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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Intensive Observation Period Projects Scheduled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligent Coatings forIntel®1 Intensive

2

Diffuse Shortwave Intensive Observation Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,Physics DiagnosticsMicrochips. |Energy3

3

X-ray periodicities in sources observed by the RXTE ASM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray intensities measured from 230 X-ray sources observed by the RXTE All-Sky Monitor (ASM) were analyzed for periodic behavior. The ASM has been observing sources for nine years in the 1.5-12 keV energy range. In ...

Shivamoggi, Vasudha B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Spicules Intensity Oscillations in SOT/HINODE Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We study the coherency of solar spicules intensity oscillations with increasing height above the solar limb in quiet Sun, active Sun and active region using observations from HINODE/SOT. Existence of coherency up to transition region strengthens the theory of the coronal heating and solar wind through energy transport and photospheric oscillations. Methods. Using time sequences from the HINODE/SOT in Ca II H line, we investigate oscillations found in intensity profiles at different heights above the solar limb. We use the Fourier and wavelet analysis to measure dominant frequency peaks of intensity at the heights, and phase difference between oscillations at two certain heights, to find evidence for the coherency of the oscillations. Finally, we can calculate the energy and the mass transported by spicules providing energy equilibrium, according to density values of spicules at different heights. To extend this work, we can also consider coherent oscillations at different latitudes and suggest to study ...

Tavabi, E; Maralani, A R Ahangarzadeh; Zeighami, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes, were found to occur during four hydraulic fracturing experiments carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Since the long period earthquakes occur in the same region as the shear type events, it is concluded that the unusual character of the long period earthquake waveforms is due to a source effect and not a path effect. The occurrence of long period earthquakes during hydraulic fracturing could indicate tensile fracturing. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. A proposed source for these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of each crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, crack lengths are estimated to be between 3 and 20m.

Bame, D.; Fehler, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Experimentally observed field–gas interaction in intense optical lattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a gas perturbed by a laser interference pattern, an optical lattice, exhibits a periodic modulation of its refractive index, strong Bragg diffraction of the perturbing light can occur. This scattering reduces the field's ability to further manipulate the gas. Experimental observations of Bragg scattering, evidence of a two-way coupling, are compared to the evolution of the light fields calculated by solutions to the wave equation. Comparison indicates momentum deposition as a prime contributor to the shape of the scattering function vs. lattice velocity, a rationale further supported through additional direct simulation Monte Carlo simulation.

Graul, Jacob S.; Cornella, Barry M.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Lilly, Taylor C. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

ISSUANCE 2015-01-26: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

9

Modeling the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity in the periods of low activity around the last three solar minima  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the simple model for the description of the GCR modulation in the heliosphere and the sets of parameters discussed in the accompanying paper we model some features of the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity near the Earth observed during periods of low solar activity around three last solar minima. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying these features in the GCR behavior, we use the suggested earlier decomposition of the calculated intensity into the partial intensities corresponding to the main processes (diffusion, adiabatic losses, convection and drifts).

Krainev, M B; Kalinin, M S; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

On the GCR intensity and the inversion of the heliospheric magnetic field during the periods of the high solar activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the long-term behavior of the solar and heliospheric parameters and the GCR intensity in the periods of high solar activity and the inversions of heliospheric magnetic field (HMF). The classification of the HMF polarity structures and the meaning of the HMF inversion are discussed. The procedure is considered how to use the known HMF polarity distribution for the GCR intensity modeling during the periods of high solar activity. We also briefly discuss the development and the nearest future of the sunspot activity and the GCR intensity in the current unusual solar cycle 24.

Krainev, M B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three-photon absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three invented in the mid- 1990s [1]. They represent a periodic change of refractive index in an optical fiber.N. Nikogosyan). Optics Communications 255 (2005) 81­90 www.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;recording techniques

Nikogosyan, David N.

12

Intensive Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligent Coatings forIntel®

13

Spectral variations of the X-ray binary pulsar LMC X-4 during its long period intensity variation and a comparison with Her X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spectral variations of the binary X-ray pulsar LMC X-4 using the RXTE/PCA observations at different phases of its 30.5 day long super-orbital period. Only out of eclipse data were used for this study. During the high state of the super-orbital period of LMC X-4, the spectrum is well described by a high energy cut-off power-law with a photon index in the range of 0.7-1.0 and an iron emission line. In the low state, the spectrum is found to be flatter with power-law photon index in the range 0.5-0.7. A direct correlation is detected between the continuum flux in 7-25 keV energy band and the iron emission line flux. The equivalent width of the iron emission line is found to be highly variable during low intensity state, whereas it remains almost constant during the high intensity state of the super-orbital period. It is observed that the spectral variations in LMC X-4 are similar to those of Her X-1 (using RXTE/PCA data). These results suggest that the geometry of the region where the iron line is produced and its visibility with respect to the phase of the super-orbital period is similar in LMC X-4 and Her X-1. A remarkable difference between these two systems is a highly variable absorption column density with phase of the super-orbital period that is observed in Her X-1 but not in LMC X-4.

S. Naik; B. Paul

2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

PERIODIC VARIATIONS IN X-RAY EMISSION INTENSITY OF CORONAL LOOPS D. E. McKenzie(  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

light observations made during solar eclipses (e.g., Pasachoff (1991), Singh et al. (1997), and recently-3840, USA (¡ ) Southwestern College, 100 College Street, Winfield, KS 67156, USA ABSTRACT The analysis of light curves generated from Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope observations of coronal loops, described by Mc

McKenzie, David E.

15

Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filamented electron beams have been observed to be emitted from the rear of thin solid targets irradiated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser when there is low-density plasma present at the back of the target. These observations are consistent with a laser-generated beam of relativistic electrons propagating through the target, which is subsequently fragmented by a Weibel-like instability in the low-density plasma at the rear. These measurements are in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations and theory, since the filamentation instability is predicted to be dramatically enhanced when the electron beam density approaches that of the background plasma.

Wei, M.S.; Beg, F.N.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clark, E.L.; Evans, R.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ledingham, K.W.D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Norreys, P.A. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Department of Physics, The Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ultrashort-period MS eclipsing systems. New observations and light curve solutions of six NSVS binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carried out photometric and low-resolution spectral observations of six eclipsing ultrashort-period binaries with MS components. The light curve solutions of the Rozhen observations show that all targets are overcontact systems. We found well-defined empirical relation "period -- semi-major axis" for the short-period binaries and used it for estimation of the global parameters of the targets. Our results revealed that NSVS 925605 is quite interesting target: (a) it is one of a few contact binaries with M components; (b) it exhibits high activity (emission in H$\\alpha$ line, X-ray emission, large cool spots, non-Planck energy distribution); (c) its components differ in temperature by 700 K. All appearances of high magnetic activity and huge fillout factor (0.7) of NSVS 925605 might be assumed as a precursor of the predicted merging of close magnetic binaries. Another unusual binary is NSVS 2700153 which reveals considerable long-term variability.

Dimitrov, Dinko

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE OBSERVED MASS-PERIOD RELATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large number of observed exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-period diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a period of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-period relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital period. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these observational properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital periods. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-period relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short periods and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.

Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: hasegay@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

E-Print Network 3.0 - arm intensive observation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 36 Better Vision Through Manipulation Giorgio Metta, Summary: . Localizing the arm visually The robot is not a passive observer of its arm, but rather the initiator of...

19

Detection and Plant Monitoring Programs: Lessons from an Intensive Survey of Asclepias meadii with Five Observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fecundity, and explore how population data relate to management. When collected with reliable protocols, such data provide essential information for decision-making in applied ecology. With few exceptions, population monitoring ultimately depends on observ... June 2007, we laid out 100 m tapes, and five individuals (observers A–E) indepen- dently searched for stems of A. meadii along each transect. Four of the five observers had experience with A. meadii surveys (A–D). The na?¨ve observer (E) was trained...

Alexander, Helen M.; Reed, Aaron W.; Kettle, W. Dean; Slade, Norman A.; Bodbyl-Roels, Sarah Ann; Collins, Cathy Diane; Salisbury,Vaughn

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Observation of a Long-Wavelength Hosing Modulation of a High-Intensity Laser Pulse in Underdense Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first experimental observation of a long-wavelength hosing modulation of a high-intensity laser pulse. Side-view images of the scattered optical radiation at the fundamental wave-length of the laser reveal a transverse oscillation of the laser pulse during its propagation through underdense plasma. The wavelength of the oscillation \\lambda_hosing depends on the background plasma density n_e and scales as \\lambda_hosing~n_e^-3/2. Comparisons with an analytical model and 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that this laser hosing can be induced by a spatio-temporal asymmetry of the intensity distribution in the laser focus which can be caused by a misalignment of the parabolic focussing mirror or of the diffraction gratings in the pulse compressor.

Kaluza, M C; Thomas, A G R; Najmudin, Z; Dangor, A E; Murphy, C D; Collier, J L; Divall, E J; Foster, P S; Hooker, C J; Langley, A J; Smith, J; Krushelnick, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

TURBULENT CHARACTERISTICS IN THE INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We focus on Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) calcium II H-line observations of a solar quiescent prominence (QP) that exhibits highly variable dynamics suggestive of turbulence. These images capture a sufficient range of scales spatially ({approx}0.1-100 arcsec) and temporally ({approx}16.8 s-4.5 hr) to allow the application of statistical methods used to quantify finite range fluid turbulence. We present the first such application of these techniques to the spatial intensity field of a long-lived solar prominence. Fully evolved inertial range turbulence in an infinite medium exhibits multifractal scale invariance in the statistics of its fluctuations, seen as power-law power spectra and as scaling of the higher order moments (structure functions) of fluctuations which have non-Gaussian statistics; fluctuations {delta}I(r, L) = I(r + L) - I(r) on length scale L along a given direction in observed spatial field I have moments that scale as ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} L{sup {zeta}(p)}. For turbulence in a system that is of finite size, or that is not fully developed, one anticipates a generalized scale invariance or extended self-similarity (ESS) ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} G(L){sup {zeta}(p)}. For these QP intensity measurements we find scaling in the power spectra and ESS. We find that the fluctuation statistics are non-Gaussian and we use ESS to obtain ratios of the scaling exponents {zeta}(p): these are consistent with a multifractal field and show distinct values for directions longitudinal and transverse to the bulk (driving) flow. Thus, the intensity fluctuations of the QP exhibit statistical properties consistent with an underlying turbulent flow.

Leonardis, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Foullon, C. [Centre for Fusion Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct observation of superconducting vortex clusters pinned by a periodic array of magnetic dots in ferromagnetic/superconducting hybrid structures T. Shapoval,1,* V. Metlushko,2 M. Wolf,1 B. Holzapfel,1 V. Neu,1, Illinois 60612, USA Received 13 November 2009; published 11 March 2010 Strong pinning of superconducting

Metlushko, Vitali

23

Observations and seasonal periodicity of the benthic algae of Galveston Island, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the marine algae of Florida: The intertidal rocks at Marineland. Florida State Univ. Stud. 7: 17-23. 1956. Sea grasses of the northern Gulf coast. Bull. Mar. Sc. Gulf & Carib. 4: 305-308. 1963. Some new records and range extensions of Florida marine... an extensive study dealing with periodicity and dis- tribution of benthic marine algae in Louisiana. Offshore collec- tions were made in addition to well-spaced sites along the coast. Keatts (196g, unpublished} surveyed the algae on a rock jetty in Freeport...

Lowe, Glenn Curtis

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ultra-long period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding $\\approx 80$ days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ~1 to ~3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be $\\mu_...

Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M; Ip, Wing-Huen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Suzaku And Multi-Wavelength Observations of OJ 287 During the Periodic Optical Outburst in 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suzaku observations of the blazar OJ 287 were performed in 2007 April 10-13 and November 7-9. They correspond to a quiescent and a flaring state, respectively. The X-ray spectra of the source can be well described with single power-law models in both exposures. The derived X-ray photon index and the flux density at 1 keV were found to be {Lambda} = 1.65 {+-} 0.02 and S{sub 1keV} = 215 {+-} 5 nJy, in the quiescent state. In the flaring state, the source exhibited a harder X-ray spectrum ({Lambda} = 1.50 {+-} 0.01) with a nearly doubled X-ray flux density S{sub 1keV} = 404{sub -5}{sup +6} nJy. Moreover, significant hard X-ray signals were detected up to {approx} 27 keV. In cooperation with the Suzaku, simultaneous radio, optical, and very-high-energy {gamma}-ray observations of OJ 287 were performed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array, the KANATA telescope, and the MAGIC telescope, respectively. The radio and optical fluxes in the flaring state (3.04 {+-} 0.46 Jy and 8.93 {+-} 0.05 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively) were found to be higher by a factor of 2-3 than those in the quiescent state (1.73 {+-} 0.26 Jy and 3.03 {+-} 0.01 mJy at 86.75 Hz and in the V-band, respectively). No notable {gamma}-ray events were detected in either observation. The spectral energy distribution of OJ 287 indicated that the X-ray spectrum was dominated by inverse Compton radiation in both observations, while synchrotron radiation exhibited a spectral cutoff around the optical frequency. Furthermore, no significant difference in the synchrotron cutoff frequency was found between the quiescent and flaring states. According to a simple synchrotron self-Compton model, the change of the spectral energy distribution is due to an increase in the energy density of electrons with small changes of both the magnetic field strength and the maximum Lorentz factor of electrons.

Seta, Hiromi; /Saitama U.; Isobe, N.; /Kyoto U.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; /Saitama U.; Yaji, Yuichi; /Saitama U.; Arai, Akira; /Hiroshima U.; Fukuhara, Masayuki; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Kohno, Kotaro; /Tokyo U.; Nakanishi, Koichiro; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Sasada, Mahito; /Hiroshima U.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; /Tokyo U. /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Tosaki, Tomoka; /Grad. U. for Adv. Stud., Nagano; Uemura, Makoto; /Hiroshima U.; Anderhub, Hans; /Zurich, ETH; Antonelli, L.A.; /INFN, Rome; Antoranz, Pedro; /Madrid U.; Backes, Michael; /Dortmund U.; Baixeras, Carmen; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.; Balestra, Silvia; /Madrid U.; Barrio, Juan Abel; /Madrid U.; Bastieri, Denis; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Becerra Gonzalez, Josefa; /IAC, La Laguna /Dortmund U. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /DESY /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /Madrid U. /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /INFN, Rome /Dortmund U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Barcelona, IEEC /Madrid U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /IAC, La Laguna /Madrid, CIEMAT /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Zurich, ETH /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Wurzburg U. /Barcelona, IFAE /UC, Davis /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Barcelona, IFAE /IAC, La Laguna /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife /Zurich, ETH /Wurzburg U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Rome /UC, Davis /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Wurzburg U. /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Wurzburg U. /Madrid U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Madrid U. /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /UC, Santa Cruz /Madrid U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Zurich, ETH /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /INFN, Trieste /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Dortmund U. /Barcelona, IEEC /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /Zurich, ETH /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Wurzburg U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /INFN, Rome /Sierra Nevada Observ. /DESY /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IEEC /Turku U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Lodz U. /Lodz U. /Wurzburg U. /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Zurich, ETH /Turku U. /INFN, Rome /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Barcelona, IFAE /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC /Siena U. /INFN, Siena /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona, IEEC /Sierra Nevada Observ. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SOLAR CYCLE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF 0.6 TeV COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY OBSERVED WITH THE MATSUSHIRO UNDERGROUND MUON DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. We find an anisotropy component in the solar diurnal anisotropy superimposed on the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The phase of this additional anisotropy is almost constant at {approx}15:00 local solar time corresponding to the direction perpendicular to the average interplanetary magnetic field at Earth's orbit, while the amplitude varies between a maximum (0.043% +- 0.002%) and minimum ({approx}0.008% +- 0.002%) in a clear correlation with the solar activity. We find a significant time lag between the temporal variations of the amplitude and the sunspot number (SSN) and obtain the best correlation coefficient of +0.74 with the SSN delayed for 26 months. We suggest that this anisotropy might be interpreted in terms of the energy change due to the solar-wind-induced electric field expected for galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) crossing the wavy neutral sheet. The average amplitude of the sidereal diurnal variation over the entire period is 0.034% +- 0.003%, which is roughly one-third of the amplitude reported from air shower and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only a weak positive correlation between the sidereal diurnal anisotropy and the solar activity cycle in which the amplitude in the 'active' solar activity epoch is about twice the amplitude in the 'quiet' solar activity epoch. This implies that only one-fourth of the total attenuation varies in correlation with the solar activity cycle and/or the solar magnetic cycle. We finally examine the temporal variation of the 'single-band valley depth' (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, in contrast with recent Milagro's report, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a seven-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore, that the steady increase of the SBVD reported by the Milagro experiment is not caused by the decreasing solar modulation in the declining phase of the 23rd solar activity cycle.

Munakata, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Mori, S. [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Takita, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Kota, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.j [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Time delays in quasi-periodic pulsations observed during the X2.2 solar flare on 2011 February 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on time scale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The Zirconium and Aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy (PROBA2) satellite and the SXR channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), where the channel at 1-8 {\\AA} leads the 0.5-4 {\\AA} channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to 9 ...

Dolla, L; Seaton, D B; Van Doorsselaere, T; Dominique, M; Berghmans, D; Cabanas, C; De Groof, A; Schmutz, W; Verdini, A; West, M J; Zender, J; Zhukov, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

ON THE ANTI-CORRELATION BETWEEN SPECTRAL LINE BROADENING AND INTENSITY IN CORONAL STRUCTURES OBSERVED WITH EIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advance in spectral resolution of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging (EIS) spectrometer on board Hinode has allowed for more detailed analysis of coronal spectral lines. Large line broadening and blueshifted velocities have been found in the periphery of active region (AR) cores and near the footpoints of coronal loops. This line broadening is yet to be understood. We study the correlation of intensity and line width for entire ARs and sub-regions selected to include coronal features. The results show that although a slight positive correlation can be found when considering whole images, many sub-regions have a negative correlation between intensity and line width. Sections of a coronal loop display some of the largest anti-correlations found for this study with the increased line broadening occurring directly adjacent to the footpoint section of the loop structure, not at the footpoint itself. The broadened lines may be due to a second Doppler-shifted component that is separate from the main emitting feature such as a coronal loop, but related in their excitation. The small size of these features forces the considerations of investigator and instrumental effects. Preliminary analyses are shown that indicate the possibility of a point-spread function that is not azimuthally symmetric and may affect velocity and line profile measurements.

Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H. [Deptartment of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Simultaneous observations of Schumann resonances in California and Australia: Evidence for intensity modulation by the local height of the D region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations are presented of the horizontal magnetic component of Schumann resonance intensities as simultaneously measured at locations in California and Western Australia during two separate intervals September 2-17, 1989, and April 14-21, 1990. For both intervals, diurnal variations of the average magnetic power over the lowest three modes of the Schumann resonances showed substantially different temporal profiles at the California and Western Australia stations, with interstation correlations of 0.51 and 0.39, respectively. A method is demonstrated for determining from these observations the average local time variation of the height of the D region. A height variation is obtained that is nearly identical for the respective analysis intervals, with a minimum height occurring at approximately 1300-1400 LT and a maximum-to-minimum height difference of roughly 50% of the mean. When corrected for the local D region height, the detailed diurnal intensity profiles over the analysis intervals display a greatly improved similarity, with interstation correlation coefficients increasing from 0.51 to 0.70 and from 0.39 to 0.82, respectively. Substantial agreement between the two stations after correction for D region height suggest that such observations could be used to monitor the global totality and variability of lightning, quantitatively and at time resolutions of the order of 10 min or less, in studies of global change.

Sentman, D.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Fraser, B.J. (Univ. of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Superorbital Periodic Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-ray Binaries from Swift BAT Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital periodicities in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital periods. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This suggests an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital period. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital periods, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, RXTE PCA, and INTEGRAL light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency mo...

Corbet, Robin H D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Data Intensive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Intensive Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program In 2014 NERSC is conducting its second and last round of allocations to projects in data intensive science. This pilot aims to...

34

Off-site Intensive Operational Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) forOdds2 ARM

35

ARM Intensive Operational Period (IOP) Data Browser  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite JC-118794Argonne National

36

Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof Multiple

37

RADIAL AND LONGITUDINAL DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR 413 MeV AND 2737 MeV PROTON PEAK INTENSITIES AND FLUENCES: HELIOS AND IMP 8 OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

space and particle accel- eration at the front of traveling interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass within 1 AU of the Sun during intense solar energetic particle events. Data are from the IMP 8 to extrapolate J and F from R ¼ 1 to R particles -- shock waves -- Sun

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

38

2011 Intensity -1 INTENSITY OF SOUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rate at which energy is passing a certain point. This concept involves sound intensity. Consider the sound intensity. Recall the time rate of energy transfer is called "power". Thus, sound intensity2011 Intensity - 1 INTENSITY OF SOUND The objectives of this experiment are: · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

39

Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to study the origin of the architectures of low mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range $(1-4)\\ \\rmn{M}_{\\oplus}.$ These evolve for up to $2\\times10^7 \\rmn{yr}$ under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow ircularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few $\\%$ terminating in second order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small $< 0.1$ and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced o...

Xiang-Gruess, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS3 ARM93 ARM2 ARM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

High intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience and results from recent high intensity proton running periods of the Brookhaven AGS, during which a record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse was reached, is presented. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of three high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the 1.5 GeV Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. Recently even higher intensity proton synchrotrons are studied for neutron spallation sources or proton driver for a muon collider. Implications of the experiences from the AGS to these proposals and also possible future upgrades for the AGS are discussed.

Brennan, J.M.; Roser, T.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

THE SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC UPFLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION TIMESERIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances are frequently observed in coronal intensity image sequences. These disturbances have historically been interpreted as being the signature of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating into the corona. The detailed analysis of Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) timeseries observations of an active region (known to contain propagating disturbances) shows strongly correlated, quasi-periodic, oscillations in intensity, Doppler shift, and line width. No frequency doubling is visible in the latter. The enhancements in the moments of the line profile are generally accompanied by a faint, quasi-periodically occurring, excess emission at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the blue wing of coronal emission lines. The correspondence of quasi-periodic excess wing emission and the moments of the line profile indicates that repetitive high-velocity upflows are responsible for the oscillatory behavior observed. Furthermore, we show that the same quasi-periodic upflows can be directly identified in a simultaneous image sequence obtained by the Hinode X-Ray Telescope. These results are consistent with the recent assertion of De Pontieu and McIntosh that the wave interpretation of the data is not unique. Indeed, given that several instances are seen to propagate along the direction of the EIS slit that clearly shows in-phase, quasi-periodic variations of intensity, velocity, width (without frequency doubling), and blue wing enhanced emission, this data set would appear to provide a compelling example that upflows are more likely to be the main cause of the quasi-periodicities observed here, as such correspondences are hard to reconcile in the wave paradigm.

