; deduced β-branching. 20Ne deduced levels α-width. 1967SU05: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced nuclear properties. 1970OA01: 20Na; measured T1/2, βα-coin, βα(θ). 1971GO18: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced mass excess. 1971MA09: 20Na; measured β-delayed α-spectra; deduced βν anisotropy coefficients. 1971WI07: 20Na; measured T1/2; deduced ft

  5. 18Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 18Na Adopted value: < 200 keV (2012MU05) Measured Mass Excess for 18Na Adopted value: 25040 ± 110 keV (2012WA38) Measurements 2004ZE05: 9Be(20Mg, 18NaX), E = 43 MeV/nucleon; measured particle spectra, angular correlations, invariant mass following fragment proton decay. 18Na; deduced excited states proton decay features. 2011AS07: 1H(17Ne, 17Ne), 1H(17Ne, X)18Na, E = 4 MeV/nucleon; measured reaction products, proton

  6. 19Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 19Na Adopted value: < 40 ns (2003AU02) Measured Mass Excess for 19Na Adopted value: 12927 ± 12 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1969CE01: 24Mg(p, 6He), E = 54.7 MeV; measured σ(E(6He)); deduced Q. 19Na deduced nuclear mass. 1975BE38: 24Mg(3He, 8Li), E = 76.8 MeV; measured σ(E(8Li)); deduced Q. 19Na deduced mass excess. 19Na deduced level. 1975BEZD: 24Mg(3He, 8Li), E = 76.3 MeV; measured σ(E(8Li)). 19Na deduced mass

  7. Chapter 12 - Inter-Entity Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    INTER-ENTITY TRANSACTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. The chapter establishes the principles and procedures of financing and accounting for costs of work performed by one DOE...

  8. Inter Action Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Action Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inter Action Corp Place: Kanagawa, Japan Zip: 236-0004 Product: Semiconductor equipment and testing devices maker building a PV...

  9. Inter-Tribal Utility Forum and Gathering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Utility Commission, the second annual Inter-Tribal Utility Forum and Gathering will cover "Foundations for Tribal Energy Development." Attendees will hear about tribal renewable energy projects, project development, and more.

  10. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report (Program...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Document: Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report The ...

  11. ORISE: Inter-rater Reliability brings Standardization to Scientific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standardization of Scientific Peer Reviews Inter-Rater Reliability (IRR): new initiative ... a new initiative termed "inter-rater reliability" or IRR. Although IRR may have a ...

  12. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry. C; Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 3 ...

  13. Increasing security in inter-chip communication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nathan J; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan

    2014-10-28

    An apparatus for increasing security in inter-chip communication includes a sending control module, a communication bus, and a receiving control module. The communication bus is coupled between the sending control module and the receiving control module. The sending control module operates to send data on the communication bus, disable the communication bus when threats are detected, or both.

  14. DOE Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Provider Network...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Provider Network RFI DOE Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Provider Network RFI October 29, 2015 5:00PM EDT U.S. Department of...

  15. Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. tang_peer2013.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal

  16. Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges March 22, 2012 New Orleans, Louisiana The Roosevelt Hotel The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges" was held March 22, 2012, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The forum provided an opportunity for tribal leaders and federal agencies to directly converse with each others regarding best practices in

  17. Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Little, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant.

  18. Turbine inter-disk cavity cooling air compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chupp, R.E.; Little, D.A.

    1998-01-06

    The inter-disk cavity between turbine rotor disks is used to pressurize cooling air. A plurality of ridges extend radially outwardly over the face of the rotor disks. When the rotor disks are rotated, the ridges cause the inter-disk cavity to compress air coolant flowing through the inter-disk cavity en route to the rotor blades. The ridges eliminate the need for an external compressor to pressurize the air coolant. 5 figs.

  19. Project Reports for Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) is an international organization with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status in the United States and Societal Status in Canada.

  20. Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) AgencyCompany Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Hydro...

  1. Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC) is an international organization with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status in the United States and Societal Status in Canada.

  2. DOE Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Provider Network RFI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is issuing a request for information (RFI) to gain input from inter-tribal organizations, tribes (including Alaska Native regional and village corporations), and other interested stakeholders on its efforts to develop an Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Provider Network.

  3. Renewable Energy and Inter-Island Power Transmission (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation summarizes recent findings pertaining to inter-island connection of renewable and other energy sources, in particular, as these findings relate cable options, routing, specifications, and pros and cons.

  4. V-163: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Inter-Satellite Sync...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Inter-Satellite Sync Remote Authentication Bypass V-163: Red Hat Network Satellite Server Inter-Satellite Sync Remote Authentication Bypass May...

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloudiness Inter-Comparison IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsCloudiness Inter-Comparison IOP Campaign Links Science Plan General Information ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloudiness Inter-Comparison IOP 2003.02.21 - 2003.04.21 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability By agreement, preliminary quality assessed guest instrument data were delivered to the ARM IOP Archive for access by the IOP participants. For data sets, see below.

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - IRSI Inter-Comparison Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIRSI Inter-Comparison Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IRSI Inter-Comparison Study 2007.08.27 - 2007.09.23 Lead Scientist : Victor Morris For data sets, see below. Abstract The principle objective of this campaign was to compare measurements of cloud fraction from different types of commercially available infrared sky imagers (IRSI) and to compare the daytime values with

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - MWR Inter-Comparison Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsMWR Inter-Comparison Study ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MWR Inter-Comparison Study 2006.10.09 - 2006.11.30 Lead Scientist : Maria Cadeddu For data sets, see below. Abstract The principal objective of the campaign was to determine the repeatability of ACRF MWR brightness temperature measurements. Secondary objectives included comparisons of precipitable water vapor (PWV)

  8. Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    2003-08-01

    Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

  9. Energy Tax Policies and Inter-Jurisdictional Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY TAX POLICIES AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL CHALLENGES March 22, 2012 THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL 123 Baronne Street, New Orleans, LA 70112 (504) 648-1200 The fourth of a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders and federal agencies to get real-time market snapshots of: renewable energy investment challenges, alternative energy tribal ownership opportunities, and tax

  10. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  11. Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics Principal Investigator : Yongchun Tang Presenter: John Ma Power Environmental Energy Research Institute DE-EE0003032 Project Officer: John Ma Total Project Funding: $2,300,000 April 23, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research Objective: Develop a matrix of the smart geothermal tracer and

  12. Comment submitted by InterMetro Industries Corp. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by InterMetro Industries Corp. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  13. Grant Peer Review: Improving Inter-Rater Reliability with Training

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sattler, David N.; McKnight, Patrick E.; Naney, Linda; Mathis, Randy

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we developed and evaluated a brief training program for grant reviewers that aimed to increase inter-rater reliability, rating scale knowledge, and effort to read the grant review criteria. Enhancing reviewer training may improve the reliability and accuracy of research grant proposal scoring and funding recommendations. Seventy-five Public Health professors from U.S. research universities watched the training video we produced and assigned scores to the National Institutes of Health scoring criteria proposal summary descriptions. For both novice and experienced reviewers, the training video increased scoring accuracy (the percentage of scores that reflect the true rating scale values), inter-ratermore » reliability, and the amount of time reading the review criteria compared to the no video condition. The increase in reliability for experienced reviewers is notable because it is commonly assumed that reviewers—especially those with experience—have good understanding of the grant review rating scale. Our findings suggest that both experienced and novice reviewers who had not received the type of training developed in this study may not have appropriate understanding of the definitions and meaning for each value of the rating scale and that experienced reviewers may overestimate their knowledge of the rating scale. Lastly, the results underscore the benefits of and need for specialized peer reviewer training.« less

  14. Grant Peer Review: Improving Inter-Rater Reliability with Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, David N.; McKnight, Patrick E.; Naney, Linda; Mathis, Randy

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we developed and evaluated a brief training program for grant reviewers that aimed to increase inter-rater reliability, rating scale knowledge, and effort to read the grant review criteria. Enhancing reviewer training may improve the reliability and accuracy of research grant proposal scoring and funding recommendations. Seventy-five Public Health professors from U.S. research universities watched the training video we produced and assigned scores to the National Institutes of Health scoring criteria proposal summary descriptions. For both novice and experienced reviewers, the training video increased scoring accuracy (the percentage of scores that reflect the true rating scale values), inter-rater reliability, and the amount of time reading the review criteria compared to the no video condition. The increase in reliability for experienced reviewers is notable because it is commonly assumed that reviewers—especially those with experience—have good understanding of the grant review rating scale. Our findings suggest that both experienced and novice reviewers who had not received the type of training developed in this study may not have appropriate understanding of the definitions and meaning for each value of the rating scale and that experienced reviewers may overestimate their knowledge of the rating scale. Lastly, the results underscore the benefits of and need for specialized peer reviewer training.

  15. Na onal Security Site?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mul ple Choice (circle the correct answer) 1. How many diff erent animal species can be found at the Nevada Na onal Security Site? a. Less than 500 b. Exactly 1,325 c. More than 1,500 d. Exactly 2,303 2. Nuclear research, development and tes ng caused radioac ve contamina on of: a. Buildings b. Clothes and tools c. Soil and water d. All of the above 3. One method used to check soil for the presence of radioac ve contamina on is: a. Use a black light to see if the soil glows b. Send soil samples

  16. InterMine Webservices for Phytozome (Rev2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph; Goodstein, David; Rokhsar, Dan

    2014-07-10

    A datawarehousing framework for information provides a useful infrastructure for providers and users of genomic data. For providers, the infrastructure give them a consistent mechanism for extracting raw data. While for the users, the web services supported by the software allows them to make complex, and often unique, queries of the data. Previously, phytozome.net used BioMart to provide the infrastructure. As the complexity, scale and diversity of the dataset as grown, we decided to implement an InterMine web service on our servers. This change was largely motivated by the ability to have a more complex table structure and richer web reporting mechanism than BioMart. For InterMine to achieve its more complex database schema it requires an XML description of the data and an appropriate loader. Unlimited one-to-many and many-to-many relationship between the tables can be enabled in the schema. We have implemented support for:1.) Genomes and annotations for the data in Phytozome. This set is the 48 organisms currently stored in a back end CHADO datastore. The data loaders are modified versions of the CHADO data adapters from FlyMine. 2.) Interproscan results from all proteins in the Phytozome database. 3.) Clusters of proteins into a grouped heirarchically by similarity. 4.) Cufflinks results from tissue-specific RNA-Seq data of Phytozome organisms. 5.) Diversity data (GATK and SnpEFF results) from a set of individual organism. The last two datatypes are new in this implementation of our web services. We anticipate that the scale of these data will increase considerably in the near future.

  17. Publication1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The top three sources of hazardous waste generation by North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) code, are waste treatment and disposal, na- tional security and ...

  18. DOE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Funding for Inter-Tribal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    within the region Build the human capacity of participating Indian ... from inter-tribal organizations interested in providing energy services to their member Indian Tribes. ...

  19. Transcript of Office of Indian Energy Webinar: Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar about the Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network funding opportunity.

  20. Knowledge base navigator facilitating regional analysis inter-tool communication.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, Jeffery Wade; Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John; Chown, Matthew N.

    2004-08-01

    To make use of some portions of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Knowledge Base (KB) for which no current operational monitoring applications were available, Sandia National Laboratories have developed a set of prototype regional analysis tools (MatSeis, EventID Tool, CodaMag Tool, PhaseMatch Tool, Dendro Tool, Infra Tool, etc.), and we continue to maintain and improve these. Individually, these tools have proven effective in addressing specific monitoring tasks, but collectively their number and variety tend to overwhelm KB users, so we developed another application - the KB Navigator - to launch the tools and facilitate their use for real monitoring tasks. The KB Navigator is a flexible, extensible java application that includes a browser for KB data content, as well as support to launch any of the regional analysis tools. In this paper, we will discuss the latest versions of KB Navigator and the regional analysis tools, with special emphasis on the new overarching inter-tool communication methodology that we have developed to make the KB Navigator and the tools function together seamlessly. We use a peer-to-peer communication model, which allows any tool to communicate with any other. The messages themselves are passed as serialized XML, and the conversion from Java to XML (and vice versa) is done using Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB).

  1. A bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline phase with inter-stack electronic coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Runkun; Günbaş, Duygu D.; Zhang, Hao; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Xiao, Kai; Jin, Shi

    2015-06-15

    The first compound proving to be capable of forming a bundled-stack discotic columnar liquid crystalline (BSDCLC) phase was designed and synthesized. Finally, the unique perylene anhydride inter-stack interaction was found to be the key to the formation of the BSDCLC structure and inter-stack electronic coupling (ISEC).

  2. Soot Particle Studies - Instrument Inter-Comparison Project Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, E.; Sedlacek, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Ahern, A.; Wrobel, W.; Slowik, J. G.; Olfert, J.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Cappa, C. D.; Schwarz, J.; Spackman, J. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Trimborn, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Freedman, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Brem, B.; Kok, G.; Subramanian, R.; Freitag, S.; Clarke, A.; Thornhill, D.; Marr, L.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2010-03-06

    An inter-comparison study of instruments designed to measure the microphysical and optical properties of soot particles was completed. The following mass-based instruments were tested: Couette Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyzer (CPMA), Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (AMS-SMPS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) and Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS2000CE). Optical instruments measured absorption (photoacoustic, interferometric, and filter-based), scattering (in situ), and extinction (light attenuation within an optical cavity). The study covered an experimental matrix consisting of 318 runs that systematically tested the performance of instruments across a range of parameters including: fuel equivalence ratio (1.8 {le} {phi} {le} 5), particle shape (mass-mobility exponent (D{sub f m}), 2.0 {le} D{sub f m} {le} 3.0), particle mobility size (30 {le} d{sub m} {le} 300 nm), black carbon mass (0.07 {le} m{sub BC} {le} 4.2 fg) and particle chemical composition. In selected runs, particles were coated with sulfuric acid or dioctyl sebacate (DOS) (0.5 {le} {Delta}r{sub ve} {le} 201 nm) where {Delta}r{sub ve} is the change in the volume equivalent radius due to the coating material. The effect of non-absorbing coatings on instrument response was determined. Changes in the morphology of fractal soot particles were monitored during coating and denuding processes and the effect of particle shape on instrument response was determined. The combination of optical and mass based measurements was used to determine the mass specific absorption coefficient for denuded soot particles. The single scattering albedo of the particles was also measured. An overview of the experiments and sample results are presented.

  3. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  4. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  5. Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy is soliciting applications from Inter-tribal Organizations and Alaska Native Regional Corporations to pilot an Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network. A webinar was held on March 1, 2016, describing the funding opportunity announcement in detail, including who is eligible to apply, what should be included in the application, cost share and other requirements, how to ask questions, and how applications will be selected for funding.

  6. Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - 2011 Project | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - 2011 Project Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - 2011 Project Summary The proposed project is to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce energy consumption 30% at these buildings. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use are the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration

  7. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  8. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Ya; Yu, Xiqian; You, Ya; Yin, Yaxia; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. The Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  9. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore » during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  10. NaWoTec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NaWoTec Jump to: navigation, search Name: NaWoTec Place: Rossdorf, Germany Zip: 64380 Product: Germany-based company developing 3-dimensional additive lithography using...