Tian Hui; McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 8037 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: htian@ucar.edu, E-mail: mscott@ucar.edu, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Light intensity compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Intensity Frontier Instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report summarizes findings of the 2013 Snowmass Community Summer Study Instrumentation Frontier's subgroup on the Intensity Frontier. This report is directed at identifying instrumentation R&D needed to support particle physics research over the coming decades at the Intensity Frontier.

S. H. Kettell; R. A. Rameika; R. S. Tschirhart

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

47

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S. energy and carbon intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the decrease in energy intensity during the study period,trends in U. S. energy intensity: An index number analysis,industry structure and energy intensity, Energy Economics

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

Modzelewska, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

ANALYSIS ON THE MAJOR INFLUENCE FACTORS OF ENERGY INTENSITY CHANGING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the energy intensity data of period 1990-2008, this paper uses impulse response function and variance decomposition model to empirical analysis the main influencing factors and effects of energy intensity,. The empirical results show that: the energy intensity of itself, and the proportion of secondary industry have a larger impact on energy intensity; the change of energy price and technological progress also play a certain impact on energy intensity; and the link with the internal relations and interaction mechanisms, which can play an active role in improving energy efficiency.

Xia Wang; Lu Tang

51

Propagation of travelling waves in sub-excitable systems driven by noise and periodic forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been reported that traveling waves propagate periodically and stably in sub-excitable systems driven by noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{88}, 138301 (2002)]. As a further investigation, here we observe different types of traveling waves under different noises and periodic forces, using a simplified Oregonator model. Depending on different noises and periodic forces, we have observed different types of wave propagation (or their disappearance). Moreover, the reversal phenomena are observed in this system based on the numerical experiments in the one-dimensional space. As an explanation, we regard it as the effect of periodic forces. Thus, we give qualitative explanations to how reversal phenomena stably appear, which seem to arise from the mixing function of the periodic force and the noise. And the output period and three velocities (the normal, the positive and the negative) of the travelling waves are defined and their relationship with the periodic forces, along with the types of waves, are also studied in sub-excitable system under a fixed noise intensity.

Fen-Ni Si; Quan-Xing Liu; Jin-Zhong Zhang; Lu-Qun Zhou

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

53

Energy Intensity Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We’ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools we’re using, what goals have been...

Rappolee, D.; Shaw, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

High intensity femtosecond enhancement cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To produce extreme ultraviolet radiation via high harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases, light intensities in excess of 1014 W/cm 2 are required. Usually such high intensity are obtained by parametric amplification of ...

Abram, Gilberto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

On the relationship of the 27-day variations of the solar wind velocity and galactic cosmic ray intensity in minimum epoch of solar activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the relationship of the 27-day variation of the galactic cosmic ray intensity with similar changes of the solar wind velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field based on the experimental data for the Bartels rotation period 2379 of 23 November 2007-19 December 2007. We develop a three dimensional (3-D) model of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity based on the heliolongitudinally dependent solar wind velocity. A consistent, divergence-free interplanetary magnetic field is derived by solving Maxwells equations with a heliolongitudinally dependent 27-day variation of the solar wind velocity reproducing in situ observations. We consider two types of 3-D models of the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity - (1) with a plane heliospheric neutral sheet, and (2)- with the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The theoretical calculation shows that the sector structure does not influence significantly on the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic ray intensity as...

Alania, M V; Wawrzynczak, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Masking line foregrounds in intensity mapping surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the problem of line confusion in intensity mapping surveys and explore the possibility to mitigate line foreground contamination by progressively masking the brightest pixels in the observed map. We consider experiments targeting CO(1-0) at $z=3$, Ly$\\alpha$ at $z=7$, and CII at $z=7$, and use simulated intensity maps, which include both clustering and shot noise components of the signal and possible foregrounds, in order to test the efficiency of our method. We find that for CO and Ly$\\alpha$ it is quite possible to remove most of the foreground contribution from the maps via only 1%-3% pixel masking. The CII maps will be more difficult to clean, however, due to instrumental constraints and the high-intensity foreground contamination involved. While the masking procedure sacrifices much of the astrophysical information present in our maps, we demonstrate that useful cosmological information in the targeted lines can be successfully retrieved.

Breysse, Patrick C; Kamionkowski, Marc

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The effect of local geologic conditions on observed seismic intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R+ c Iog(R+ iO) (2) We may derive the attenuation equation from a point source model where the amplitude of body waves in a homogeneous medium is given by an equation of the form (Chandra, I982a): A-(A /R) exp(-pR) (3) where R Aa, 2 ~ h2.... This attenuation equation is sImilar to equation (3) in that we have an initial source strength value Io, a geometrical spreading factor represented by bR, and an anelastic attenuation factor, c log R. In 16 order to avoid the singularity at R - 0...

Moran, David Rick

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric OpticalExperiment (VORTEX) govCampaignsVerification of

59

ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cyclone Center Using Crowdsourcing to Determine Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclone Center Using Crowdsourcing to Determine Tropical Cyclone Intensity Almost all tropical cyclones are not directly observed. Agency estimates of storm position and intensity are not homogeneous in time and space. Cyclone Center uses crowdsourcing to collect data that will lead to a consistent

Hennon, Christopher C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

On the Velocity and Intensity Line Asymmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that, if solar 5 min. oscillations are excited by convection in the upper layers of the convective envelope, it is impossible to explain the opposite line asymmetries observed in the velocity and intensity spectra with assumptions on the dissipations which reduce the problem to a second order one. The interpretation of that observation requires to solve the full non-adiabatic problem which is of the fourth or sixth order. We also analyze the causes of line asymmetries in the frame of the general problem and we show that to locate the source, it is better to study line asymmetries not too far from line centers.

M. Gabriel

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

teChnologIes Program IntroduCtIon the research and development (r&d) portfolio for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy...

64

Intensity-Intensity Correlations of Classically Entangled Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment is proposed to show that after initial frequency and polarization selection, classical thermal light from two independent sources can be made path-polarization entangled. Such light will show new intensity-intensity correlations involving both path and polarization phases, formally similar to those for four-particle GHZ states. For fixed polarization phases, the correlations reduce to the Hanbury Brown-Twiss phase correlations. It is also shown that these classical correlations violate noncontextuality.

Partha Ghose; Anirban Mukherjee

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

General Observation Period 2007: Concept and first results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepool QuarterlyGeneraland ErnestOn

66

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use...

68

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Department of Physics and the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dynamics of stellar wind in a Roche potential: implications for (i) outflows & periodicities relevant to astronomical masers, and (ii) generation of baroclinicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of stellar wind from one of the bodies in the binary system, where the other body interacts only gravitationally. We focus on following three issues: (i) we explore the origin of observed periodic variations in maser intensity; (ii) we address the nature of bipolar molecular outflows; and (iii) we show generation of baroclinicity in the same model setup. From direct numerical simulations and further numerical modelling, we find that the maser intensity along a given line of sight varies periodically due to periodic modulation of material density. This modulation period is of the order of the binary period. Another feature of this model is that the velocity structure of the flow remains unchanged with time in late stages of wind evolution. Therefore the location of the masing spot along the chosen sightline stays at the same spatial location, thus naturally explaining the observational fact. This also gives an appearance of bipolar nature in the standard position-velocity diagram, as has ...

Singh, Nishant K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

QUASI-PERIODIC PROPAGATING SIGNALS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: THE SIGNATURE OF MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OR HIGH-VELOCITY UPFLOWS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the discovery of quasi-periodic propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed quasi-periodicities. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discovered as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed quasi-periodic oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a quasi-periodically varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission quasi-periodically modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the quasi-periodicities observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.

De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: bdp@lmsal.co, E-mail: mscott@ucar.ed [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

TEMPORAL STABILITY OF SUNSPOT UMBRAL INTENSITIES: 1986-2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the relative intensity of sunspot umbrae during the period from 1986 to 2012 using photometric images from the San Fernando Observatory. We confirm the presence of a relationship between the mean umbral core intensity and the mean sunspot area, as found in previous studies, and do not find a notable change in this relationship between cycles 22 and 23. We looked for a possible time variation in the sunspot umbral contrast during the 27 yr covering cycles 22, 23, and the rise of cycle 24, and we did not find a significant change. These findings do not indicate that sunspots have become less dark during cycles 23 and 24.

De Toma, G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Preminger, D., E-mail: detoma@ucar.edu [San Fernando Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate. During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8% per year from 1973 to 2008. In the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9% from 2008 to 2035.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Neutrino physics with an intense \  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

R. Henning

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Near-infrared Period-luminosity Relations of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared (J & Ks) observations of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The goals of these observations are to better characterize the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation at these wavelengths, especially for periods below 10 days...

Mahzooni, Salma

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

84

Investigation of long-period fiber gratings induced by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,5]. Such UV laser irradiation led to a refractive index change in the Ge-doped fiber core via a single for fiber irradiation [6,7], focused ion- beam radiation [8], and electric arc [9,10]. It was also shown@phys.ucc.ie (D.N. Nikogosyan). Optics Communications 246 (2005) 107­115 www.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;most

Nikogosyan, David N.

85

MHD Simulations of Accretion onto Sgr A*: Quiescent Fluctuations, Outbursts, and Quasi-Periodicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High resolution observations of Sgr A* have revealed a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from intense rapid flares to quasi-periodic oscillations, making this object an ideal system to study the properties of low luminosity accreting black holes. In this paper, we use a pseudo-spectral algorithm to construct and evolve a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the accretion disk in Sgr A*. Assuming a hybrid thermal-nonthermal emission scheme, we show that the MHD turbulence can by itself only produce factor of two fluctuations in luminosity. These amplitudes in variation cannot explain the magnitude of flares observed in this system. However, we also demonstrate that density perturbations in the disk do produce outbursts qualitatively similar to those observed by XMM-Newton in X-rays and ground-based facilities in the near infrared. Quasi-periodic oscillations emerge naturally in the simulated lightcurves. We attribute these to non-axisymmetric density perturbations that emerge as the disk evolves back toward its quiescent state.

Chi-kwan Chan; Siming Liu; Christopher L. Fryer; Dimitrios Psaltis; Feryal Ozel; Gabriel Rockefeller; Fulvio Melia

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

CHEM 740: ENERGIES, INTENSITIES AND POTENTIALS: CONCEPTS AND TOOLS IN SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHEM 740: ENERGIES, INTENSITIES AND POTENTIALS: CONCEPTS AND TOOLS IN SPECTROSCOPY Fall 2001 Instructor: R.J. Le Roy Wednesday Evenings The patterns of energy levels and transition intensities observed energy curves or surfaces characterizing the forces between the component atoms. This course will discuss

Le Roy, Robert J.

87

ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT­PERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E 4 , E. van Dishoeck 5 , R. Knacke 6 , T.Y. Brooke 7 1 Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France 2 ISO are found in a short­period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter­family comet P/Hartley 2, presum

Demoulin, Pascal

88

Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program...

89

Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program...

90

Predicting Hurricane Intensity and Structure Changes Associated with Eyewall Replacement Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Hurricane Intensity and Structure Changes Associated with Eyewall Replacement Cycles replacement cycles are commonly observed in tropical cyclones and are well known to cause fluctuations associated with eyewall replacement cycles in Atlantic Ocean hurricanes. The model input comprises

Kossin, James P.

91

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world best practice energy intensity values for productionWorld best practice energy intensity values for productionWorld Best Practice Final Energy Intensity Values for Aluminium Production (

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best Practice Final Energy Intensity Values for Stand-AloneBest Practice Final Energy Intensity Values for Stand-AloneBest Practice Primary Energy Intensity Values for Stand-

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

J. L. Hewett; H. Weerts; R. Brock; J. N. Butler; B. C. K. Casey; J. Collar; A. de Gouvea; R. Essig; Y. Grossman; W. Haxton; J. A. Jaros; C. K. Jung; Z. T. Lu; K. Pitts; Z. Ligeti; J. R. Patterson; M. Ramsey-Musolf; J. L. Ritchie; A. Roodman; K. Scholberg; C. E. M. Wagner; G. P. Zeller; S. Aefsky; A. Afanasev; K. Agashe; C. Albright; J. Alonso; C. Ankenbrandt; M. Aoki; C. A. Arguelles; N. Arkani-Hamed; J. R. Armendariz; C. Armendariz-Picon; E. Arrieta Diaz; J. Asaadi; D. M. Asner; K. S. Babu; K. Bailey; O. Baker; B. Balantekin; B. Baller; M. Bass; B. Batell; J. Beacham; J. Behr; N. Berger; M. Bergevin; E. Berman; R. Bernstein; A. J. Bevan; M. Bishai; M. Blanke; S. Blessing; A. Blondel; T. Blum; G. Bock; A. Bodek; G. Bonvicini; F. Bossi; J. Boyce; R. Breedon; M. Breidenbach; S. J. Brice; R. A. Briere; S. Brodsky; C. Bromberg; A. Bross; T. E. Browder; D. A. Bryman; M. Buckley; R. Burnstein; E. Caden; P. Campana; R. Carlini; G. Carosi; C. Castromonte; R. Cenci; I. Chakaberia; M. C. Chen; C. H. Cheng; B. Choudhary; N. H. Christ; E. Christensen; M. E. Christy; T. E. Chupp; E. Church; D. B. Cline; T. E. Coan; P. Coloma; J. Comfort; L. Coney; J. Cooper; R. J. Cooper; R. Cowan; D. F. Cowen; D. Cronin-Hennessy; A. Datta; G. S. Davies; M. Demarteau; D. P. DeMille; A. Denig; R. Dermisek; A. Deshpande; M. S. Dewey; R. Dharmapalan; J. Dhooghe; M. R. Dietrich; M. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; S. Dobbs; M. Duraisamy; B. Dutta; H. Duyang; D. A. Dwyer; M. Eads; B. Echenard; S. R. Elliott; C. Escobar; J. Fajans; S. Farooq; C. Faroughy; J. E. Fast; B. Feinberg; J. Felde; G. Feldman; P. Fierlinger; P. Fileviez Perez; B. Filippone; P. Fisher; B. T. Flemming; K. T. Flood; R. Forty; M. J. Frank; A. Freyberger; A. Friedland; R. Gandhi; K. S. Ganezer; A. Garcia; F. G. Garcia; S. Gardner; L. Garrison; A. Gasparian; S. Geer; V. M. Gehman; T. Gershon; M. Gilchriese; C. Ginsberg; I. Gogoladze; M. Gonderinger; M. Goodman; H. Gould; M. Graham; P. W. Graham; R. Gran; J. Grange; G. Gratta; J. P. Green; H. Greenlee; R. C. Group; E. Guardincerri; V. Gudkov; R. Guenette; A. Haas; A. Hahn; T. Han; T. Handler; J. C. Hardy; R. Harnik; D. A. Harris; F. A. Harris; P. G. Harris; J. Hartnett; B. He; B. R. Heckel; K. M. Heeger; S. Henderson; D. Hertzog; R. Hill; E. A Hinds; D. G. Hitlin; R. J. Holt; N. Holtkamp; G. Horton-Smith; P. Huber; W. Huelsnitz; J. Imber; I. Irastorza; J. Jaeckel; I. Jaegle; C. James; A. Jawahery; D. Jensen; C. P. Jessop; B. Jones; H. Jostlein; T. Junk; A. L. Kagan; M. Kalita; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; G. Karagiorgi; A. Karle; T. Katori; B. Kayser; R. Kephart; S. Kettell; Y. K. Kim; M. Kirby; K. Kirch; J. Klein; J. Kneller; A. Kobach; M. Kohl; J. Kopp; M. Kordosky; W. Korsch; I. Kourbanis; A. D. Krisch; P. Krizan; A. S. Kronfeld; S. Kulkarni; K. S. Kumar; Y. Kuno; T. Kutter; T. Lachenmaier; M. Lamm; J. Lancaster; M. Lancaster; C. Lane; K. Lang; P. Langacker; S. Lazarevic; T. Le; K. Lee; K. T. Lesko; Y. Li; M. Lindgren; A. Lindner; J. Link; D. Lissauer; L. S. Littenberg; B. Littlejohn; C. Y. Liu; W. Loinaz; W. Lorenzon; W. C. Louis; J. Lozier; L. Ludovici; L. Lueking; C. Lunardini; D. B. MacFarlane; P. A. N. Machado; P. B. Mackenzie; J. Maloney; W. J. Marciano; W. Marsh; M. Marshak; J. W. Martin; C. Mauger; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; G. McLaughlin; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; B. T. Meadows; R. Mehdiyev; D. Melconian; H. Merkel; M. Messier; J. P. Miller; G. Mills; U. K. Minamisono; S. R. Mishra; I. Mocioiu; S. Moed Sher; R. N. Mohapatra; B. Monreal; C. D. Moore; J. G. Morfin; J. Mousseau; L. A. Moustakas; G. Mueller; P. Mueller; M. Muether; H. P. Mumm; C. Munger; H. Murayama; P. Nath; O. Naviliat-Cuncin; J. K. Nelson; D. Neuffer; J. S. Nico; A. Norman; D. Nygren; Y. Obayashi; T. P. O'Connor; Y. Okada; J. Olsen; L. Orozco; J. L. Orrell; J. Osta; B. Pahlka; J. Paley; V. Papadimitriou; M. Papucci; S. Parke; R. H. Parker; Z. Parsa; K. Partyka; A. Patch; J. C. Pati; R. B. Patterson; Z. Pavlovic; G. Paz; G. N. Perdue; D. Perevalov; G. Perez; R. Petti; W. Pettus; A. Piepke; M. Pivovaroff; R. Plunkett; C. C. Polly; M. Pospelov; R. Povey; A. Prakesh; M. V. Purohit; S. Raby; J. L. Raaf; R. Rajendran; S. Rajendran; G. Rameika; R. Ramsey; A. Rashed; B. N. Ratcliff; B. Rebel; J. Redondo; P. Reimer; D. Reitzner; F. Ringer; A. Ringwald; S. Riordan; B. L. Roberts; D. A. Roberts; R. Robertson; F. Robicheaux; M. Rominsky; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; C. Rott; P. Rubin; N. Saito; M. Sanchez; S. Sarkar; H. Schellman; B. Schmidt; M. Schmitt; D. W. Schmitz; J. Schneps; A. Schopper; P. Schuster; A. J. Schwartz; M. Schwarz; J. Seeman; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. K. Seth; Q. Shafi; P. Shanahan; R. Sharma; S. R. Sharpe; M. Shiozawa; V. Shiltsev; K. Sigurdson; P. Sikivie; J. Singh; D. Sivers; T. Skwarnicki; N. Smith; J. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Soderberg; Y. H. Song; A. Soni; P. Souder; A. Sousa; J. Spitz; M. Stancari; G. C. Stavenga; J. H. Steffen

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

Hewett, J L; Brock, R; Butler, J N; Casey, B C K; Collar, J; de Gouvea, A; Essig, R; Grossman, Y; Haxton, W; Jaros, J A; Jung, C K; Lu, Z T; Pitts, K; Ligeti, Z; Patterson, J R; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ritchie, J L; Roodman, A; Scholberg, K; Wagner, C E M; Zeller, G P; Aefsky, S; Afanasev, A; Agashe, K; Albright, C; Alonso, J; Ankenbrandt, C; Aoki, M; Arguelles, C A; Arkani-Hamed, N; Armendariz, J R; Armendariz-Picon, C; Diaz, E Arrieta; Asaadi, J; Asner, D M; Babu, K S; Bailey, K; Baker, O; Balantekin, B; Baller, B; Bass, M; Batell, B; Beacham, J; Behr, J; Berger, N; Bergevin, M; Berman, E; Bernstein, R; Bevan, A J; Bishai, M; Blanke, M; Blessing, S; Blondel, A; Blum, T; Bock, G; Bodek, A; Bonvicini, G; Bossi, F; Boyce, J; Breedon, R; Breidenbach, M; Brice, S J; Briere, R A; Brodsky, S; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Browder, T E; Bryman, D A; Buckley, M; Burnstein, R; Caden, E; Campana, P; Carlini, R; Carosi, G; Castromonte, C; Cenci, R; Chakaberia, I; Chen, M C; Cheng, C H; Choudhary, B; Christ, N H; Christensen, E; Christy, M E; Chupp, T E; Church, E; Cline, D B; Coan, T E; Coloma, P; Comfort, J; Coney, L; Cooper, J; Cooper, R J; Cowan, R; Cowen, D F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Datta, A; Davies, G S; Demarteau, M; DeMille, D P; Denig, A; Dermisek, R; Deshpande, A; Dewey, M S; Dharmapalan, R; Dhooghe, J; Dietrich, M R; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Dobbs, S; Duraisamy, M; Dutta, B; Duyang, H; Dwyer, D A; Eads, M; Echenard, B; Elliott, S R; Escobar, C; Fajans, J; Farooq, S; Faroughy, C; Fast, J E; Feinberg, B; Felde, J; Feldman, G; Fierlinger, P; Perez, P Fileviez; Filippone, B; Fisher, P; Flemming, B T; Flood, K T; Forty, R; Frank, M J; Freyberger, A; Friedland, A; Gandhi, R; Ganezer, K S; Garcia, A; Garcia, F G; Gardner, S; Garrison, L; Gasparian, A; Geer, S; Gehman, V M; Gershon, T; Gilchriese, M; Ginsberg, C; Gogoladze, I; Gonderinger, M; Goodman, M; Gould, H; Graham, M; Graham, P W; Gran, R; Grange, J; Gratta, G; Green, J P; Greenlee, H; Guardincerri, E; Gudkov, V; Guenette, R; Haas, A; Hahn, A; Han, T; Handler, T; Hardy, J C; Harnik, R; Harris, D A; Harris, F A; Harris, P G; Hartnett, J; He, B; Heckel, B R; Heeger, K M; Henderson, S; Hertzog, D; Hill, R; Hinds, E A; Hitlin, D G; Holt, R J; Holtkamp, N; Horton-Smith, G; Huber, P; Huelsnitz, W; Imber, J; Irastorza, I; Jaeckel, J; Jaegle, I; James, C; Jawahery, A; Jensen, D; Jessop, C P; Jones, B; Jostlein, H; Junk, T; Kagan, A L; Kalita, M; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Karagiorgi, G; Karle, A; Katori, T; Kayser, B; Kephart, R; Kettell, S; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirch, K; Klein, J; Kneller, J; Kobach, A; Kohl, M; Kopp, J; Kordosky, M; Korsch, W; Kourbanis, I; Krisch, A D; Krizan, P; Kronfeld, A S; Kulkarni, S; Kumar, K S; Kuno, Y; Kutter, T; Lachenmaier, T; Lamm, M; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lane, C; Lang, K; Langacker, P; Lazarevic, S; Le, T; Lee, K; Lesko, K T; Li, Y; Lindgren, M; Lindner, A; Link, J; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L S; Littlejohn, B; Liu, C Y; Loinaz, W; Lorenzon, W; Louis, W C; Lozier, J; Ludovici, L; Lueking, L; Lunardini, C; MacFarlane, D B; Machado, P A N; Mackenzie, P B; Maloney, J; Marciano, W J; Marsh, W; Marshak, M; Martin, J W; Mauger, C; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLaughlin, G; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Meadows, B T; Mehdiyev, R; Melconian, D; Merkel, H; Messier, M; Miller, J P; Mills, G; Minamisono, U K; Mishra, S R; Mocioiu, I; Sher, S Moed; Mohapatra, R N; Monreal, B; Moore, C D; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Moustakas, L A; Mueller, G; Mueller, P; Muether, M; Mumm, H P; Munger, C; Murayama, H; Nath, P; Naviliat-Cuncin, O; Nelson, J K; Neuffer, D; Nico, J S; Norman, A; Nygren, D; Obayashi, Y; O'Connor, T P; Okada, Y; Olsen, J; Orozco, L; Orrell, J L; Osta, J; Pahlka, B; Paley, J; Papadimitriou, V; Papucci, M; Parke, S; Parker, R H; Parsa, Z; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Pati, J C; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Paz, G; Perdue, G N; Perevalov, D; Perez, G; Petti, R; Pettus, W; Piepke, A; Pivovaroff, M; Plunkett, R; Polly, C C; Pospelov, M; Povey, R; Prakesh, A; Purohit, M V; Raby, S; Raaf, J L; Rajendran, R; Rajendran, S; Rameika, G; Ramsey, R; Rashed, A; Ratcliff, B N; Rebel, B; Redondo, J; Reimer, P; Reitzner, D; Ringer, F; Ringwald, A; Riordan, S; Roberts, B L; Roberts, D A; Robertson, R; Robicheaux, F; Rominsky, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Rott, C; Rubin, P; Saito, N; Sanchez, M; Sarkar, S; Schellman, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, M; Schmitz, D W; Schneps, J; Schopper, A; Schuster, P; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, M; Seeman, J; Semertzidis, Y K; Seth, K K; Shafi, Q; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Sharpe, S R; Shiozawa, M; Shiltsev, V; Sigurdson, K; Sikivie, P; Singh, J; Sivers, D; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H; Soderberg, M; Song, Y H; Soni, A; Souder, P; Sousa, A; Spitz, J; Stancari, M; Stavenga, G C; Steffen, J H; Stepanyan, S; Stoeckinger, D; Stone, S; Strait, J; Strassler, M; Sulai, I A; Sundrum, R; Svoboda, R; Szczerbinska, B; Szelc, A; Takeuchi, T; Tanedo, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

CV evolution: AM Her binaries and the period gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AM Her variables -- synchronised magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) -- exhibit a different period distribution from other CVs across the period gap. We show that non-AM Her systems may infiltrate the longer-period end of the period gap if they are metal-deficient, but that the position and width of the gap in orbital period is otherwise insensitive to other binary parameters (excepting the normalisation of the braking rate). In AM Her binaries, magnetic braking is reduced as the wind from the secondary star may be trapped within the magnetosphere of the white dwarf primary. This reduced braking fills the period gap from its short-period end as the dipole magnetic moment of the white dwarf increases. The consistency of these models with the observed distribution of CVs, both AM Her and non-AM Her type, provides compelling evidence supporting magnetic braking as the agent of angular momentum loss among long-period CVs, and its disruption as the explanation of the 2 - 3 hour period gap among nonmagnetic CVs.