  11. A=14Na (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1983ANZQ

  12. A=14Na (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Ne, 14Na and 14Mg have not been observed. See (1986AN07

  13. Threshold electron excitation of Na

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, B.; Wang, P.; Gallagher, A. )

    1992-09-01

    Electron collisional excitation of the 4{ital D}, 5{ital D}, 4{ital P}, and 6{ital S} states of Na has been measured with about 30-meV energy resolution. Very rapid, unresolved threshold onsets are seen for all but the 4{ital P} state, and a near-threshold resonance is suggested by the 5{ital D} data. However, only weak undulations in the cross sections are observed above threshold.

  14. DOE Establishment of an Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network FOA Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is soliciting applications from Inter-tribal organizations and Alaska Native Regional Corporations to pilot a Technical Assistance Energy Providers Networks. This webinar described who is eligible to apply, what the application needs to include, cost share and other requirements, how to ask questions, and how applications will be selected for funding.

  15. DOE Announces Notice of Intent to Issue Funding for Inter-Tribal Providers Network

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Dec. 8, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs announced a notice of intent to issue a funding opportunity announcement in February 2016 for inter-tribal organizations to help provide tribal communities with the knowledge, skills, and resources needed to implement successful strategic energy solutions.

  16. A=19Na (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) A study of the reaction 24Mg(p, 6He)19Na at Ep = 54.7 MeV reveals a group of 6He particles corresponding to a state in 19Na with M - A = 12.974 ± 0.070 MeV. It is presumed to be the ground state of 19Na, although the close proximity of the second T = 3/2 state in 19O from the first (96 keV), does not permit a definite assignment. If it is assumed that 19Na(0) has M - A = 12.974 ± 0.070 MeV, then 19Na is unbound with respect to decay into 18Ne + p by

  17. A=20Na (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See Table 20.35 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 20Na: From the threshold energy of the 20Ne(p, n)20Na reaction, Ethresh. = 15.419 ± 0.006 MeV, the atomic mass excess of 20Na is 6.850 ± 0.006 MeV (1971GO18, 1971WI07). See also (1964GA1C, 1966GA25, 1966KE16, 1969HA38). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.892 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of excited states which decay by α-emission to the ground state of

  18. Nevada Na onal Security Site U.S. Department of Energy, Na ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wells Sampled On and Near the Nevada Na onal Security Site U.S. Department of Energy, Na onal Nuclear Security Administra on Nevada Field Office Stages of an Underground Nuclear ...

  19. New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  20. A=18Na (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (Not illustrated) A calculation using an isobaric mass formula predicts that the mass excess of 18Na is 25.4 ± 0.4 MeV (1966KE16): 18Na is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.6 MeV. See also (1965JA1C

  1. Spin orbital torque driven magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junction with inter-layer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lei; Ma, Zhongshui; Wei, Dan

    2015-01-14

    The switching processes of elliptically shaped magnetic tunnel junction bits with the structure Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB have been studied by the micromagnetic models. By comparing the tunneling magneto-resistance minor and major loops calculated by our model with related experimental results, we found that the inter-layer exchange coupling between the two CoFeB layers and a reduced saturation magnetization M{sub s} distribution at the edge of the elliptical bit should be included. The chosen strength of the inter-layer exchange coupling also matches well with experimental observations. The current induced magnetization switching is generated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer. The critical switching currents calculated by our model are coincident with experiment. This shows the reliability of our micromagnetic model with the spin orbital torque term.

  2. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Linlong; Du, Jinglei; Shi, Haofei Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei

    2014-10-15

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  3. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  4. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  5. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  6. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of IV curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 m?, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 1001000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  7. DOE Establishment of an Inter-Tribal Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy is soliciting applications from Inter-tribal Organizations and Alaska Native Regional Corporations to pilot a Technical Assistance Energy Providers Network. Up to $7 million in funding is available through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to develop regional energy experts to provide technical energy assistance and informational resources to their member Indian tribes, including Alaska Native villages.

  8. Inter-Agency Agreement Signed between DOE's Wind and Water Power Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Carderock Inter-Agency Agreement Signed between DOE's Wind and Water Power Program and Carderock - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid

  9. A=19Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) This nucleus has been observed in the 24Mg(p, 6He)19Na reaction (1969CE01; Ep = 54.7 MeV) and in the 24Mg(3He, 8Li)19Na reaction (1975BE38; E(3He) = 76.3 MeV). The latter experiment leads to an atomic mass excess of 12.928 ± 0.012 MeV for 19Na in its ground state. In addition, an excited state is observed at Ex = 120 ± 10 keV (1975BE38). Assuming the atomic mass excess listed above, 19Na(0) is unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 320 ± 13

  10. Development of an inter-atomic potential for the Pd-H binary system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Griffin, Joshua D.; Zhou, Xiao Wang

    2007-09-01

    Ongoing research at Sandia National Laboratories has been in the area of developing models and simulation methods that can be used to uncover and illuminate the material defects created during He bubble growth in aging bulk metal tritides. Previous efforts have used molecular dynamics calculations to examine the physical mechanisms by which growing He bubbles in a Pd metal lattice create material defects. However, these efforts focused only on the growth of He bubbles in pure Pd and not on bubble growth in the material of interest, palladium tritide (PdT), or its non-radioactive isotope palladium hydride (PdH). The reason for this is that existing inter-atomic potentials do not adequately describe the thermodynamics of the Pd-H system, which includes a miscibility gap that leads to phase separation of the dilute (alpha) and concentrated (beta) alloys of H in Pd at room temperature. This document will report the results of research to either find or develop inter-atomic potentials for the Pd-H and Pd-T systems, including our efforts to use experimental data and density functional theory calculations to create an inter-atomic potential for this unique metal alloy system.

  11. A=19Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) A study of this nucleus via the 24Mg(3He, 8Li)19Na reaction at E(3He) = 76.3 MeV leads to an atomic mass excess of 12.928 ± 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 320 ± 13 keV. An excited state at Ex = 120 ± 10 keV is also reported (1975BE38). See also (1978AJ03, 1978GU10, 1979BE1H

  12. A=19Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) A study of this nucleus via the 24Mg(3He, 8Li)19Na reaction at E(3He) = 76.3 MeV leads to an atomic mass excess of 12.929 ± 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 321 ± 13 keV. An excited state at Ex = 120 ± 10 keV is also reported (1975BE38, 1985WA02). See also (1985AN28, 1986AN07) and (1983ANZQ, 1983AU1B; theor.

  13. NNSA reorganizes Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40), Office...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Frank Klotz and Madelyn Creedon "Mission First, People Always" Related Topics NA-40 NA-80 OEO Office of Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation. OCC Office of Emergency ...

  14. NA 80 - Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism andCounterprolif...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 80 - Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism ... NA 80 - Associate...

  15. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense ... NA 70 - Associate Administrator...

  16. NA 50 - Associate Administrator for Safety, Infrastructure and...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 50 - Associate Administrator for Safety, ... NA 50 - Associate Administrator...

  17. NA 1 - Immediate Office of the Administrator | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 1 - Immediate Office of the Administrator NA 1 - Immediate Office of the...

  18. NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for...

  19. NA EA - Associate Administrator for External Affairs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA EA - Associate Administrator for External Affairs NA EA - Associate...

  20. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense ... NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for...

  1. NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for ... NA 15 - Assistant Deputy...

  2. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for...

  3. NA GC - Office of General Counsel | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Blog Home About Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA GC - Office of General Counsel NA GC - Office of General Counsel...

  4. Introducing thermally stable inter-tube defects to assist off-axial phonon transport in carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Di; Wallace, Joseph; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Shao, Lin

    2014-05-12

    Through integrated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies, we demonstrated the feasibility of an ion-irradiation-and-annealing based phonon engineering technique to enhance thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) films. Upon ion irradiation of CNT films, both inter-tube defects and intra-tube defects are introduced. Our MD simulations show that inter-tube defects created between neighboring tubes are much more stable than intra-tube defects created on tube graphitic planes. Upon thermal annealing, intra-tube defects are preferentially removed but inter-tube defects stay. Consequently, axial phonon transport increases due to reduced phonon scattering and off-axial phonon transport is sustained due to the high stability of inter-tube defects, leading to a conductivity enhancement upon annealing. The modeling predictions agree with experimental observations that thermal conductivities of CNT films were enhanced after 2 MeV hydrogen ion irradiations and conductivities were further enhanced upon post irradiation annealing.

  5. FEiNA SCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Sant Marta de Torruella, Spain Product: Manufacturer of tracking systems for PV plants, and looking for STEG partners. References: FEiNA SCP1 This article is a stub. You...

  6. na-00 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    na-00 Infrastructure and Operations NNSA's missions require a secure production and laboratory infrastructure meeting immediate and long term needs. The Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Operations develops and executes NNSA's infrastructure investment, maintenance, and operations programs and policies

  7. A=19Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) This nucleus was observed in the 24Mg(p, 6He)19Na reaction at Ep = 54.7 MeV (1969CE01). A study via the 24Mg(3He, 8Li)19Na reaction at E(3He) = 76.3 MeV leads to an atomic mass excess of 12.929 ± 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 321 ± 13 keV. An excited state at Ex = 120 ± 10 keV is also reported (1975BE38, 1993AU05). See also (1987AJ02) and (1987PO01, 1987SA24, 1988CO15, 1990PO04, 1992AV03

  8. A=20Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See also (1972AJ02) and Table 20.39 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). (1973HA77, 1973SU1B, 1974HA17, 1976CH1T, 1977SH13). J = 2 (1975SC20); μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table 20.37 (in PDF or PS). The half-life of 20Na is 442 ± 5 msec (1971GO18, 1971WI07), 446 ± 8 msec (1972MO08), 448 ± 4 msec

  9. A=20Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.36 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). (1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1979BE1H, 1980OK01, 1981AY01). J = 2 (1975SC20); μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table 20.33 (in PDF or PS) and reaction 63 in 20Ne. The half-life of 20Na is 446 ± 3 msec; Jπ = 2+: see (1978AJ03). 2. 16O(12C,

  10. A=20Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    87AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 20.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). (1981WA1Q, 1983ANZQ, 1983BR29, 1985AN28, 1985HA1N, 1985RO1N, 1986AN07, 1986GA1I). 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table 20.26 (in PDF or PS) and reaction 53 in 20Ne. The half-life of 20Na is 447.9 ± 2.3 msec [weighted mean of values quoted in (1978AJ03) and in (1983CL01)];

  11. A=20Na (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 20.32 preview 20.32 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 20.33 preview 20.33 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20, 1989RA17) 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table Prev. Table 20.31 preview 20.31 (in PDF or PS) and reaction 59 in 20Ne. The half-life of 20Na is 447.9

  12. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  13. Method of fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohriner, Evan Keith (Knoxville, TN); Blue, Craig Alan (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A method for fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy comprising the steps of providing a base-metal wire bundle comprising a metal, an alloy or a combination thereof; working the wire bundle through at least one die to obtain a desired dimension and to form a precursor wire; and, controllably heating the precursor wire such that a portion of the wire will become liquid while simultaneously maintaining its desired shape, whereby substantial homogenization of the wire occurs in the liquid state and additional homogenization occurs in the solid state resulting in a homogenous alloy product.

  14. NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation

  15. Locus-specific oligonucleotide probes increase the usefulness of inter-Alu polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarnik, M.; Tang, J.Q.; Korab-Laskowska, M.

    1994-09-01

    Most of the mapping approaches are based on single-locus codominant markers of known location. Their multiplex ratio, defined as the number of loci that can be simultaneously tested, is typically one. An increased multiplex ratio was obtained by typing anonymous polymorphisms using PCR primers anchored in ubiquitous Alu-repeats. These so called alumorphs are revealed by inter-Alu-PCR and seen as the presence or absence of an amplified band of a given length. We decided to map alumorphs and to develop locus-specific oligonucleotide (LSO) probes to facilitate their use and transfer among different laboratories. We studied the segregation of alumorphs in eight CEPH families, using two distinct Alu-primers, both directing PCR between the repeats in a tail-to-tail orientation. The segregating bands were assigned to chromosomal locations by two-point linkage analysis with CEPH markers (V6.0). They were excised from dried gels, reamplified, cloned and sequenced. The resulting LSOs were used as hybridization probes (i) to confirm chromosomal assignments in a human/hamster somatic cell hybrid panel, and (ii) to group certain allelic length variants, originally coded as separate dominant markres, into more informative codominant loci. These codominants were then placed by multipoint analysis on a microsatellite Genethon map. Finally, the LSO probes were used as polymorphic STSs, to identify by hybridization the corresponding markers among products of inter-Alu-PCR. The use of LSOs converts alumorphs into a system of non-anonymous, often multiallelic codominant markes which can be simultaneously typed, thus achieving the goal of high multiplex ratio.

  16. A=18Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (Not illustrated) 18Na has not been observed: its atomic mass excess has been estimated to be 25.32 MeV: it is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.55 MeV (1977WA08). See also (1976JA23, 1976WA1E

  17. A=18Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (Not illustrated) 18Na has not been observed: its atomic mass excess has been estimated to be 25.32 MeV: it is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.55 MeV (1977WA08). See also (1978GU10

  18. A=18Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (Not observed) 18Na has not been observed; its atomic mass excess has been estimated to be 25.32 MeV; it is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.6 MeV: see (1978AJ03). See also (1986AN07) and (1983ANZQ

  19. A=18Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) 18Na has not been observed; its atomic mass excess has been estimated to be 25.32 MeV (1993AU05); it is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.6 MeV: see (1978AJ03). See also (1986AN07) and (1983ANZQ

  20. OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NA L S I GNE D B Y OR I GI NA L S I GNE D B Y

  1. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  2. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

  3. A conceptual redesign of an Inter-Building Fuel Transfer Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klann, R.T.; Picker, B.A. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The Inter-Building Fuel Transfer Cask, referred to as the IBC, is a lead shielded cask for transporting subassemblies between buildings on the Argonne National Laboratory-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The cask transports both newly fabricated and spent reactor subassemblies between the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) and the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). The IBC will play a key role in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel recycling demonstration project. This report discusses a conceptual redesign of the IBC which has been performed. The objective of the conceptual design was to increase the passive heat removal capabilities, reduce the personnel radiation exposure and incorporate enhanced safety features into the design. The heat transfer, radiation and thermal-hydraulic properties of the IBC were analytically modelled to determine the principal factors controlling the desip. The scoping studies that were performed determined the vital physical characteristics (i.e., size, shielding, pumps, etc.) of the MC conceptual design.

  4. A conceptual redesign of an Inter-Building Fuel Transfer Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klann, R.T.; Picker, B.A. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Inter-Building Fuel Transfer Cask, referred to as the IBC, is a lead shielded cask for transporting subassemblies between buildings on the Argonne National Laboratory-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The cask transports both newly fabricated and spent reactor subassemblies between the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) and the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). The IBC will play a key role in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel recycling demonstration project. This report discusses a conceptual redesign of the IBC which has been performed. The objective of the conceptual design was to increase the passive heat removal capabilities, reduce the personnel radiation exposure and incorporate enhanced safety features into the design. The heat transfer, radiation and thermal-hydraulic properties of the IBC were analytically modelled to determine the principal factors controlling the desip. The scoping studies that were performed determined the vital physical characteristics (i.e., size, shielding, pumps, etc.) of the MC conceptual design.

  5. Multiloop integral system test (MIST): Final report, Inter-group comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gloudemans, J.R.

    1989-07-01

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) was part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox-designed plants. MIST was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the once-through integral system (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The individual tests are described in detail in Volumes 2 through 8 and Volume 11, and are summarized in Volume 1. Inter-group comparisons are addressed in this document, Volume 9. These comparisons are grouped as follows: mapping versus SBLOCA transients, SBLOCA, pump effects, and the effects of noncondensible gases. Appendix A provides an index and description of the microfiched plots for each test, which are enclosed with the corresponding Volumes 2 through 8. 147 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. DETECTING NANOFLARE HEATING EVENTS IN SUBARCSECOND INTER-MOSS LOOPS USING Hi-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald; Cirtain, Jonathan; Walsh, Robert W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-07-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high-spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 A channel. In this paper, we analyze a set of rapidly evolving loops that appear in an inter-moss region. We select six loops that both appear in and fade out of the Hi-C images during the short flight. From the Hi-C data, we determine the size and lifetimes of the loops and characterize whether these loops appear simultaneously along their length or first appear at one footpoint before appearing at the other. Using co-aligned, co-temporal data from multiple channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we determine the temperature and density of the loops. We find the loops consist of cool ({approx}10{sup 5} K), dense ({approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) plasma. Their required thermal energy and their observed evolution suggest they result from impulsive heating similar in magnitude to nanoflares. Comparisons with advanced numerical simulations indicate that such dense, cold and short-lived loops are a natural consequence of impulsive magnetic energy release by reconnection of braided magnetic field at low heights in the solar atmosphere.

  7. The footprint of the inter-decadal Pacific oscillation in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dong, Lu; Zhou, Tianjun; Dai, Aiguo; Song, Fengfei; Wu, Bo; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-17

    Superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also show considerable decadal variations that can cause regional climate oscillations around the IO. However, the mechanisms of the IO decadal variability remain unclear. Here we perform numerical experiments using a state-of-the-art, fully coupled climate model in which the external forcings with or without the observed SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean (TEP) are applied for 1871–2012. Both the observed timing and magnitude of the IO decadal variations are well reproduced in those experiments with the TEP SSTs prescribed to observations. Although the external forcingsmore » account for most of the warming trend, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is dominated by internal variability that is induced by the TEP SSTs, especially the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). The IPO weakens (enhances) the warming of the external forcings by about 50% over the IO during IPO’s cold (warm) phase, which contributes about 10% to the recent global warming hiatus since 1999. As a result, the decadal variability in IO SSTs is modulated by the IPO-induced atmospheric adjustment through changing surface heat fluxes, sea surface height and thermocline depth.« less

  8. Effects of inter-packet spacing on the delivery of multimedia content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapadia, A. C.; Feng, A. C.; Feng, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    Streaming multimedia content with UDP has become increasingly popular over distributed systems such as the Internet. However, because UDP does not possess any congestion-control mechanism and most best-effort trafic is served by the congestion-controlled TCP, UDP flows steal bandwidth from TCP to the point that TCP flows can starve for network resources. Furthermore, such applications may cause the Internet infrastructure to eventually suffer from congestion collapse because UDP trafic does not self-regulate itself. To address this problem, next-generation Internet routers will implement active queue-management schemes to punish malicious traffic, e.g., non-adaptive UDP flows, and to the improve the performance of congestion-controlled traffic, e.g., TCP flows. The arrival of such routers will cripple the performance of today's UDP-based multimedia applications. So, in this paper, we introduce the notion of inter-packet spacing with control feedback to enable these UDP-based applications to perform well in the next-generation Internet while being adaptive and self-regulating. When compared with traditional UDP-based multimedia streaming, we illustrate that our counterintuitive, interpacket-spacing scheme with control feedback can reduce packet loss by 90% without adversely affecting delivered throughput. Keywords: network protocol, multimedia, packet spacing, rate-adjusting congestion control.

  9. An ecological engineering approach for keeping water from reaching interred wastes in arid or semiarid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes application of a soil-plant cover system (SPCS) to preclude water from reaching interred wastes in arid and semiarid regions. Where potential evapotranspiration far exceeds precipitation, water can be kept from reaching buried wastes by (1) providing a sufficiently deep cap of soil to store precipitation that falls while plants are dormant and (2) maintaining plant cover to deplete soil moisture during the growing season, thereby emptying the storage reservoir. Research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has shown that 2 m of soil is adequate to store moisture from snowmelt and spring rains. Healthy stands of perennial grasses and shrubs adapted to the INEL climate use all available soil moisture, even during a very wet growing season. However, burrowing by small mammals or ants may affect the performance of a SPCS by increasing infiltration of water. Intrusion barriers of gravel and cobble can be used to restrict burrowing, but emplacement of such barriers affects soil moisture storage and plant rooting depths. A replicated field experiment to investigate the implications of those effects is in progress. Incorporation of an SPCS should be considered in the design of isolation barriers for shallow land burial of hazardous wastes in and regions.

  10. The interplay between inter- and intra-molecular dynamics in a series of alkylcitrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe Kiprop; Kossack, Wilhelm; Iacob, Ciprian; Zeigermann, Philipp; Jasiurkowska, Malgorzata; Sangoro, Joshua R; Valiullin, Rustem; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The inter- and intra-molecular dynamics in a series of glass-forming alkylcitrates is studied by a combination of Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS), Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Analyzing the temperature dependencies of specific IR absorption bands in terms of their spectral position and the corresponding oscillator strengths enables one to unravel the intramolecular dynamics of specific molecular moieties and to compare them with the (primarily dielectrically) determined intermolecular dynamics. With decreasing temperature, the IR band positions of carbonyls (part of the core units) and H-bonded moieties of citrates show a red shift with a kink at the calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg) while other moieties, whose dynamics are decoupled from those of the core units, exhibit a blue shift with nominal changes at Tg. The oscillator strength of all units in citrates depicts stronger temperature dependencies above Tg and in some, the ester linkage and H-bonded units show a change of slope at a temperature where structural and faster secondary relaxations merge. By that, a wealth of novel information is obtained proving the fundamental importance of intramolecular mobility in the process of glass formation, beyond coarse-grained descriptions.

  11. Document: NA (FOIA) Actionee: Dorothy Riehie

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vT op Document: NA (FOIA) Actionee: Dorothy Riehie ~ * Document Date: 09/07/2011 Due Date: NO ACTION Ii~rilAuthor: CARPENTER T Addressee: RIEHLE DC Title: FOIA Request DIR DIV NAME DIR DIV NAME MGR AMMS DEP AMMS ISI AMA AMMS PIC AMA FMD AMMS SES AMA HRM AMMS SSD AMA PRO AMRC AMCP AMSE AMSE EMD AMSE GOD AMSE SED 0CC OCE Riehle, Dorothy (Actionee) ORP PNSO RLCI Comments: Records Schedule information: ADM-1.28.1 Scan?: Yes Sensitive?: Yes Sensitive Attachments?: Yes - IDMS Folder: RL General Corr

  12. SU-F-BRF-12: Investigating Dosimetric Effects of Inter-Fraction Deformation in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, J; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We studied dosimetric effects of inter-fraction deformation in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to investigate the necessity of adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Six lung cancer patients with different treatment fractions were retrospectively investigated. All the patients were immobilized and localized with a stereotactic body frame and were treated under cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance at each fraction. We calculated the actual delivered dose of the treatment plan using the up-to-date patient geometry of each fraction, and compared the dose with the intended plan dose to investigate the dosimetric effects of the inter-fraction deformation. Deformable registration was carried out between the treatment planning CT and the CBCT of each fraction to obtain deformed planning CT for more accurate dose calculations of the delivered dose. The extent of the inter-fraction deformation was also evaluated by calculating the dice similarity coefficient between the delineated structures on the planning CT and those on the deformed planning CT. Results: The average dice coefficients for PTV, spinal cord, esophagus were 0.87, 0.83 and 0.69, respectively. The volume of PTV covered by prescription dose was decreased by 23.78% on average for all fractions and all patients. For spinal cord and esophagus, the volumes covered by the constraint dose were increased by 4.57% and 3.83%. The maximum dose was also increased by 4.11% for spinal cord and 4.29% for esophagus. Conclusion: Due to inter-fraction deformation, large deterioration was found in both PTV coverage and OAR sparing, which demonstrated the needs for adaptive re-planning of lung SBRT cases to improve target coverage while reducing radiation dose to nearby normal tissues.

  13. Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Gloval Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Global Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS M.-J. Jeong and Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. A. Chu and S.-C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Eighteen years of satellite-based monthly aerosol products have been derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and total ozone mapping experiment

  14. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolosz, Ben Grant-Muller, Susan

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years.

  15. An Economic Analysis of the Kilauea Geothermal Development and Inter-Island Cable Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-03-01

    A study by NEA completed in April 1987 shows that a large scale (500 MW) geothermal development on the big island of Hawaii and the inter-island power transmission cable is economically infeasible. This updated report, utilizing additional information available since 1987, reaches the same conclusion: (1) The state estimate of $1.7 billion for development cost of the geothermal project is low and extremely optimistic. more realistic development costs are shown to be in the range of $3.4 to $4.3 billion and could go as high as $4.6 billion. (2) Compared to alternative sources of power generation, geothermal can be 1.7 to 2.4 times as costly as oil, and 1.2 to 1.7 times as costly as a solar/oil generating system. (3) yearly operation and maintenance costs for the large scale geothermal project are estimated to be 44.7 million, 72% greater than a solar/oil generating system. (4) Over a 40-year period ratepayers could pay, on average, between 1.3 (17.2%) and 2.4 cents (33%) per kWh per year more for electricity produced by geothermal than they are currently paying (even with oil prices stabilizing at $45 per barrel in 2010). (5) A comparable solar/oil thermal energy development project is technologically feasible, could be island specific, and would cost 20% to 40% less than the proposed geothermal development. (6) Conservation is the cheapest alternative of all, can significantly reduce demand, and provides the greatest return to ratepayers. There are better options than geothermal. Before the State commits the people of Hawaii to future indebtedness and unnecessary electricity rate increases, more specific study should be conducted on the economic feasibility, timing, and magnitude of the geothermal project. The California experience at The Geyers points up the fact that it can be a very risky and disappointing proposition. The state should demand that proponents and developers provide specific answers to geothermals troubling questions before they make an

  16. NNSA reorganizes Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40), Office of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation (NA-80) | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) reorganizes Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40), Office of Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation (NA-80) Wednesday, December 9, 2015 - 11:00am Colleagues: The Department of Energy has adopted an enterprise-wide approach to strengthening its preparedness for and its capability to respond to a broad spectrum of potential emergencies, including those resulting from natural phenomena

  17. Office of Nuclear Material Integration (ONMI), NA-73

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of Nuclear Material Integration (ONMI), NA-73 Over 420 Government & Commercial ... Required U.S. Reporting to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under ...

  18. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Kassaee, Alireza; Mitra, Nandita; Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P.; Drebin, Jeff; Wan, Fei; Metz, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  19. EA-372 GDF Suez Energy Marketing NA, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 GDF Suez Energy Marketing NA, Inc. EA-372 GDF Suez Energy Marketing NA, Inc. Order authorizing GDF Suez Energy Marketing NA, Inc. to export electric energy to Canada EA-372 GDF ...

  20. Electron scattering in graphene with adsorbed NaCl nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drabińska, Aneta Kaźmierczak, Piotr; Bożek, Rafał; Karpierz, Ewelina; Wysmołek, Andrzej; Kamińska, Maria; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-07

    In this work, the results of contactless magnetoconductance and Raman spectroscopy measurements performed for a graphene sample after its immersion in NaCl solution were presented. The properties of the immersed sample were compared with those of a non-immersed reference sample. Atomic force microscopy and electron spin resonance experiments confirmed the deposition of NaCl nanoparticles on the graphene surface. A weak localization signal observed using contactless magnetoconductance showed the reduction of the coherence length after NaCl treatment of graphene. Temperature dependence of the coherence length indicated a change from ballistic to diffusive regime in electron transport after NaCl treatment. The main inelastic scattering process was of the electron-electron type but the major reason for the reduction of the coherence length at low temperatures was additional, temperature independent, inelastic scattering. We associate it with spin flip scattering, caused by NaCl nanoparticles present on the graphene surface. Raman spectroscopy showed an increase in the D and D′ bands intensities for graphene after its immersion in NaCl solution. An analysis of the D, D′, and G bands intensities proved that this additional scattering is related to the decoration of vacancies and grain boundaries with NaCl nanoparticles, as well as generation of new on-site defects as a result of the decoration of the graphene surface with NaCl nanoparticles. The observed energy shifts of 2D and G bands indicated that NaCl deposition on the graphene surface did not change carrier concentration, but reduced compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layer.

  1. NNSA Corporate CPEP Process NNSA Honeywell FM&T PER NNSA/NA-00...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... and ship all NA-242 International Non-proliferation Export Control Program (INECP) ... and ship all NA-242 International Non-proliferation Export Control Program (INECP) ...

  2. NNSA Supplemental Guidance: NA-1 SD G 1027 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplemental Guidance: NA-1 SD G 1027 NNSA Supplemental Guidance: NA-1 SD G 1027 Guidance on using Release Fraction and Modern Dosimetric information consistently with DOE STD ...

  3. Analysis of NaOH releases for Hanford tank farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-12

    The information contained in the canceled document is now located in the document: Consequence Analysis of a NaOH Solution Spray Release During Addition to Waste Tank, WHC-SD-WM-CN-065.

  4. NaIrO3A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  5. Darek Seweryniak Argonne National Laboratory Interational Symposium on Super Heavy Nuclei 2015, Texas A&M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Grant # DE-NA0002909 Application of DOE NEPA Procedure: Categorical Exclusions A1 and A9, Applicable to General Agency Actions (10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix A) and Categorical Exclusion B3.6, Applicable to Specific Agency Actions (10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B). Rationale: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) proposes to provide financial assistance to Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute for scientific research related to the

  6. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; Griffith, C.; Hedges, S.; Dilmore, R.; Goodman, A.; Black, J.; Haese, R.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Icenhower, J. P.; Daval, D.; Saldi, G. D.; Knauss, K. G.; Schmidt, M.; Mito, S.; Sorai, M.; Truche, L.

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  7. Office of Nuclear Material Integration (ONMI), NA-73

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Office of Nuclear Material Integration (ONMI), NA-73 Over 420 Government & Commercial Nuclear Entities currently report to NMMSS Mission U.S. Government's Official Database to Track Transactions, Movements and Inventories of Nuclear Materials throughout the U.S. as well as Imports and Exports Jointly funded by the NRC & NNSA - Managed by NA-73 Fuel Cycle Facilities  Conversion  Enrichment  Fuel Fabrication  Power Reactors, etc. DOE/NNSA  Defense Programs  Naval

  8. Inter-strain heterogeneity in rat hepatic transcriptomic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Cindy Q.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Pang, Renee; P'ng, Christine; Chong, Lauren C.; Harding, Nicholas J. [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada)] [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland) [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, University of Helsinki (Finland); Okey, Allan B. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Boutros, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Boutros@oicr.on.ca [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    The biochemical and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have been the subject of intense study for decades. It is now clear that essentially all TCDD-induced toxicities are mediated by DNAprotein interactions involving the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). Nevertheless, it remains unknown which AHR target genes cause TCDD toxicities. Several groups, including our own, have developed rodent model systems to probe these questions. mRNA expression profiling of these model systems has revealed significant inter-species heterogeneity in rodent hepatic responses to TCDD. It has remained unclear if this variability also exists within a species, amongst rodent strains. To resolve this question, we profiled the hepatic transcriptomic response to TCDD of diverse rat strains (L-E, H/W, F344 and Wistar rats) and two lines derived from L-E H/W crosses, at consistent age, sex, and dosing (100 ?g/kg TCDD for 19 h). Using this uniquely consistent dataset, we show that the majority of TCDD-induced alterations in mRNA abundance are strain/line-specific: only 11 genes were affected by TCDD across all strains, including well-known dioxin-responsive genes such as Cyp1a1 and Nqo1. Our analysis identified two novel universally dioxin-responsive genes as well as 4 genes induced by TCDD in dioxin-sensitive rats only. These 6 genes are strong candidates to explain TCDD-related toxicities, so we validated them using 152 animals in time-course (0 to 384 h) and doseresponse (0 to 3000 ?g/kg) experiments. This study reveals that different rat strains exhibit dramatic transcriptional heterogeneity in their hepatic responses to TCDD and that inter-strain comparisons can help identify candidate toxicity-related genes.