R. F. Webbink; D. T. Wickramasinghe

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ModelingData-Intensive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ChapterXII ModelingData-Intensive Web Sites-by-stepapproachtothedesign,implementation and management of a Data-Intensive Web Site (DIWS). The approach introduces five data formulation is that of "Web fragments," that is an information decomposition technique that aids design, implementation

Bouras, Christos

97

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

On the Mass-Period Correlation of the Extrasolar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a possible correlation between the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets, manifested as a paucity of massive planets with short orbital periods. Monte-Carlo simulations show the effect is significant, and is not solely due to an observational selection effect. We also show the effect is stronger than the one already implied by published models that assumed independent power-law distributions for the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets. Planets found in binary stellar systems may have an opposite correlation. The difference is highly significant despite the small number of planets in binary systems. We discuss the paucity of short-period massive planets in terms of some theories for the close-in giant planets. Almost all models can account for the deficit of massive planets with short periods, in particular the model that assumes migration driven by a planet-disk interaction, if the planet masses do not scale with their disk masses.

Shay Zucker; Tsevi Mazeh

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

An Autonomous Adaptive Scheduling Agent for Period Searching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the design and implementation of an autonomous adaptive software agent that addresses the practical problem of observing undersampled, periodic, time-varying phenomena using a network of HTN-compliant robotic telescopes. The algorithm governing the behaviour of the agent uses an optimal geometric sampling technique to cover the period range of interest, but additionally implements proactive behaviour that maximises the optimality of the dataset in the face of an uncertain and changing operating environment.

Eric S. Saunders; Tim Naylor; Alasdair Allan

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solutions to Test 1 Review Problems 1. Here are two sound waves. Identify which is periodic. For the periodic wave, sketch a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions to Test 1 Review Problems 1. Here are two sound waves. Identify which is periodic. Sound wave = You hear a sound that fades in, then gets quiet, then gets louder, and inally fades out. The width of the sound wave corresponds to intensity. (b) Suppose a 1000 Hz tone and a 1008 Hz tone

Hall, Rachel W.

102

Impact Factors of Energy Intensity in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy intensity reflects energy usage efficiency in the production and consumption process, and leads to carbon dioxide emissions and the energy security of an economy. Liao et al. (2007) analyzed factors contribute to the fluctuation of China’s energy intensity from 1997 to 2006, and found that efficiency effects and structural effects are the major impacting factors. Therefore, they suggested that China should attach more importance to optimizing its sectoral structure, and lowering its investment ratio in the future. However, economic development and energy intensity are influenced by many factors. In their research, Liao et al. (2007) omitted some important contributing factors to energy intensities, and their suggestions also had some practical limitations. First of all, Liao et al. (2007) did not analyze impacts from energy prices in energy usage efficiency. In the existing literature, Birol and Keppler (2000) applied economics theory and suggested that higher energy prices can induce the improvements in energy usage efficiency, thereby lowering energy intensity. Hang and Tu (2007) studied the influence of energy price on the Chinese economy's energy intensity and their empirical results also showed that higher energy prices can lower energy intensity. Because energy prices have been regulated by the

unknown authors

103

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

105

Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Technical Change, Investment and Energy Intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyzes the role of different components of technical change on energy intensity by applying a Translog variable cost function setting to the new EU KLEMS dataset for 3 selected EU countries (Italy, Finland and ...

Kratena, Kurt

107

Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sustaining Performance Improvements in Energy Intensive Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experience has shown that significant opportunity for performance improvements exists in energy intensive operations. Often, efforts to improve efficiency focus on vendor-led initiatives to improve operations of particular equipment. This approach...

Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.

111

Laser intensity effects in noncommutative QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a two-fold extension of QED assuming the presence of strong external fields provided by an ultra-intense laser and noncommutativity of spacetime. While noncommutative effects leave the electron's intensity induced mass shift unchanged, the photons change significantly in character: they acquire a quasi-momentum that is no longer light-like. We study the consequences of this combined noncommutative strong-field effect for basic lepton-photon interactions.

Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Mattias Marklund

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

small when considering the overall experimental period: those observed during early growth were compensated for during the finishing period.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lucerne meal (12 %) as a partial protein supplementation led to good growth perfor- mances during without lucerne meal. In the case of diets containing 15 per cent protein and supplemented with lysine L.) for the growing pig. Two wrinkled varieties (LmvcoLrr and FxoGEL) and three smooth ones (STnxcov

Boyer, Edmond

113

MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fundamental physics on natures of the macroscopic vacuum under high intense electromagnetic fields with accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High intense electromagnetic fields can be unique probes to study natures of macroscopic vacua by themselves. Combining accelerators with the intense field can provide more fruitful probes which can neither be achieved by only intense fields nor only high energy accelerators. We will overview the natures of vacua which can be accessible via intense laser-laser and intense laser-electron interactions. In the case of the laser-laser interaction, we propose how to observe nonlinear QED effects and effects of new fields like light scalar and pseudo scalar fields which may contribute to a macroscopic nature of our universe such as dark energy. In the case of the laser-electron interaction, in addition to nonlinear QED effects, we can further discuss the nature of accelerating field in the vacuum where we can access physics related with event horizons such as Hawking-Unruh radiations. We will introduce a recent experimental trial to search for this kind of odd radiations.

Kensuke Homma

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

On community acquired infections requiring intensive care.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM), influenza, and necrotizing soft-tissue infections (NSTIs) are diseases that in a short period of time can progress to become life threatening.… (more)

Brink, Magnus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short laser pulse with a He jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short of interaction of a relativistically intense 4-TW, 400-fs laser pulse with a He gas jet. We observe a stable data, we reconstructed the axial profile of laser channel and on-axis laser intensity. The estimated

Umstadter, Donald

118

Radiation Reaction in High-Intense Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the development of the radiating electron model by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938, many authors have tried to reformulate this model so-called radiation reaction. Recently, this effects has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a method for the stabilization of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [PTEP 2014, 043A01 (2014), PTEP 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. In the other hand, the field modification by high-intense fields should be required under 10PW lasers, like ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose the combined method how to adopt the high-intense field correction with the stabilization by quantum vacuum as the extension from the model by Dirac.

Seto, Keita

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Future High-Intensity Proton Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an overview of currently planned high-intensity proton accelerators. While for high energies (>10GeV) synchrotrons remain the preferred tools to produce high-intensity beams, recent years have seen an impressive development of linac-based lower-energy (intensity proton drivers for spallation sources, accelerator driven systems (ADS), production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) and various neutrino applications (beta-beam, superbeam, neutrino factory). This paper discusses the optimum machine types for the various beam requirements and uses a range of projects, which are likely to be realised within the coming decade, to illustrate the different approaches to reach high average beam power with the application-specific time structure. Only machines with a beam power above 100kW are considered.

Gerigk, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) initialization product. The 1-year deployment period enabled measurements in the dry and wet (monsoon) seasons radar. Peak surface rainfall is observed during August, and the largest daily rainfall rates are observed during the period from July to September. The lifting condensation level (LCL) is observed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, C.L.

1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the aggregate energy-intensity of industry. Applied Energyindustries with final energy intensities of 12.3 Billion BtuAs mentioned, the energy intensity of this sector is much

Can, Stephane de la Rue du

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters. M the emission yield of anionic clusters increases much faster with n than expected from simple proportionality. Accordingly, the most intense emission is observed for Au7 - : under Au9 + impact the Au7 - yield per incident

Boyer, Edmond

124

airglow intensities measured: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mark I 2013-01-01 23 Strongly Intensive Measures for Transverse Momentum and Particle Number Fluctuations Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: The strongly intensive measures ...

125

2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2014 call for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program Due December 10 November 18, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments)...

126

Reducing Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project Fact Sheet Reducing Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project Fact Sheet This fact sheet contains details regarding...

127

Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

128

Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen...

129

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables...

130

WHERE ARE THE MOST INTENSE THUNDERSTORMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided unparalleled information on the global distribution of intense convective storms. T he Tropical-alti- tude, non-sun-synchronous orbit permits sampling throughout the diurnal cycle of precipitation. The cloud-top temperature of storms has been measured using infrared (IR) bright- ness temperature (Tb

Nesbitt, Steve

131

Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependencies in the light of energy price volatility and concerns as to long-term fossil energy availabilities ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . 232 6. FOOD WASTE AND ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . . . . Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems Nathan Pelletier,1 Eric Audsley,2 Sonja Brodt,3

Wang, Changlu

132

Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multiple hot images from an obscuration in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical investigation on the formation of hot images in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks, to disclose the distribution and intensity of hot images in high-power disk amplifiers. It is shown that multiple hot images from an obscuration may be formed, instead of one hot image as reported previously in the literature. This gives a clear explanation for the curious damage pattern of hot images, namely, damage sites appearing on alternating optics in periodic trains. Further analysis demonstrates that the distribution and intensity of hot images depend closely on the number of Kerr medium disks, the distance from the obscuration to the front of the first disk downstream, the space between two neighboring disks, and the thickness and B integral of each disk. Moreover, we take two cascaded Kerr medium disks for example to detail multiple hot images from an obscuration and confirm the theoretical results by numerical simulations.

Wang Youwen; Wen Shuangchun; You Kaiming; Tang Zhixiang; Deng Jianqin; Zhang Lifu; Fan Dianyuan

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

RECORD-SETTING COSMIC-RAY INTENSITIES IN 2009 AND 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements of record-setting intensities of cosmic-ray nuclei from C to Fe, made with the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer carried on the Advanced Composition Explorer in orbit about the inner Sun-Earth Lagrangian point. In the energy interval from {approx}70 to {approx}450 MeV nucleon{sup -1}, near the peak in the near-Earth cosmic-ray spectrum, the measured intensities of major species from C to Fe were each 20%-26% greater in late 2009 than in the 1997-1998 minimum and previous solar minima of the space age (1957-1997). The elevated intensities reported here and also at neutron monitor energies were undoubtedly due to several unusual aspects of the solar cycle 23/24 minimum, including record-low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensities, an extended period of reduced IMF turbulence, reduced solar-wind dynamic pressure, and extremely low solar activity during an extended solar minimum. The estimated parallel diffusion coefficient for cosmic-ray transport based on measured solar-wind properties was 44% greater in 2009 than in the 1997-1998 solar-minimum period. In addition, the weaker IMF should result in higher cosmic-ray drift velocities. Cosmic-ray intensity variations at 1 AU are found to lag IMF variations by 2-3 solar rotations, indicating that significant solar modulation occurs inside {approx}20 AU, consistent with earlier galactic cosmic-ray radial-gradient measurements. In 2010, the intensities suddenly decreased to 1997 levels following increases in solar activity and in the inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. We describe the conditions that gave cosmic rays greater access to the inner solar system and discuss some of their implications.

Mewaldt, R. A.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Surface Spectral Albedo Intensive Operational Period at the ARM SGP Site in august 2002: Results, Analysis, and Future Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline GalliumSuppression of conductivity inBatteriesonBeam

136

How intense quality control improves hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not unlike the subject of Forced Closure, Intense Quality Control is probably misnamed. What actually is discussed in this article is pilot testing of the fracturing fluids actually pumped at in-situ conditions of temperature and shear. Presented here is development of the need for onsite testing, equipment used, shear and viscosity curves from several jobs showing what went wrong that would otherwise not have been known, and a discussion of borate gel fluids.

Ely, J.W. [Ely and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

Lewis, Laura

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 Table 1.14 SalesWorkerWorkforce1: Model4:97

140

Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems.Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries.

Hill, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Westerly, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Mackie, Thomas [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)] [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

Periodic photometric variability of the brown dwarf Kelu-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have detected a strong periodicity of 1.80+/-0.05 hours in photometric observations of the brown dwarf Kelu-1. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the variation is ~1.1% (11.9+/-0.8 mmag) in a 41nm wide filter centred on 857nm and including the dust/temperature sensitive TiO & CrH bands. We have identified two plausible causes of variability: surface features rotating into- and out-of-view and so modulating the light curve at the rotation period; or, elliposidal variability caused by an orbiting companion. In the first scenario, we combine the observed vsin(i) of Kelu-1 and standard model radius to determine that the axis of rotation is inclined at 65+/-12 degrees to the line of sight.

F. J. Clarke; C. G. Tinney; K. R. Covey

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Intermittent and sustained periodic windows in networked chaotic Rössler oscillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Route to chaos (or periodicity) in dynamical systems is one of fundamental problems. Here, dynamical behaviors of coupled chaotic Rössler oscillators on complex networks are investigated and two different types of periodic windows with the variation of coupling strength are found. Under a moderate coupling, the periodic window is intermittent, and the attractors within the window extremely sensitively depend on the initial conditions, coupling parameter, and topology of the network. Therefore, after adding or removing one edge of network, the periodic attractor can be destroyed and substituted by a chaotic one, or vice versa. In contrast, under an extremely weak coupling, another type of periodic window appears, which insensitively depends on the initial conditions, coupling parameter, and network. It is sustained and unchanged for different types of network structure. It is also found that the phase differences of the oscillators are almost discrete and randomly distributed except that directly linked oscillators more likely have different phases. These dynamical behaviors have also been generally observed in other networked chaotic oscillators.

He, Zhiwei; Sun, Yong [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China) [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhan, Meng, E-mail: zhanmeng@wipm.ac.cn [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Title of Document: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SOLITONS ON INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Title of Document: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SOLITONS ON INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Yichao Mo such as condensed matter physics, plasma physics, beam physics, optics, biology and medicine. Whereas solitons in electron beams have been predicted on theoretical grounds decades ago, they have been observed

Anlage, Steven

146

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

147

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO.sub.2, with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube.

Lapatovich, Walter P. (Hudson, MA); Keeffe, William M. (Rockport, MA); Liebermann, Richard W. (Danvers, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medvedev and Melott (2007) have suggested that periodicity in fossil biodiversity may be induced by cosmic rays which vary as the Solar System oscillates normal to the galactic disk. We re-examine the evidence for a 62 million year (Myr) periodicity in biodiversity throughout the Phanerozoic history of animal life reported by Rohde & Mueller (2005), as well as related questions of periodicity in origination and extinction. We find that the signal is robust against variations in methods of analysis, and is based on fluctuations in the Paleozoic and a substantial part of the Mesozoic. Examination of origination and extinction is somewhat ambiguous, with results depending upon procedure. Origination and extinction intensity as defined by RM may be affected by an artifact at 27 Myr in the duration of stratigraphic intervals. Nevertheless, when a procedure free of this artifact is implemented, the 27 Myr periodicity appears in origination, suggesting that the artifact may ultimately be based on a signal in the...

Lieberman, Bruce S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

On the description of the GCR intensity in the last three solar minima  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the main characteristic features in the heliospheric parameters important for the GCR intensity modulation for the last three solar minima (1986--1987, 1996--1997 and 2008--2009). The model for the GCR intensity modulation is considered and the set of the model parameters is chosen which allows the description of the observed GCR intensity distributions at the moments of the maximum GCR intensity in two solar minima (1987 and 1997) normal for the second half of the last century. Then we try to describe with the above model and set of parameters the unusually soft GCR energy spectra at the moments of the maximum GCR intensity in the last solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24 (2009). Our main conclusion is that the most simple way to do so is to reduce the size of the modulation region and, probably, change the rigidity dependence of the diffusion coefficient. The change of both parameters is substantiated by the observations of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field.

Kalinin, M S; Krainev, M B; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dlcfc^ooWS imsm "-"' Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period 1 January to 31 December 1962 (Uw National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark July 1963 #12;Risø-R-486 METALLURGY DEPARTMENT PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY TO 31 DECEMBER 1982 Abstract. The activities of the Metallurgy

152

Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province, 230009, P. R. China. Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have greatBroadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes Michael M. Adachi demonstrate a bottom- illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption

153

Quantum reflection and interference of matter waves from periodically doped surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that periodically doped, flat surfaces can act as reflective diffraction gratings for atomic and molecular matter waves. The diffraction element is realized by exploiting that charged dopants locally suppress quantum reflection from the Casimir-Polder potential. We present a general quantum scattering theory for reflection off periodically charged surfaces and discuss the requirements for the observation of multiple diffraction peaks.

Benjamin A. Stickler; Uzi Even; Klaus Hornberger

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling scattered intensity from microspheres in evanescent field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total scattered light intensity on microsphere size accounts for the scattered intensity distribution in a polydisperse microsphere sample. Understanding this variation in the scattered light with microsphere size will allow improved characterization...

Shah, Suhani Kiran

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated hypofractionated intensity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(IMRT) de- pendends on finding... technologies. I. INTRODUCTION Intensity modulated radiation ... Source: Censor, Yair - Department of Mathematics, University of Haifa...

157

Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Hui Li, Doctor Engineering The transport of intense beams for advanced accelerator applications with high-intensity beams of beam characteristics over long distances. The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), which uses

Anlage, Steven

158

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INTENSE LOW ENERGY MUON SOURCE FOR THE MUON COLLIDER D. Taqqu Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH Abstract A scheme for obtaining an intense source of low energy muons is described. It is based of the decay muons an intense intermediate energy muon beam is obtained. For the specific case of negative

McDonald, Kirk

159

Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315?nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 10{sup 16}?W/cm{sup 2} by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4?MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50?MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica e S.d.T. Università di Messina, V.S. d'Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata (Italy)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789 between the U.S. Department of Energy and AT&T Technologies, Inc.

Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Schils, George F. (San Ramon, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE CENTER FOR DATA INTENSIVE COMPUTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CDIC will provide state-of-the-art computational and computer science for the Laboratory and for the broader DOE and scientific community. We achieve this goal by performing advanced scientific computing research in the Laboratory's mission areas of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Biological and Environmental Research, and Basic Energy Sciences. We also assist other groups at the Laboratory to reach new levels of achievement in computing. We are ''data intensive'' because the production and manipulation of large quantities of data are hallmarks of scientific research in the 21st century and are intrinsic features of major programs at Brookhaven. An integral part of our activity to accomplish this mission will be a close collaboration with the University at Stony Brook.

GLIMM,J.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier: Intensity Frontier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Intensity Frontier (IF) is a primary focus of the U.S.-based particle physics program. It encompasses a large spectrum of physics, including quark flavor physics, charged lepton processes, neutrinos, baryon number violation, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei and atoms. There are many experiments, a range of scales in data output and throughput, and a wide range in the number of experimenters. The experiments, projects and theory in this area all require demanding computing capabilities and technologies. The IF experiments have significant computing requirements for simulation, theory and modeling, beam line and experiment design, triggers and DAQ, online monitoring, event reconstruction and processing, and physics analysis. We have conducted a qualitative survey of the current and near-term future experiments in the IF to understand the computing demands of this area and their expected evolution. This report details the expected computing requirements for the IF in the context of the Snowmass Community Summer Study 2013.

B. Rebel; M. C. Sanchez; S. Wolbers

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

DEVELOPMENT OF RASASASTRA IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: The paper deals with the historical development of Rasasastra in Medieval period. Knowledge of Rasa has been in existence from the time immemorial. Exploration of natural resources for the benefit of human beings is the object of this therapy. It is a medical science recognized during vedic periods for the betterment of even Devas. Medieval period can be treated as a golden age for the development of this science. Looking at its aim and objects, methodology and therapeutics, it was recognized as a medical science with an independent philosophical background in 14 th century, by Madhavacharya in his Sarva Darsana Samgraha.

Harishankar Sharma

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

2006-01-0181 Periodic Input Observer Design: Application for Imbalance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their practical context and illustrated by experimental results on a 4 cylinder HCCI engine. INTRODUCTION

168

Weather Observations and a Tentative Meteorological Analysis of the Period May  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding in three areas: past climate history and its impact on humanity; the course and causes.S. Douglas and H. H. Lamb 1979 Climatic Research Unit School of Environmental Sciences University of East with the study of natural and anthropogenic climate change. CRU is part of the School of Environmental Sciences

Feigon, Brooke

169

LONG PERIOD OSCILLATIONS IN POLAR PLUMES AS OBSERVED BY CDS ON SoHO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and which may also provide enough energy flux for the acceleration of the fast solar wind. The data supports of the C­3 field of view and above the likely Alf'venic point of the wind flow. With the SUMER

170

Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care Ii (Mimic-Ii): A Public-Access Intensive Care Unit Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objective: We sought to develop an intensive care unit research database applying automated techniques to aggregate high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic data from a large, diverse population of adult intensive care ...

Saeed, Mohammed

171

QUIET-SUN INTENSITY CONTRASTS IN THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET AS MEASURED FROM SUNRISE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-resolution images of the Sun in the near-ultraviolet spectral range between 214 nm and 397 nm as obtained from the first science flight of the 1 m SUNRISE balloon-borne solar telescope. The quiet-Sun rms intensity contrasts found in this wavelength range are among the highest values ever obtained for quiet-Sun solar surface structures-up to 32.8% at a wavelength of 214 nm. We compare the rms contrasts obtained from the observational data with theoretical intensity contrasts obtained from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For 388 nm and 312 nm the observations agree well with the numerical simulations whereas at shorter wavelengths discrepancies between observed and simulated contrasts remain.

Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Borrero, J. M.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37434 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Afram, N.; Unruh, Y. C. [Astrophysics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Berdyugina, S. V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Bonet, J. A.; MartInez Pillet, V. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: hirzberger@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

Raj Saha

2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

PERI Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue10/17/134,3-AStanford1

175

Analytical homogenization method for periodic composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an easy-to-implement technique for determining the effective properties of composite materials with periodic microstructures, as well as the field distributions in them. Our method is based on the transformation ...

Chen, Ying

176

Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

177

PARS II Process Document – DOE Period Close  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document details the process adopted by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management to prepare APM DepSec Monthly Status Report, finalize DOE close period package, and perform reporting...

178

Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for ITER Jaeyoung Park and Glen A. Wurden Plasma Physics Group (P-24) Los Alamos National Laboratory LosIntense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden 2 Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam Alamos, NM 87545 Executive Summary An intense pulsed diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) is proposed to enable

179

Increase in the Intensity of Postmonsoon Bay of Bengal Tropical Cyclones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post-monsoon (October-November) tropical cyclone (TC) season in the Bay of Bengal has spawned many of the deadliest storms in recorded history. Here it is shown that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs, and the contribution of major TCs to total TC power, increased during 1981-2010. It is found that changes in environmental parameters are responsible for the observed increases in TC intensity. Increases in sea surface temperature and upper ocean heat content made the ocean more conducive to TC development, while enhanced convective instability made the atmosphere more favorable for the growth of TCs. The largest changes in the atmosphere and ocean occurred in the eastern Bay of Bengal, where nearly all major TCs form. These changes are part of positive linear trends, suggesting that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs may continue to increase in the future.

Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

periods of inconvenience when they drop fruit and create litter problems on paved surfaces such as patios, walks, driveways,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods of inconvenience when they drop fruit and create litter problems on paved surfaces a flowering or fruiting tree lives up to its potential for health and beauty is largely dependent upon its will thrive and flower well. Flowering and fruiting are greatly influenced by duration and intensity

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

Edgecock, T R; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Wildner, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Hansen, C; Benedetto, E; Jensen, E; Kosmicki, A; Martini, M; Osborne, J; Prior, G; Stora, T; Melo-Mendonca, T; Vlachoudis, V; Waaijer, C; Cupial, P; Chancé, A; Longhin, A; Payet, J; Zito, M; Baussan, E; Bobeth, C; Bouquerel, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Lepers, B; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V; Bielski, J; Kozien, M; Lacny, L; Skoczen, B; Szybinski, B; Ustrycka, A; Wroblewski, A; Marie-Jeanne, M; Balint, P; Fourel, C; Giraud, J; Jacob, J; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Mitrofanov, S; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, Th; Delbar, Th; Debray, F; Trophine, C; Veys, S; Daversin, C; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Collazuol, G; Laveder, M; Mazzocco, M; Mezzetto, M; Signorini, C; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Migliozzi, P; Moro, R; Palladino, V; Gelli, N; Berkovits, D; Hass, M; Hirsh, T Y; Schaumann, M; Stahl, A; Wehner, J; Bross, A; Kopp, J; Neuffer, D; Wands, R; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, P; Agarwalla, S K; Villanueva, A Cervera; Donini, A; Ghosh, T; Cadenas, J J Gómez; Hernández, P; Martín-Albo, J; Mena, O; Burguet-Castell, J; Agostino, L; Buizza-Avanzini, M; Marafini, M; Patzak, T; Tonazzo, A; Duchesneau, D; Mosca, L; Bogomilov, M; Karadzhov, Y; Matev, R; Tsenov, R; Akhmedov, E; Blennow, M; Lindner, M; Schwetz, T; Martinez, E Fernández; Maltoni, M; Menéndez, J; Giunti, C; García, M C González; Salvado, J; Coloma, P; Huber, P; Li, T; López-Pavón, J; Orme, C; Pascoli, S; Meloni, D; Tang, J; Winter, W; Ohlsson, T; Zhang, H; Scotto-Lavina, L; Terranova, F; Bonesini, M; Tortora, L; Alekou, A; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Kurup, A; Jenner, L J; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Pozimski, J; Back, J J; Harrison, P; Beard, K; Bogacz, A; Berg, J S; Stratakis, D; Witte, H; Snopok, P; Bliss, N; Cordwell, M; Moss, A; Pattalwar, S; Apollonio, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Line asymmetry of solar p-modes: Reversal of asymmetry in intensity power spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sense of line asymmetry of solar p-modes in the intensity power spectra is observed to be opposite of that seen in the velocity power spectra. Theoretical calculations provide a good understanding and fit to the observed velocity power spectra whereas the reverse sense of asymmetry in the intensity power spectrum has been poorly understood. We show that when turbulent eddies arrive at the top of the convection zone they give rise to an observable intensity fluctuation which is correlated with the oscillation they generate, thereby affecting the shape of the line in the p-mode power spectra and reversing the sense of asymmetry (this point was recognized by Nigam et al. and Roxburgh & Vorontsov). The addition of the correlated noise displaces the frequencies of peaks in the power spectrum. Depending on the amplitude of the noise source the shift in the position of the peak can be substantially larger than the frequency shift in the velocity power spectra. In neither case are the peak frequencies precisely equal to the eigenfrequencies of p-modes. We suggest two observations which can provide a test of the model discussed here.

Pawan Kumar; Sarbani Basu

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Periodic subsystem density-functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Ceresoli, Davide [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); CNR-ISTM, Institute of Molecular Sciences and Technologies, Milano (Italy)

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 2004-06 Ocean Atlas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together ...

Forget, Gael

185

Periodic Exponential Shear of Complex Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a class of flows with exponential kinematics termed Periodic Exponential Shear (PES) flow which involve periodic exponential stretching of fluid elements along with their rotation. We exhibit analytical and numerical results for PES flow by using the Oldroyd-B model for viscoelastic fluids. We calculate the growth in the shear and the normal stresses analytically as well as demonstrate that repeated application of the flow leads to stable oscillatory shear and normal stresses. We define a material function applicable to a periodic, unsteady shear flow and show numerically that this material function exhibits deformation-rate thickening behavior for viscoelastic fluids subject to PES flow. We demonstrate the feasibility of PES flow by presenting preliminary experimental results from a controlled-strain rate rheometer, using a Newtonian mineral oil.

Chirag Kalelkar; Gareth McKinley

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Parc Periodical | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingToolsto controlParc Periodical Parc Periodical

188

Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medvedev and Melott (2007) have suggested that periodicity in fossil biodiversity may be induced by cosmic rays which vary as the Solar System oscillates normal to the galactic disk. We re-examine the evidence for a 62 million year (Myr) periodicity in biodiversity throughout the Phanerozoic history of animal life reported by Rohde & Mueller (2005), as well as related questions of periodicity in origination and extinction. We find that the signal is robust against variations in methods of analysis, and is based on fluctuations in the Paleozoic and a substantial part of the Mesozoic. Examination of origination and extinction is somewhat ambiguous, with results depending upon procedure. Origination and extinction intensity as defined by RM may be affected by an artifact at 27 Myr in the duration of stratigraphic intervals. Nevertheless, when a procedure free of this artifact is implemented, the 27 Myr periodicity appears in origination, suggesting that the artifact may ultimately be based on a signal in the data. A 62 Myr feature appears in extinction, when this same procedure is used. We conclude that evidence for a periodicity at 62 Myr is robust, and evidence for periodicity at approximately 27 Myr is also present, albeit more ambiguous.

Bruce S. Lieberman; Adrian L. Melott

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

BEAM INTENSITY AND ENERGY CONTROL FOR THE SPIRAL2 FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEAM INTENSITY AND ENERGY CONTROL FOR THE SPIRAL2 FACILITY C. Jamet, T. Andre, B. Ducoudret, C to control both beam intensity and energy by non-interceptive methods at the linac exit. The beam current will range in intensity from a few 10 A to 1mA for ions, up to 5 mA for deuterons, and in energy from 0.75 up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

X-ray Variability and Period Determinations in the Eclipsing Polar DP Leo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of ROSAT observations for the eclipsing magnetic cataclysmic binary DP Leo provides constraints on the origin, size, temperature, variability and structure of the soft X-ray emission region on the surface of the white dwarf. These data, when combined with prior observations, show a progression of approximately 2 degrees per year in the impact position of the accretion stream onto the white dwarf. One explanation for the observed drift in stream position is that a magnetic activity cycle on the secondary produces orbital period oscillations. These oscillations result in an orbital period which cycles above and below the rotational period of the nearly synchronous white dwarf. The accretion stream and X-ray emission regions are modeled to fit the observational data. A distance to the system is also calculated. [An erroneous value for the cyclotron luminosity, included in an earlier paper version of the preprint, is corrected here.

C. R. Robinson; F. A. Cordova

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pdf More Documents &...

193

Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructur...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the porosity, mechanical strength, and luminescence intensity of metal chalcogenide aerogels was probed by comparison of CdSe aerogels prepared from spherical and rod-shaped...

194

Reducing Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Authority and its project partners will establish the Southeastern Center for Industrial Energy Intensity Reduction (the Center) to inform industrial facilities about the U.S....

195

EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8c) html table 8c excel table 8c excel table 8c For questions about the "Residential Energy Intensity Tables," please contact: Behjat Hojjati Program Manager...

196

Is China on Track to Comply with Its 2020 Copenhagen Carbon Intensity Commitment?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provinces Figure 1: Carbon intensities of provinces fromwith Its 2020 Copenhagen Carbon Intensity Commitment? ? YuanChina agreed to slash its carbon intensity (carbon dioxide

Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Junjie; Wang, Can

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practice equals 100. Carbon intensity trends are closelyby calculating a carbon intensity index, which compares theThe best practice benchmark carbon intensity for each of the

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complemented with carbon intensity targets, to explicitlybe complemented with carbon intensity targets, to explicitlyin the provinces. Carbon Intensity. The methodology can also

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Schaeffer, 1997, “Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steelwhich is the ratio of the actual energy intensity to thebest practice energy intensity, where the best practice

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy-Efficiency Technologies and Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmarking the Energy Intensity for the Textile Industryand Comparing the Energy Intensity in the Textile Industrywere visited. The energy intensity of each plant was

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Intensity Frontier: More Information | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intensity Frontier Intensity Frontier: More Information High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

202

Analysis and Decomposition of the Energy Intensity of Industries in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selectedworld-best-practice-energy-intensity-values- selected-2005. Changes in energy intensities of Thai industry between

Can, Stephane de la Rue de

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Identification for a Nonlinear Periodic Wave Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is concerned with an approximation process for the identification of nonlinearities in the nonlinear periodic wave equation. It is based on the least-squares approach and on a splitting method. A numerical algorithm of gradient type and the numerical implementation are given.

Morosanu, C. [Department of Mathematics, University 'Al.I.Cuza', 6600 Iasi (Romania); Trenchea, C. [Institute of Mathematics of Romanian Academy, 6600 Iasi (Romania)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

206

Coherency saturation in periodic structures with randomization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,28 or multicascade stimulated Raman scattering.29­31 A major example of naturally occurring spatially periodic with very reasonable precision. In the specific case of x ray transition radiation of low layers can generate resonantly enhanced radiation in the hard x ray domain with almost unhampered

Kaplan, Alexander

207

EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063-6259  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063-6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 {mu}m) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 {mu}m silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063-6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 {mu}m absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bik, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the same coverage of the target volume when subjected to uncertainties. Conclusions: The authors find that the worst-case robust optimization provides robust target coverage without sacrificing, and possibly even improving, the sparing of normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the importance of robust optimization. The authors assert that all IMPT plans should be robustly optimized.

Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

211

Timing, Intensity, and Duration of Rehabilitation for Hip and Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Timing, Intensity, and Duration of Rehabilitation for Hip and Stroke Fracture BETHESDA, MD on rehabilitation for stroke and hip fracture was held August 4 by the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation, intensity, and duration of rehabilitation. Stroke and hip fracture were included together because these two

Rau, Don C.

212

The investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, access to high temperature states of mat- ter capable of thermonuclear fusion and/or the effi- cientThe investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources for fusion materials. The application of fast pulse, high intensity lasers to drive low cost DT point neutron sources for fusion

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

213

Optical absorption intensity of semiconductor single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical absorption intensity of semiconductor single-wall carbon nanotubes Y. Oyama1 , R. Saito1. The optical absorption intensity is inversely proportional to the diameter in the unit of per carbon atom of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) synthesized by alcohol CCVD (ACCVD) method and HiPco method [1

Maruyama, Shigeo

214

Response of GaAs to fast intense laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent experiments, we have performed simulations which show in detail how the electrons and ions in GaAs respond to fast intense laser pulses (with durations of order 100 fs and intensities of order 1-10 TW/cm(2)). The method of tight...

Graves, JS; Allen, Roland E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

UMass Lowell Intensive Spanish Language & Culture in Cdiz, Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UMass Lowell Intensive Spanish Language & Culture in Cádiz, Spain Program Description Travel to Spain and study at the University of Cádiz in a specialized intensive language program established Lowell During the Summer in Cádiz, Spain! Complete Levels 1-4 (12 credit) of Spanish language in one

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

216

Automated Checkpointing for Enabling Intensive Applications on Energy Harvesting Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Checkpointing for Enabling Intensive Applications on Energy Harvesting Devices Azalia intensive computation on ultra-low power devices with discontinuous energy-harvesting supplies. We devise on a battery-less RF energy-harvester platform. Extensive experiments targeting applications in medical implant

217

A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe F. Aymea , C. Carioub , M is a great advantage. In this frame, a new intensity acoustic probe has been developed to compute acoustic quantities which can be input data for energetic identification methods. 1 Introduction Noise matters

Boyer, Edmond

218

Chaotic Transport in Planar Periodic Vortical Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a chaotic transport in a two-dimensional periodic vortical flow under a time-dependent perturbation with period T where the global diffusion occurs along the stochastic web. By using the Melnikov method we construct the separatrix map describing the approximate dynamics near the saddle separatrices. Focusing on the small T, the width of the stochastic layer is calculated analytically by using the residue criterion and the diffusion constant by using the random phase assumption and correlated random walks. The analytical results are in good agreements with the results of two different types of numerical simulations by integrations of the Hamilton's equation of motion and by iterations of the separatrix map, which establishes the validity of the use of the separatrix map.

Taehoon Ahn; Seunghwan Kim

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Periodic-Orbit Theory of Level Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a semiclassical explanation of the so-called Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture which asserts universality of spectral fluctuations in chaotic dynamics. We work with a generating function whose semiclassical limit is determined by quadruplets of sets of periodic orbits. The asymptotic expansions of both the non-oscillatory and the oscillatory part of the universal spectral correlator are obtained. Borel summation of the series reproduces the exact correlator of random-matrix theory.

Stefan Heusler; Sebastian Müller; Alexander Altland; Petr Braun; Fritz Haake

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Embedding a chaotic signature in a periodic train: can periodic signals be chaotic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how a chaotic system can be locked to emit a periodic waveform belonging to its chaotic attractor. We numerically demonstrate our idea in a system composed of a semiconductor laser driven to chaos by optical feedback from a short external cavity. The clue is the injection of an appropriate periodic signal that modulates the phase and amplitude of the intra-cavity radiation, a chaotic analogy of conventional mode-locking. The result is a time process that manifests a chaotic signature embedded in a long-scale periodic train.

Antonio Mecozzi; Cristian Antonelli

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

225

Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

226

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition's Regional Contests Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan...

227

DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

228

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:Technology ReadinessTimePeriod Jump to:

230

Periodic striations on beryllium and tungsten surfaces by indirect femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Femtosecond laser pulses with ??=?800?nm were focused in air at one atmosphere and in deuterium (D) at low pressure. Submicron periodic structures were observed on surfaces made of Be, W and a mixture of Be-W immersed in these gases and placed nearly parallel with the laser beam, at 300??m from the focal spot. In air, no structures were observed on Be. For the Be-W mixture, the periodic structures were uniform and parallel when formed in D but irregular in air. In this last case the striations were organized into small patches of 1 to 2 ?m in size.

Lungu, C. P.; Tico?, C. M., E-mail: catalin.ticos@inflpr.ro; Poro?nicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Lungu, M.; Marcu, A.; Luculescu, C.; Cojocaru, G.; Ursescu, D.; B?nici, R.; Ungureanu, G. R. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)] [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

THE DISCOVERY OF PERIODIC MODULATIONS IN THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF GALAXIES, POSSIBLY DUE TO ULTRARAPID LIGHT BURSTS FROM THEIR MASSIVE CENTRAL BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Fourier transform analysis of 2.5 million spectra in the SDSS survey was carried out to detect periodic modulations contained in the intensity versus frequency spectrum. A statistically significant signal was found for 223 galaxies, while the spectra of 0.9 million galaxies were observed. A plot of the periods as a function of redshift clearly shows that the effect is real without any doubt, because the modulations are quantized at two base periods that increase with redshift in two very tight parallel linear relations. We suggest that this result could be caused by light bursts separated by times on the order of 10{sup -13} s, but other causes may be possible. We investigate the hypothesis that the modulation is generated by the Fourier transform of spectral lines, but conclude that this hypothesis is not valid. Although the light burst suggestion implies absurdly high temperatures, it is supported by the fact that the Crab pulsar also has extremely short unresolved pulses (<0.5 ns) that imply similarly high temperatures. Furthermore, the radio spectrum of the Crab pulsar also has spectral bands similar to those that have been detected. Finally, decreasing the signal-to-noise threshold of detection gives results consistent with beamed signals having a small beam divergence, as expected from non-thermal sources that send a jet, like those seen in pulsars. Considering that galaxy centers contain massive black holes, exotic black hole physics may be responsible for the spectral modulation. However, at this stage, this idea is only a hypothesis to be confirmed with further work.

Borra, Ermanno F., E-mail: borra@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 Quebec (Canada)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Joint Owners' Group Program on MOV Periodic Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address long-term motor operated valve (MOV) performance, the Babcock and Wilcox, Boiling Water Reactor, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse Groups (B and WOG, BWROG, CEOG and WOG) teamed in 1997 to form the Joint Group (JOG) MOV Periodic Verification (PV) Program. This program is nearing completion, with 98 of the 103 operating U.S. reactor units participating. The goal of the program is to provide a justified approach for periodically testing MOVs, that addresses potential degradation. The program defines an interim approach that specifies periodic tests without flow and differential pressure (DP), at a frequency determined by the s risk significance and margin. To justify this approach, each participating plant is also DP testing 2 valves per unit. Each valve is tested three times over five years, with at least one year between tests. The data are evaluated jointly to confirm or adjust the initial guidance. The majority of the tests are complete and conclusions are coming into focus. For gate valves, when the valve factor is initially low, increases can occur between one test and a later test. One common way that the valve factor becomes low is disassembling and reassembling the valve. The data show that, following valve disassembly and re-assembly, the valve factor tends to be reduced, and it tends to increase in subsequent service. Outside of the valves disassembled and reassembled, some gate valves have low valve factors apparently because the valves are not stroked under DP conditions in service. For butterfly valves, there have been no observations of degradation in bearing friction coefficient. A few valves with bronze bearings in raw (untreated) water service have shown significant variations in friction, but they tend to be a mixture of increases and decreases with no pattern of degradation. Globe valves, both unbalanced and balanced, tend to show a constant valve factor with no indication of degradation. (authors)

Damerell, Paul S.; Spears, Todd A. [MPR Associates Inc., 140 Mustang Circle, Simpsonville, SC 29681 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

On a periodicity measure and superoscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of superoscillation, where band limited signals can oscillate over some time period with a frequency higher than the band limit, is not only very interesting but it also seems to offer many practical applications. The first reason is that the superoscillation frequency can be exploited to perform tasks beyond the limits imposed by the lower bandwidth of the signal. The second reason is that it is generic and applies to any wave form, be it optical, electrical, sonic, or quantum mechanical. For practical applications, it is important to overcome two problems. The first problem is that an overwhelming proportion of the energy goes into the non superoscillating part of the signal. The second problem is the control of the shape of the superoscillating part of the signal. The first problem has been recently addressed by optimization of the super oscillation yield, the ratio of the energy in the superoscillations to the total energy of the signal. The second problem may arise when the superoscillation, is to mimic a high frequency purely perodic signal. This may be required, for example, when a superoscillating force is to drive a harmonic oscillator at a high resonance frequency. In this paper the degree of periodicity of a signal is defined and applied to some yield optimized superoscillating signals.

Nehemia Schwartz; Moshe Schwartz

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

234

Periodic Cluster Mutations and Related Integrable Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the remarkable properties of cluster algebras is that any cluster, obtained from a sequence of mutations from an initial cluster, can be written as a Laurent polynomial in the initial cluster (known as the "Laurent phenomenon"). There are many nonlinear recurrences which exhibit the Laurent phenomenon and thus unexpectedly generate integer sequences. The mutation of a typical quiver will not generate a recurrence, but rather an erratic sequence of exchange relations. How do we "design" a quiver which gives rise to a given recurrence? A key role is played by the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", introduced in 2009. Each recurrence corresponds to a finite dimensional map. In the context of cluster mutations, these are called "cluster maps". What properties do cluster maps have? Are they integrable in some standard sense? In this review I describe how integrable maps arise in the context of cluster mutations. I first explain the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", giving some classification results. I then give a review of what is meant by an integrable map and apply this to cluster maps. Two classes of integrable maps are related to interesting monodromy problems, which generate interesting Poisson algebras of functions, used to prove complete integrability and a linearisation. A connections to the Hirota-Miwa equation is explained.