  9. Magnetism in Na-filled Fe-based skutterudites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xing, Guangzong; Fan, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Weitao; Ma, Yanming; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-01

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism is a subject of ongoing interest, stimulated most recently by the discovery of Fe-based superconductivity and the recognition that spin-fluctuations near a magnetic quantum critical point may provide an explanation for the superconductivity and the order parameter. We investigate magnetism in the Na filled Fe-based skutterudites using first principles calculations. NaFe4Sb12 is a known ferromagnet near a quantum critical point. We find a ferromagnetic metallic state for this compound driven by a Stoner type instability, consistent with prior work. In accord with prior work, the magnetization is overestimated, as expected for a material nearmore » an itinerant ferromagnetic quantum critical point. NaFe4P12 also shows a ferromagnetic instability at the density functional level, but this instability is much weaker than that of NaFe4Sb12, possibly placing it on the paramagnetic side of the quantum critical point. NaFe4As12 shows intermediate behavior. We also present results for skutterudite FeSb3, which is a metastable phase that has been reported in thin film form.« less

  10. Magnetism in Na-filled Fe-based skutterudites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Guangzong; Fan, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Weitao; Ma, Yanming; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-01

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism is a subject of ongoing interest, stimulated most recently by the discovery of Fe-based superconductivity and the recognition that spin-fluctuations near a magnetic quantum critical point may provide an explanation for the superconductivity and the order parameter. We investigate magnetism in the Na filled Fe-based skutterudites using first principles calculations. NaFe4Sb12 is a known ferromagnet near a quantum critical point. We find a ferromagnetic metallic state for this compound driven by a Stoner type instability, consistent with prior work. In accord with prior work, the magnetization is overestimated, as expected for a material near an itinerant ferromagnetic quantum critical point. NaFe4P12 also shows a ferromagnetic instability at the density functional level, but this instability is much weaker than that of NaFe4Sb12, possibly placing it on the paramagnetic side of the quantum critical point. NaFe4As12 shows intermediate behavior. We also present results for skutterudite FeSb3, which is a metastable phase that has been reported in thin film form.

  11. Inter-comparison of Computer Codes for TRISO-based Fuel Micro-Modeling and Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Boer; Chang Keun Jo; Wen Wu; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Donald McEachren; Francesco Venneri

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), the Deep Burn Pebble Bed Reactor (DB-PBR) and the Deep Burn Prismatic Block Reactor (DB-PMR) are all based on fuels that use TRISO particles as their fundamental constituent. The TRISO particle properties include very high durability in radiation environments, hence the designs reliance on the TRISO to form the principal barrier to radioactive materials release. This durability forms the basis for the selection of this fuel type for applications such as Deep Bun (DB), which require exposures up to four times those expected for light water reactors. It follows that the study and prediction of the durability of TRISO particles must be carried as part of the safety and overall performance characterization of all the designs mentioned above. Such evaluations have been carried out independently by the performers of the DB project using independently developed codes. These codes, PASTA, PISA and COPA, incorporate models for stress analysis on the various layers of the TRISO particle (and of the intervening matrix material for some of them), model for fission products release and migration then accumulation within the SiC layer of the TRISO particle, just next to the layer, models for free oxygen and CO formation and migration to the same location, models for temperature field modeling within the various layers of the TRISO particle and models for the prediction of failure rates. All these models may be either internal to the code or external. This large number of models and the possibility of different constitutive data and model formulations and the possibility of a variety of solution techniques makes it highly unlikely that the model would give identical results in the modeling of identical situations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an inter-comparison between the codes and to identify areas of agreement and areas that need reconciliation. The inter-comparison has been carried out by the cooperating

  12. Inter- and Intrafraction Target Motion in Highly Focused Single Vocal Cord Irradiation of T1a Larynx Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwa, Stefan L.S. Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Osman, Sarah O.S.; Gangsaas, Anne; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to verify clinical target volume–planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins in single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI) of T1a larynx tumors and characterize inter- and intrafraction target motion. Methods and Materials: For 42 patients, a single vocal cord was irradiated using intensity modulated radiation therapy at a total dose of 58.1 Gy (16 fractions × 3.63 Gy). A daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was performed to online correct the setup of the thyroid cartilage after patient positioning with in-room lasers (interfraction motion correction). To monitor intrafraction motion, CBCT scans were also acquired just after patient repositioning and after dose delivery. A mixed online-offline setup correction protocol (“O2 protocol”) was designed to compensate for both inter- and intrafraction motion. Results: Observed interfraction, systematic (Σ), and random (σ) setup errors in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions were 0.9, 2.0, and 1.1 mm and 1.0, 1.6, and 1.0 mm, respectively. After correction of these errors, the following intrafraction movements derived from the CBCT acquired after dose delivery were: Σ = 0.4, 1.3, and 0.7 mm, and σ = 0.8, 1.4, and 0.8 mm. More than half of the patients showed a systematic non-zero intrafraction shift in target position, (ie, the mean intrafraction displacement over the treatment fractions was statistically significantly different from zero; P<.05). With the applied CTV-PTV margins (for most patients 3, 5, and 3 mm in LR, CC, and AP directions, respectively), the minimum CTV dose, estimated from the target displacements observed in the last CBCT, was at least 94% of the prescribed dose for all patients and more than 98% for most patients (37 of 42). The proposed O2 protocol could effectively reduce the systematic intrafraction errors observed after dose delivery to almost zero (Σ = 0.1, 0.2, 0.2 mm). Conclusions: With

  13. A new low-voltage plateau of Na3V2(PO4)(3) as an anode for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian, ZL; Sun, Y; Ji, XL

    2015-01-01

    A low-voltage plateau at similar to 0.3 V is discovered for the deep sodiation of Na3V2(PO4)(3) by combined computational and experimental studies. This new low-voltage plateau doubles the sodiation capacity of Na3V2(PO4)(3), thus turning it into a promising anode for Na-ion batteries.

  14. Two-frequency lidar technique for mesospheric Na temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    She, C.Y.; Latifi, H.; Yu, J.R.; Alvarez, R.J. II ); Bills, R.E.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors describe a new two-frequency lidar for measuring Na temperature profiles that uses a stabilized cw single-mode dye laser oscillator (rms frequency jitter < 1 MHz) followed by a pulsed-dye power amplifier (140 MHz FWHM linewidth) which is pumped by an injection-locked Nd:YAG laser. The laser oscillator is tuned to the two operating frequencies by observing the Doppler-free structure of the Na D{sub 2} fluorescence spectrum in a vapor cells. The lidar technique and the initial observations of the temperature profile between 82 and 102 km at Ft. Collins, CO (40.6{degree}N,105{degree}W) are described. Absolute temperature accuracies at the Na layer peak of better than {plus minus}3 K with a vertical resolution of 1 km and an integration period of approximately 5 min were achieved.

  15. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore » of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  16. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup ?}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1?y} lattice matched to InP, as example of IIIV compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  17. DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NA-STD-3016-2006 DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 May 19, 2006 Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations The purpose of this technical standard is to clarify DOE/NNSA expectations and to provide guidance for preparing HARs for NEOs. The general requirements for operation-specific HARs are those contained in Chapters 2-5 of DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, "Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis", or superseding

  18. WIPP Projects Interative Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View WIPP Projects in a larger map. To report corrections, please email WeatherizationInnovation@ee.doe.gov.

  19. Inter substation data communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukas, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The paper briefly describes the scada system operated by ComEd for substation communications. This system has proven a reliable means for monitor and control of the generation, transmission, and distribution system. An attempt to automate stand-alone substation functions into the RTU has had limited success. An automated substation capacitor control algorithm was incorporated into a PC. The PC directly interfaced with the RTU through the serial port for analog monitoring and control of the capacitor banks. There were no further enhancements or development of other control algorithms with the PC. The paper discusses the power system data evolution, the proposed design improvements, and implementation concerns.

  20. Results from NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usai, G.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.

    2006-07-11

    The NA60 experiment studies open charm and prompt dimuon production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. During 2003 the experiment collected data in Indium-Indium collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. In this paper the first results on low mass dimuons, intermediate mass dimuons and J/{psi} suppression are presented.

  1. NA 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) 30 - Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors NA 30 - Naval Reactors FY15 Year End Report Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End Report Semi Annual Report NX 3 - Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office FY15 Year End

  2. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalvati, Farzad Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Rodrigues, George

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  3. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  4. Mid-infrared electro-luminescence and absorption from AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Bour, David P.; Kirste, Lutz

    2014-06-16

    We present electro-modulated absorption and electro-luminescence measurements on chirped AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The absorption signal is a TM-polarized, 70?meV wide feature centred at 230?meV. At medium injection current, a 58?meV wide luminescence peak corresponding to an inter-subband transition at 1450?cm{sup ?1} (180?meV) is observed. Under high injection current, we measured a 4?meV wide structure peaking at 92.5?meV in the luminescence spectrum. The energy location of this peak is exactly at the longitudinal optical phonon of GaN.

  5. Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for supercritical CO2 power cycles for concentrated solar power Title Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat...

  6. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of NaOsO3 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of NaOsO3 Title: Electronic structure and magnetic properties of NaOsO3 Authors: Du, Yongping ; Wan, Xiangang ; Sheng, Li ; Dong, ...

  7. Conversion of ethanol to 1,3-butadiene over Na doped ZnxZryOz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conversion of ethanol to 1,3-butadiene over Na doped ZnxZryOz mixed metal oxides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of ethanol to 1,3-butadiene over Na doped ...

  8. Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 ...

  9. Impact of Biodiesel-based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Biodiesel-based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by NH3 Over Cu-zeolite Catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of Biodiesel-based Na on the ...

  10. Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 You ...

  11. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

    2009-03-31

    This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

  12. APPENDIXN DE-NA0000622 LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    .I APPENDIXN DE-NA0000622 LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES 09/17/2014 Directive Directive Title 10 CFR 824, Current Rule Procedural Rules for the Assessment of Civil Penalties for Classified Information Security Violations 1 O CFR 830 - Current Rule Nuclear Safety Management 1 O CFR 851 - Current Rule Worker Safety and Health Program ANSI B30.11 Monorails and Underhung Hoists ANSI N323A Radiation Protection Instrumentation Test and Calibration Portable Survey Instrumentation, 1997 ANSI N43.2

  13. NA-SD 243.1B NNSA Records Management Suplemental Directive

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    243.1 Admin Change 1 1 3-21-16 ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE TO NA SD 243.1, Records Management Program Locations of Changes: Page Paragraph From To Throughout Document * NNSA Records Management (Update name and hyperlink to new SharePoint site.) * NNSA Records Program Office (Update name and hyperlink to new SharePoint site.) 2 5.a.(1) * Office of the Administrator (NA-1) * Office of Defense Programs (NA- 10) * Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20) * Office of Naval Reactors (NA-30) *

  14. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by dynamically adjusting local routing strategies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-03-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Each node implements a respective routing strategy for routing data through the network, the routing strategies not necessarily being the same in every node. The routing strategies implemented in the nodes are dynamically adjusted during application execution to shift network workload as required. Preferably, adjustment of routing policies in selective nodes is performed at synchronization points. The network may be dynamically monitored, and routing strategies adjusted according to detected network conditions.

  15. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by employing bandwidth shells at areas of overutilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-04-27

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a final destination. The default routing strategy is altered responsive to detection of overutilization of a particular path of one or more links, and at least some traffic is re-routed by distributing the traffic among multiple paths (which may include the default path). An alternative path may require a greater number of link traversals to reach the destination node.

  16. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by routing through transporter nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-16

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. An automated routing strategy routes packets through one or more intermediate nodes of the network to reach a destination. Some packets are constrained to be routed through respective designated transporter nodes, the automated routing strategy determining a path from a respective source node to a respective transporter node, and from a respective transporter node to a respective destination node. Preferably, the source node chooses a routing policy from among multiple possible choices, and that policy is followed by all intermediate nodes. The use of transporter nodes allows greater flexibility in routing.

  17. Characterization of H, Na-Y using amine desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biaglow, A.I.; Parrillo, D.J.; Gorte, R.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have examined series of partially ion-exchanged H, Na-Y zeolites using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of isopropylamine and n-propylamine in order to examine the acid sites in H-Y zeolites as a function of Na poisoning. Both amines desorbed from Na-Y, unreacted, below 500 K; however, samples containing protonic sites exhibited two additional desorption features. First, unreacted amine molecules were observed leaving the samples between [approximately] 500 and 600 K. Second, reaction features appeared which were observed as the simultaneous desorption of propene and ammonia between 575 and 650 K for isopropylamine and between 625 and 700 K for n-propylamine. For a given sample, the number of both isopropylene and n-propylamine molecules which desorbed in both features was identical. Furthermore, the number of molecules desorbing from the two high-temperature features was found to be equal to the number of protonic sites for the entire series, which indicates that both desorption features are associated with protonic sites. This finding was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, which also demonstrated that the unreacting desorption feature was associated with the low-frequency, hydroxyl stretch at 3540 cm[sup [minus]1] and that the reacting amine molecules was adsorbed at the high-frequency, hydroxyl stretch near 3640 cm[sup [minus]1]. The implications of these results for understanding the use of TPD-TGA of amines for the characterization of acidity is discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. NA-ASC-100R-04-Vol.1-Rev.0

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    100R-04-Vol.1-Rev.0 August 2004 SAND 2004-3740P Issued by Sandia National Laboratories for NNSA's Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NA-114. For more information, contact Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov at dimitri.kusnezov@nnsa.doe.gov ON THE COVER: These experimental images show the evolution of three gaseous cylinders (seeded with a tracer gas) that have been accelerated by a planar shock wave. The flow fields are dominated by vortices created by the shock acceleration, so the swirling red

  19. Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC Contract NO. DE-NA0001942

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC Contract NO. DE-NA0001942 Modification No. 0015 Page 2 of 31 1. PURPOSE: The purpose of this modification is to: a. PART I - The Schedule i. TABLE OF CONTENTS for Section B-H, is updated; b. PART I - The Schedule, Section B, Supplies or Services and Prices/Costs i. CLIN 0001A CONTRACT TRANSITION: COST REIMBURSEMENT, NO FEE, is replaced in its entirety; ii. CLIN 0001B BASE TERM (YEARS 1-5), is replaced in its entirety; iii. CLIN 0001C OPTION I TERM (YEARS 6-7),

  20. Standard Model Tests at the NA62 CERN Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bifani, Simone

    2010-02-10

    The physics program of the NA62 experiment aims to search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model by measuring the ratio R{sub K} (GammaK->ev{sub e}(gamma))/GAMMA(K->muv{sub mu}{sub (gamma)}) and studying the ultra rare decay K{sup +}->pi{sup +}vv-bar. The status of the R{sub K} analysis based on approx40% of the data collected during 2007 and 2008 is summarized and the proposed detector layout to measure the branching ratio of the K{sup +}->pi{sup +}vv-bar decay is described.