Allan P Fordy

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electric dipole-forbidden nuclear transitions driven by super-intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric dipole-forbidden transitions of nuclei interacting with super-intense laser fields are investigated considering stable isotopes with suitable low-lying first excited states. Different classes of transitions are identified, and all magnetic sublevels corresponding to the near-resonantly driven nuclear transition are included in the description of the nuclear quantum system. We find that large transition matrix elements and convenient resonance energies qualify nuclear M1 transitions as good candidates for the coherent driving of nuclei. We discuss the implications of resonant interaction of intense laser fields with nuclei beyond the dipole approximation for the controlled preparation of excited nuclear states and important aspects of possible experiments aimed at observing these effects.

Adriana Pálffy; Jörg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report optimization of laser-driven proton acceleration, for a range of experimental parameters available from a single ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser system. We have characterized laser-generated protons produced at the rear and front target surfaces of thin solid targets (15 nm to 90 {mu}m thicknesses) irradiated with an ultra-intense laser pulse (up to 10{sup 20} W Dot-Operator cm{sup -2}, pulse duration 30 to 500 fs, and pulse energy 0.1 to 1.8 J). We find an almost symmetric behaviour for protons accelerated from rear and front sides, and a linear scaling of proton energy cut-off with increasing pulse energy. At constant laser intensity, we observe that the proton cut-off energy increases with increasing laser pulse duration, then roughly constant for pulses longer than 300 fs. Finally, we demonstrate that there is an optimum target thickness and pulse duration.

Fourmaux, S.; Gnedyuk, S.; Lassonde, P.; Payeur, S.; Pepin, H.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Buffechoux, S.; Albertazzi, B. [INRS-EMT, Universite du Quebec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Capelli, D.; Antici, P. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Sapienza, Universita di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Levy, A.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Universite Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lecherbourg, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S. [Department of Physics and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Intensity oscillations in the carbon 1s ionization cross sections of 2-butyne  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for 2-butyne (CH{sub 3}C{identical_to}CCH{sub 3}) measured in the photon energy range from threshold to 150 eV above threshold show oscillations in the intensity ratio C2,3/C1,4. Similar oscillations have been seen in chloroethanes, where the effect has been attributed to EXAFS-type scattering from the substituent chlorine atoms. In 2-butyne, however, there is no high-Z atom to provide a scattering center and, hence, oscillations of the magnitude observed are surprising. The results have been analyzed in terms of two different theoretical models: a density-functional model with B-spline atom-centered functions to represent the continuum electrons and a multiple-scattering model using muffin-tin potentials to represent the scattering centers. Both methods give a reasonable description of the energy dependence of the intensity ratios.

Carroll, Thomas X. [Division of Natural Sciences, Keuka College, Keuka Park, New York 14478 (United States); Zahl, Maria G.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, NO-5007 Bergen (Norway); Decleva, Piero; Ponzi, Aurora [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Box 351560, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Thomas, T. Darrah [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Capacity planning and admission control policies for intensive care units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poor management of the patient flow in intensive care units (ICUs) causes service rejections and presents significant challenges from the standpoint of capacity planning and management in ICUs. This thesis reports on the ...

Chaiwanon, Wongsakorn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Gamma Intensity Monitor at the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis details the motivation, design, construction, and testing of the Gamma Intensity Monitor (GIM) for the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment at the Universität Bonn. The CB-ELSA collaboration studies the baryon excitation ...

McGehee, William R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Effect of Tidal Inflation Instability on the Mass and Dynamical Evolution of Extrasolar Planets with Ultra-Short Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of substantial inflation of short-period Jupiter-mass planets, as a result of their internal tidal dissipation associated with the synchronization and circularization of their orbits. We employ the simplest prescription based on an equilibrium model with a constant lag angle for all components of the tide. We show that for young Jupiter-mass planets, with a period less than 3 days, an initial radius about 2 Jupiter radii, and an orbital eccentricity greater than 0.2, the energy dissipated during the circularization of their orbits is sufficiently intense and protracted to inflate their sizes up to their Roche radii.

Pin-Gao Gu; Doug Lin; Peter Bodenheimer

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Vacuum self-focussing of very intense laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that long-range photon-photon attraction induced by the dipole interaction of two electron-positron loops can lead to "vacuum self-focussing" of very intense laser beams. The focussing angle theta(F) is found to increase with the beam intensity I as theta(F) I^(4/3); for the laser beams available at present or in the near future, theta(F) 10^(-10)--10^(-7).

Dmitri Kharzeev; Kirill Tuchin

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Transverse spreading of electrons in high-intensity laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that for collisions of electrons with a high-intensity laser, discrete photon emissions introduce a transverse beam spread which is distinct from that due to classical (or beam shape) effects. Via numerical simulations, we show that this quantum induced transverse momentum gain of the electron is manifest in collisions with a realistic laser pulse of intensity within reach of current technology, and we propose it as a measurable signature of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

D. G. Green; C. N. Harvey

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

Tunable Radiation Source by Coupling Laser-Plasma-Generated Electrons to a Periodic Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-infrared radiation around 1000 nm generated from the interaction of a high-density MeV electron beam, obtained by impinging an intense ultrashort laser pulse on a solid target, with a metal grating is observed experimentally. Theoretical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation suggest that the radiation is caused by the Smith-Purcell mechanism. The results here indicate that tunable terahertz radiation with tens GV/m field strength can be achieved by using appropriate grating parameters.

Jin, Z. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Chen, Z. L.; Kon, A.; Nakatsutsumi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Zhuo, H. B. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); School of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Wang, H. B.; Zhang, B. H.; Gu, Y. Q.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Wang, L. [National Key Laboratory of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany); Sheng, Z. M. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Kodama, R. [Photon Pioneers Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

A ground level gamma-ray burst observed in association with rocket-triggered lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ground level gamma-ray burst observed in association with rocket-triggered lightning J. R. Dwyer 2004; published 13 March 2004. [1] We report the observation of an intense gamma-ray burst observed lightning channel with gamma-ray energies extending up to more than 10 MeV. The burst consisted of 227

Florida, University of

250

Periodic table for topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gapped phases of noninteracting fermions, with and without charge conservation and time-reversal symmetry, are classified using Bott periodicity. The symmetry and spatial dimension determines a general universality class, which corresponds to one of the 2 types of complex and 8 types of real Clifford algebras. The phases within a given class are further characterized by a topological invariant, an element of some Abelian group that can be 0, Z, or Z_2. The interface between two infinite phases with different topological numbers must carry some gapless mode. Topological properties of finite systems are described in terms of K-homology. This classification is robust with respect to disorder, provided electron states near the Fermi energy are absent or localized. In some cases (e.g., integer quantum Hall systems) the K-theoretic classification is stable to interactions, but a counterexample is also given.

Alexei Kitaev

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

Samuel Walsh

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fluorescence in nonlocal dissipative periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an approach for the description of fluorescence from optically active material embedded in layered periodic structures. Based on an exact electromagnetic Green's tensor analysis, we determine the radiative properties of emitters such as the local photonic density of states, Lamb shifts, line widths etc. for a finite or infinite sequence of thin alternating plasmonic and dielectric layers. In the effective medium limit, these systems may exhibit hyperbolic dispersion relations so that the large wave-vector characteristics of all constituents and processes become relevant. These include the finite thickness of the layers, the nonlocal properties of the constituent metals, and local-field corrections associated with an emitter's dielectric environment. In particular, we show that the corresponding effects are non-additive and lead to considerable modifications of an emitter's luminescence properties.

Francesco Intravaia; Kurt Busch

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR A 5.4 MINUTE ORBITAL PERIOD IN HM CANCRI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HM Cancri is a candidate ultracompact binary white dwarf with an apparent orbital period of only 5.4 minutes, as suggested by X-ray and optical light-curve modulations on that period, and by the absence of longer-period variability. In this Letter, we present Keck-I spectroscopy which shows clear modulation of the helium emission lines in both radial velocity and amplitude on the 5.4 minute period and no other. The data strongly suggest that the binary is emitting He I 4471 from the irradiated face of the cooler, less massive star, and He II 4686 from a ring around the more massive star. From their relative radial velocities, we measure a mass ratio q = 0.50 {+-} 0.13. We conclude that the observed 5.4 minute period almost certainly represents the orbital period of an interacting binary white dwarf. We thus confirm that HM Cnc is the shortest period binary star known: a unique test for stellar evolution theory, and one of the strongest known sources of gravitational waves for LISA.

Roelofs, Gijs H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rau, Arne [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Marsh, Tom R.; Steeghs, Danny [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Groot, Paul J.; Nelemans, Gijs [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: groelofs@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: arau@mpe.mpg.de

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Observing Massive Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

Christopher J. Conselice

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

Air Observe System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ratchet Effects Induced by Terahertz Radiation in Heterostructures with a Lateral Periodic Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratchet Effects Induced by Terahertz Radiation in Heterostructures with a Lateral Periodic of the Seebeck ratchet effect. The effect is measured in semiconductor heterostructures with a one ratchet effect, we observe a photon helicity dependent response and propose a microscopic mechanism

Ganichev, Sergey

258

Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D , C. T. David2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D S. Luding1 , C. T. David2 , R. Garcia the (deviatoric) stress- strain relation a ratchet-like behavior is observed: Increasing the coefficient of friction leads to a transition from ratcheting to shake-down, i.e., the accumulation of strain stops

Luding, Stefan

259

QUANTUM ENERGY EXPECTATION IN PERIODIC TIME-DEPENDENT HAMILTONIANS VIA GREEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTUM ENERGY EXPECTATION IN PERIODIC TIME-DEPENDENT HAMILTONIANS VIA GREEN FUNCTIONS C´ESAR R. DE. Introduction 1 2. Average Energy and Green Functions 4 3. Applications 10 3.1. Time-Independent Hamiltonians 10(t). For each positive and discrete observable A (which we call a probe energy), we derive a formula

260

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

262

Global Warming Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

Schofield, Jeremy

263

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

264

Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration, motivated by the possibility of parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations. The large imaginary parts of the forward kaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the decay width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma$ prevent a sizable enhancement of the $K_L\\to K_S$ transition probability. However, some interesting effects can be produced using regenerators made of alternating layers of two different materials. Despite the fact that the regenerator has a fixed length one can obtain different values for the probability distribution of the $K_L$ decay into a final state. Using a two-arm regenerator set up it is possible to measure the imaginary parts of the $K^0(\\bar{K}^0)$-nucleon scattering amplitudes in the correlated decays of the $\\phi$-resonance. Combining the data of the single-arm regenerator experiments with direct and reverse orders of the matter layers in the regenerator one can independently measure the CP violating parameter $\\delta$.

Evgeny Akhmedov; Augusto Barroso; Petteri Keränen

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Superconvergence of period doubling cascade in trapezoid maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the symmetric and the asymmetric trapezoid maps, as a slope of the trapezoid is increased, the period doubling cascade occurs and the symbolic sequence of periodic points is the Metropolis-Stein-Stein sequence and the convergence of the onset point of the period 2^m solution to the accumulation point is exponentially fast. We reported these results previously. In this paper, we give the detailed description of the proof on the results. Further, we study the period doubling cascade starting from period p solution and show the superconvergence of the period doubling cascade.

T. Uezu

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source for Spatial Beam Profile Measurement of a High Intensity Positive Ion Beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been developing a negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -} ion) source for a spatial beam profile monitor of a high intensity positive ion beam as a new diagnostic tool. In case of a high intensity continuous-wave (CW) deuteron (D{sup +}) beam for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), it is difficult to measure the beam qualities in the severe high radiation environment during about one-year cyclic operation period. Conventional techniques are next to unusable for diagnostics in the operation period of about eleven months and for maintenance in the one-month shutdown period. Therefore, we have proposed an active beam probe system by using a negative ion beam and started an experimental study for the proof-of-principle (PoP) of the new spatial beam profile monitoring tool. In this paper, we present the status of development of the H{sup -} ion source as a probe beam source for the PoP experiment.

Shinto, Katsuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Wada, Motoi; Nishida, Tomoaki; Demura, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Daichi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan); Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Nishiura, Masaki; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kisaki, Masashi; Sasao, Mamiko [Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Measurement of Dynamic Light Scattering Intensity in Gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the scientific literature little attention has been given to the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a tool for extracting the thermodynamic information contained in the absolute intensity of light scattered by gels. In this article we show that DLS yields reliable measurements of the intensity of light scattered by the thermodynamic fluctuations, not only in aqueous polymer solutions, but also in hydrogels. In hydrogels, light scattered by osmotic fluctuations is heterodyned by that from static or slowly varying inhomogeneities. The two components are separable owing to their different time scales, giving good experimental agreement with macroscopic measurements of the osmotic pressure. DLS measurements in gels are, however, tributary to depolarised light scattering from the network as well as to multiple light scattering. The paper examines these effects, as well as the instrumental corrections required to determine the osmotic modulus. For guest polymers trapped in a hydrogel the measured intensity...

Rochas, Cyrille

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coherent control and giant enhancement of multiphoton ionization and high-order-harmonic generation driven by intense frequency-comb laser fields: An ab initio theoretical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the intensity of the driving frequency-comb laser fields. However, the two-level model does not take into account the effects of multilevel structure and ionization, which are inherent in real atomic and/or molecular systems driven by intense laser fields... function. In general, the carrier frequency ?c is not necessarily one of the comb frequencies nor does it equal ?0. Due to the incommensuration between the time period (=2?/?c) of the carrier wave and the time interval ? of the pulse envelope, there is a...

Chu, Shih-I; Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-li

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

Mirzoeva, I. K., E-mail: colombo2006@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Evaluation of expanded uncertainties in luminous intensity and illuminance calibrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detector-based calibrating methods and expressions for calculation of photometric uncertainties related to uncertainties in the calibrations of luminous intensity of a light source, illuminance responsivity of a photometer head, and calibration factors of an illuminance meter are discussed. These methods permit luminous intensity calibrations of incandescent light sources, luminous responsivity calibrations of photometer heads, and calibration factors of illuminance meters to be carried out with relative expanded uncertainties (with a level of confidence of 95.45%) of 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.6%, respectively.

Sametoglu, Ferhat

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FY06 LDRD Final Report Data Intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the data intensive LDRD was to investigate the fundamental research issues underlying the application of High Performance Computing (HPC) resources to the challenges of data intensive computing. We explored these issues through four targeted case studies derived from growing LLNL programs: high speed text processing, massive semantic graph analysis, streaming image feature extraction, and processing of streaming sensor data. The ultimate goal of this analysis was to provide scalable data management algorithms to support the development of a predictive knowledge capability consistent with the direction of Aurora.

Abdulla, G M

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Light Intensity-Dependent Modulation of Chlorophyll b Biosynthesis and Photosynthesis by Overexpression of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limiting and saturating light intensities. Although the quantum yield of carbon dioxide fixation remained carbon dioxide assimilation, starch content, and dry matter accumulation. Light intensity is a majorLight Intensity-Dependent Modulation of Chlorophyll b Biosynthesis and Photosynthesis

Govindjee

275

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

er in their lifecycle carbon intensity. Since SCO requiresfuel their lifecycle carbon intensity is reported to be 20%of crude oil have a ?xed carbon intensity. Without loss of

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Frontal brain electrical activity (EEG) distinguishes valence and intensity of musical emotions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frontal brain electrical activity (EEG) distinguishes valence and intensity of musical emotions (i.e., positive vs. negative) and intensity (i.e., intense vs. calm) in a group of under- graduates

Trainor, Laurel J.

277

Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projections of energy and intensity for the 12 th FYP werelevel projections of energy and intensity for the 12 th FYPth APPENDIX Table A-2 Energy Intensity Target Allocation

Ohshita, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 5.3 Energy Use and Energy Intensity of Chlorine44314 Energy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. ChemicalEnergy Use and Energy Intensity of the U.S. Chemical

Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian; Einstein, Dan; Martin, Nathan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and theGJ/t crude steel Primary Energy Intensity* kgce/t GJ/t crudeChina U.S. Final Energy Intensity No. 5b Scenarios Country

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

distributing and archiving of reports; and close period activities. PROCESS The Monthly Report and Close Period process starts on the 1 st working day of the reporting month. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Observations on the growth of Tetrahymena pyriformis strain W in a medium-intensity, static magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Morphological Considerations Normal Growth Characteristics CHAPTER III. Experimental Procedure Material 16 Method 16 CHAPTER IV. Discussion of Results. 24 Primary Culture Data 24 Subculture Data 24 CHAPTER V. Statistical Analysis. SUMMARY ~ ADDENDUM.... The generation time, or time required for the population to double itself, is a point of conjecture. Many different values have been reported in the literature, ranging from lows of 2, 5 hours (McCashland and Johnson, 1957), 2. 78 hours (Kidder, 1941b), and 3...

Laird, Robert Joel

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures Francis H. Bennet,* Inés A. Amuli

286

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China andof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Period of K system generator of pseudorandom numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field GF[p]. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of p and the dimension of the matrix d.

Akopov, N Z; Floratos, Emmanuel G; Savvidy, G K

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Period of K System Generator of Pseudorandom Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field $GF[p]$. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of $p$ and the dimension of the matrix $d$.

N. Z. Akopov; G. G. Athanasiu; E. G. Floratos; G. K. Savvidy

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: June 30, 2013 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Project Number Project Index

Alpay, S. Pamir

290

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: March 31, 2014 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Project Number Project

Alpay, S. Pamir

291

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

292

MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/mechanical property changes experiment for baseline materials Carbon-Carbon composite This low-Z composite gives;PHASE I: Graphite & Carbon-Carbon Targets #12;E951 Results: ATJ Graphite vs. Carbon-Carbon CompositePLAN MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS Nicholas Simos, Harold Kirk

McDonald, Kirk

293

Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neu...

Lyashuk, V I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University, Princeton Plasma. Temperature of the streams. 2. Lithium jets. 3. Injection into vacuum chamber. 4. Propulsion inside the vacuum chamber. 5. Stability of the lithium streams. 6. Expulsion of the lithium. 7. Summary. PRINCETON PLASMA

Zakharov, Leonid E.

295

Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advantage of being able to convert sunlight into clean energy. After the glass is coated, we install clean electricity. Advantages · Building-integratable. · Contributes to EU targets towards energySolar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to where they can be integrated

Langendoen, Koen

296

Research Strategies for Increasing Productivity of Intensively Managed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fiber production from a smaller land base and provides market incentives to keep these lands under, plantation forestry, intensive silviculture, biomass T raditional and emerging markets for wood products and bioenergy are likely to increase pressure on forests and create incentives for enhancing their pro

297

PNNLs Data Intensive Computing research battles Homeland Security threats  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL's) approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architecture, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

David Thurman; Joe Kielman; Katherine Wolf; David Atkinson

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

Liska, Donald J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schamaun, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Donald C. (Los Alamos, NM); Potter, R. Christopher (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Joseph A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimized Pre-Copy Live Migration for Memory Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimized Pre-Copy Live Migration for Memory Intensive Applications Khaled Z. Ibrahim, Steven Hofmeyr, Costin Iancu, Eric Roman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Email: {kzibrahim, shofmeyr and fault tolerance. KVM and Xen use iterative pre-copy approaches which work well in practice

302

Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

Sprangle, Phillip [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Hafizi, Bahman [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Title of Document: LONGITUDINAL CONTROL OF INTENSE CHARGED PARTICLE BEAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Title of Document: LONGITUDINAL CONTROL OF INTENSE CHARGED PARTICLE BEAMS Brian Louis, accelerator facilities are demanding beams with higher quality. Applications such as Free Electron Lasers energy spread throughout the accelerator. Fluctuations in beam energy or density at the low-energy side

Anlage, Steven

305

Some Intensive and Extensive Quantities in High-Energy Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the evolution of some statistical and thermodynamical quantities measured in difference sizes of high-energy collisions at different energies. We differentiate between intensive and extensive quantities and discuss the importance of their distinguishability in characterizing possible critical phenomena of nuclear collisions at various energies with different initial conditions.

A. Tawfik

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thesis Oral Energy-efficient Data-intensive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thesis Oral Energy-efficient Data-intensive Computing with a Fast Array of Wimpy Nodes Vijay has raised datacenter energy demand and created an increasingly large financial burden and scaling challenge: Peak energy requirements today are a significant cost of provisioning

307

Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization P such as sonoporation, inertial cavitation is commonly considered as the main candidate inducing membrane poration. Thus, characterizing inertial cavitation, as related to bubble size distribution and medium history, is of great

Boyer, Edmond

308

Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

Kareem, Ahsan

309

Title of dissertation: NOVEL APPLICATIONS OF HIGH INTENSITY FEMTOSECOND LASERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cycle seed pulse of terahertz radiation: a short, intense optical pulse (or sequence of pulses) aligns for amplification of few-cycle, high energy pulses of terahertz radiation. We report the development of corrugated the limitations of diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds and promise to allow high

Anlage, Steven

310

In-Flight Measurements of Freestream Atmospheric Turbulence Intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difference in turbulence intensity. It has been determined through this work that the levels of freestream turbulence range from 0.023% - 0.047% with an average of 0.035%. These levels were reached through the use of temporal correlations to remove electronic...

Fanning, Joshua 1987-

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electron-ion collisions in intensely illuminated plasmas G. Shvetsa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron-ion collisions in intensely illuminated plasmas G. Shvetsa) and N. J. Fisch Princeton, the collisions of electrons with ions can be made more frequent or less frequent, depending on the polarization to the size of the electron oscillation in the hf field. The stimulated bremsstrahlung emission is calculated

312

PNNL Data-Intensive Computing for a Smarter Energy Grid  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Middleware for Data-Intensive Computing (MeDICi) Integration Framework, an integrated platform to solve data analysis and processing needs, supports PNNL research on the U.S. electric power grid. MeDICi is enabling development of visualizations of grid operations and vulnerabilities, with goal of near real-time analysis to aid operators in preventing and mitigating grid failures.

Carol Imhoff; Zhenyu (Henry) Huang; Daniel Chavarria

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

314

How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! ! ! ! How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities Andrew Miano1 Mentor to their natural function. This is known as stream restoration. Unfortunately, ecological concepts can be left out during stream restoration JK$>*!*1!$9:!'LLMN. This is in part due to the fact that ecologists still do

Vallino, Joseph J.

315

Evidence for ultra-fast heating in intense-laser irradiated reduced-mass targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on an experiment irradiating individual argon droplets of 20 {mu}m diameter with laser pulses of several Joule energy at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. K-shell emission spectroscopy was employed to determine the hot electron energy fraction and the time-integrated charge-state distribution. Spectral fitting indicates that bulk temperatures up to 160 eV are reached. Modelling of the hot-electron relaxation and generation of K-shell emission with collisional hot-electron stopping only is incompatible with the experimental results, and the data suggest an additional ultra-fast (sub-ps) heating contribution. For example, including resistive heating in the modelling yields a much better agreement with the observed final bulk temperature and qualitatively reproduces the observed charge state distribution.