  1. Formation of titanate nanostructures under different NaOH concentration and their application in wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Jiquan; Cao Yongge; Deng Zhonghua; Tong Hao

    2011-03-15

    The effects of the concentration of NaOH on the formation and transformation of various titanate nanostructures were studied. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. Nanotubes can only be obtained under moderate NaOH conditions, and should transform into nanowires with prolonged hydrothermal treatment, and their formation rate is accelerated by increasing NaOH concentration. Low concentration of NaOH results in the direct formation of nanowires, while extra high concentration of NaOH leads to the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. Adsorption and photocatalysis studies show that titanate nanowires and nanotubes might be potential adsorbents for the removal of both heavy metal ions and dyes and photocatalysts for the removal of dyes from wastewater. -- Graphical abstract: The morphologies of the titanates depend deeply on the concentration of NaOH. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. The application of these titanate nanostructures in the wastewater treatment was studied. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of NaOH concentration on the structures of various titanates was reported. {yields} Three different formation mechanisms were presented with increasing NaOH concentration. {yields} Various titanates were used as adsorbents/photocatalysts in wastewater treatment.

  2. MINOS Calibration and NA49 Hadronic Production Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, Robert James

    2003-08-01

    An overview of the current status of the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is presented. MINOS is a long-baseline experiment with two detectors situated in North America. The near detector is based at the emission point of the NuMI beam at Fermilab, Chicago, the far detector is 735 km downstream in a disused iron mine in Soudan, Minnesota. A third detector, the calibration detector, is used to cross-calibrate these detectors by sampling different particle beams at CERN. A detailed description of the design and construction of the light-injection calibration system is included. Also presented are experimental investigations into proton-carbon collisions at 158 GeV/c carried out with the NA49 experiment at CERN. The NA49 experiment is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) based experiment situated at CERN's North Area. It is a well established experiment with well known characteristics. The data gained from this investigation are to be used to parameterize various hadronic production processes in accelerator and atmospheric neutrino production. These hadronic production parameters will be used to improve the neutrino generation models used in calculating the neutrino oscillation parameters in MINOS.

  3. NaRec New and Renewable Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New and Renewable Energy Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: NaRec New and Renewable Energy Centre Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This...

  4. Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 A presentation showing that point defects play an important role in the kinetics of NaAlH4 including vacancies and interstitials consistent with observed effects of Ti. effects_of_point_defects.pdf (503.7 KB) More Documents & Publications Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 FTA - SunLine Transit Agency - Final Report Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE

  5. Phase transitions and compressibility of NaMgF[subscript 3] ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Phase transitions and compressibility of NaMgFsubscript 3 (Neighborite) in perovskite- and post perovskite-related structures Authors: Martin, C. David ; Crichton, Wilson ...

  6. Influence of NaA Zeolite Crystal Expansion/Contraction on Zeolite Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorenson, Stephanie G; Payzant, E Andrew; Gibbons, Will T; Soydas, Belma; Kita, Hidetoshi; Noble, Richard D; Falconer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ powder XRD measurements showed that the NaA zeolite unit cell contracts and expands upon adsorption, and these changes in zeolite crystal size correlate with permeation changes through NaA zeolite membranes. These membranes had high pervaporation selectivities, even though gas permeation was mainly through defects, as indicated by Knudsen selectivities for gases. At 300 K and a thermodynamic activity of 0.03, water contracted the NaA crystals by 0.22 vol%, and this contraction increased the helium flux through two NaA membranes by approximately 80%. Crystal contraction also increased the fluxes of i-butane during vapor permeation and i-propanol (IPA) during pervaporation (~ 0.03 wt% water). At activities above 0.07, water expanded NaA crystals and correspondingly decreased the membrane fluxes of helium, i-butane, and IPA. Similarly, methanol contracted NaA crystals by 0.05 vol% at an activity of 0.02, and this contraction slightly increased the helium and i-butane fluxes through a NaA membrane. Above an activity of 0.06, methanol expanded the crystals, and the fluxes of helium and i-butane through a NaA membrane decreased. The adsorbate-induced changes explain some pervaporation behavior reported by others, and they indicate that crystal expansion and contraction may increase or decrease zeolite NaA membrane selectivity by changing the defect sizes.

  7. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50).

  8. High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-02-15

    High temperature (250-350C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

  9. Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4 A presentation about how hydrogen can be reversibly absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH4 under moderate conditions by the addition of catalysts. catalytic_effect_of_ti.pdf (877.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Effects of Point Defects and Impurities on Kinetics in NaAlH4 Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds

  10. SU-E-J-258: Inter- and Intra-Fraction Setup Stability and Couch Change Tolerance for Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teboh, Forbang R; Agee, M; Rowe, L; Creasy, T; Schultz, J; Bell, R; Wong, J; Armour, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Immobilization devices combine rigid patient fixation as well as comfort and play a key role providing the stability required for accurate radiation delivery. In the setup step, couch re-positioning needed to align the patient is derived via registration of acquired versus reference image. For subsequent fractions, replicating the initial setup should yield identical alignment errors when compared to the reference. This is not always the case and further couch re-positioning can be needed. An important quality assurance measure is to set couch tolerances beyond which additional investigations are needed. The purpose of this work was to study the inter-fraction couch changes needed to re-align the patient and the intra-fraction stability of the alignment as a guide to establish the couch tolerances. Methods: Data from twelve patients treated on the Accuray CyberKnife (CK) system for fractionated intracranial radiotherapy and immobilized with Aquaplast RT, U-frame, F-Head-Support (Qfix, PA, USA) was used. Each fraction involved image acquisitions and registration with the reference to re-align the patient. The absolute couch position corresponding to the approved setup alignment was recorded per fraction. Intra-fraction set-up corrections were recorded throughout the treatment. Results: The average approved setup alignment was 0.030.28mm, 0.150.22mm, 0.060.31mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.000.35degrees, 0.030.32degrees, 0.080.45degrees for roll, pitch and yaw respectively. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the couch position was 6.65mm, 10.55mm, and 4.77mm in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively and 0.82degrees, 0.71degrees for roll and pitch respectively. Intra-fraction monitoring showed small average errors of 0.210.21mm, 0.000.08mm, 0.230.22mm in the L/R, A/P, S/I directions respectively and 0.030.12degrees, 0.040.25degrees, and 0.130.15degrees in the roll, pitch and yaw respectively. Conclusion: The inter

  11. pH-regulative synthesis of Na3(VPO4)2F3 nanoflowers and their improved Na cycling stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, Yuruo; Mu, Linqin; Zhao, Junmei; Hu, Yong -Sheng; Liu, Huizhou; Dai, Sheng

    2016-04-08

    Na-ion batteries are becoming increasingly attractive as a low cost energy storage device. Sodium vanadium fluorophosphates have been studied extensively recently due to their high storage capacity and high discharge voltage. Shape and size often have a crucial influence over the properties. The controlling synthesis of nanoparticles with special microstructures is significant, which becomes a challenging issue and has drawn considerable attention. In this study, Na3(VPO4)2F3 nanoflowers have been synthesized via a pH-regulative low-temperature (120 °C) hydro-thermal route. In particular, it is a green route without any organic compounds involved. The hydro-thermal reaction time for the formation of Na3(VPO4)2F3 nanoflowersmore » has also been investigated. A weak acid environment (pH = 2.60) with the possible presence of hydrogen fluoride molecules is necessary for the formation of the desired nanoflower microstructures. Moreover, compared to the nanoparticles obtained by Na2HPO4·12H2O, the as-synthesized Na3(VPO4)2F3 nanoflowers showed an excellent Na-storage performance in terms of superior cycle stability, even without any further carbon coating or high-temperature treatment.« less

  12. Role of bimodal distribution in tailoring the inter-particle interactions in Cu{sub 79}Co{sub 21} nanogranular films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Dinesh Chaudhary, Sujeet Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2014-04-24

    Nanogranular Cu{sub 79}Co{sub 21} films were deposited by magnetron co-sputtering and their magnetotransport properties were investigated as a function of thickness (t). The fitting of magnetoresistance (MR) data reveals the presence of bimodal distribution of Co-particles. With the increase of film thickness from 25 to 200 nm, whereas smaller particle (2.5 nm) distribution remains unaffected, the bigger one grows monotonically from 3.3 nm to 4.9 nm for 25 ≤ t < 100 nm and stays same (4.9 nm) for 100 ≤ t ≤ 200 nm. From MR data recorded in the range of 20–300 K, it is observed that dependence of MR on thickness keeps on reducing on lowering the temperature. This observance has been presented in terms of presence of bimodal distribution and its role in tailoring the inter-particle magnetic interactions.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  14. Concentration and precipitation of NaCl and KCl from salt cake leach solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreenivasarao, K; Patsiogiannis, F.; Hryn, J.N.

    1997-02-09

    Electrodialysis was investigated for cost-effective recovery of salt from salt cake leach solutions. (Salt cake is a waste stream generated by the aluminum industry during treatment of aluminum drosses and scrap.) We used a pilot-scale electrodialysis stack of 5 membrane pairs, each with an effective area of 0.02 m{sup 2}. The diluate stream contained synthetic NaCl, KCl,mixtures of NaCl and KCl, and actual salt cake leach solutions (mainly NaCl and KCl, with small amounts of MgCl{sub 2}). We concentrated and precipitated NaCl and KCl salts from the concentrate steam when the initial diluate stream concentration was 21.5 to 28.8 wt% NaCl and KCl. We found that water transferring through the membranes was a significant factor in overall efficiency of salt recovery by electrodialysis.

  15. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  16. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  17. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  18. Investigation of the Effects of Biodiesel-based Na on Emissions Control Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookshear, D. William; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J; Bunting, Bruce G; Howe, Janet E

    2012-01-01

    A single-cylinder diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of biodiesel-based Na on emissions control components using specially blended 20% biodiesel fuel (B20). The emissions control components investigated were a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a Cu-zeolite-based NH{sub 3}-SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst, and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both light-duty vehicle, DOC-SCR-DPF, and heavy-duty vehicle, DOC-DPF-SCR, emissions control configurations were employed. The accelerated Na aging is achieved by introducing elevated Na levels in the fuel, to represent full useful life exposure, and periodically increasing the exhaust temperature to replicate DPF regeneration. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated Na aging protocol, engine-aged lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs), DOCs and DPFs are also evaluated. To fully characterize the impact on the catalytic activity the LNT, DOC and SCR catalysts were evaluated using a bench flow reactor. The evaluation of the aged DOC samples and LNT show little to no deactivation as a result of Na contamination. However, the SCR in the light-duty configuration (DOC-SCR-DPF) was severely affected by Na contamination, especially when NO was the only fed NO{sub x} source. In the heavy-duty configuration (DOC-DPF-SCR), no impact is observed in the SCR NO{sub x} reduction activity. Electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) reveals that Na contamination on the LNT, DOC, and SCR samples is present throughout the length of the catalysts with a higher concentration on the washcoat surface. In both the long-term engine-aged DPF and the accelerated Na-aged DPFs, there is significant Na ash present in the upstream channels; however, in the engine-aged sample lube oil-based ash is the predominant constituent.

  19. Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOx Using Cu-zeolite | Department of Energy Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel on three emission control devices: the diesel particulate filter, diesel oxidation catalyst, and zeolyte-based SCR catalyst deer11_toops.pdf (1.75 MB) More Documents & Publications Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control

  20. Recent results from NA44 and a review of HBT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacak, B.V.

    1995-04-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions provide the opportunity to create hadronic matter at high energy density and study its properties. In order to do this, one must characterize the collisions, ascertain the size and density of the hot system in the central region of the nucleus-nucleus system, and determine the energy density achieved. Furthermore, one needs to determine whether or not the system approaches equilibrium so thermodynamic descriptions may be used. One of the experimental tools available is the study of two-particle correlations to map the space-time extent of the system when the hadrons decouple. Other observables include the flow of energy and charged particles transverse to the beam and the rapidity distribution of protons to indicate the amount of stopping and randomization of the incoming energy. The transverse mass distributions of hadrons reflect the temperature of the system at freezeout and effects of radial expansion. The production ratios of different particles are related to the extent of chemical equilibrium reached in the collision and subsequent evolution of the hadron gas. The NA44 Experiment at CERN can address all of these observables, though here the author focus mainly on correlation measurements. Kaons and pions are emitted rather late in the evolution of a heavy ion collision, at the time of {open_quotes}freezeout{close_quotes} when the hadrons cease to interact. Their correlations reflect the space-time evolution of the later part of the collision. In addition to characterizing the collision, correlations can signal a phase transition as they measure the duration of hadronization and particle emission, which should be long in both a first- or second-order phase transition. Furthermore, correlation measurements offer an important tool to help disentangle effects of expansion from the freezeout temperature reflected in the single particle spectra.

  1. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-27

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  2. Correlations between quasi-coherent fluctuations and the pedestal evolution during the inter-edge localized modes phase on DIII-D

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Diallo, A.; Groebner, R. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Battaglia, D. J.; Smith, D. R.; Osborne, T. H.; Canik, J. M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Snyder, P. B.

    2015-05-15

    Direct measurements of the pedestal recovery during an edge-localized mode cycle provide evidence that quasi-coherent fluctuations (QCFs) play a role in the inter-ELM pedestal dynamics. When using fast Thomson scattering measurements, we found that the pedestal density and temperature evolutions are probed on sub-millisecond time scales to show a fast recovery of the density gradient compared to the temperature gradient. The temperature gradient appears to provide a drive for the onset of quasi-coherent fluctuations (as measured with the magnetic probe and the density diagnostics) localized in the pedestal. The amplitude evolution of these QCFs tracks the temperature gradient evolution includingmore » its saturation. Such correlation suggests that these QCFs play a key role in limiting the pedestal temperature gradient. Moreover, the saturation of the QCFs coincides with the pressure gradient reaching the kinetic-ballooning mode (KBM) critical gradient as predicted by EPED1. Furthermore, linear microinstability analysis using GS2 indicates that the steep gradient is near the KBM threshold. Finally, the modeling and the observations together suggest that QCFs are consistent with dominant KBMs, although microtearing cannot be excluded as subdominant.« less

  3. Tailoring characteristic thermal stability of Ni-Au binary nanocrystals via structure and composition engineering: theoretical insights into structural evolution and atomic inter-diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bangquan; Wang, Hailong; Xing, Guozhong; Wang, Rongming E-mail: rmwang@ustb.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    We report on the structural evolution and atomic inter-diffusion characteristics of the bimetallic Ni-Au nanocrystals (NCs) by molecular dynamics simulations studies. Our results reveal that the thermal stability dynamics of Ni-Au NCs strongly depends on the atomic configurations. By engineering the structural construction with Ni:Au = 1:1 atomic composition, compared with core-shell Au@Ni and alloy NCs, the melting point of core-shell Ni@Au NCs is significantly enhanced up to 1215 K. Unexpectedly, with atomic ratio of Au:Ni= 1:9, the melting process initiates from the atoms in the shell of Ni@Au and alloy NCs, while starts from the core of Au@Ni NCs. The corresponding features and evolution process of structural motifs, mixing and segregation are illustrated via a series of dynamic simulations videos. Moreover, our results revealed that the face centered cubic phase Au{sub 0.75}Ni{sub 0.25} favorably stabilizes in NCs form but does not exist in the bulk counterpart, which elucidates the anomalies of previously reported experimental results on such bimetallic NCs.

  4. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation of energy ...

  5. MHK Projects/University of Manchester Phase 1 and 2 NaREC | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University of Manchester Phase 1 and 2 NaREC < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  6. NaI (Tl) Calorimeter Calibration and Simulation for Coulomb Sum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Simulation for Coulomb Sum Rule Experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NaI (Tl) Calorimeter Calibration and Simulation for ...

  7. Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel on three emission control devices: the diesel particulate filter, diesel oxidation catalyst, and zeolyte-based SCR catalyst deer11toops.pdf ...

  8. New and Renewable Energy Centre NaREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NE24 3AG Product: NaREC is a Centre of Excellence, fast-tracking concept evaluation, feasibility studies and prototype evaluation and testing through to early commercialisation....

  9. NA-243 ANNUAL REPORT 24.3.1.5.4 Cooperation with UK (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NA-243 ANNUAL REPORT 24.3.1.5.4 Cooperation with UK Authors: Smith, Morag Kristin 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  10. Thermochemistry of phosphorus oxynitrides: PON and LiNaPON glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tessier, F.; Navrotsky, A.; Le Sauze, A.; Marchand, R.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature solution calorimetry has been very useful in elucidating the energetics of many oxide materials. Recently, a sodium molybdate melt, 3Na{sub 2}O{center{underscore}dot}4MoO{sub 3}, has been shown to be very effective for nitride calorimetry. This methodology has now been used to determine the energetics of formation of phosphorus oxynitride PON samples and of a series of LiNaPON oxynitride glasses. The magnitude of the energetics of nitrogen/oxygen substitution within PON and LiNaPON glasses has been correctly evaluated by using N-N, O-O, P-N, and P-O bond strengths. The in-situ precipitation of metallic particles from corresponding oxides in LiNaPON glasses has been predicted from high-temperature solution calorimetry results and appropriate thermodynamic cycles. The results constitute the first set of energetic data on nitridophosphates.

  11. Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-GaN Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dislocation confinement in the growth ...

  12. Europium (Z=63) n=3-3 lines in the extreme ultraviolet: Na- through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Europium (Z63) n3-3 lines in the extreme ultraviolet: Na- through Si-like ions Authors: Trabert, E ; Beiersdorfer, P ; Hell, N ; Brown, G V Publication Date: 2014-08-22 ...

  13. " East North Central",9.3,"NA",10.1,10.7,11.6,11.85822

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Thousands) " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",9.4,9.9,10.2,10.6,11.4,12 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",9.5,"NA",10.3...

  14. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO{sub 4} media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO{sub 4} up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25{degrees}C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na{sup +}-HOx{sup -}, Na{sup +}-Ox{sup -}, AmOx{sup +}-ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and Na{sup +}-Am(Ox){sub 2}{sup -} interactions obtained by fitting the data.

  15. Thermoelectric Enhancement in PbTe with K or Na codoping from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermoelectric Enhancement in PbTe with K or Na codoping from tuning the interaction of the light- and heavy-hole valence bands Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  16. FT-IR study of CO2 interaction with Na-rich montmorillonite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krukowski, Elizabeth G.; Goodman, Angela; Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Guthrie, George; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2015-05-27

    Here, carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature (PT) conditions relevant to CCUS, CO2 is less dense than the pre-existing brine in the formation, and the more buoyant CO2 will migrate to the top of the formation where it will be in contact with cap rock. Interactions between clay-rich shale cap rocks and CO2 are poorly understood at PT conditions appropriatemore » for CCUS in saline formations. In this study, the interaction of CO2 with clay minerals in the cap rock overlying a saline formation has been examined using Na+ exchanged montmorillonite (Mt) (Na+-STx-1) (Na+ Mt) as an analog for clay-rich shale. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to discern mechanistic information for CO2 interaction with hydrated (both one- and two-water layers) and relatively dehydrated (both dehydrated layers and one-water layers) Na+-STx-1 at 35 °C and 50 C and CO2 pressure from 0 5.9 MPa. CO2-induced perturbations associated with the water layer and Na+-STx-1 vibrational modes such as AlAlOH and AlMgOH were examined. Data indicate that CO2 is preferentially incorporated into the interlayer space, with relatively dehydrated Na+-STx-1 capable of incorporating more CO2 compared to hydrated Na+-STx-1. Spectroscopic data provide no evidence of formation of carbonate minerals or the interaction of CO2 with sodium cations in the Na+-STx-1 structure.« less

  17. Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NA-SH - 2013 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NA-SH - 2013 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - NA-SH - 2013 DOE Federal Technical Capability Panel provides the requirements for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of federal personnel with demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department's missions and responsibilities. This Program applies to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Headquarters (HQ) and Field organizations that have safety

  18. Controlled thermal decomposition of NaSi to derive silicon clathrate compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horie, Hiro-omi; Kikudome, Takashi; Teramura, Kyosuke; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Formation conditions of two types of sodium containing silicon clathrate compounds were determined by the controlled thermal decomposition of sodium monosilicide NaSi under vacuum. The decomposition began at 360 deg. C. Much higher decomposition temperatures and the presence of sodium metal vapor were favorable for the formation of type I clathrate compound Na{sub 8}Si{sub 46}. Type II clathrate compound Na{sub x}Si{sub 136} was obtained as a single phase at a decomposition temperature <440 deg. C under the condition without sodium metal vapor. The type I clathrate compound was decomposed to crystalline Si above 520 deg. C. The type II clathrate compound was thermally more stable, and retained at least up to 550 deg. C in vacuum. - Graphical Abstract: The optimal condition to prepare type II silicon clathrate Na{sub x}Si{sub 136} with minimal contamination of the type I phase is proposed. The starting NaSi should be thermally decomposed below 440 deg. C, and the rapid removal of Na vapor evolved is essentially important.

  19. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W.

    2014-08-25

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E{sub g}) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na{sup +} ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na{sup +} ions is found to deplete the ?* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E{sub g}. The band gap increases with increasing Na{sup +} coverage with a maximum E{sub g}?0.70?eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na{sup +} ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na{sup +} ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  20. Constrained Surface Complexation Modeling: Rutile in RbCl, NaCl, and NaCF3SO3 Media to 250 °C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Předota, Milan; Ridley, Moira K.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive set of molecular-level results, primarily from classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, are used to constrain CD-MUSIC surface complexation model (SCM) parameters describing rutile powder titrations conducted in RbCl, NaCl, and NaTr (Tr = triflate, CF3SO3–) electrolyte media from 25 to 250 °C. Rb+ primarily occupies the innermost tetradentate binding site on the rutile (110) surface at all temperatures (25, 150, 250 °C) and negative charge conditions (-0.1 and -0.2 C/m2) probed via CMD simulations, reflecting the small hydration energy of this large, monovalent cation. Consequently, variable SCM parameters (Stern-layer capacitance values and intrinsic Rb+ bindingmore » constants) were adjusted relatively easily to satisfactorily match the CMD and titration data. The larger hydration energy of Na+ results in a more complex inner-sphere distribution, which shifts from bidentate to tetradentate binding with increasing negative charge and temperature, and this distribution was not matched well for both negative charge conditions, which may reflect limitations in the CMD and/or SCM approaches. Finally, in particular, the CMD axial density profiles for Rb+ and Na+ reveal that peak binding distances shift toward the surface with increasing negative charge, suggesting that the CD-MUSIC framework may be improved by incorporating CD or Stern-layer capacitance values that vary with charge.« less

  1. SU-E-T-603: Analysis of Optical Tracked Head Inter-Fraction Movements Within Masks to Access Intracranial Immobilization Techniques in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsi, W; Zeidan, O

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a quantitative methodology utilizing an optical tracking system for monitoring head inter-fraction movements within brain masks to assess the effectiveness of two intracranial immobilization techniques. Methods and Materials: A 3-point-tracking method was developed to measure the mask location for a treatment field at each fraction. Measured displacement of mask location to its location at first fraction is equivalent to the head movement within the mask. Head movements for each of treatment fields were measured over about 10 fractions at each patient for seven patients; five treated in supine and two treated in prone. The Q-fix Base-of-Skull head frame was used in supine while the CIVCO uni-frame baseplate was used in prone. Displacements of recoded couch position of each field post imaging at each fraction were extracted for those seven patients. Standard deviation (S.D.) of head movements and couch displacements was scored for statistical analysis. Results: The accuracy of 3PtTrack method was within 1.0 mm by phantom measurements. Patterns of head movement and couch displacement were similar for patients treated in either supine or prone. In superior-inferior direction, mean value of scored standard deviations over seven patients were 1.6 mm and 3.4 mm for the head movement and the couch displacement, respectively. The result indicated that the head movement combined with a loose fixation between the mask-to-head frame results large couch displacements for each patient, and also large variation between patients. However, the head movement is the main cause for the couch displacement with similar magnitude of around 1.0 mm in anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Conclusions: Optical-tracking methodology independently quantifying head movements could improve immobilization devices by correctly acting on causes for head motions within mask. A confidence in the quality of intracranial immobilization techniques could be more efficient by

  2. Assembly of 500,000 inter-specific catfish expressed sequence tags and large scale gene-associated marker development for whole genome association studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catfish Genome Consortium; Wang, Shaolin; Peatman, Eric; Abernathy, Jason; Waldbieser, Geoff; Lindquist, Erika; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan; Wang, Mei; Li, Ping; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Liu, Lei; Vullaganti, Deepika; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Murdock, Christopher; Small, Brian C; Wilson, Melanie; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Yanliang; Lee, Yoona; Chen, Fei; Lu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqi; Xu, Peng; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Baoprasertkul, Puttharat; Quilang, Jonas; Sha, Zhenxia; Bao, Baolong; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Qun; Takano, Tomokazu; Nandi, Samiran; Liu, Shikai; Wong, Lilian; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Quiniou, Sylvie; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman; Trant, John; Rokhsar, Daniel; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-03-23

    Background-Through the Community Sequencing Program, a catfish EST sequencing project was carried out through a collaboration between the catfish research community and the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute. Prior to this project, only a limited EST resource from catfish was available for the purpose of SNP identification. Results-A total of 438,321 quality ESTs were generated from 8 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and 4 blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) libraries, bringing the number of catfish ESTs to nearly 500,000. Assembly of all catfish ESTs resulted in 45,306 contigs and 66,272 singletons. Over 35percent of the unique sequences had significant similarities to known genes, allowing the identification of 14,776 unique genes in catfish. Over 300,000 putative SNPs have been identified, of which approximately 48,000 are high-quality SNPs identified from contigs with at least four sequences and the minor allele presence of at least two sequences in the contig. The EST resource should be valuable for identification of microsatellites, genome annotation, large-scale expression analysis, and comparative genome analysis. Conclusions-This project generated a large EST resource for catfish that captured the majority of the catfish transcriptome. The parallel analysis of ESTs from two closely related Ictalurid catfishes should also provide powerful means for the evaluation of ancient and recent gene duplications, and for the development of high-density microarrays in catfish. The inter- and intra-specific SNPs identified from all catfish EST dataset assembly will greatly benefit the catfish introgression breeding program and whole genome association studies.

  3. Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Martin, Sheryl A

    2006-02-01

    Welcome to the 2006 joint meeting of the fourth Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop and the six Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference. The vision and scope of the Genomics:GTL program continue to expand and encompass research and technology issues from diverse scientific disciplines, attracting broad interest and support from researchers at universities, DOE national laboratories, and industry. Metabolic engineering's vision is the targeted and purposeful alteration of metabolic pathways to improve the understanding and use of cellular pathways for chemical transformation, energy transduction, and supramolecular assembly. These two programs have much complementarity in both vision and technological approaches, as reflected in this joint workshop. GLT's challenge to the scientific community remains the further development and use of a broad array of innovative technologies and computational tools to systematically leverage the knowledge and capabilities brought to us by DNA sequencing projects. The goal is to seek a broad and predictive understanding of the functioning and control of complex systems--individual microbes, microbial communities, and plants. GTL's prominent position at the interface of the physical, computational, and biological sciences is both a strength and challenge. Microbes remain GTL's principal biological focus. In the complex 'simplicity' of microbes, they find capabilities needed by DOE and the nation for clean and secure energy, cleanup of environmental contamination, and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. An ongoing challenge for the entire GTL community is to demonstrate that the fundamental science conducted in each of your research projects brings us a step closer to biology-based solutions for these important national energy and environmental needs.

  4. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na⁺/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both “disordered” and “ordered” forms, depending onmore » the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3¯m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) Å and c = 16.05192(7) Å) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) Å, b = 9.18432(1) Å, c = 5.62742(1) Å and β = 108.2797(2)°) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O₂ is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through ²³Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the

  5. Batteries: An Advanced Na-FeCl2 ZEBRA Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-17

    Sodium-metal chloride batteries, ZEBRA, are considered as one of the most important electrochemical devices for stationary energy storage applications because of its advantages of good cycle life, safety, and reliability. However, sodium-nickel chloride (Na-NiCl2) batteries, the most promising redox chemistry in ZEBRA batteries, still face great challenges for the practical application due to its inevitable feature of using Ni cathode (high materials cost). In this work, a novel intermediate-temperature sodium-iron chloride (Na-FeCl2) battery using a molten sodium anode and Fe cathode is proposed and demonstrated. The first use of unique sulfur-based additives in Fe cathode enables Na-FeCl2 batteries can be assembled in the discharged state and operated at intermediate-temperature (<200°C). The results in this work demonstrate that intermediate-temperature Na-FeCl2 battery technology could be a propitious solution for ZEBRA battery technologies by replacing the traditional Na-NiCl2 chemistry.

  6. Amorphous RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles: High temperature solution synthesis and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles by high-temperature solution synthesis are ultra-small monodisperse and air-stable amorphous, whose size and magnetic dependence are studied. - Highlights: • RE–Fe–B–Na nanoparticles are obtained by high-temperature solution synthesis. • These colloidal nanoparticles are monodisperse and size controlled. • The magnetism dependence and possible magnetic coupling mechanism are studied. - Abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles are prepared by high-temperature solution synthesis. These nanoparticles are ultra-small monodisperse, air-stable and amorphous, whose particle size and magnetic property are characterized by transmission electron microscope and superconducting quantum interference device. Taking Nd–Fe–B–Na nanoparticle as an example, it is found that the particle size can be controlled in less than 7 nm. Besides, the magnetic properties of RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles can be compared for different rare earth elements. Based on the bulk ferromagnetic coupling, other possible magnetic coupling mechanism is discussed.