Neumayer, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies FIAS, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B.; Stoehlker, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Costa Fraga, R. A.; Kalinin, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Kuehl, T. [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Polz, J. [IOQ Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Jena (Germany); Reuschl, R. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Winters, D.; Winters, N.; Yin, Z. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Getting More For Your Money: Identifying and Confirming Long-Period Planets with Kepler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kepler will monitor enough stars that it is likely to detect single transits of planets with periods longer than the mission lifetime. We show that by combining the Kepler photometry of such transits with precise radial velocity (RV) observations taken over ~3 months, and assuming circular orbits, it is possible to estimate the periods of these transiting planets to better than 20% (for planets with radii greater than that of Neptune) and the masses to within a factor of 2 (for planet masses m_p > M_Jup). We also explore the effects of eccentricity on our estimates of these uncertainties.

Jennifer C. Yee; B. Scott Gaudi

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ?50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofofEdge Turbulence

319

Fundamental physics at the intensity frontier. Report of the workshop held December 2011 in Rockville, MD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle physics aims to understand the universe around us. The Standard Model of particle physics describes the basic structure of matter and forces, to the extent we have been able to probe thus far. However, it leaves some big questions unanswered. Some are within the Standard Model itself, such as why there are so many fundamental particles and why they have different masses. In other cases, the Standard Model simply fails to explain some phenomena, such as the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and the mechanism that reconciles gravity with quantum mechanics. These gaps lead us to conclude that the universe must contain new and unexplored elements of Nature. Most of particle and nuclear physics is directed towards discovering and understanding these new laws of physics. These questions are best pursued with a variety of approaches, rather than with a single experiment or technique. Particle physics uses three basic approaches, often characterized as exploration along the cosmic, energy, and intensity frontiers. Each employs different tools and techniques, but they ultimately address the same fundamental questions. This allows a multi-pronged approach where attacking basic questions from different angles furthers knowledge and provides deeper answers, so that the whole is more than a sum of the parts. A coherent picture or underlying theoretical model can more easily emerge, to be proven correct or not. The intensity frontier explores fundamental physics with intense sources and ultra-sensitive, sometimes massive detectors. It encompasses searches for extremely rare processes and for tiny deviations from Standard Model expectations. Intensity frontier experiments use precision measurements to probe quantum effects. They typically investigate very large energy scales, even higher than the kinematic reach of high energy particle accelerators. The science addresses basic questions, such as: Are there new sources of CP violation? Is there CP violation in the leptonic sector? Are neutrinos their own antiparticles? Do the forces unify? Is there a weakly coupled hidden sector that is related to dark matter? Do new symmetries exist at very high energy scales? To identify the most compelling science opportunities in this area, the workshop Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier was held in December 2011, sponsored by the Office of High Energy Physics in the US Department of Energy Office of Science. Participants investigated the most promising experiments to exploit these opportunities and described the knowledge that can be gained from such a program. The workshop generated much interest in the community, as witnessed by the large and energetic participation by a broad spectrum of scientists. This document chronicles the activities of the workshop, with contributions by more than 450 authors. The workshop organized the intensity frontier science program along six topics that formed the basis for working groups: experiments that probe (i) heavy quarks, (ii) charged leptons, (iii) neutrinos, (iv) proton decay, (v) light, weakly interacting particles, and (vi) nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. The conveners for each working group included an experimenter and a theorist working in the field and an observer from the community at large. The working groups began their efforts well in advance of the workshop, holding regular meetings and soliciting written contributions. Specific avenues of exploration were identified by each working group. Experiments that study rare strange, charm, and bottom meson decays provide a broad program of measurements that are sensitive to new interactions. Charged leptons, particularly muons and taus, provide a precise probe for new physics because the Standard Model predictions for their properties are very accurate. Research at the intensity frontier can reveal CP violation in the lepton sector, and elucidate whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles. A very weakly coupled hidden-sector that may comprise the dark matter in the univ

Hewett, J.L.; Weerts, H.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Dietrich, M.R.; Djurcic, Z.; Goodman, M.; Green, J.P.; Holt, R.J.; Mueller, P.; Paley, J.; Reimer, P.; Singh, J.; Upadhye, A. (High Energy Physics); ( PHY); (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center); (Univ. of Michigan); (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic â??bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file systemâ? during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Rossâ??s group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SCâ??08 and SCâ??10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing-Bung Chen, etc) from HPC5 and James Ahrens from Advanced Computing Laboratory in Los Alamos National Laboratory. We hold a weekly conference and/or video meeting on advancing works at two fronts: the hardware/software infrastructure of building large-scale data intensive cluster and research publications. Our group members assist in constructing several onsite LANL data intensive clusters. Two parties have been developing software codes and research papers together using both sidesâ?? resources.

Wang, Jun

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on the Ti-based nanolayered thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) and chemical composition changes of Ti-based nanolayered thin films (Al/Ti, Ni/Ti) after femtosecond (fs) laser pulses action were studied. Irradiation is performed using linearly polarized Ti:Sapphire fs laser pulses of 40 fs pulse duration and 800 nm wavelength. The low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization with periods slightly lower than the irradiation wavelength, was typically formed at elevated laser fluences. On the contrary, high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with uniform period of 155 nm, parallel to the laser light polarization, appeared at low laser fluences, as well as in the wings of the Gaussian laser beam distribution for higher used fluence. LSFL formation was associated with the material ablation process and accompanied by the intense formation of nanoparticles, especially in the Ni/Ti system. The composition changes at the surface of both multilayer systems in the LSFL area indicated the intermixing between layers and the substrate. Concentration and distribution of all constitutive elements in the irradiated area with formed HSFLs were almost unchanged.

Petrovi?, Suzana M.; Gakovi?, B.; Peruško, D. [Institute of Nuclear Science—Vin?a, University of Belgrade, POB 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Institute of Nuclear Science—Vin?a, University of Belgrade, POB 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece) [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, I. [Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)] [Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); ?ekada, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece) [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, 714 09 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Jelenkovi?, B. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

Observing the Inflationary Reheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waveform and there are voltage oscillations. Before reachingbunching of the beam. Voltage oscillations in the diode alsoThe period T of the voltage oscillation must be t a < T < t

Heimbucher, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world-best-practice-energy- intensity-values-selected-World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selectedof the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Periodically-driven quantum matter: the case of resonant modulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum systems can show qualitatively new forms of behavior when they are driven by fast time-periodic modulations. In the limit of large driving frequency, the long-time dynamics of such systems can often be described by a time-independent effective Hamiltonian, which is generally identified through a perturbative treatment. Here, we present a general formalism that describes time-modulated physical systems, in which the driving frequency is large, but resonant with respect to energy spacings inherent to the system at rest. Such a situation is currently exploited in optical-lattice setups, where superlattice (or Wannier-Stark-ladder) potentials are resonantly modulated so as to control the tunneling matrix elements between lattice sites, offering a powerful method to generate artificial fluxes for cold-atom systems. The formalism developed in this work identifies the basic ingredients needed to generate interesting flux patterns and band structures using resonant modulations. We also discuss the micro-motion underlying the dynamics, and illustrate its characteristics based on diverse dynamic-lattice configurations. It is shown that the impact of the micro-motion on physical observables strongly depends on the implemented scheme, suggesting that a theoretical description in terms of the effective Hamiltonian alone is generally not sufficient to capture the full time-evolution of the system.

N. Goldman; J. Dalibard; M. Aidelsburger; N. R. Cooper

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hydrographic observations off Savannah and Brunswick, Georgia: March, May and September 1977 and January 1978. Technical report 80-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume 3 contains technical reports of hydrographic observations. (ACR)

Singer, J J; Atkinson, L P; Chandler, W S; Bishop, S S

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Combined effects of Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and periodic unsteady wake flow conditions on boundary layer development and heat transfer of a low pressure turbine blade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.18 (S R =80 mm)........................................103 Figure 11.1. Static pressure distributions at Re=110,000 and reduced frequencies S=0, 1.59, 3.18 (no rod, 160 mm, 80 mm), SS=Separation start, SE= Separation end...................................................110 Figure 11.2. Time-averaged hot-film distributions at Re=110,000 and reduced frequencies S=0, 1.59, 3.18 (no rod, 160 mm, 80 mm)...........................112 Figure 11.3. Ensemble averaged velocity as a function for (a) steady flow case S=0 (S R...

Ozturk, Burak

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through the ionosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power line harmonic radiation observed by satellite: Properties and propagation through of power line harmonic radiation events observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft. Altogether, 88 with the largest intensities often occur off exact multiples of base power system frequency. This can be explained

Santolik, Ondrej

329

Complex modes and new amplification regimes in periodic multi transmission lines interacting with an electron beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show the existence of a new regime of operation for travelling wave tubes (TWTs) composed of slow-wave periodic structures that support two or more electromagnetic modes, with at least two synchronized with an electron beam. The interaction between the slow-wave structure and an electron beam is quantified using a multi transmission line approach (MTL) and transfer matrix analysis leading to the identification of modes with complex Bloch wavenumber. In particular, we report a new operation condition for TWTs based on an electron beam synchronous to two modes exhibiting a degeneracy condition near a band edge in a MTL slow-wave periodic structure. We show a phenomenological change in the band structure of periodic TWT where we observe at least two growing modal cooperating solutions as opposed to a uniform MTL interacting with an electron beam where there is strictly only one growing mode solution.

Othman, Mohamed; Capolino, Filippo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Long-Period Objects in the Extrasolar Planetary Systems 47 UMa and 14 Her  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible existence of additional long-period planetary-mass objects in the extrasolar planetary systems 47 UMa and 14 Her is investigated. We combine all available radial-velocity data on these stars, spanning up to 18 years. For the 47 UMa system, we show that while a second planet improves the fit to all available data, there is still substantial ambiguity as to the orbital parameters of the proposed planetary companion 47 UMa c. We also present new observations which clearly support a long-period companion in the 14 Her system. With a period of 6906+/-70 days, 14 Her c may be in a 4:1 resonance with the inner planet. We also present revised orbital solutions for 7 previously known planets incorporating recent additional data obtained with the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory.

Robert A. Wittenmyer; Michael Endl; William D. Cochran

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient of cranberry farming on streams. These restoration projects vary in their intensity from low restoration streams with varying degrees of restoration intensity to determine if increased restoration intensity more

Vallino, Joseph J.

332

Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

Deason, Vance Albert (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Observing alternatives to inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

P. Peter

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Testing a Coupled Global-limited-area Data Assimilation System Using Observations from the 2004 Pacific Typhoon Season  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical cyclone (TC) track and intensity forecasts have improved in recent years due to increased model resolution, improved data assimilation, and the rapid increase in the number of routinely assimilated observations over oceans. The data...

Holt, Christina

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

A possible relationship between Global Warming and Lightning Activity in India during the period 1998-2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lightning activity on a global scale has been studied season wise using satellite data for the period from 1998 to 2009. Lightning activity shows an increasing trend during the period of study which is highly correlated with atmospheric warming. A similar increasing trend of lightning activity is observed in the Indian region during the pre-monsoon season which is correlated with global lightning trends and warming trends of surface temperature in India. Key words: Global warming, lightning activity, Solar cycle changes

Felix Pereira B.; Priyadarsini G.; T. E. Girish

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Molecules in intense laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for a Born-Oppenheimer (static nuclei) three-dimensional H{sub 2}{sup +} in super intense laser fields (I=4x10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19}, and 4x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) at wavelength {lambda}{sub L}=45 nm and 25 nm to assess the influence of nondipolar (magnetic) effects on high order harmonic generation spectra in molecules. It is found that even harmonics appear due to the magnetic field component direction perpendicular to the electric field polarization with intensities about two orders of magnitude less than the odd harmonics emitted along the electric field polarization. The even harmonics exhibit plateaus with cutoffs which exceed in intensity the odd harmonic plateaus and maximum energies predicted by semiclassical electron recollision models. Although the spectra are weak, the wavelength of the recollision electron in the maximum energy regions correspond to subatomic dimensions and the corresponding emitted photons have subnanometer wavelengths.

Bandrauk, A. D.; Lu, H. Z. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Excitation of intense acoustic waves in hexagonal crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant excitation of an intense elastic wave using reflection of a pump wave from a free surface of hexagonal crystal is described. A resonance arises in the case of specially chosen propagation geometry where the reflecting boundary slightly deviates from symmetric orientation and the propagation direction of an intense reflected wave is close to that of an exceptional bulk wave, which satisfies the free boundary condition in unperturbed symmetric orientation. It is shown that, in crystals with elastic moduli c{sub 44}>c{sub 66}, a resonance arises when the initial boundary is chosen parallel to the hexagonal axis 6, whereas in crystals characterized by the relation c{sub 44}intensity can be increased by a factor of 5-10 at sufficiently high frequencies, with beam divergence remaining acceptable.

Alshits, V. I., E-mail: alshits@ns.crys.ras.ru; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cosmology with a SKA HI intensity mapping survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HI intensity mapping (IM) is a novel technique capable of mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in three dimensions and delivering exquisite constraints on cosmology, by using HI as a biased tracer of the dark matter density field. This is achieved by measuring the intensity of the redshifted 21cm line over the sky in a range of redshifts without the requirement to resolve individual galaxies. In this chapter, we investigate the potential of SKA1 to deliver HI intensity maps over a broad range of frequencies and a substantial fraction of the sky. By pinning down the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion features in the matter power spectrum -- thus determining the expansion and growth history of the Universe -- these surveys can provide powerful tests of dark energy models and modifications to General Relativity. They can also be used to probe physics on extremely large scales, where precise measurements of spatial curvature and primordial non-Gaussianity can be used to test in...

Santos, Mario G; Alonso, David; Camera, Stefano; Ferreira, Pedro G; Bernardi, Gianni; Maartens, Roy; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Abdalla, Filipe B; Jarvis, Matt; Metcalf, R Benton; Pourtsidou, A; Wolz, Laura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cosmology with a SKA HI intensity mapping survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HI intensity mapping (IM) is a novel technique capable of mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in three dimensions and delivering exquisite constraints on cosmology, by using HI as a biased tracer of the dark matter density field. This is achieved by measuring the intensity of the redshifted 21cm line over the sky in a range of redshifts without the requirement to resolve individual galaxies. In this chapter, we investigate the potential of SKA1 to deliver HI intensity maps over a broad range of frequencies and a substantial fraction of the sky. By pinning down the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion features in the matter power spectrum -- thus determining the expansion and growth history of the Universe -- these surveys can provide powerful tests of dark energy models and modifications to General Relativity. They can also be used to probe physics on extremely large scales, where precise measurements of spatial curvature and primordial non-Gaussianity can be used to test inflation; on small scales, by measuring the sum of neutrino masses; and at high redshifts where non-standard evolution models can be probed. We discuss the impact of foregrounds as well as various instrumental and survey design parameters on the achievable constraints. In particular we analyse the feasibility of using the SKA1 autocorrelations to probe the large-scale signal.

Mario G. Santos; Philip Bull; David Alonso; Stefano Camera; Pedro G. Ferreira; Gianni Bernardi; Roy Maartens; Matteo Viel; Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro; Filipe B. Abdalla; Matt Jarvis; R. Benton Metcalf; A. Pourtsidou; Laura Wolz

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Dynamic Fiber Optic Sensors Under Intense Radioactive Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A liquid mercury target will be used as the neutron source for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility. This target is subjected to bombardment by short-pulse, high-energy proton beams. The intense thermal loads caused by interaction of the pulsed proton beam with the mercury create an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s) during a very brief beam pulse ({approximately } 0.5 {micro}s). The resulting pressure waves in the mercury will interact with the walls of the mercury target and may lead to large stresses. To gain confidence in the mercury target design concept and to benchmark the computer design codes, we tested various electrical and optical sensors for measuring the transient strains on the walls of a mercury container and the pressures in the mercury. The sensors were attached on several sample mercury targets that were tested at various beam facilities: Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The effects of intense background radiation on measured signals for each sensor are described and discussed. Preliminary results of limited tests at these facilities indicate that the fiber optic sensors function well in this intense radiation environment, whereas conventional electrical sensors are dysfunctional.

Allison, S.W.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Tsai, C.C.

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Efficient plasma production by intense laser irradiation of low density foam targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental investigations conducted on low density structured materials, such as foams have been presented in this paper. These low density foam targets having a density greater than the critical density of the laser produced plasma ({rho}{sub cr{approx_equal}}3 mg{center_dot}cm{sup -3} at laser wavelength 1.06 {mu}m) have been envisaged to have enhanced laser absorption. Experiments were done with an indigenously developed, focused 15 Joule/500 ps Nd: Glass laser at {lambda} = 1064 nm. The focused laser intensity on the target was in the range of I{approx_equal}10{sup 13}-2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser absorption was determined by energy balance experiments. Laser energy absorption was observed to be higher than 85%. In another set of experiments, low density carbon foam targets of density 150 mg/cc were compared with the solid carbon targets. The x-ray emission in the soft x-ray region was observed to increase in foam target by about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt doped foam as compared to solid carbon. Further, investigations were also carried out to measure the energy transmitted through the sub-critical density TAC foam targets having a density less than 3 mg/cc. Such targets have been proposed to be used for smoothening of intensity ripples in a high power laser beam profile. Transmission exceeding 1.87% has been observed and consistent with results from other laboratories.

Tripathi, S.; Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J. [Laser and Neutron Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Nataliya, B. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

TWO NEW LONG-PERIOD HOT SUBDWARF BINARIES WITH DWARF COMPANIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot subdwarf stars with F-K main sequence binary companions have been known for decades, but the first orbital periods for such systems were published just recently. Current observations suggest that most have long periods, on the order of years, and that some are or once were hierarchical triple systems. As part of a survey with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, we have been monitoring the radial velocities of several composite-spectra binaries since 2005 in order to determine their periods, velocities, and eccentricities. Here we present observations and orbital solutions for two of these systems, PG 1449+653 and PG 1701+359. Similar to the other sdB+F/G/K binaries with solved orbits, their periods are long, 909 and 734 days, respectively, and pose a challenge to current binary population synthesis models of hot subdwarf stars. Intrigued by their relatively large systemic velocities, we also present a kinematical analysis of both targets and find that neither is likely a member of the Galactic thin disk.

Barlow, Brad N.; Wade, Richard A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Liss, Sandra E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Green, Elizabeth M., E-mail: bbarlow@psu.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

SEARCHES FOR PERIODIC NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM BINARY SYSTEMS WITH 22 AND 40 STRINGS OF ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the results of searches for periodic neutrino emission from a catalog of binary systems. Such modulation, observed in the photon flux, would be caused by the geometry of these systems. In the analysis, the period is fixed by these photon observations, while the phase and duration of the neutrino emission are treated as free parameters to be fit with the data. If the emission occurs during {approx}20% or less of the total period, this analysis achieves better sensitivity than a time-integrated analysis. We use the IceCube data taken from 2007 May 31 to 2008 April 5 with its 22 string configuration and from 2008 April 5 to 2009 May 20 with its 40 string configuration. No evidence for neutrino emission is found, with the strongest excess occurring for Cygnus X-3 at 2.1{sigma} significance after accounting for trials. Neutrino flux upper limits for both periodic and time-integrated emission are provided.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Can Bohmian trajectories account for quantum recurrences having classical periodicities?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum systems in specific regimes display recurrences at the period of the periodic orbits of the corresponding classical system. We investigate the excited hydrogen atom in a magnetic field -- a prototypical system of 'quantum chaos' -- from the point of view of the de Broglie Bohm (BB) interpretation of quantum mechanics. The trajectories predicted by BB theory are computed and contrasted with the time evolution of the wavefunction, which shows pronounced features at times matching the period of closed orbits of the classical hydrogen in a magnetic field problem. Individual BB trajectories do not possess these periodicities and cannot account for the quantum recurrences. These recurrences can however be explained by BB theory by considering the ensemble of trajectories compatible with an initial statistical distribution, although none of the trajectories of the ensemble are periodic, rendering unclear the dynamical origin of the classical periodicities.

A. Matzkin

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Green's function analysis of periodic structures in computational electromagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the two-dimensional periodic Green's function," IEEE Trans.evaluation of the Green's function for the Helmholtzrepresentations of certain Green's functions," J. Comp.

Van Orden, Derek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

352

EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment The Department of Energy is now announcing...

353

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Draft ULPEIS comment extension community notification041813 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications...

354

Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funds and the Procedures for Reporting of Obligated Funds for the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to...

355

EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comment Period Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published...

356

Quality of Monitoring of Stochastic Events by Periodic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be periodically turned off to conserve energy, thereby ... such as chemical, biological, nuclear, radiational, .... ited/offset by the latency and energy costs of turn-.

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for Electric Transmission Projects Requiring Federal Authorizations Extension of...

358

THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND INTENSITY AND ANISOTROPIES DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fraction of the extragalactic near-infrared (near-IR) background light involves redshifted photons from the ultraviolet (UV) emission from galaxies present during reionization at redshifts above 6. The absolute intensity and the anisotropies of the near-IR background provide an observational probe of the first-light galaxies and their spatial distribution. We estimate the extragalactic background light intensity during reionization by accounting for the stellar and nebular emission from first-light galaxies. We require the UV photon density from these galaxies to generate a reionization history that is consistent with the optical depth to electron scattering from cosmic microwave background measurements. We also require the bright-end luminosity function (LF) of galaxies in our models to reproduce the measured Lyman-dropout LFs at redshifts of 6-8. The absolute intensity is about 0.1-0.4 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at the peak of its spectrum at {approx}1.1 {mu}m. We also discuss the anisotropy power spectrum of the near-IR background using a halo model to describe the galaxy distribution. We compare our predictions for the anisotropy power spectrum to existing measurements from deep near-IR imaging data from Spitzer/IRAC, Hubble/NICMOS, and AKARI. The predicted rms fluctuations at tens of arcminute angular scales are roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the existing measurements. While strong arguments have been made that the measured fluctuations do not have an origin involving faint low-redshift galaxies, we find that measurements in the literature are also incompatible with galaxies present during the era of reionization. The measured near-IR background anisotropies remain unexplained with an unknown origin.

Cooray, Asantha; Gong Yan; Smidt, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Santos, Mario G. [CENTRA, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Quantum Energy Expectation in Periodic Time-Dependent hamiltonians via Green Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let $U_F$ be the Floquet operator of a time periodic hamiltonian $H(t)$. For each positive and discrete observable $A$ (which we call a {\\em probe energy}), we derive a formula for the Laplace time average of its expectation value up to time $T$ in terms of its eigenvalues and Green functions at the circle of radius $e^{1/T}$. Some simple applications are provided which support its usefulness.