  7. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, andmore » scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.« less

  8. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

    2009-02-20

    A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  10. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D&D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  11. Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH 4 Mei-Yin Chou School of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology (DE-FG02-05ER46229) Acknowledgment: Yan Wang, Roland Stumpf Why is NaAlH 4 interesting? A viable candidate for hydrogen-storage material: High theoretical weight-percent hydrogen content of 5.55% and low cost But (before 1997) Dehydrogenation occurs at high temperature; rehydrogenation is difficult. Bogdanovic and Schwickardi, 1997 Hydrogen can be reversibly absorbed and desorbed

  12. FT-IR study of CO2 interaction with Na-rich montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krukowski, Elizabeth G.; Goodman, Angela; Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Guthrie, George; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2015-05-27

    Here, carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature (PT) conditions relevant to CCUS, CO2 is less dense than the pre-existing brine in the formation, and the more buoyant CO2 will migrate to the top of the formation where it will be in contact with cap rock. Interactions between clay-rich shale cap rocks and CO2 are poorly understood at PT conditions appropriate for CCUS in saline formations. In this study, the interaction of CO2 with clay minerals in the cap rock overlying a saline formation has been examined using Na+ exchanged montmorillonite (Mt) (Na+-STx-1) (Na+ Mt) as an analog for clay-rich shale. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to discern mechanistic information for CO2 interaction with hydrated (both one- and two-water layers) and relatively dehydrated (both dehydrated layers and one-water layers) Na+-STx-1 at 35 °C and 50 C and CO2 pressure from 0 5.9 MPa. CO2-induced perturbations associated with the water layer and Na+-STx-1 vibrational modes such as AlAlOH and AlMgOH were examined. Data indicate that CO2 is preferentially incorporated into the interlayer space, with relatively dehydrated Na+-STx-1 capable of incorporating more CO2 compared to hydrated Na+-STx-1. Spectroscopic data provide no evidence of formation of carbonate minerals or the interaction of CO2 with sodium cations in the Na+-STx-1 structure.

  13. POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

    2011-03-08

    At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a

  14. Study of the nanobubble phase of aqueous NaCl solutions by dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N F; Shkirin, A V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Burkhanov, I S; Chaikov, L L [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomkova, A K [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Aqueous NaCl solutions with different concentrations have been investigated by dynamic scattering of laser radiation. It is experimentally shown that these solutions contain scattering particles with a wide size distribution in a range of ?10 100 nm. The experimental results indirectly confirm the existence of quasi-stable gas nanobubbles in the bulk of aqueous ionic solutions. (light scattering)

  15. Electron doping evolution of the magnetic excitations in NaFe1 xCoxAs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carr, Scott V.; Zhang, Chenglin; Song, Yu; Tan, Guotai; Li, Yu; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Perring, T. G.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2016-06-13

    We use time-of-flight (TOF) inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy to investigate the doping dependence of magnetic excitations across the phase diagram of NaFe1-xCoxAs with x = 0, 0.0175, 0.0215, 0.05, and 0.11. The effect of electron-doping by partially substituting Fe by Co is to form resonances that couple with superconductivity, broaden and suppress low energy (E 80 meV) spin excitations compared with spin waves in undoped NaFeAs. However, high energy (E > 80 meV) spin excitations are weakly Co-doping dependent. Integration of the local spin dynamic susceptibility "(!) of NaFe1-xCoxAs reveals a total fluctuating moment of 3.6 μ2 B/Fe andmore » a small but systematic reduction with electron doping. The presence of a large spin gap in the Cooverdoped nonsuperconducting NaFe0.89Co0.11As suggests that Fermi surface nesting is responsible for low-energy spin excitations. These results parallel Ni-doping evolution of spin excitations in BaFe2-xNixAs2, confirming the notion that low-energy spin excitations coupling with itinerant electrons are important for superconductivity, while weakly doping dependent high-energy spin excitations result from localized moments.« less

  16. LANL surveillance requirements management and surveillance requirements from NA-12 tasking memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, Charles R

    2011-01-25

    Surveillance briefing to NNSA to support a tasking memo from NA-12 on Surveillance requirements. This talk presents the process for developing surveillance requirements, discusses the LANL requirements that were issued as part of that tasking memo, and presents recommendations on Component Evaluation and Planning Committee activities for FY11.

  17. Phase Development of NaOH Activated Blast Furnace Slag Geopolymers Cured at 90 deg. C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Bo; Bigley, C.; Ryan, M. J.; MacKenzie, K. J. D.; Brown, I. W. M.

    2009-07-23

    Geopolymers were synthesized from blast furnace slag activated with different levels of NaOH and cured at 90 deg. C. The crystalline and amorphous phases of the resulting geopolymers were characterized by XRD quantitative analysis, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR. Amorphous species are predominant in materials at all NaOH levels. In the amorphous phase, aluminium substituted silicate species (Q{sup 2}(1Al)) dominated among the species of Q{sup 0}, Q{sup 1}, Q{sup 2}(1Al) and Q{sup 2}(where Q{sup n}(mAl) denotes a silicate tetrahedron [SiO{sub 4}] with n bridging oxygen atoms and m adjacent tetrahedra substituted with an aluminate tetrahedron [AlO{sub 4}]). In addition, it was also found that 4-fold coordination aluminium [AlO{sub 4}] species ({sup 27}Al chemical shift 66.1 ppm) in low NaOH containing materials differs from the species ({sup 27}Al chemical shift 74.3 ppm) in high NaOH containing materials.

  18. Consequence analysis of an unmitigated NaOH solution spray release during addition to waste tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-21

    Toxicological consequences were calculated for a postulated maximum caustic soda (NaOH) solution spray leak during addition to a waste tank to adjust tank pH. Although onsite risk guidelines were exceeded for the unmitigated release, site boundary consequences were below the level of concern. Means of mitigating the release so as to greatly reduce the onsite consequences were recommended.

  19. Consequence analysis of a postulated NaOH release from the 2727-W sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, D.A.

    1996-09-27

    Toxicological and radiological consequences were calculated for a maximum sodium fire in the 2727-W Sodium Storage Facility. The sodium is solid and cannot leak out of the tanks. The maximum fire therefore corresponded to the maximum cross-sectional area of one tank. It was shown that release of the entire facility inventory of 22 Na is insufficient to produce an appreciable effect.

  20. Ion-conduction mechanisms in NaSICON-type membranes for energy storage and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Anthony H.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2015-10-01

    Next generation metal-ion conducting membranes are key to developing energy storage and utilization technologies like batteries and fuel ce lls. Sodium super-ionic conductors (aka NaSICON) are a class of compounds with AM 1 M 2 (PO 4 ) 3 stoichiometry where the choice of "A" and "M" cation varies widely. This report, which de scribes substitutional derivatives of NZP (NaZr 2 P 3 O 12 ), summarizes the accomplishments of a Laboratory D irected Research and Development (LDRD) project to analyze transport mec hanisms using a combination of in situ studies of structure, composition, and bonding, com bined with first principles theory and modeling. We developed an experimental platform and applied methods, such as synchrotron- based X-ray spectroscopies, to probe the electronic structure of compositionally well-controlled NaSICON films while in operation ( i.e ., conducting Na ions exposed to oxygen or water va por atmospheres). First principles theory and modeling were used to interpret the experimental observations and develop an enhanced understanding of atomistic processes that give rise to, and affect, ion conduction.

  1. Reactivity enhancement of oxide skins in reversible Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Borgschulte, Andreas; Gehrig, Jeffrey C.; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-15

    The reversibility of hydrogen sorption in complex hydrides has only been shown unambiguously for NaAlH{sub 4} doped with transition metal compounds. Despite a multitude of investigations of the effect of the added catalyst on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, the mechanism of catalysis remains elusive so far. Following the decomposition of TiCl{sub 3}-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we link the chemical state of the dopant with those of the hydride and decomposition products. Titanium and aluminium change their oxidation states during cycling. The change of the formal oxidation state of Al from III to zero is partly due to the chemical reaction from NaAlH{sub 4} to Al. Furthermore, aluminium oxide is formed (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which coexists with titanium oxide (Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The interplay of metallic and oxidized Ti with the oxide skin might explain the effectiveness of Ti and similar dopants (Ce, Zr…)

  2. Effect of Na-doped Mo on Selenization Pathways for CuGa/In Metallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, Rangarajan; Tong, Gabriel; Kim, Woo Kyoung; Payzant, E Andrew; Adelhelm, Christoph; Franzke, Enrico; Winkler, Jörg; Anderson, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Reaction pathways were followed for selenization of CuGa/In precursor structures using in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Precursor films were deposited on Na-free and Na-doped Mo (3 and 5 at %)/Na-free glass. The precursor film was constituted with CuIn, In, Cu9Ga4, Cu3Ga, Cu16In9 and Mo. HTXRD measurements during temperature ramp selenization showed CIS formation occurs first, followed by CGS formation, and then mixing on the group III sub-lattice to form CIGS. CIGS formation was observed to be complete at ~450 C for samples deposited on 5 at % Na-doped Mo substrates. MoSe2 formation was evidenced after the CIGS synthesis reaction was complete. The Ga distribution in the annealed CIGS was determined by Rietveld refinement. Isothermal reaction studies were conducted for CIGS (112) formation in the temperature range 260-320 C to estimate the rate constants.

  3. Hydrothermal crystallization of Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}, Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and Na{sub 16}Ti{sub 10}O{sub 28} in the NaOH-TiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system at a temperature of 500 deg. C and a pressure of 0.1 GPa: The structural mechanism of self-assembly of titanates from suprapolyhedral clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyushin, G. D.

    2006-07-15

    An increase in the NaOH concentration in the NaOH-TiO{sub 2} (rutile)-H{sub 2}O system at a temperature of 500 deg. C and a pressure of 0.1 GPa leads to the crystallization R-TiO{sub 2} + Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} {sup {yields}} Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} {sup {yields}} Na{sub 16}Ti{sub 10}O{sub 28}. Crystals of the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} titanate (space group C2/m) have the three-dimensional framework structure Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13}. The structure of the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} titanate (space group P2{sub 1}/m) contains the two-dimensional layers Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}. The structure of the Na{sub 16}Ti{sub 10}O{sub 28} titanate (space group P-1) is composed of the isolated ten-polyhedron cluster precursors Ti{sub 10}O{sub 28}. In all the structures, the titanium atoms have an octahedral coordination (MTiO{sub 6}). The matrix self-assembly of the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} and Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} (Na{sub 4}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 14}) crystal structures from Na{sub 4}M{sub 12} invariant precursors is modeled. These precursors are clusters consisting of twelve M polyhedra linked through the edges. It is demonstrated that the structurally rigid precursors Na{sub 4}M{sub 12} control all processes of the subsequent evolution of the crystal-forming titanate clusters. The specific features of the self-assembly of the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} structure that result from the additional incorporation of twice the number of sodium atoms into the composition of the high-level clusters are considered.

  4. Background studies for NaI(Tl) detectors in the ANAIS dark matter project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaré, J.; Borjabad, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; Fortuño, D.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Gómez, H.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Solórzano, A. Ortiz de; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2013-08-08

    Several large NaI(Tl) detectors, produced by different companies, have been operated in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in the frame of the ANAIS (Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators) project devoted to the direct detection of dark matter. A complete background model has been developed for a 9.6 kg detector (referred as ANAIS-0 prototype) after a long data taking at LSC. Activities from the natural chains of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K in the NaI(Tl) crystal were evaluated applying different methods: discrimination of alpha particles vs beta/gamma background by Pulse Shape Analysis for quantifying the content of the natural chains and coincidence techniques for {sup 40}K. Radioactive contaminations in the detector and shielding components were also determined by HPGe spectrometry. Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 package were carried out to evaluate their contribution. At high energies, most of the measured background is nicely reproduced; at low energy some non-explained components are still present, although some plausible background sources have been analyzed. The {sup 40}K content of the NaI(Tl) crystal has been confirmed to be the dominant contributor to the measured background with this detector. In addition, preliminary results of the background characterization, presently underway at the LSC, of two recently produced NaI(Tl) detectors, with 12.5 kg mass each, will be presented: cosmogenic induced activity has been clearly observed and is being quantified, and {sup 40}K activity at a level ten times lower than in ANAIS-0 has been determined.

  5. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R.; Hodgson, K.M.

    2008-01-15

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the

  6. Quarterly Progress Report Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    801 Microchannel Receiver Development Oregon State University Page 1 of 44 Project Title: High Flux Microchannel Receiver Development with Adap- tive Flow Control Project Period: (e.g. 01/01/14 - 12/31/16) Submission Date: (07/15/15) Recipient: Oregon State University Address: 204 Rogers Hall, Oregon State University Corvallis OR, 97331 Website (if available) oregonstate.edu Award Number: DE-EE0005801 Project Team: Oregon State University (OSU) and Pacific Northwest Na- tional Laboratory (PNNL)

  7. Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory Projects that involve signatures are taking place in every corner of the Laboratory. Top. One of the world's most powerful computers, Cielo is a Cray Computing system and a project of ACES, the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale, a joint project of Sandia and Los Alamos na- tional laboratories. Cielo is the next-generation capability-class platform for the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, and it allows signa- ture modeling

  8. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9}: The first osmium perovskites containing alkali cations at the 'A' site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogare, Kailash M.; Klein, Wilhelm; Jansen, Martin

    2012-07-15

    K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} were obtained from solid-state reactions of potassium superoxide, sodium peroxide and osmium metal at elevated oxygen pressures. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} crystallizes as an oxygen-deficient cubic double perovskite in space group Fm3{sup Macron }m with a=8.4184(5) A and contains isolated OsO{sub 6} octahedra. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} crystallizes hexagonally in P6{sub 3}/mmc with a=5.9998(4) A and c=14.3053(14) A. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} consists of face sharing Os{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs of octahedra. According to magnetic measurements K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} is diamagnetic, whereas K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays strong antiferromagnetic coupling (T{sub N}=140 K), indicating enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair. - Graphical abstract: High oxidation states of Os, obtained by high oxygen pressure synthesis, are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New osmates containing highly oxidized Os were obtained by high O{sub 2} pressure synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High oxidation states of Os are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds represent the first Os perovskites with an alkali metal at the A site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair.

  9. The first Fe-based Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kan, W. H.; Huq, A.; Manthiram, A.

    2015-05-15

    We report the synthesis, structure, and electrochemistry of the first Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19. The Fe-based cathode has a reversible capacity of ca. 70 mAh g-1; ca. 1.7 Na+ ions per formula can be inserted/extracted at an average voltage of 2.5 V versus Na+/Na.

  10. Synthesis, structure and properties of new chain cuprates, Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofin, Mikhail; Peters, Eva-Maria; Jansen, Martin . E-mail: jansen@fkf.mpg.de

    2005-12-15

    Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10} were prepared via the azide/nitrate route from stoichiometric mixtures of the precursors CuO, NaN{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3}. Single crystals have been grown by subsequent annealing of the as prepared powders at 500 deg. C for 2000h in silver crucibles, which were sealed in glass ampoules under dried Ar. According to the X-ray analysis of the crystal structures (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}: P2{sub 1}/n, Z=4, a=5.7046(2), b=11.0591(4), c=8.0261(3)A, {beta}=108.389(1){sup o}, 2516 independent reflections, R{sub 1}(all)=0.0813, wR{sub 2} (all)=0.1223; Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}: Cm, Z=2, a=8.228(1), b=13.929(2), c=5.707(1)A, {beta}=111.718(2){sup o}, 2949 independent reflections, R{sub 1}(all)=0.0349, wR{sub 2} (all)=0.0850), the main feature of both crystal structures are CuO{sub 2} chains built up from planar, edge-sharing CuO{sub 4} squares. From the analysis of the Cu-O bond lengths, the valence states of either +2 or +3 can be unambiguously assigned to each copper atom. In Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} these ions alternate in the chains, in Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10} the periodically repeated part consists of five atoms according to Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup III}-Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup III}. The magnetic susceptibilities show the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions. At high temperatures the compounds exhibit Curie-Weiss behaviour (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}: {mu}=1.7{mu}{sub B}, {theta}=-160K, Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}: {mu}=1.8{mu}{sub B}, {theta}=-58K, magnetic moments per divalent copper ion). Antiferromagmetic ordering is observed to occur in these compounds below 13K (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and 24K (Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10})

  11. The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

    2012-08-29

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

  12. Photoresponsive Release from Azobenzene-Modified Single Cubic Crystal NaCl/Silica Particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Nanguo; Assink, Roger A.; Jiang, Yingbing; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Azobenzene ligands were uniformly anchored to the pore surfaces of nanoporous silica particles with single crystal NaCl using 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropylureido)azobenzene (TSUA). The functionalization delayed the release of NaCl significantly. The modified particles demonstrated a photocontrolled release by trans/cis isomerization of azobenzene moieties. The addition of amphiphilic solvents, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol propyl ether (PGPE), and dipropylene glycol propyl ether (DPGPE) delayed the release in water, although the wetting behavior was improved and the delay is the most for the block molecules with the longest carbon chain. The speedup by UV irradiation suggests a strong dependence of diffusion on the switchablemore » pore size. TGA, XRD, FTIR, and NMR techniques were used to characterize the structures.« less

  13. Groundwater quality assessment plan for the 1324-N/NA Site: Phase 1 (first determination)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1998-05-01

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond (1324-N/NA Site) are treatment/storage/disposal sites regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). They are located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, and were used to treat and dispose of corrosive waste from a water treatment plant. Groundwater monitoring under an interim-status detection program compared indicator parameters from downgradient wells to background values established from an upgradient well. One of the indicator parameters, total organic carbon (TOC), exceeded its background value in one downgradient well, triggering an upgrade from a detection program to an assessment program. This plan presents the first phase of the assessment program.

  14. APM-16-009-SC-Emergency-Management-DE-NA0002976.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6-009 National Nuclear Security Administration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: South Carolina Emergency Management Division Support Program or Field Office: APM Grant No.: DE-NA0002976 Location(s) (City/County/State): South Carolina Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) proposes to provide financial and technical assistance South Carolina Emergency Management Division (SCEMD), Aiken,

  15. Consequence analysis of a postulated NaOH release from the 2727-W sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himes, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-02

    Toxicological and radiological consequences were calculated for a maximum sodium fire in the 2727-W Sodium Storage Facility. The sodium is solid and cannot leak out of the tanks. The maximum fire therefore corresponded to the maximum cross-sectional area of one tank. It was shown that release of the entire facility inventory of {sup 22}Na is insufficient to produce an appreciable effect.

  16. {alpha}-particle optical potentials for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2012-11-20

    The high precision of recent measurements for low-energy {alpha}-particle elastic-scattering as well as induced-reaction data makes possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the global optical model potentials parameters. Involvement of recent optical potentials for reliable description of both the elastic scattering and emission of {alpha}-particles, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT) for fusion devices, is discussed in the present work.

  17. Evaluation of aqueous Na{sup +}/Cs{sup +} separation by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buehler, M.F.; Lawrence, W.E.; Norton, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    In support of the Hanford Site cleanup, electrodialysis is being investigated as a method to separate aqueous sodium (Na{sup +}) and cesium (Cs{sup +}) ions. The approach has many advantages over existing separation technologies; in particular, electrodialysis creates little secondary waste while producing usable acid and base streams. The fundamentals of electrodialysis are presented in this report to provide a foundation for interpreting experimental data. A flat-plate laboratory-scale apparatus was used to determine the feasibility of separating Na{sup +}/Cs{sup +} mixtures by electrodialysis. The results showed that Cs{sup +} is preferentially separated over Na{sup +} by a factor of 2 to 3 using a Nafion{reg_sign} 417 cationic membrane. The separation is relatively insensitive to solution ionic strength and flow-rate variations. The current efficiency of the separation ranges from 0.60 to 0.65 depending on the applied voltage. The laboratory-scale system was characterized by dimensional analysis, which demonstrated that the process could be scaled up to a size attractive for the volume of waste at the Hanford Site. Preliminary experiments on a bench-scale system were also conducted. The initial results showed that the current-voltage response of the laboratory- and the bench-scale unit is identical.

  18. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2013-11-21

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  19. Synthesis and crystal structure of NaNb{sub 2}AsO{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, W.T.A.; Liang, C.S.; Stucky, G.D.; Nenoff, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The high-temperature/high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis and X-ray single crystal structure of NaNb{sub 2}AsO{sub 8} are reported. The title compound contains a three-dimensional network of NbO{sub 6}, NbO{sub 5}, and AsO{sub 4} groups, enclosing one-dimensional channels containing seven-coordinate guest sodium cations. UV/visible measurements on NaNb{sub 2}AsO{sub 8} indicate two distinct absorption features at {approximately}285 and {approximately} 360 nm. Crystal data for NaNb{sub 2}AsO{sub 8}:M{sub r} = 410.79, monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n(No.14), a = 4.8970(6) {angstrom}, b = 8.516(2) {angstrom}, c = 15.075(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.971(6){degrees}, V = 620.98 {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4, R = 5.31%, R{sub w} = 5.15%, 2121 observed reflections (I > 3{sigma}(I)).

  20. Computational observation of enhanced solvation of the hydroxyl radical with increased NaCl concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2006-05-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials were carried out to quantitatively determine the effect of NaCl salt concentration on the aqueous solvation and surface concentration of hydroxyl radicals. The potential of mean force technique was used to track the incremental free energy of the hydroxyl radical from the vapor, crossing the air-water interface into the aqueous bulk. Results showed increased NaCl salt concentration significantly enhanced hydroxyl radical solvation, which should significantly increase its accommodation on water droplets. This has been experimentally observed for ozone aqueous accommodation with increased NaI concentration, but to our knowledge, no experimental study has probed this for hydroxyl radicals. The origin for this effect was found to be very favorable hydroxyl radical-chloride ion interactions, being stronger than for water-chloride. This work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. Battelle operates PNNL for the Department of Energy.

  1. Synthesis and crystal structure of the palladium oxides NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panin, Rodion V. Khasanova, Nellie R.; Abakumov, Artem M.; Antipov, Evgeny V.; Tendeloo, Gustaaf van; Schnelle, Walter

    2007-05-15

    NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been prepared by solid-state reaction of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} or KO{sub 2} and PdO in sealed silica tubes. Crystal structures of the synthesized phases were refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffraction data. NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4} (space group Pm3-barn, a=5.64979(6) A, Z=2) is isostructural to NaPt{sub 3}O{sub 4}. It consists of NaO{sub 8} cubes and PdO{sub 4} squares, corner linked into a three-dimensional framework where the planes of neighboring PdO{sub 4} squares are perpendicular to each other. Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} (space group C2/c, a=5.3857(1) A, b=9.3297(1) A, c=10.8136(2) A, {beta}=99.437(2){sup o}, Z=8) belongs to the Li{sub 2}RuO{sub 3}-structure type, being the layered variant of the NaCl structure, where the layers of octahedral interstices filled with Na{sup +} and Pd{sup 4+} cations alternate with Na{sub 3} layers along the c-axis. Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} exhibits a stacking disorder, detected by electron diffraction and Rietveld refinement. K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4}, prepared for the first time, crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (a=6.1751(6) A, b=9.1772(12) A, c=11.3402(12) A, Z=4). Its structure is composed of planar PdO{sub 4} units connected via common edges to form parallel staggered PdO{sub 2} strips, where potassium atoms are located between them. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4} reveal a Curie-Weiss behavior in the temperature range above 80 K. - Graphical abstract: Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} (space group C2/c, a=5.3857(1) A, b=9.3297(1) A, c=10.8136(2) A, {beta}=99.437(2), Z=8) belongs to the Li{sub 2}RuO{sub 3}-structure type, being the layered variant of the NaCl structure, where the layers of octahedral interstices filled with Na{sup +} and Pd{sup 4+} cations (NaPd{sub 2}O{sub 6} slabs) alternate with Na{sub 3} layers along the c-axis.

  2. 20Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. FY14 Annual Report for NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: FY14 Annual Report for NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing Accurate Simulations of Correlated Data in Fission Events" Authors: Talou, Patrick 1 ; Vogt, Ramona ...

  4. FY14 Annual Report for NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FY14 Annual Report for NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing Accurate Simulations ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  5. The electrochemical reactions of SnO2 with Li and Na: A study using thin films and mesoporous carbons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Górka, Joanna; Baggetto, Loïc; Keum, Jong K.; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2015-02-28

    In this work we have determined the room temperature electrochemical reactivity of SnO2 thin films and mesoporous carbons filled with SnO2 anodes with Na, and compare the results with those obtained during the reaction with Li. We show that SnO2 can reversibly deliver up to 6.2 Li/SnO2 whereas the reaction with Na is significantly limited. The initial discharge capacity is equivalent to less than 4 Na/SnO2, which is expected to correspond to the formation of 2 Na2O and Sn. This limited discharge capacity suggests the negative role of the formed Na2O matrix upon the reversible reaction of Sn clusters. Moreover,more » the reversible cycling of less than 1 Na/SnO2, despite the utilization of 6-7 nm SnO2 particles, is indicative of sluggish reaction kinetics. The origin of this significant capacity reduction is likely due to the formation of a diffusion limiting interface. Furthermore, there is a larger apparent hysteresis compared to Li. These results point to the need to design composite structures of SnO2 nanoparticles with suitable morphological and conductivity components.« less

  6. The electrochemical reactions of SnO2 with Li and Na: a study using thin films and mesoporous carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng; Veith, Gabriel M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we have determined the room temperature electrochemical reactivity of SnO2 thin films and mesoporous carbons filled with SnO2 anodes with Na, and compare the results with those obtained during the reaction with Li. We show that SnO2 can reversibly deliver up to 6.2 Li/SnO2 whereas the reaction with Na is significantly limited. The initial discharge capacity is equivalent to less than 4 Na/SnO2, which is expected to correspond to the formation of 2 Na2O and Sn. This limited discharge capacity suggests the negative role of the formed Na2O matrix upon the reversible reaction of Sn clusters. Moreover, the reversible cycling of less than 1 Na/SnO2, despite the utilization of 6-7 nm SnO2 particles, is indicative of sluggish reaction kinetics. The origin of this significant capacity reduction is likely due to the formation of a diffusion limiting interface. Furthermore, there is a larger apparent hysteresis compared to Li. These results point to the need to design composite structures of SnO2 nanoparticles with suitable morphological and conductivity components.

  7. Method and apparatus for routing data in an inter-nodal communications lattice of a massively parallel computer system by semi-randomly varying routing policies for different packets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Musselman, Roy Glenn; Peters, Amanda; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Swartz, Brent Allen; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-11-23

    A massively parallel computer system contains an inter-nodal communications network of node-to-node links. Nodes vary a choice of routing policy for routing data in the network in a semi-random manner, so that similarly situated packets are not always routed along the same path. Semi-random variation of the routing policy tends to avoid certain local hot spots of network activity, which might otherwise arise using more consistent routing determinations. Preferably, the originating node chooses a routing policy for a packet, and all intermediate nodes in the path route the packet according to that policy. Policies may be rotated on a round-robin basis, selected by generating a random number, or otherwise varied.

  8. NA-42 TI Shared Software Component Library FY2011 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, Christa K.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2011-07-21

    The NA-42 TI program initiated an effort in FY2010 to standardize its software development efforts with the long term goal of migrating toward a software management approach that will allow for the sharing and reuse of code developed within the TI program, improve integration, ensure a level of software documentation, and reduce development costs. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked with two activities that support this mission. PNNL has been tasked with the identification, selection, and implementation of a Shared Software Component Library. The intent of the library is to provide a common repository that is accessible by all authorized NA-42 software development teams. The repository facilitates software reuse through a searchable and easy to use web based interface. As software is submitted to the repository, the component registration process captures meta-data and provides version control for compiled libraries, documentation, and source code. This meta-data is then available for retrieval and review as part of library search results. In FY2010, PNNL and staff from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) teamed up to develop a software application with the goal of replacing the aging Aerial Measuring System (AMS). The application under development includes an Advanced Visualization and Integration of Data (AVID) framework and associated AMS modules. Throughout development, PNNL and RSL have utilized a common AMS code repository for collaborative code development. The AMS repository is hosted by PNNL, is restricted to the project development team, is accessed via two different geographic locations and continues to be used. The knowledge gained from the collaboration and hosting of this repository in conjunction with PNNL software development and systems engineering capabilities were used in the selection of a package to be used in the implementation of the software component library on behalf of NA-42 TI. The second task managed by PNNL

  9. Electrochemically influenced cation inter-diffusion and Co3O4 formation on La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 infiltrated into SOFC cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Xueyan; Lee, Shiwoo; Chen, Yun; Gerdes, Kirk

    2015-06-18

    Nanosized LSC electrocatalyst was infiltrated into a porous scaffold cathode composed of Sm2O3-doped CeO2 (SDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) in a commercial button solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). To understand the stability of cathodes infiltrated with LSC, the infiltrated composite cells were subjected to both electrochemical operating and thermal aging states at 750 °C for 1500 h. Nanostructure and local chemistry evolution of La0.6Sr0.4CoO3 (LSC) infiltrated cathodes upon operation and aging were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. After operation, the LSC remained a cubic perovskite, and the crystal grains exhibit comparable size to as-infiltrated LSC grains. Inter-diffusion of Fe from themore » LSCF to a Fe-incorporated LSC layer developed on the LSCF backbone. However, only sharp interfaces were observed between LSC and SDC backbone in the as-infiltrated cathode and such interfaces remain after operation. The infiltrated LSC on the SDC backbone also retains granular particle morphology. Furthermore, newly grown Co3O4 nanocrystals were found in the operated cathode. After thermal aging, on the other hand, cation inter-diffusion across the interfaces of the infiltrate particles and the cathode backbones is less than that from the operated cells. Lastly, the following hypothesis is proposed: Co3O4 forms on LSC arising from local charge balancing between cobalt and oxygen vacancies.« less

  10. Magnetoelastic Coupling and Symmetry Breaking in the Frustrated Antiferromagnet {alpha}-NaMnO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giot, Maud; Chapon, Laurent C.; Radaelli, Paolo G.; Androulakis, John; Lappas, Alexandros; Green, Mark A.

    2007-12-14

    The magnetic and crystal structures of the {alpha}-NaMnO{sub 2} have been determined by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. The system maps out a frustrated triangular spin lattice with anisotropic interactions that displays two-dimensional spin correlations below 200 K. Magnetic frustration is lifted through magneto-elastic coupling, evidenced by strong anisotropic broadening of the diffraction profiles at high temperature and ultimately by a structural phase transition at 45 K. In this low-temperature regime a three-dimensional antiferromagnetic state is observed with a propagation vector k=((1/2),(1/2),0)