Cesar R. de Oliveira; Mariza S. Simsen

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

Long, David G.

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fermi-LAT gamma-ray anisotropy and intensity explained by unresolved Radio-Loud Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are expected to contribute substantially to both the intensity and anisotropy of the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB). In turn, the measured properties of the IGRB can be used to constrain the characteristics of proposed contributing source classes. We consider individual subclasses of radio-loud AGN, including low-, intermediate-, and high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, and misaligned AGN. Using updated models of the gamma-ray luminosity functions of these populations, we evaluate the energy-dependent contribution of each source class to the intensity and anisotropy of the IGRB. We find that collectively radio-loud AGN can account for the entirety of the IGRB intensity and anisotropy as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Misaligned AGN provide the bulk of the measured intensity but a negligible contribution to the anisotropy, while high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae objects provide the dominant contribution to the anisotropy. In anticipation of upcoming measurements with the Fermi-LAT and the forthcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array, we predict the anisotropy in the broader energy range that will be accessible to future observations.

Mattia Di Mauro; Alessandro Cuoco; Fiorenza Donato; Jennifer M. Siegal-Gaskins

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

(dfdf(dfdfdfdfdfdfdfdf Observation of Excitonic Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in understanding fundamental properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) [1] ?Light absorption excites strongly with different RBM frequency are in resonance ?We performed measurements of intensity profiles at temperatures between 300 K and 873 K ?Sample: nanotubes forest (unbundled ensemble) INTENSITY PROFILES ?RBM intensity

Nabben, Reinhard

363

A comparative study of four significance measures for periodicity detection in astronomical surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the problem of periodicity detection in massive data sets of photometric or radial velocity time series, as presented by ESA's Gaia mission. Periodicity detection hinges on the estimation of the false alarm probability (FAP) of the extremum of the periodogram of the time series. We consider the problem of its estimation with two main issues in mind. First, for a given number of observations and signal-to-noise ratio, the rate of correct periodicity detections should be constant for all realized cadences of observations regardless of the observational time patterns, in order to avoid sky biases that are difficult to assess. Second, the computational loads should be kept feasible even for millions of time series. Using the Gaia case, we compare the $F^M$ method (Paltani 2004, Schwarzenberg-Czerny 2012), the Baluev method (Baluev 2008) and the GEV method (S\\"uveges 2014), as well as a method for the direct estimation of a threshold. Three methods involve some unknown parameters, which are obtained by fi...

Süveges, Maria; Eyer, Laurent; Cuypers, Jan; Holl, Berry; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Mowlavi, Nami; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Blanco, Diego Ordóñez; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ruiz, Idoia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Intensity profiles of superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes in a two-level mixing model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently developed two-level mixing model of the decay out of superdeformed bands is applied to examine the loss of flux from the yrast superdeformed bands in {sup 192}Pb, {sup 194}Pb, and {sup 196}Pb. Probability distributions for decay to states at normal deformations are calculated at each level. The sensitivity of the results to parameters describing the levels at normal deformation and their coupling to levels in the superdeformed well is explored. It is found that except for narrow ranges of the interaction strength coupling the states, the amount of intensity lost is primarily determined by the ratio of {gamma} decay widths in the normal and superdeformed wells. It is also found that while the model can accommodate the observed fractional intensity loss profiles for decay from bands at relatively high excitation, it cannot accommodate the similarly abrupt decay from bands at lower energies if standard estimates of the properties of the states in the first minimum are employed.

Wilson, A. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Rogers, J. I. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Davidson, P. M. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Cardamone, D. M. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

TEMPERATURE AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET INTENSITY IN A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY AND STREAMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the temperature and EUV line emission of a coronal cavity and surrounding streamer in terms of a morphological forward model. We use a series of iron line ratios observed with the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on 2007 August 9 to constrain temperature as a function of altitude in a morphological forward model of the streamer and cavity. We also compare model predictions to the EIS EUV line intensities and polarized brightness (pB) data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) Mark 4 K-coronameter. This work builds on earlier analysis using the same model to determine geometry of and density in the same cavity and streamer. The fit to the data with altitude-dependent temperature profiles indicates that both the streamer and cavity have temperatures in the range 1.4-1.7 MK. However, the cavity exhibits substantial substructure such that the altitude-dependent temperature profile is not sufficient to completely model conditions in the cavity. Coronal prominence cavities are structured by magnetism so clues to this structure are to be found in their plasma properties. These temperature substructures are likely related to structures in the cavity magnetic field. Furthermore, we find that the model overestimates the EUV line intensities by a factor of 4-10, without overestimating pB. We discuss this difference in terms of filling factors and uncertainties in density diagnostics and elemental abundances.

Kucera, T. A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Tripathi, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag-4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions S.Y. Ye,1 D. A emissions is examined, restricting the spacecraft location to either the northern or the southern hemisphere of Saturn. It is found that in both hemispheres, the modulation period of 5 kHz narrowband emissions has two

Gurnett, Donald A.

368

Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

Harrison, Neil (Santa Fe, NM); Singleton, John (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

369

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson St. Louis University 16 May 2009 Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look at periodic wavelets 16 May 2009 1 / 31 #12;Overview Overview. (see, e.g., the texts of Meyer and Daubechies) Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look

Johnson, Brody Dylan

370

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates MICHAEL R. GUEVARA, ALVIN GUEVARA,MICHAEL R., ALVIN SHRIER,ANDLEONGLASS. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell, THE SINOATRIAL NODE acts as the pace- maker of the heart. As a result of the orderly spread of excitation

Glass, Leon

371

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period The Osmia cornifrons nesting male offspring. The end caps of nesting tubes made by older females are thin and weak, and they tend to break easily. In addition, near the end of the nesting period the numbers of parasites and predators

372

TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARADIGM FOR TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS BLAKE consistent with time-periodic sound wave propagation in the 3 Ã? 3 nonlinear compressible Euler equations description of shock-free waves that propagate through an oscillating entropy field without breaking or dis

373

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Economic potential of intensive culture of Penaeus vannamei in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with its subtropical-tropical climate and extensive coastlines, would seem to have great potential for shrimp farming. Large tracts of land suitable for shrimp culture do exist in several states on the Pacific coast of this country. However, not all... the Pacific-coast states are so favored: Some of them do not have the kind of land needed for shrimp farming, or appropriate land is scarce, or there are ownership problems. Intensive systems developed for the culture of Penaeus vannamei in the continental...

De La Mora Perez-Arce, Jose Bernardo

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Rapid microbial identification by circular intensity differential scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circular Intensity Differential Scattering (CIDS) is one of the few really new approaches to microbial identification to have come into existence in the past several decades. The CIDS spectra can be measured as a function of wavelength, scattering angle, and/or matrix element, and a number of matrix elements can be measured virtually simultaneously. This panoply of measurements potentially gives the method resolving power for microbial identification. Some representative data taken over the past couple of years on CIDS spectra of several anti-viral vaccines is presented. 17 references; 9 figures.

Gregg, C.T.; Salzman, G.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1. Summary: ReportedEnergy Intensity,

379

Intensity Frontier| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHuman Resources Human Resources andIntensity Frontier High

380

Table 6. Energy intensity by State (2000-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Short-Period Waves That Heat the Corona Detected at the 1999 Eclipse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a part of a study of the cause of solar coronal heating, we searched for high-frequency (~1 Hz) intensity oscillations in coronal loops in the [Fe XIV] coronal green line. We summarize results from observations made at the 11 August 1999 total solar eclipse from Ramnicu-Valcea, Romania, through clear skies. We discuss the image reduction and analysis through two simultaneous series of coronal CCD images digitized at 10 Hz for a total time of about 140 s. One series of images was taken through a 3.6 A filter isolating the 5303 A [Fe XIV] coronal green line and the other through a 100 A filter in the nearby K-corona continuum. Previous observations, described in Pasachoff et al. (2000), showed no evidence for oscillations in the [Fe XIV] green line at a level great than 2% of coronal intensity. We describe several improvements made over the 1998 eclipse that led to increased image clarity and sensitivity. The corona was brighter in 1999 with the solar maximum, further improving the data. We use Fourier analysis to search in the [Fe XIV] channel for intensity oscillations in loops at the base of the corona. Such oscillations in the 1-Hz range are predicted as a result of density fluctuations from the resonant absorption of MHD waves. The dissipation of a significant amount of mechanical energy from the photosphere into the corona through this mechanism could provide sufficient energy to hear the corona. A Monte-Carlo model of the data suggests the presence of enhanced power, particularly in the 0.75-1.0 Hz range, and we conclude that MHD waves remain a viable method for coronal heating.

Jay M. Pasachoff; Bryce A. Babcock; Kevin D. Russell; Daniel B. Seaton

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Rare-gas-cluster explosions under irradiation by intense short XUV pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-intensity, extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond interactions with large rare-gas clusters of xenon and argon have been studied at a wavelength of 38 nm. Pulses of XUV radiation with nJ energy are produced by high-order harmonic conversion from a 35-fs, near-infrared, terawatt laser. Mass resolved ion spectra show charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} and Ar{sup 4+}. Kinetic-energy measurements of ions and electrons indicate that a nanoplasma is formed and a hydrodynamic cluster explosion ensues after heating by the short wavelength pulse. It appears that the observed charge states and electron temperatures are consistent with sequential, single-photon ionization and collisional ionization of ions that have had their ionization potential depressed by plasma continuum lowering in the cluster nanoplasma.

Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Kandadai, N.; Erk, B.; Helal, A.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Que, Christopher T. [Physics Department, De La Salle University, 2401 Taft Avenue, Manila 1004 (Philippines); Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Intense femtosecond photoexcitation of bulk and monolayer MoS2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on bulk and single-layer MoS2 on silicon oxide is studied. Optical, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Raman microscopies were used to quantify the damage. The intensity of A1g and E2g1 vibrational modes was recorded as a function of the number of irradiation pulses. The observed behavior was attributed to laser-induced bond breaking and subsequent atoms removal due to electronic excitations. The single-pulse optical damage threshold was determined for the monolayer and bulk under 800nm and 1030nm pulsed laser irradiation and the role of two-photon versus one photon absorption effects is discussed.

Paradisanos, I; Fotakis, C; Kioseoglou, G; Stratakis, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Intense terahertz pulses from SLAC electron beams using coherent transition radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SLAC has two electron accelerators, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET), providing high-charge, high-peak-current, femtosecond electron bunches. These characteristics are ideal for generating intense broadband terahertz (THz) pulses via coherent transition radiation. For LCLS and FACET respectively, the THz pulse duration is typically 20 and 80 fs RMS and can be tuned via the electron bunch duration; emission spectra span 3-30 THz and 0.5 THz-5 THz; and the energy in a quasi-half-cycle THz pulse is 0.2 and 0.6 mJ. The peak electric field at a THz focus has reached 4.4 GV/m (0.44 V/A) at LCLS. This paper presents measurements of the terahertz pulses and preliminary observations of nonlinear materials response.

Wu Ziran; Fisher, Alan S.; Hogan, Mark; Loos, Henrik [Accelerator Directorate, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Goodfellow, John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Fuchs, Matthias [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Daranciang, Dan [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lindenberg, Aaron [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping as a Test of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious anti-gravity agent of this acceleration has been called ``dark energy''. To measure the dynamics of dark energy, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as $10^9$ individual galaxies, by observing the 21cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the 21 cm brightness can be accomplished by economical three dimensional intensity mapping. If our estimates gain acceptance they may be the starting point for a new class of dark energy experiments dedicated to large angular scale mapping of the radio sky, shedding light on dark energy.

Tzu-Ching Chang; Ue-Li Pen; Jeffrey B. Peterson; Patrick McDonald

2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

Exact Solutions for Non-Hermitian Dirac-Pauli Equation in an intensive magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The modified Dirac-Pauli equations, which are introduced by means of ${\\gamma_5}$-mass factorization of the ordinary Klein-Gordon operator, are considered. We also take into account the interaction of fermions with the intensive homogenous magnetic field focusing attention to their (g-2) gyromagnetic factor. The basis of this approach is developing of methods for study of the structure of regions of unbroken $\\cal PT$ symmetry of Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians which be no studied earlier. For that, without the use of perturbation theory in the external field the exact energy spectra are deduced with regard to spin effects of fermions. We also investigate the unique possible of experimental observability the non-Hermitian restrictions in the spectrum of mass consistent with the conjecture Markov about Maximal Mass. This, in principal will may allow to find out the existence of an upper limit value in spectrum masses of elementary particles and confirm or deny the significance of the Planck mass.

Vasily N. Rodionov

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

388

The intensity contrast of solar granulation: comparing Hinode SP results with MHD simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contrast of granulation is an important quantity characterizing solar surface convection. We compare the intensity contrast at 630 nm, observed using the Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) aboard the Hinode satellite, with the 3D radiative MHD simulations of V{\\"o}gler & Sch{\\"u}ssler (2007). A synthetic image from the simulation is degraded using a theoretical point-spread function of the optical system, and by considering other important effects. The telescope aperture and the obscuration by the secondary mirror and its attachment spider, reduce the simulated contrast from 14.4 % to 8.5 %. A slight effective defocus of the instrument brings the simulated contrast down to 7.5 %, close to the observed value of 7.0 %. A proper consideration of the effects of the optical system and a slight defocus, lead to sufficient degradation of the synthetic image from the MHD simulation, such that the contrast reaches almost the observed value. The remaining small discrepancy can be ascribed to straylight and slight imperfe...

Danilovic, S; Lagg, A; Schüssler, M; Solanki, S K; Vögler, A; Katsukawa, Y; Tsuneta, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The intensity contrast of solar granulation: comparing Hinode SP results with MHD simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contrast of granulation is an important quantity characterizing solar surface convection. We compare the intensity contrast at 630 nm, observed using the Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) aboard the Hinode satellite, with the 3D radiative MHD simulations of V{\\"o}gler & Sch{\\"u}ssler (2007). A synthetic image from the simulation is degraded using a theoretical point-spread function of the optical system, and by considering other important effects. The telescope aperture and the obscuration by the secondary mirror and its attachment spider, reduce the simulated contrast from 14.4 % to 8.5 %. A slight effective defocus of the instrument brings the simulated contrast down to 7.5 %, close to the observed value of 7.0 %. A proper consideration of the effects of the optical system and a slight defocus, lead to sufficient degradation of the synthetic image from the MHD simulation, such that the contrast reaches almost the observed value. The remaining small discrepancy can be ascribed to straylight and slight imperfections of the instrument, which are difficult to model. Hence, Hinode SP data are consistent with a granulation contrast which is predicted by 3D radiation MHD simulations.

S. Danilovic; A. Gandorfer; A. Lagg; M. Schüssler; S. K. Solanki; A. Vögler; Y. Katsukawa; S. Tsuneta

2008-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Department of Energy Support of Energy Intensive Manufacturing Related to Refractory Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many years, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) richly supported refractory related research to enable greater energy efficiency processes in energy intensive manufacturing industries such as iron and steel, glass, aluminum and other non-ferrous metal production, petrochemical, and pulp and paper. Much of this support came through research projects funded by the former DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) under programs such as Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM), Industrial Materials of the Future (IMF), and the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). Under such initiatives, work was funded at government national laboratories such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at universities such as West Virginia University (WVU) and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T) which was formerly the University of Missouri Rolla, and at private companies engaged in these manufacturing areas once labeled industries of the future by DOE due to their strategic and economic importance to American industry. Examples of such projects are summarized below with information on the scope, funding level, duration, and impact. This is only a sampling of representative efforts funded by the DOE in which ORNL was involved over the period extending from 1996 to 2011. Other efforts were also funded during this time at various other national laboratories, universities and private companies under the various programs mentioned above. Discussion of the projects below was chosen because I was an active participant in them and it is meant to give a sampling of the magnitude and scope of investments made by DOE in refractory related research over this time period.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Turbulence intensity pulse propagation with self-consistent nonlinear noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model of turbulence intensity spreading with self-consistent nonlinear noise is derived systematically for the simple dynamical model of resistivity gradient driven turbulence. Local effective drive, thermal conduction damping, nonlinear coupling, and spatial scattering effects are included. As a consequence of nonlinear mode coupling processes (i.e., triad mode interactions), turbulence energy can be spatially scattered, leading to turbulence propagation and spreading. However, the range of any nonlinear mode interactions of the background with a test mode is restricted to within a few mode scale widths from the test mode rational surface. The speed of a turbulent spreading front is calculated. This front speed is effectively constant on macroscopic scales. We show that the effect of self-consistent nonlinear noise on the intensity front speed is modest, as a consequence of the ordering {Delta}{sub c}

Wang, Z. H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Guercan, Oe. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Garbet, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

Coverdale, C.A.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Observed Multi-Decade DD and DT Z-Pinch Fusion Rate Scaling in 5 Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Machines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) machines are in use worldwide or a wide variety of applications; one of these is to produce intense, short bursts of fusion via r-Z pinch heating and compression of a working gas. We have designed and constructed a series of these, ranging from portable to a maximum energy storage capacity of 2 MJ. Fusion rates from 5 DPF pulsed fusion generators have been measured in a single laboratory using calibrated activation detectors. Measured rates range from ~ 1015 to more than 1019 fusions per second have been measured. Fusion rates from the intense short (20 – 50 ns) periods of production were inferred from measurement of neutron production using both calibrated activation detectors and scintillator-PMT neutron time of flight (NTOF) detectors. The NTOF detectors are arranged to measure neutrons versus time over flight paths of 30 Meters. Fusion rate scaling versus energy and current will be discussed. Data showing observed fusion cutoff at D-D fusion yield levels of approximately 1?1012, and corresponding tube currents of ~ 3 MA will be shown. Energy asymmetry of product neutrons will also be discussed. Data from the NTOF lines of sight have been used to measure energy asymmetries of the fusion neutrons. From this, center of mass energies for the D(d,n)3He reaction are inferred. A novel re-entrant chamber that allows extremely high single pulse neutron doses (> 109 neutrons/cm2 in 50 ns) to be supplied to samples will be described. Machine characteristics and detector types will be discussed.

Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC; Lowe, D. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC; O'Brien, R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Meehan, B. T. [National Security Technologies, LLC

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

400

Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Changes in MRI signal intensity during hypercapnic challenge under conscious and anesthetized conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in MRI signal intensity during hypercapnic challenge under conscious and anesthetized were exposed to different concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) while conscious and anesthetized. Hypercapnia produced significantly greater increases in MRI signal intensity in fully conscious animals (6

Duong, Timothy Q.

402

Is the apparent period-doubling in Blazhko stars actually an illusion?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that the light curves of many Blazhko stars exhibit intervals in which successive pulsation maxima alternate between two levels in a way that is characteristic of period-doubling. In addition, hydrodynamical models of these stars have clearly demonstrated period-doubling bifurcations. As a result, it is now generally accepted that these stars do indeed exhibit period-doubling. Here we present strong evidence that this assumption is incorrect. The alternating peak heights likely result from the presence of one or more near-resonant modes which appear in the stellar spectra and are significantly offset from 3/2 times the fundamental frequency. A previous explanation for the presence of these peaks is shown to be inadequate. The phase-slip of the dominant near-resonant peak in RR Lyr is shown to be fully correlated with the parity of the observed alternations, providing further strong evidence that the process is nonresonant and cannot be characterized as period-doubling. The dominant near-resonant p...

Bryant, Paul H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) and water (H{sub 2}O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ?110 fs pulse duration and ?800?nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620?nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100?nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ac.in, E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Deepak, K. L. N. [Department of Physics and Center for Research in Photonics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa K1N6N5, Ontario (Canada)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transiting Planets with LSST II. Period Detection of Planets Orbiting 1 Solar Mass Hosts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will photometrically monitor ~1 billion stars for ten years. The resulting light curves can be used to detect transiting exoplanets. In particular, as demonstrated by Lund et al. (2015), LSST will probe stellar populations currently undersampled in most exoplanet transit surveys, including out to extragalactic distances. In this paper we test the efficiency of the box-fitting least-squares (BLS) algorithm for accurately recovering the periods of transiting exoplanets using simulated LSST data. We model planets with a range of radii orbiting a solar-mass star at a distance of 7 kpc, with orbital periods ranging from 0.5 to 20 d. We find that typical LSST observations will be able to reliably detect Hot Jupiters with periods shorter than ~3 d. At the same time, we find that the LSST deep drilling cadence is extremely powerful: the BLS algorithm successfully recovers at least 30% of sub-Saturn-size exoplanets with orbital periods as long as 20 d.

Jacklin, Savannah R; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

GENERATION OF QUASI-PERIODIC WAVES AND FLOWS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY OSCILLATORY RECONNECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the long-term evolution of an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube emerging into a gravitationally stratified coronal hole environment and report on the resulting oscillations and outflows. We perform 2.5-dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations, generalizing the models of McLaughlin et al. and Murray et al. We find that the physical mechanism of oscillatory reconnection naturally generates quasi-periodic vertical outflows, with a transverse/swaying aspect. The vertical outflows consist of both a periodic aspect and evidence of a positively directed flow. The speed of the vertical outflow (20-60 km s{sup -1}) is comparable to those reported in the observational literature. We also perform a parametric study varying the magnetic strength of the buoyant flux tube and find a range of associated periodicities: 1.75-3.5 minutes. Thus, the mechanism of oscillatory reconnection may provide a physical explanation to some of the high-speed, quasi-periodic, transverse outflows/jets recently reported by a multitude of authors and instruments.

McLaughlin, J. A.; Verth, G. [School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R., E-mail: james.a.mclaughlin@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: gary.verth@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: v.fedun@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE VELOCITY CENTROID PERIODICITY OF L2 PUPPIS' SiO MASER EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first short term velocity centroid (VC) periodicity derived from SiO maser emission. L2 Puppis, a semi-regular AGB star, was observed using the Mopra radio telescope of the Australia Telescope National Facility in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0 and v = 1, J = 2-1 transitions. It exhibits a 139 day period in its SiO maser VC based on a period folding analysis and a Lomb Scargle analysis. L2 Pup's SiO maser emission has an unusually large velocity range and an unusual three-peaked spectrum. To create the change in VC the entire spectrum does not shift in velocity, but changes in the relative emission of the peaks generate the variation. The changes in the VC may be due to differential illumination, an asymmetric circumstellar distribution of material, or a mixture of causes. The unusual velocity structure, similar to that observed in Orion source 1, may be due to revolution of the circumstellar material or asymmetries in the circumstellar environment.

McIntosh, Gordon C. [Division of Science and Mathematics, University of Minnesota, Morris, Morris, MN 56267 (United States); Indermuehle, Balthasar [Australia Telescope National Facility, Locked Bag 194, Narrabri, NSW 2390 (Australia)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5 additional invitations for invited papers at upcoming conferences, we attracted collaborators who had SBIR funding, we are collaborating with scientists at CERN and GSI Darmstadt on gas desorption physics for submission to Physical Review Letters, and another PRL on absolute measurements of electron cloud density and Phys. Rev. ST-AB on electron emission physics are also being readied for submission.

Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon tax, mandate, intensity standard JEL classi?cations: Q42; Q48 Introduction Governments throughout the world

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Energy Use Intensities, May 5, 2009  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This file contains the energy use intensities (EUIs) for the benchmark building files by building type and climate zone.

410

Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

Zhang, Da

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Optimization models for improving periodic maintenance schedules by utilizing opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to this as preventive maintenance activities at an oppor- tunity. The original opportunistic replacement problemOptimization models for improving periodic maintenance schedules by utilizing opportunities Torgny of Technology Abstract We present mathematical models for finding optimal opportunistic maintenance schedules

Patriksson, Michael

412

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee September 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,260,603,765 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

413

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

414

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- September 2015 September 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 444,161,295 Contract Period:...

415

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Cumulative Fee Paid 22,200,285 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee 989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December...

416

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

417

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Available 4,324,912 408,822,369 Contract Period: December 2010 -...

418

Variable Selection and Inference for Multi-period Forecasting Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable Selection and Inference for Multi-period Forecasting Problems? M. Hashem Pesaran Cambridge University and USC Andreas Pick De Nederlandsche Bank and Cambridge University, CIMF Allan Timmermann UC San Diego and CREATES January 26, 2009...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Pick, Andreas; Timmermann, Allan

419

Dynamic Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks: Issues and Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chetto and Audrey Marchand IRCCyN, University of Nantes, Nantes, FRANCE Email: {maryline.chetto, audrey.marchand Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks in Weakly-Hard Real-Time Systems," by M. Silly-Chetto, and A. Marchand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

activity rules periodic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WITH PERIODIC ACTIVE THERMAL IMAGING Physics Websites Summary: methods where the thermal evolution of a scene is recorded while some external time varying energyIMPACT OF A LOSSY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Periodic solutions of Schrodinger equation in Hilbert space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of boundary value problem of Schrodinger equation are obtained in linear and nonlinear cases. Periodic analytical solutions are represented using generalized Green's operator

A. A. Boichuk; A. A. Pokutnyi

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in NEPA reviews. The comment period now ends on March 25, 2015. The revised...

423

Thermal equilibrium theory of periodically focused charged-particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermal equilibrium theory of periodically focused charged-particle beams is presented in the framework of both warm-fluid and kinetic descriptions. In particular, the thermal beam equilibria are discussed for paraxial ...

Samokhvalova, Ksenia R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Microsoft Word - DOE News Release - Public Comment Period Extended...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Period on Proposed Cleanup Plans Extended 60 Days On Oct. 31, 2014 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released two formal Proposed Plans for the decontamination and...

425

Wave propagation in periodic lattices with defects of smaller dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The procedure of evaluating of the spectrum for discrete periodic operators perturbed by operators of smaller dimensions is obtained. This result allows to obtain propagative, guided, localised spectra for different kind of physical operators on graphs with defects.

A. A. Kutsenko

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Short-period seismic rotations and translations recorded by Rotaphone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-period Rotaphone records of events induced by natural and/or anthropogenic sources 31 5.1 Records of quarry blasts Rotation to translation relations 39 7 The problem of seismic translational components being contaminated

Cerveny, Vlastislav

427

Realtime controller tuning for periodic disturbance rejection with application to active noise control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de Callafon. Scheduling control for periodic disturbance at-de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic DisturbanceR.A. de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic Distur-

Kinney, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ultrasonic wave propagation in random and periodic particulate composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN RANDOM AND PERIODIC PARTICULATE COMPOSITES A Thesis by BENJAMIN KYLE HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilltnent of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN RANDOM AND PERIODIC PARTICULATE COMPOSITES A Thesis by BENJAMIN KYLE HENDERSON Submitted to Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

Henderson, Benjamin Kyle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa Higgs-like

430

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa

431

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding accessandBusinessDevelopmentObligations

432

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding

433

Excitonic effects and chirality dependence of photoluminescence intensity of single wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitonic effects and chirality dependence of photoluminescence intensity of single wall carbon characterization of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) because the PL intensity and PL energy of the PL intensity and the energy shift of the PL peak position [3,4]. In the previous theoretical work [2

Maruyama, Shigeo

434

Parametric cascade downconverter for intense ultrafast mid-infrared generation beyond the ManleyRowe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

codes: 190.2620, 190.4970, 320.7160, 320.7110. Intense and ultrafast optical pulses (durations typ of optical sources that directly produce ultrafast intense pulses at long wavelengths. One technique that has from in- tense ultrafast pulses in the near infrared 800 nm . Recent results that produce intense

Boyer, Edmond

435

Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser18, deliver an intense uranium beam that deposit about 1 kJ0g specific energy in solid matter. Using 2004! Abstract Intense heavy ion beams from the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung ~GSI, Darmstadt

436

A2E: Adaptively Aggressive Energy Efficient DVFS Scheduling for Data Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A2E: Adaptively Aggressive Energy Efficient DVFS Scheduling for Data Intensive Applications Li Tan strategy to achieve energy efficiency for data intensive applications, and further save energy via five memory and disk access intensive benchmarks with imbalanced branches against another two energy

437

A STAGED MUON-BASED FACILITY TO ENABLE INTENSITY AND ENERGY FRONTIER SCIENCE IN THE US*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STAGED MUON-BASED FACILITY TO ENABLE INTENSITY AND ENERGY FRONTIER SCIENCE IN THE US* Jean. It requires facilities at both high energy and high intensity frontiers. Neutrino oscillations are irrefutable precision flavour physics at the high intensity frontier. At the high energy frontier, a multi-TeV lepton

McDonald, Kirk

438

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

Soatto, Stefano

439

Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electronsa... I. D. Kaganovich beams,13 the physics of solar flares,14 high-intensity high- energy particle beam propagation Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range

Kaganovich, Igor

440

Energy Policy 35 (2007) 52675286 The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Policy 35 (2007) 5267­5286 The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity 2007 Abstract This paper analyzes the influence of the long-run decline in US energy intensity change) and adjustments in the energy demand of individual industries (intensity change), and identifies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Integration Describes Sound-Intensity Coding in an Insect Auditory System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Integration Describes Sound-Intensity Coding in an Insect Auditory System Tim Gollisch receptor; hearing; sound intensity; energy; model; locust Auditory receptor cells are commonly measurements of intensity-duration tradeoffs sug- gest that the stimulus energy is the crucial variable (Garner

Benda, Jan

442

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of vinyl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of pulse intensity distributions on fragment internal energy in the infrared multiphoton of laser intensity on the production of fragment energy distribu- tions. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF pumping is pro- portional to the light intensity, the final energy of the parent molecule

Zare, Richard N.

443

Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Intensity and ENSO SUZANA J. CAMARGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity in the western North Pacific basin is examined. Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), constructed from cyclones that are both more intense and longer-lived than in La Niña years. ACE leads ENSO indices: duringWestern North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Intensity and ENSO SUZANA J. CAMARGO International Research

Sobel, Adam

444

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

X-ray intensity interferometer for undulator radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensity interferometry is well established with visible light but has never been demonstrated with x-radiation. We propose to measure the transverse coherence of an x-ray beam, for the first time, using the method of Hanbury Brown and Twiss. The x-ray interferometer consists of an array of slits, a grazing incidence reflective beamsplitter, a pair of fast multichannel plate detectors and a broadband, low-noise correlator circuit. The NSLS X1 or X13 soft x-ray undulator will supply the partially coherent x-rays. We are developing this technique to characterize the coherence properties of x-ray beams from high brilliance insertion devices at third-generation synchrotron light facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source and the Advanced Light Source. 17 refs.

Gluskin, E.; McNulty, I.; Viccaro, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Howells, M.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­?energy-­? density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­?energy-­? density plasma the ideas for steady-­?state current drive developed for low-­?energy-­? density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­?energy-­?density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

Fisch, Nathaniel J

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

449

Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Wolbers, S.

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Prominence seismology using the period ratio of transverse thread oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to that of the first overtone of kink oscillations, from here on the "period ratio", is a seismology tool that can be used to infer information about the spatial variation of density along solar magnetic flux tubes. The period ratio is 2 in longitudinally homogeneous thin tubes, but it differs from 2 due to longitudinal inhomogeneity. In this paper we investigate the period ratio in longitudinally inhomogeneous prominence threads and explore its implications for prominence seismology. We numerically solve the two-dimensional eigenvalue problem of kink oscillations in a model of a prominence thread. We take into account three nonuniform density profiles along the thread. In agreement with previous works that used simple piecewise constant density profiles, we find that the period ratio is larger than 2 in prominence threads. When the ratio of the central density to that at the footpoints is fixed, the period ratio depends strongly on the form of the density profi...

Soler, R; Ballester, J L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Curious Variables Experiment (CURVE). Three Periodicities of BF Ara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report CCD photometry of the dwarf nova BF Ara throughout fifteen consecutive nights in quiescence. Light curve in this interval is dominated by a large amplitude around 0.8 mag modulation consisting two periods. Higher amplitude signal is characterized by period of 0.082159(4) days, which was increasing at the rate of dotP/Psh = 3.8(3)* 10^{-5}. Weaker and stable signal has period of 0.084176(21) days. Knowing the superhump period of BF Ara determined by Kato et al. (2003) and equal to 0.08797(1) days, the first modulation is interpreted as quiescent negative superhump arising from retrograde precesion of titled accretion disk and the latter one as an orbital period of the binary. The respective period excess and defect are epsilon_+ = 4.51% +/- 0.03% and epsilon_- = -2.44% +/- 0.02%. Thus BF Ara is yet another in-the-gap nova with mass ratio q of around 0.21.

A. Olech; A. Rutkowski; A. Schwarzenberg-Czerny

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

BoseEinstein condensates in spatially periodic potentials Kirstine BergSrensen 1 and Klaus Mlmer 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bose­Einstein condensates in spatially periodic potentials Kirstine Berg­Sørensen 1 and Klaus Bose­Einstein condensation in trapped dilute gases 1, 2, 3 was observed only recently. Nevertheless, the experimental developments in this field have advanced rapidly, and the properties of condensates in different

Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

453

Expanding the Discovery Potential of VERITAS via Moonlight Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant partially supported the base research efforts of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), Very-High-Energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray research group from 8/1/09 to 7/31/14. During the project period, the SAO gamma-ray group carried out a wide-range of research efforts, but focused on VHE observations of extragalactic sources with VERITAS. The SAO group led or co-lead nearly all VERITAS extragalactic working groups and the observations addressed themes in Particle Physics and Fundamental Laws, Cosmology, and Black Holes. The primary topics of this research were processes in exotic galaxies, especially active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies, which have implications for cosmology and Lorentz invariance violation, as well as indirect dark matter detection via VERITAS observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In addition, the SAO group let the development of unique capabilities for VERITAS to observe during all periods of moonlight. Overall, this has increased the VERITAS data yield by 60% and these data are both scientifically useful and regularly published. This grant funded research that led to contributions towards the publication of 51 refereed journal articles during the project period, including several led by, or with significant contributions from, the SAO group.

Benbow, Wystan R. [PI

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110?nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

Gianotto, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the… (more)

Updike, Adria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effect of image charge on the off-axis transport of intense beams in a small aperture quadrupole lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the first order image charge effects of circular conducting pipe on an intense off-axis continuous charged particle beam propagating through an alternating-gradient focusing channel. The equations of motion for the centroid and envelopes of slightly off-axis beam are derived and used to determine the equilibrium and stability conditions for the beam transport. The envelope oscillation frequencies of the mismatched beam are obtained by the smooth approximation method and by numerical evaluation of the linearly perturbed envelope equations. Depending on the beam intensity and focusing parameters, it is found that the frequency of the out-of-phase mode of envelope oscillation is reduced due to the presence of the conducting wall. Detailed numerical results for off-axis beam transport in a quadrupole lattice are presented and the stable regimes in the parameter space are determined numerically. It is observed that the unstable region for the envelope evolution with image charge effects depends on beam intensity and external focusing strength and increases with the off centering of the beam.

Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)] [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the negligible range in achieving dose escalation with intensity-modulated RT combined with BH at EE.

Nakamura, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shiinoki, Takehiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakata, Manabu [Clinical Radiology Service Division, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

A self-consistent regime of generation of terahertz radiation by an optical pulse with a tilted intensity front  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derived a self-consistent system of nonlinear wave equations describing the terahertz generation in dielectric uniaxial crystals by optical pulsed radiation with a tilted wavefront. The numerical analysis of the system of equations showed that the generation of a broadband one-period terahertz signal is accompanied by a red shift of the carrier frequency of the optical pulse, the magnitude of the shift being proportional to the pulse intensity. The generation efficiency with respect to energy reached a maximum at a certain distance of propagation in the crystal, after which the efficiency decreased. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between theoretical calculations and experimental data of other investigations. (generation of terahertz radiation)

Bugai, A N; Sazonov, S V; Shashkov, Andrei Yu

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

Greenwood, R.E.

463

Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

Reeder, Reed [Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID (United States); Carter, Dennis L. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Dennis.Carter@usoncology.com; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Tallhamer, Michael [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Aurora, CO (United States); Johnson, Tim [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States); Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi [Arapahoe Surgical Associates, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Kaske, Terese [Sally Jobe Diagnostic Breast Center, Greenwood Village, CO (United States); Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Rose Hospital, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, Charles E. [Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers, Littleton, CO (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

Loop quantum gravity and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

A. Barrau; J. Grain

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spectrally accurate numerical method for finding non-trivial time-periodic solutions of non-linear partial differential equations. The method is based on minimizing a functional (of the initial condition and the period) that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. We solve an adjoint PDE to compute the gradient of this functional with respect to the initial condition. We include additional terms in the functional to specify the free parameters, which, in the case of the Benjamin-Ono equation, are the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase and the real part of one of the Fourier modes at t = 0. We use our method to study global paths of non-trivial time-periodic solutions connecting stationary and traveling waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation. As a starting guess for each path, we compute periodic solutions of the linearized problem by solving an infinite dimensional eigenvalue problem in closed form. We then use our numerical method to continue these solutions beyond the realm of linear theory until another traveling wave is reached (or until the solution blows up). By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the analytical form of the solutions on the path connecting the one-hump stationary solution to the two-hump traveling wave. We then derive exact formulas for these solutions by explicitly solving the system of ODE's governing the evolution of solitons using the ansatz suggested by the numerical simulations.

Ambrose , D.M.; Wilkening, Jon

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

Coleman, Joshua Eugene

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Selective emission and luminescence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} under intense laser excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) layers was observed upon interaction of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 200 – 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength ? = 10.6 ?m) and resonant laser (? ? 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 400 – 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions formed under intense laser excitation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er{sup 3+} ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Marchenko, V M; Studenikin, M I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L D [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Femtosecond diffraction dynamics of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on fused silica upon irradiation with linearly polarized fs-laser pulses (50 fs pulse duration, 800 nm center wavelength) is studied experimentally using a transillumination femtosecond time-resolved (0.1 ps-1 ns) pump-probe diffraction approach. This allows to reveal the generation dynamics of near-wavelength-sized LIPSS showing a transient diffraction at specific spatial frequencies even before a corresponding permanent surface relief was observed. The results confirm that the ultrafast energy deposition to the materials surface plays a key role and triggers subsequent physical mechanisms such as carrier scattering into self-trapped excitons.

Hoehm, S.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krueger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und - pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und - pruefung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

472

Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

Counting of Sieber-Richter pairs of periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the semiclassical approach the universal spectral correlations in the Hamiltonian systems with classical chaotic dynamics can be attributed to the systematic correlations between actions of periodic orbits which (up to the switch in the momentum direction) pass through approximately the same points of the phase space. By considering symbolic dynamics of the system one can introduce a natural ultrametric distance between periodic orbits and organize them into clusters. Each cluster consists of orbits approaching closely each other in the phase space. We study the distribution of cluster sizes for the backer's map in the asymptotic limit of long trajectories. This problem is equivalent to the one of counting degeneracies in the length spectrum of the {\\it de Bruijn} graphs. Based on this fact, we derive the probability $\\P_k$ that $k$ randomly chosen periodic orbits belong to the same cluster. Furthermore, we find asymptotic behaviour of the largest cluster size $|\\Cll_{\\max}|$ and derive th...

Gutkin, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Observed radar reflectivity in convectively coupled Kelvin and mixed Rossby-gravity waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be measurable from surface gauges (>0.5 mm/hr). Addition- ally, the area of radar echo at each height of a normalized probability density function (PDF) of radar echo intensity at that level. Our analysis uses radarObserved radar reflectivity in convectively coupled Kelvin and mixed Rossby-gravity waves A. Swann

Yuter, Sandra

475

Influence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the intense solar heat. For perihelion distances of radius R = 4-10 solar radii, R, (the values proposedInfluence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations A. Hassanein Argonne National or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

Harilal, S. S.

476

SOLAR PHYSICS, 2006 The May 13, 2005 Eruption: Observations, Data Analysis and Interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. Yurchyshyn1, C. Liu2, V. Abramenko1, J. Krall3 1Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA). The primary cause of these intense storms are disturbances in the solar wind which are observed) taken at 16:42 UT. Contours show RHESSI hard Xray emission in 50100keV energy band accumulated

Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

477

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of rotating jets of carbon monoxide in comet Hale-Bopp with the IRAM interferometer the projection of the jet mean velocity on the line of sight. As the jet rotates with the nucleus, the velocity, an interesting feature is to be noted. We have computed the mean photometric centre from the peak intensity

Demoulin, Pascal

478

Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread application of intensive forest management practices throughout the southeastern U.S. has increased loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., yields and shortened conventional rotation lengths. Fluctuations in Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), population density and subsequent damage levels have been linked to variations in management intensity. We examined the effects of two practices, irrigation and fertilization, on R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights in an intensively-managed P. taeda plantation in South Carolina. Trees received intensive weed control and one of the following treatments; irrigation only. fertilization only, irrigation + fertilization, or control. Mean whole-tree tip moth damage levels ranged from <1 to 48% during this study. Damage levels differed significantly among treatments in two tip moth generations in 2001, but not 2000. Pupal weight was significantly heavier in fertilization compared to the irrigation treatment in 2000, but no significant differences were observed in 2001. Tree diameter. height. and aboveground volume were significantly greater in the irrigation + fertilization than in the irrigation treatment after two growing seasons. Our data suggest that intensive management practices that include irrigation and fertilization do not consistently increase R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights as is commonly believed. However, tip moth suppression efforts in areas adjacent to our study may have partially reduced the potential impacts of R. frustrana on this experiment.

Coyle, David, R.; Nowak, John, T.; Fettig, Christopher, J.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S. energy and carbon intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a lower energy-and-carbon-intensive mix of economicintensity into fuel mix and energy intensity terms. Thisof fuel mix and weather on energy and carbon intensity using

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

committed to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit ofcommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of2 emissions, and the 40-45% carbon intensity reduction goals

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "intensive observation periods" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S. energy and carbon intensity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U.S. Energy and Carbon Intensity W. Bart Davis a, b, * ,declines in energy and carbon intensity in the U.S. remainsexplain the declines in carbon intensity. The fuel mix, both

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23 5. Comparison of Energy Intensity of Iron and Steelthe U.S. . 27 5.1. Energy Intensity of Iron and27 5.2. Energy Intensity of Iron and Steel Production in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

MARS15 Code Developments Driven by the Intensity Frontier Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MARS15(2012) is the latest version of a multi-purpose Monte-Carlo code developed since 1974 for detailed simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in an arbitrary 3-D geometry of shielding, accelerator, detector and spacecraft components with energy ranging from a fraction of an electronvolt to 100 TeV. Driven by needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, the code has been recently substantially improved and extended. These include inclusive and exclusive particle event generators in the 0.7 to 12 GeV energy range, proton inelastic interaction modeling below 20 MeV, implementation of the EGS5 code for electromagnetic shower simulation at energies from 1 keV to 20 MeV, stopping power description in compound materials, new module for DPA calculations for neutrons from a fraction of eV to 20-150 MeV, user-friendly DeTra-based method to calculate nuclide inventories, and new ROOT-based geometry.

Mokhov, N V; Rakhno, I L; Striganov, S I; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Yu I; Aarnio, P; Gudima, K K; Konobeev, A Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

Iverson, E. B.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

485

High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference (cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1 - 2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

Arnold O. Benz; Peter Messmer; Christian Monstein

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

486

Phase transitions in full counting statistics for periodic pumping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the problem of full counting statistics for periodic pumping. The probability generating function is usually defined on a circle of the "physical" values of the counting parameter, with its periodicity corresponding to charge quantization. The extensive part of the generating function can either be an analytic function on this circle or have singularities. These two cases may be interpreted as different thermodynamic phases in time domain. We discuss several examples of phase transitions between these phases for classical and quantum systems. Finally, we prove a criterion for the "analytic" phase in the problem of a quantum pump for noninteracting fermions.

Dmitri A. Ivanov; Alexander G. Abanov

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

487

Truncation of Periodic Image Interactions for Confined Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First principles methods based on periodic boundary conditions are used extensively by materials theorists. However, applying these methods to systems with confined electronic states entails the use of large unit cells in order to avoid artificial image interactions. We present a general approach for truncating the Coulomb interaction that removes image effects directly and leads to well converged results for modest-sized periodic cells. As an illustration, we find the lowest-energy quasiparticle and exciton states in two-dimensional hexagonal GaN sheets. These sheets have been proposed as parent materials for single-walled GaN nanotubes which may be of interest for optoelectronics.

Sohrab Ismail-Beigi

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

488

Period doubling, information entropy, and estimates for Feigenbaum's constants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between period doubling bifurcations and Feigenbaum's constants has been studied for nearly 40 years and this relationship has helped uncover many fundamental aspects of universal scaling across multiple nonlinear dynamical systems. This paper will combine information entropy with symbolic dynamics to demonstrate how period doubling can be defined using these tools alone. In addition, the technique allows us to uncover some unexpected, simple estimates for Feigenbaum's constants which relate them to log 2 and the golden ratio, phi, as well as to each other.

Reginald D. Smith

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

489

Gravitational Waves from Periodic Three-Body Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three bodies moving in a periodic orbit under the influence of Newtonian gravity ought to emit gravitational waves. We have calculated the gravitational radiation quadrupolar waveforms and the corresponding luminosities for the 13+11 recently discovered three-body periodic orbits in Newtonian gravity. These waves clearly allow one to distinguish between their sources: all 13+11 orbits have different waveforms and their luminosities (evaluated at the same orbit energy and body mass) vary by up to 13 orders of magnitude in the mean, and up to 20 orders of magnitude for the peak values.

Dmitrašinovi?, V; Hudomal, Ana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Controlling mobility via rapidly oscillating time-periodic stimulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To address the dynamics of a Brownian particle on a periodic symmetric substrate under high-frequency pe